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Dec 18, 2018 at 12:00am ET By Joanna Hughes

With Australia facing a shortfall of employees with critical IT skills, technology consulting leader Infosys has announced plans to create 1,200 local tech jobs in the country. Here’s a closer look at the development, as recently reported by news.com.au.

Bridging the Digital Skills Gap

Infosys announced its job creation strategy, which also includes the opening of three Innovation Hubs in Australia by the year 2020, at a recent event in Sydney alongside Federal Minister for Industry, Science and Technology, Karen Andrews.

Infosys senior vice-president for Australia and New Zealand Andrew Groth told news.com.au, “It’s about how do we maximize the efficiency of their operations by deploying things like artificial intelligence and automation to increase efficiency, so funding can be directed to some of those new digital areas (that improve outcomes).”

Amping Up Efforts

While Infosys has long operated in Australia, the new scheme will support the company’s desire to serve its local customers, while helping organizations 'upskill' to meet current and future demands.

To that end, it will also strengthen its academic partnerships in order to be able to attract the best and brightest graduate talent while spurring the growth of digital skills in the workforce.

And while workers in tech-related fields like computer science, engineering, and design will comprise 40 percent of the new positions, Infosys says it’s also looking for candidates with liberal arts backgrounds who exhibit another key 21st-century skill: creativity.

With the clock ticking, Infosys isn’t wasting any time. “Building our Australian talent pool is already underway. So far, we have recruited 75 graduates, and more than half have completed their induction training,” Groth said.

Infosys has also opened training centers in Sydney and Melbourne, where the company’s new hires have their pick of in-demand study areas, including machine learning, artificial intelligence, cybersecurity, big data, cloud computing, and user experience design.

According to insiders, initiatives such as Infosys’ are necessary. Australian venture capitalist and Innovation Australia Chair Bill Ferris said, “The falling numbers for research and science and innovation in the country is a sorry tale. [...] It’s an absolute race to keep at the front of global innovation.”

Learn more about studying in Australia.

Joanna worked in higher education administration for many years at a leading research institution before becoming a full-time freelance writer. She lives in the beautiful White Mountains region of New Hampshire with her family.

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