Master in Zoology in South Africa

See Masters Programs in Zoology in South Africa 2018

Zoology

A masters is earned after students complete an undergraduate degree program. To obtain a masters, you usually need to complete 12 to 18 college courses that often involve completing comprehensive tests and/or a thesis.

An MSc in Zoology/Animal Sciences provides you with the chance to study animals and their habitats. With an MSc in Zoology/Animal Sciences, you will become an expert on habitats as diverse as deserts, wetlands, high altitude fauna, and rainforests.

South Africa, officially the Republic of South Africa, is a country located at the southern tip of Africa. It is divided into nine provinces. South Africa is not only a jumping off point, it is itself a fantastic destination rich in culture, fauna & flora and history.

Top Master Programs in Zoology in South Africa 2018

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Master in Biotechnology and the Management of Animal & Zoonotic Diseases

University of Pretoria
Campus Full time February 2019 South Africa Pretoria

The Institutional Research Theme (IRT) “Biotechnology and the Management of Animal and Zoonotic Diseases” was established at the University of Pretoria to build and expand [+]

Master in Biotechnology and the Management of Animal & Zoonotic Diseases

The Institutional Research Theme (IRT) “Biotechnology and the Management of Animal and Zoonotic Diseases” was established at the University of Pretoria to build and expand on our current strength and research capacity in animal and zoonotic diseases in the Faculties of Health Sciences, Veterinary Science and Natural and Agricultural Sciences. As the only University with a Faculty of Veterinary Science, this presents a unique opportunity for further research growth in this field. Animal health has undergone an almost unprecedented increase in importance in the last century and is today inextricably linked to our local and global economy as well as societal issues such as public health, food and food security. Animal pathogens also affect humans and of the more than 1400 pathogens that affect humans as many as 60% are zoonotic, indicating that the disease can be transmitted from wild and domestic animal to humans.... [-]