Sep 22, 2017 at 12:00am ET By Alyssa Walker

If you’re a woman interested in computer science, consider studying in Israel.  Last week, we reported that Israel is looking for more international students, and this week we learned that Israel needs more women in computer science.

According to TheMarker, although women comprise 58 percent of all students pursuing a bachelor’s degree in Israel, they make up just 29 percent of students studying computer science.

In the US, it’s even lower, with just 18 percent of women pursuing computer science.

In an article on Haaretz, Professor Yaffa Zilbershats, chairwoman of the education council’s steering committee on high-tech studies said, “The academic world has succeeded in achieving gender equality in leading areas like medicine and law, and we’re determined to do the same in high-tech.”

She added, “The high-tech industries need a quality workforce, and bringing in women—who account for half the population, but far less of the employment in tech—is the way to build the workforce.”

The report from TheMarker shows that some women are taking the lead in computer science at certain universities.  At the ultra-Orthodox Lev Academic Center, 53 percent of its computer science students are women. 

Other top institutions with high percentages of women studying computer science in Israel are Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan, and Hadassah Academic College. 

Another interesting finding?  Across Israel, women account for 31 percent of all senior faculty in computer science programs.

Zilbershats says that the council will work to increase the numbers of women in computer science and other tech-based courses, including the addition of scholarships and other financial incentives.

Learn more about studying computer science.

Alyssa Walker is a freelance writer, educator, and nonprofit consultant. She lives in the White Mountains of New Hampshire with her family.

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