Master's Degree in Political Science in Brno in Czech Republic

Find Masters Programs in Political Science 2017 in Brno in Czech Republic

Political Science

A masters is the first level of graduate coursework and can be obtained after you receive a bachelor’s degree. Earning a masters usually requires two years of full-time study, which amounts to 36 to 54 semester credits.

 

Political science provides individuals with an understanding of the executive, legislative, and judicial processes that are used to govern a country or society. Their impact on the economic and social structure is also examined. 

Czech Republic is in the heart of Europe is a neighbor of Slovakia, Austria, Germany, and Poland. Czech universities offer long-standing reputation and interesting specializations.

This city has produced prominent people; the founder of genetics Gregory Mendel has a university named after him. However, the city has that challenge still, and it’s striving through its higher education institutions, to produce other Mendels who can have an impact to the community.

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Master in European Politics

Masaryk University Faculty of Social Studies
Campus Full time 2 years September 2017 Czech Republic Brno

European Politics is a full-time Master's program taught at the Department of International Relations and European Studies and the Department of Political Science at the Faculty of Social Studies, Masaryk University. Its standard duration is four semesters. [+]

Masters in Political Science in Brno in Czech Republic. Program Content: A comprehensive program of study in the fields of comparative politics and European integration Location: Masaryk University in Brno, Czech Republic Department of Political Science and Department of International Relations and European Studies Program Description European Politics is a full-time Master's program taught at the Department of International Relations and European Studies and the Department of Political Science at the Faculty of Social Studies, Masaryk University. Its standard duration is four semesters. European Politics is a comprehensive program of study in the fields of comparative politics and European integration. The comparative politics component of the program covers basic theories, research methodology, empirical analysis, and comparative studies of the political developments and the party systems in European countries. This component allows students to focus specifically on the region of Central and Eastern Europe, to explore the experiences of post-communist transformations, and to acquire a thorough understanding of the political developments in post-socialist countries. The European integration component includes theoretical and empirical analysis of different international organizations and their interaction in Europe. Special emphasis is put on the study of the European Union and its enlargements. The Department of Political Science at the Faculty of Social Studies of the Masaryk University was founded in 1990 as an academic unit providing students with high-quality education in the discipline. The courses taught at the department draw on extensive independent research. The department was initially part of the Faculty of Arts (1990-1997). In 1998... [-]

Master in Conflict and Democracy Studies

Masaryk University Faculty of Social Studies
Campus Full time 2 years September 2017 Czech Republic Brno

The Master’s Program in Conflict and Democracy Studies focuses on the discussion of the variety of potential relationships between democracy (and its quality), authoritarianism, totalitarianism, democratization, and conflict. We understand conflict to be a permanent, invariant feature of humankind, one that fuels both progress and failure. [+]

The Master’s Program in Conflict and Democracy Studies focuses on the discussion of the variety of potential relationships between democracy (and its quality), authoritarianism, totalitarianism, democratization, and conflict. We understand conflict to be a permanent, invariant feature of humankind, one that fuels both progress and failure. Since humans first began to establish rich social (and societal) ties, there have been struggles for power and a search for the best possible regime in any given time and place. Sometimes, to achieve their goals, conflicting parties use violence; sometimes they are able to come to a peaceful solution. A key question therefore becomes whether it is possible to democratize (or decentralize) various (deeply divided) societies without fuelling ethnic, religious, or other conflict. Following that is the question as to whether and how the threat of violent conflict is used by authorities to entrench, sustain, or even deepen autocratic tendencies. A focus on these questions is therefore natural and prudent. We are, moreover, currently witness to a number of efforts to transform democratic societies around the world. There are many factors behind this development, but in each case, sooner or later, an intensive discussion of the necessary trade-offs between security and personal freedom arises. Sometimes conflicting parties find an acceptable solution for most of these points, one which maintains the (democratic) status quo; sometimes all attempts fail and in the making open a pathway for securing and strengthening nondemocratic tendencies. To prevent things from going wrong—or even to make them better—it is crucial... [-]