Master's Degree in Peace and Conflict Studies in Brno in Czech Republic

View Masters Programs in Peace and Conflict Studies 2019 in Brno in Czech Republic

Peace and Conflict Studies

A Masters degree gives you the opportunity to either further your understanding of a particular question or take off in a completely different way using skills you have gained from your previous undergraduate degree.

Peace and conflict studies aim to understand the causes of violent and deadly conflict throughout numerous societies. Opportunities for study range from courses that last a few weeks to degrees that take a few years to attain.

The Czech Republic, is a landlocked country in Central Europe. The country is bordered by Germany to the west, Austria to the south, Slovakia to the east and Poland to the north. Its capital and largest city, with 1.3 million inhabitants, is Prague.

This city has produced prominent people; the founder of genetics Gregory Mendel has a university named after him. However, the city has that challenge still, and it’s striving through its higher education institutions, to produce other Mendels who can have an impact to the community.

Request Information Master's Degrees in Peace and Conflict Studies in Brno in Czech Republic 2019

Read More

Master in Conflict and Democracy Studies

Masaryk University Faculty of Social Studies
Campus Full time 2 years September 2019 Czech Republic Brno

The Master’s Program in Conflict and Democracy Studies focuses on the discussion of the variety of potential relationships between democracy (and its quality), authoritarianism, totalitarianism, democratization, and conflict. We understand conflict to be a permanent, invariant feature of humankind, one that fuels both progress and failure. [+]

The Master’s Program in Conflict and Democracy Studies focuses on the discussion of the variety of potential relationships between democracy (and its quality), authoritarianism, totalitarianism, democratization, and conflict. We understand conflict to be a permanent, invariant feature of humankind, one that fuels both progress and failure. Since humans first began to establish rich social (and societal) ties, there have been struggles for power and a search for the best possible regime in any given time and place. Sometimes, to achieve their goals, conflicting parties use violence; sometimes they are able to come to a peaceful solution.

A key question, therefore, becomes whether it is possible to democratize (or decentralize) various (deeply divided) societies without fuelling ethnic, religious, or other conflicts. Following that is the question as to whether and how the threat of violent conflict is used by authorities to entrench, sustain, or even deepen autocratic tendencies. A focus on these questions is therefore natural and prudent.... [-]