Masters Program in Literature in United Kingdom

View all Masters Programs in Literature in United Kingdom 2017

Literature

Master-level studies involve specialized study in a field of research or an area of professional practice. Earning a master’s degree demonstrates a higher level of mastery of the subject. Earning a master’s degree can take anywhere from a year to three or four years. Before you can graduate, you usually must write and defend a thesis, a long paper that is the culmination of your specialized research.

Literature refers to creative written works in categories such as poetry, novels and fiction to name a few. A literature program may allow students to explore different literature types. A student may choose to specialize in an area such as British literature or drama, or example.

Education in the United Kingdom is a devolved matter with each of the countries of the United Kingdom having separate systems under different governments: the UK Government is responsible for England, and the Scottish Government, the Welsh Government and the Northern Ireland Executive are responsible for Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, respectively.

Top Master Programs in Literature in United Kingdom 2017

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Master of Letters in English Literature

University of Glasgow
Campus Full time Part time 2 semesters August 2017 United Kingdom Glasgow + 1 more

This programme gives you the opportunity to pursue your own interests in English Literature at postgraduate level across a wide range of courses led by internationally renowned experts. [+]

Best Masters in Literature in United Kingdom 2017. English Literature MLitt This programme gives you the opportunity to pursue your own interests in English Literature at postgraduate level across a wide range of courses led by internationally renowned experts. A core research training course will introduce you to key skills in postgraduate study, while a flexible degree structure allows you to select from the rich variety of optional courses on offer from the School of Critical Studies and elsewhere in the College of Arts, or even beyond. You can also pursue one of the specialist pathways offered by English Literature, including Fantasy, Medieval and Early Modern, Modernities, and Victorian Literature. The programme ends with an opportunity to write a dissertation on an appropriate English Literature-related topic of your choice. Why this programme The structure of the degree allows you to follow either a bespoke English Literature MLitt programme, constructing your own pathway through a range of different courses, or one of several specialist pathways to suit your interests (see below). You will have access to world class libraries and museums, as well as the extraordinary diversity of cultural, literary and artistic events that makes Glasgow such a vibrant place for postgraduate study. The core research skills programme includes tailored workshops with the University’s archives and world-class Special Collections, as well as providing the academic and technical skills you will need to succeed at postgraduate level in the university and other professional environments. Programme structure There are five different pathways through the MLitt in English Literature at Glasgow: MLitt in English Literature MLitt in English Literature: Fantasy MLitt in English Literature: Medieval and Early Modern Literature and Culture MLitt in English Literature: Modernities: Literature, Culture, Theory MLitt in English Literature: Victorian Literature  Each pathway will give you a different mix of core and optional courses. All students take our 20 credit core English Literature Research Training Course. You then take five more 20 credit courses, some of which may be compulsory for your chosen pathway, and one 60 credit dissertation. The structure for full-time students is as follows: Semester 1:  English Literature Research Training Course plus two 20 credit courses Semester 2:  Three 20 credit courses Summer:  Dissertation Part-time students take the English Literature Research Training Course and three 20 credit courses in their first year of study, and two 20 credit courses and the dissertation in their second year. Pathways English Literature Build your own English Literature postgraduate degree, drawing on the rich range of optional courses available from English Literature, the School of Critical Studies, and elsewhere in the College of Arts or even beyond. Core courses: English Literature Research Training  English Literature Dissertation Optional courses: Of the five further 20 credit courses you take, two must be from any of those offered within the English Literature MLitt programme. The remaining three 20 credit courses may be either from English Literature or, with the convenor’s permission, from elsewhere in the College of Arts and beyond, e.g. Celtic Studies, Classics, History of Art, the School of Education, etc. English Literature courses may include: The American Counterculture, 1945-75 American Fiction of the 1930s Creative Writing Fiction Workshop (cross-discipline) Decadence and The Modern Embodiments: Literature and Medicine, 1750-1900 Explaining Change: Science and Literary Culture 1830-1880 F Scott Fitzgerald, Edith Wharton and Dialogues of American Literary Modernism Fantasy c. 1780 to 1950 Fantasy 1950 to the present Fictions of Adultery From Medieval to Early Modern Genres and Canons Historic and Critical Approaches to Medieval and Early Modern English Literature The Mind of the Contemporary American Novel The Modern Everyday Modernist Sexualities Modernities 1: Literature, Culture and Theory 1880-1945 Modernities 2: Literature, Culture and Theory 1945 to the present Neo-Victorianism The Novel Now Proust in Theory Victorian Literary History Virginia Woolf Writes Modernity Writing Empire English Literature: Fantasy This programme is designed to give you an overview of fantasy literature in English from the era of revolutions at the end of the eighteenth century to the present. As well as charting the history of modern fantasy, including major children’s fiction where this had a significant impact on the development of adult fantasy literature, the course will introduce you to a range of contemporary critical and theoretical approaches to fantasy and the fantastic. Visiting speakers will be invited, which will give you the opportunity to meet contemporary writers, critics and publishers. There is a Fantasy Film Club and you will also be encouraged to participate reflectively in fantasy-related conventions, conferences and festivals, and to join us on field trips and other events. The Masters in Fantasy is a programme run by enthusiasts for enthusiasts, and we hope this will show. Core courses: Fantasy 1: c. 1780-1950 Fantasy 2: 1950 to the present English Literature Research Training Optional courses: You then take a further three 20 credit courses. These can be from: the options listed under the General English Literature pathway  elsewhere in the College of Arts and beyond (with the convenor's permission). E.g. Celtic Studies, Classics, History of Art, School of Education, and many more.   English literature: Medieval and Early Modern Literature and Culture The MLitt in Medieval and Early Modern English Literature and Culture offers students the opportunity to study one of the most vibrant and intellectually challenging periods of literary history. This is an interdisciplinary programme offering a mixture of compulsory and option courses; students may choose options across the range of postgraduate taught courses on offer across the University. You will work with a team of internationally renowned experts with an unparalleled range of medieval and early modern interests, and develop your research skills in manuscripts and print culture by working with the rich manuscript and printed collections held at Glasgow University, the Hunterian, and the Kelvin Hall.  You will also have the option to study a language (i.e. Old English or Latin).  Core courses: From Medieval to Early Modern Historic and Critical Approaches to Medieval and Early Modern English Literature English Literature Research Training Optional courses: You then take a further three 20 credit courses. These can be from: the options listed under the General English Literature pathway  elsewhere in the College of Arts and beyond (with the convenor's permission). E.g. Celtic Studies, Classics, History of Art, School of Education, and many more.  English Literature: Modernities This programme provides the opportunity for advanced study of literary modernism and the avant-garde, and postmodern and contemporary developments in culture and theory. You will investigate the key texts and concepts which shape our understanding of literature and culture across a period of radical change, through an examination of the aesthetic and cultural assumptions of different modern movements; and through an examination of issues in modern writing, particularly those relating to modernity (such as mass culture, revolution, war and empire) and post-modernity (such as simulation, spectacle, performativity and trauma). Throughout, you will study texts in relation to developments in other cultural practices, such as film, theatre and the visual arts. Core courses: Modernities 1: 1890-1945 Modernities 2: 1945 to the present English Literature Research Training Optional courses: You then take a further three 20 credit courses. These can be from: the options listed under the General English Literature pathway  elsewhere in the College of Arts and beyond (with the convenor's permission). E.g. Celtic Studies, Classics, History of Art, School of Education, and many more.  English Literature: Victorian Literature This programme is designed to give you a wide-ranging knowledge of Victorian literature and literary history, introducing you to the period or building on any previous experience of it you may have. You will study a great variety of Victorian writers, genres and forms, and will hone your skills in close reading, historical contextualisation, and use of critical and theoretical sources.  You will also have the opportunity to explore your particular interests in detail, working with staff who are specialists in many aspects of Victorian literature and culture. Glasgow has outstanding resources for the study of Victorian literature including our Special Collections and library. Glasgow is in many ways a Victorian city and you will be working amid some of the most important and beautiful Victorian architecture and landscapes in the UK.  The programme is designed to help you develop research, writing and professional skills which will be transferrable to doctoral study or employment. Previous graduates have gone on to pursue PhDs at Glasgow, Oxford, Cambridge, and other universities, and to careers in teaching, journalism, and consultancy, among other areas. Core courses: Genres and Canons Victorian Literary History English Literature Research Training Optional courses: You then take a further three 20 credit courses. These can be from: the options listed under the General English Literature pathway  elsewhere in the College of Arts and beyond (with the convenor's permission). E.g. Celtic Studies, Classics, History of Art, School of Education, and many more.  Dissertation The two semesters of coursework are followed by one term of supervised work towards a dissertation of up to 15,000 words which you will submit at the beginning of September. The topic normally arises out of the work of the previous two semesters, but the choice is very much open to the student’s own initiative. If you are on a named pathway, then your dissertation topic should fall within the scope of that pathway. If you are on the general pathway, you are welcome to choose a topic from anywhere in the field of English Literature. Your supervisor helps you to develop the proposal and plan the most appropriate reading and methodology. It is also possible to write a dissertation made up of creative writing with a critical component. Normally this possibility is only available to students who have taken the Creative Writing Fiction Workshop (cross-discipline) as one of their options. Entry requirements For entry in 2017 Entry requirements for postgraduate taught programmes are a 2.1 Honours degree or equivalent qualification (for example, GPA 3.0 or above) in a relevant subject unless otherwise specified. We also require: a sample of written work, about 3,000 words in length. This can be a previous piece of work from an undergraduate degree. The work should be written in English and the content does not have to cover a topic related to this specific programme. a short statement of around 500 words outlining your interest in this programme. two academic references. International students  with  academic  qualifications below those required should contact our partner institution, Glasgow International College, who offer a range of pre-Masters courses. English language requirements For applicants whose first language is not English, the University sets a minimum English Language proficiency level. Career prospects Our MLitt programmes provide excellent preparation for PhD studies and an academic career. They also develop key skills sought by many employers, including: the ability to find, select and manage large quantities of information; confident and persuasive oral and written communication; and problem solving through creative and critical thinking. Past Glasgow MLitt graduates have gone on to pursue successful careers in writing, editing, publishing, teaching, the media, heritage and creative industries, and numerous other related professions. [-]

MLitt/PgDip/PgCert Literature, Culture & Place

University of Strathclyde: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences
Campus Full time Part time 12 - 24 months September 2017 United Kingdom Glasgow + 1 more

This course allows graduates with first degrees in literature, cultural studies, or related areas to take their studies to a more specialised level or in an entirely new direction. [+]

Why this course? This course allows graduates with first degrees in literature, cultural studies, or related areas to take their studies to a more specialised level or in an entirely new direction. The course is unique in the UK. It combines a broad range of periods and places. Specialist expertise is provided by teaching staff, who are members of the Literature, Culture & Place research group. You’ll use rare local resources, such as: the University library's collections of eighteenth-century travel writing the National Gallery of Scotland's landscape collection the Canadian collections at the National Library of Scotland You’ll study You'll complete a number of compulsory and elective classes as well as a dissertation. Dissertation MLitt students will write a dissertation of 15,000 words on a relevant subject of their choice. You’ll be guided by an expert supervisor. Entry requirements First- or upper second-class Honours degree, or equivalent in English Literature or a related subject. Pre-Masters Preparation Course The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at the University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options. Fees & funding How much will my course cost? All fees quoted are for full-time courses and per academic year unless stated otherwise. Scotland/EU 2015/16 - Mlitt Literature, Culture & Place full-time £7,150 2015/16 - Mlitt Literature, Culture & Place part-time £3,575 2015/16 - PgDip Literature, Culture & Place full-time £5,335 Rest of UK 2015/16 - Mlitt Literature, Culture & Place full-time £7,150 2015/16 - Mlitt Literature, Culture & Place part-time £3,575 2015/16 - PgDip Literature, Culture & Place full-time £5,335 International 2015/16 - Mlitt Literature, Culture & Place full-time £12,155 2015/16 - Mlitt Literature, Culture & Place part-time £6,078 2015/16 - PgDip Literature, Culture & Place full-time £12,155 How can I fund my course? The fees shown are annual and may be subject to an increase each year. Careers Students with a first degree in literary or cultural studies (or a related subject) will find this course relevant to careers in: teaching the media the arts heritage tourism other fields Those considering a PhD will also find it a valuable stepping stone. Where are they now? 90% of our graduates are in further work or study* *Based on the results of the National Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey (2010/11 and 2011/12). [-]

MRes in Renaissance Studies

University of Stirling
Campus Full time Part time 12 - 27 months September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

The MRes Renaissance Studies is aimed at those who are interested in the literary and broader cultural aspects of the Renaissance and who wish to acquire a more specialised knowledge of this field. A primary objective is to investigate factors that contribute to the distinctiveness of the cultural productions of Northern Europe, including Scotland. [+]

Best Masters in Literature in United Kingdom 2017. Suspended for 2016/17 entry The MRes Renaissance Studies is aimed at those who are interested in the literary and broader cultural aspects of the Renaissance and who wish to acquire a more specialised knowledge of this field. A primary objective is to investigate factors that contribute to the distinctiveness of the cultural productions of Northern Europe, including Scotland. Course objectives The research-based MRes course aims to: Introduce you to key areas of critical debate in Renaissance Studies by comparing different canonical accounts of the period Explore the distinctiveness of northern Renaissance culture, including Scotland. Develop a critical understanding of the variety of genres, media and signifying practices employed by Renaissance writers and visual artists Equip you with the technical skills necessary for conducting research in this field, presenting information and constructing scholarly arguments What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. A sample of work (e.g. English Essay) is required. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 56 in each component IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View our range of pre-sessional courses. Scholarships & funding University of Stirling Postgraduate Merit Scholarship The University of Stirling is offering any UK or European Union student with a First Class Honours degree (or equivalent) a £2,000 scholarship to study full-time on any taught Master's course or £1,000 for part-time study. Structure and content The core of this MRes course is a sustained period of independent study, assessed by coursework over two semesters. This involves a course of directed reading and research, to be agreed by each individual student with his/her supervisor, and tailored to his/her interests. In addition, students take two taught modules from a menu including: Politics and Renaissance Drama: Shakespeare and His Contemporaries Renaissance Sovereignty: Politics and Representation Writing and National Identity Please note that not all these optional modules may be offered in each academic year. Arts Research Training Our innovative training for graduates enables students to build up a portfolio of skills that prepare them for academic and professional life. All graduate students will work with their supervisors to select what’s right for them from a menu of activities. Each student will build up a portfolio of skills every year. On a taught postgraduate degree, you may be given specific guidance on what activities you need to undertake for those qualifications. Dissertation The most significant piece of work on the course will be a dissertation of 15,000 words on a subject of your choosing in consultation with a member of English Studies. You may choose to develop work initiated on one of the modules you have studied. Those who do not embark on the dissertation may be awarded a Diploma. Career opportunities Completing a Master’s degree as a prelude to further academic research is a route encouraged by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC). Advanced education in the Arts and the practical experience of research and the production of a dissertation are significant transferable skills for many careers. [-]

MLitt in Publishing Studies

University of Stirling
Campus Full time Part time 12 - 27 months September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

The MLitt in Publishing Studies teaching course is devised, and continually updated, to reflect current publishing industry practice and standards. It produces graduates who will have an enhanced opportunity to succeed in publishing and publishing-related careers. The course is demanding, stimulating and enjoyable, and many publishers now consider it to be the equivalent of a year’s experience within a publishing company. Our graduates occupy senior positions in both commercial and not-for-profit publication organisations throughout the world. [+]

The Stirling Centre for International Publishing and Communication provides a comprehensive and coherent approach to all forms of publishing. The course covers the whole process of planning, editing, production, marketing and publication management in print and digital environments. It is dedicated to teaching the best current publishing practice, so the detailed content is updated each year as a result of the rapid changes that are transforming the industry worldwide. The MLitt in Publishing Studies teaching course is devised, and continually updated, to reflect current publishing industry practice and standards. It produces graduates who will have an enhanced opportunity to succeed in publishing and publishing-related careers. The course is demanding, stimulating and enjoyable, and many publishers now consider it to be the equivalent of a year’s experience within a publishing company. Our graduates occupy senior positions in both commercial and not-for-profit publication organisations throughout the world. The MLitt in Publishing offers: Strong publishing industry links and networks Enhanced publishing career pathways International environment with a student cohort from all around the world Intensive publishing research environment Course objectives In close contact with publishing businesses and the changing needs of the industry worldwide, the teaching team equips you with the qualities — intellectual and prac What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. INTO University of Stirling offers a Graduate Diploma for those students who do not meet the required criteria for this course. If you successfully complete the Graduate Diploma in Media, Humanities and Social Sciences and meet the required progression grades, you will be guaranteed entry onto year one of this Master's degree. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Scholarships & funding University of Stirling Postgraduate Merit Scholarship The University of Stirling is offering any UK or European Union student with a First Class Honours degree (or equivalent) a £2,000 scholarship to study full-time on any taught Master's course or £1,000 for part-time study. Structure and content The MLitt in Publishing Studies is a one-year, full-time course (two years, part-time) designed to enable students' career development in Publishing. In Semester 1, students take compulsory modules in Publishing Dynamics, Editorial Practice and Content Creation, Marketing Management and Communications, Skills Training for Publishing, and the Publishing Project. These modules offer a coherent introduction to the publishing and related industries, offering students a thorough grounding in contemporary publishing. Part-time students take the course over two years. As well as the content of the modules, students attend a regular series of Visiting Speakers, have the opportunity to attend industry events such as the Publishing Scotland conference and the London Book Fair, go on field trips to locations including a printer and a book distributor, and to undertake a variety of internships and work placements. Delivery and assessment The MLitt in Publishing Studies is delivered through interactive lectures, seminars, workshops (including sessions in the Publishing Computer Lab) and one-to-one teaching. Assessment is based on a range of practical and academic activities, including the creation of a physical publishing product (a book, magazine, e-book or app), marketing plans, presentations, and a dissertation. Students have opportunities to undertake work experience and internships, and to go on industry visits and field trips. There is also a weekly series of visiting speakers. Strengths The Stirling Centre for International Publishing and Communication was established in 1982 and has since developed a global reputation for its postgraduate degrees in publishing, its research activities, and its industry links. Focusing on book, magazine, journal and digital publishing, the Centre trains the publishers of the future, provides opportunities for those currently working in the industry to reflect on their professional practice, and through its research, critically analyses the past, present and future of the publishing. The Centre undertakes a range of staff and student research activities, including collaborations with industry, publishing-related organisations and other Universities. We focus on the history of the book and publishing studies in the 20th and 21st centuries, both in Scotland, the UK and globally, including digital publishing, graphic novels and games, contemporary literary publishing, children’s publishing literary awards and book festivals. Our work has been funded by a number of funders including the AHRC, RSE, British Council, Nesta, and Creative Scotland, working with partners including Glasgow Life, the Saltire Society and Publishing Scotland. Career opportunities The Stirling Centre for International Publishing and Communication has over 30 years of graduates now working in the publishing and related industries. Entry level jobs our students have gone into in recent years include: Publicity Assistant, Canongate Publicity Assistant, Faber & Faber Marketing Assistant, Taylor & Francis Events & Marketing Assistant, The Bookseller Sales & Marketing Assistant, McGraw Hill Production Assistant, Oxford University Press Editorial Assistant, Oxford University Press Production Editor, Cicerone Press Publishing Assistant, Cengage Learning Web editor, Digital Publishing Department, China Social Sciences Press Foreign Rights Specialist, Suncolor Publishing Group Web Editor, BooksfromScotland.com Some of our alumni who have worked in the publishing industry have gone onto the following job roles: Group Sales Director and President (Asia Region), Taylor & Francis Chief Executive, Publishing Scotland Managing Editor, Little Island Books Higher Education Texts and eBook Sales Manager, Taylor and Francis (Asia Pacific) Director, World Book Day Production Editor, Taylor & Francis Founder and Publisher, Tapsalteerie and Lumphanan Press Employability The MLitt in Publishing Studies is built around developing and enhancing publishing careers for its students. The focus of the modules is on building skills and understanding of the contemporary publishing industry, with constantly updated content and access to industry expertise. All students have the opportunity to undertake work placements, with host organisations in recent years including: Alban Books Barrington Stoke Bloody Scotland International Crime Writing Festival Canongate Books Fledgling Press Floris Books Freight Books HarperCollins Luath Press Octopus Books Oxford University Press Saraband Books Tern Digital Industry connections The Centre is supported by an Industry Advisory Board, with members from Floris Books, Freight Books, Publishing Scotland, Oxford University Press and Taylor & Francis. Further industry support is provided by our regular visiting speaker series, and the internships and work placements provided for our students. The Centre is a Network Member of Publishing Scotland. [-]

MLitt in Modern Scottish Writing

University of Stirling
Campus Full time Part time 12 - 27 months September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

The Stirling Master's course views Scottish literature in the light of this ambiguity from a perspective shaped by critical theory as well as traditional literary history. Our focus is the unusually strong role played by literature in sustaining the reality and difference of Scottish culture over the past three centuries – not forgetting the role of novelists and poets in integrating Scottish identity into the project of Britishness. [+]

Best Masters in Literature in United Kingdom 2017. After more than a decade of devolution, Scotland’s national status ‘is both dangled before us and tantalisingly withheld’ (Don Paterson) The Stirling Master's course views Scottish literature in the light of this ambiguity from a perspective shaped by critical theory as well as traditional literary history. Our focus is the unusually strong role played by literature in sustaining the reality and difference of Scottish culture over the past three centuries – not forgetting the role of novelists and poets in integrating Scottish identity into the project of Britishness. As debate intensifies over Scotland’s political status, the time is ripe to examine the role of writing in shaping the image and reality of the nation. Scholarships & funding University of Stirling Postgraduate Merit Scholarship The University of Stirling is offering any UK or European Union student with a First Class Honours degree (or equivalent) a £2,000 scholarship to study full-time on any taught Master's course or £1,000 for part-time study. Structure and content The Autumn core modules provide a thematic and historical overview; the Spring core module explores Scottish Romantic and Modernist writing in relation to specific themes of authenticity, representation and democracy. Option modules allow students to pursue deeper knowledge of specific texts and issues. Full-time students take one option in each semester; part-time students take options in Year 2 of their course. It is now possible to study Modern Scottish Writing jointly with Creative Writing; students on this pathway do ‘critical’ modules in Modern Scottish Writing alongside Creative Writing workshops. Delivery and assessment Dissertation The most significant piece of work on the course will be a dissertation of 15,000 words, written during the summer on a subject of your choosing in consultation with a member of teaching staff. You may choose to develop work initiated on one of the modules you have studied. Those who do not embark on the dissertation may be awarded a Diploma. The work of the best students completing the course may be deemed worthy of an MLitt with Distinction. Career opportunities Completing a Master’s degree as a prelude to further academic research is an increasingly common pattern of study for young scholars and is a route encouraged by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC). Advanced education in the Arts, the practical experience of research and the production of a dissertation are significant transferable skills for many careers in business and the professions. Skills you can develop through this course An English degree is acknowledged by potential employers as providing important skills, such as motivation, intelligence and the ability to meet deadlines. Although English is not a specifically vocational degree it offers a number of important transferable skills, such as the ability to write clearly, effectively, accurately and persuasively. Seminar discussion and oral presentations (required by many of our modules) help to develop your spoken communication skills. The critical and reflexive study of a variety of texts (literary and non-literary) teaches you how to analyse and interpret complex information and to apply abstract concepts and theories. Our criteria for assessment also requires students to be able to synthesise conclusions, to assimilate existing research and to construct and defend an argument clearly and cogently. Throughout their degrees, our students are also trained to use library and bibliographic resources effectively and appropriately to reference accurately, and to present their work professionally. All of these skills are essential to many kinds of work, which is why so many employers recognise the value of an English Degree. In a recent report, graduates of English were as likely (if not more) to be in professional or managerial jobs three to three and a half years after graduation than graduates in other subjects (including science and social science subjects). Almost fifty percent of English graduates pursue further education within three years of graduating from their undergraduate degree, often as a route to a professional career, such as teaching or law. Chances to expand your horizons During the semester, the department runs a number of lively literary seminars for students and staff alike, in which writers, staff members, postgraduate students and distinguished visiting scholars give papers on their work and special interests. We are fortunate in that the macrobert Arts Centre is at the centre of the University, presenting a widely varied programme of film, drama and music throughout the year. Small magazines are published on campus and the Literary Society organises visits from distinguished creative writers each year, along with theatre trips to Glasgow and Edinburgh. Finally, the University Drama Society is very active, producing about seven plays a year, including performances at the Edinburgh Festival. Where are our graduates now? In a recent report, graduates of English were as likely (if not more) to be in professional or managerial jobs three to three and a half years after graduation than graduates in other subjects (including science and social science subjects). Almost fifty percent of English graduates pursue further education within three years of graduating from their undergraduate degree, often as a route to a professional career, such as teaching or law. Here are a few examples of the sorts of careers graduates of this course have gone on to, in recent years: Teaching and Research Assistant Doctoral research Teaching Freelance content editor Photographer Journalist Completing a Master’s degree as a prelude to further academic research is an increasingly common pattern of study for young scholars and is a route encouraged by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC). [-]

MLitt in The Gothic Imagination

University of Stirling
Campus Full time Part time 12 - 27 months September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

The MLitt in The Gothic Imagination at the University of Stirling provides students with the unique opportunity to steep themselves in the scholarly appreciation of this mode, providing a rigorous and intensive historical survey of its literary origins and developments, and charting its dispersal across a broad range of media and national contexts. [+]

Contemporary culture is characterised by nothing if not a reawakened interest in the Gothic, be that in the form of the current vogue for horror film, in the heightened preoccupation with terror and monstrosity in the media, the extraordinary success of writers such as Stephen King and Stephenie Meyer, or in manifestations of an alternative Gothic impulse in fashion, music and lifestyle. As the countless adaptations and retellings of texts such as Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (1818; 1831) and Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1897) in our own day attest, the Gothic, though once relegated to a dark corner of literary history, has assumed a position of considerable cultural prominence. The MLitt in The Gothic Imagination at the University of Stirling provides students with the unique opportunity to steep themselves in the scholarly appreciation of this mode, providing a rigorous and intensive historical survey of its literary origins and developments, and charting its dispersal across a broad range of media and national contexts. In so doing, the course equips its graduates with the necessary theoretical vocabulary to address, and critically reflect upon, the Gothic as a complex and multi-faceted cultural phenomenon, while also preparing them for further postgraduate research in the rich and vibrant field of Gothic Studies. In addition to these subject-specific objectives, the MLitt in The Gothic Imagination also provides its graduates with several invaluable transferable skills, including critical thinking, theoretical conceptualisation, historical periodization and independent research. Course objectives The MLitt in the Gothic Imagination consists of four core modules, two option modules, and a dissertation. Across these components, the course aims to provide students with a rigorous grounding in the work and thematic preoccupations of the most influential Gothic writers, both historical and contemporary. Supplemented by relevant historical and theoretical material throughout, the course aims to provide as rich and varied an exposure to the academic study of the Gothic as possible. The first two core modules seek to provide a searching historical overview of the genesis and development of the Gothic aesthetic, taking students systematically from the circulation of the term ‘Gothic’ in the political and aesthetic discourses of the late seventeeth and eighteenth centuries, through the late eighteenth-century writings of Horace Walpole, Ann Radcliffe, Matthew Lewis and Charlotte Dacre, and into the nineteenth-century fictions of writers such as Charles Maturin, Mary Shelley, Charles Dickens, the Brontës, Sheridan Le Fanu, Robert Louis Stevenson, Bram Stoker and Oscar Wilde. The second and third core modules, on Gothic in modern, modernist and postmodern writing, include texts by authors such as Gaston Leroux, Algernon Blackwood, H.P. Lovecraft, Djuna Barnes; Mervyn Peake, Shirley Jackson, Stephen King, Anne Rice, Joyce Carol Oates, Toni Morrison and Patrick McGrath. Option modules vary from year to year, depending on student interest and demand. Recent option topics have included the Gothic on the Romantic Stage; Nineteenth-century American Gothic; Transmutations of the Vampire; The Gothic in Children’s Literature; Monstrosity; The Female Gothic; Queer Gothic; and Gothic in/and Modern Horror Cinema. At the dissertation stage, students are encouraged to undertake independent, supervised research on any particular interest within Gothic studies that they might wish to pursue. Subject to the agreement of the course director, a creative writing dissertation may be undertaken at this stage. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. A sample of work (e.g. English Essay) is required. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Scholarships & funding University of Stirling Postgraduate Merit Scholarship The University of Stirling is offering any UK or European Union student with a First Class Honours degree (or equivalent) a £2,000 scholarship to study full-time on any taught Master's course or £1,000 for part-time study. Structure and content The teaching year at Stirling is divided into two semesters, which run from mid-September to late December, and from January to the end of May respectively. Both full-time and part-time students take four Gothic core modules over two semesters. For part-time students, these core modules are completed in year 1. The core modules in the Autumn semester are as follows: Early British Gothic, 1764-1820 (20 credits) and Victorian Gothic, 1820-1900 (20 credits). The core modules for the Spring semester are Twentieth-century British and American Gothic (20 credits) and Twenty-first-century Gothic (20 credits). In parallel with the core modules, students are required to take one optional module in each semester, each weighted at 20 credits. Part-time students take one optional module in each semester in the second year of study. In addition to allowing for the development of a range of subject-specific skills, these two optional modules are also designed to provide students with a rigorous training in research and employability skills. These modules vary depending on teaching staff, but in the past have included the following: American Gothic: An examination of the emergence and development of Gothic in 19th-century American fiction with particular attention to the ways in which these texts transform the optimistic narratives of the new American republic Gothic in Contemporary Film: An analysis of the ways in which Gothic tropes have been appropriated and reworked in a selection of contemporary films The Female Gothic: A study of selected contemporary texts as reworkings of the female Gothic tradition of Ann Radcliffe Transmutations of the Vampire: An investigation into the cultural significance of the vampire over the past 50 years The most significant piece of work on the course will be a dissertation of 15,000 words, written during the summer, on a subject of your choosing, in consultation with a member of English Studies. You may choose to develop work initiated on one of the modules you have studied. Those who do not embark on the dissertation may be awarded a Diploma. The work of the best students completing the course may be deemed worthy of an MLitt with Distinction. Delivery and assessment Two hours of seminars per module per week, plus individual consultations and supervisions with members of staff. Assessment is by means of a 4,000-word essay for each core module, and a variety of skills-based assessments (such as presentations; portfolios; blog-entries) for optional modules. All students complete a 15,000-word dissertation on a topic of their choice once optional and core modules have been completed. Strengths The MLitt in The Gothic Imagination at the University of Stirling is one of the few taught Master's degree courses worldwide that is devoted exclusively to the academic study of the dynamic, ever-expanding field of the Gothic. While aspects of the Gothic feature prominently on undergraduate and graduate university curricula across the globe, the MLitt in The Gothic Imagination at Stirling is unique in the advanced levels of specialisation and expertise with which it equips its graduates. Long acknowledged as a centre of excellence for the study of the Gothic aesthetic worldwide, the division of English Studies at Stirling has historically been the home of leading Gothic scholars for the last two decades; students on the course thus have the opportunity to work closely with some of the leading researchers in the field. As recruitment patterns reveal, the MLitt in The Gothic Imagination enjoys a strong international reputation, and Stirling in the past has been proud to welcome students from as far afield as Argentina, Canada, Greece, Mexico, India, Indonesia, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, South Africa, Spain, Sweden and the USA. With high levels of choice and flexibility built into it, the course structure allows students to develop their own critical interests, though always under the specialist guidance of recognised experts in the broad and exciting field of Gothic Studies. Employability With course-work assessed solely by means of independently devised, researched and executed essays, the MLitt in The Gothic Imagination equips students with a number of the skills and abilities that are prized and actively sought after by employers across the private and public sectors. These include the ability to process and reflect critically upon cultural forms; the ability to organise, present and express ideas clearly and logically; the ability to understand complex theoretical ideas; and the ability to undertake extended independent research. Previous graduates of the course have gone on to pursue successful careers in such fields as teaching, publishing, research, academia, advertising, journalism and the film industry. The 15,000-word dissertation that is submitted towards the end of the course allows students to devise, develop, support and defend their own academic ideas across an extended piece of written work; addition to the skills of independence, organisation and expression fostered by this exercise, the dissertation also provides an excellent point of entry into more advanced forms of postgraduate research, including the Doctoral degree. [-]

Master in Creative Writing (MLitt)

University of Stirling
Campus Full time Part time 12 - 27 months September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

The MLitt Creative Writing offers the opportunity to produce a body of work – poetry, fiction, or creative non-fiction – over the course of a creative and stimulating year. The degree combines intensive writers’ workshops, technique-focused option modules, and one-to-one tuition by the distinguished writers on staff, along with stimulating visits from authors, agents and publishers. [+]

Best Masters in Literature in United Kingdom 2017. The MLitt Creative Writing offers the opportunity to produce a body of work – poetry, fiction, or creative non-fiction – over the course of a creative and stimulating year. The degree combines intensive writers’ workshops, technique-focused option modules, and one-to-one tuition by the distinguished writers on staff, along with stimulating visits from authors, agents and publishers. Course objectives The course is designed to develop the talents of creative individuals, allowing them to focus in-depth on a project while offering them creative encounters with a range of genres and working practices, drawing on Stirling’s rich expertise in contemporary literature, publishing, film, media, and journalism.
 Students learn skills in listening and diplomacy, advocacy, and in producing fine, nuanced writing. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. Applicants must supply a sample of their creative work: For the prose strand - up to eight pages of prose (fiction or creative nonfiction) or a portfolio of eight poems. A half-and-half mix is also acceptable. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Scholarships & funding University of Stirling Postgraduate Merit Scholarship The University of Stirling is offering any UK or European Union student with a First Class Honours degree (or equivalent) a £2,000 scholarship to study full-time on any taught Master's course or £1,000 for part-time study. Structure and content The teaching year at Stirling is divided into two semesters, which run from mid-September to late December, and from January to the end of May. Full-time students In the Autumn Semester, all full-time students take two consecutive core modules, the Writer’s Workshops. In these core modules, students and tutors read and discuss each other’s work and present their own creative work for discussion. Also in Autumn, full-time students will take a specialist option module, either Prose Fiction or Poetry. In Spring, full-time students will take a third core module the Writer’s Workshop and also a Research Skills module which entails visits to class by literary agents, editors etc. Also in Spring, we offer an option called ‘The Writing Life’ which covers non-fiction writing, memoir, and script-writing. The Summer is spent preparing and writing the Dissertation. Part-time students Part-time students take the MLitt over two years: Year 1: In the Autumn Semester of Year 1, part-time students take one core module, 'The Writer’s Workshop'. In these core modules, students and tutors read and discuss each other’s work and present their own creative work for discussion. Also in Autumn, part-time students will take a specialist option module, either Prose Fiction or Poetry. In Spring, part-time students take the option ‘The Writing Life’, plus the Research Skills module. Year 2: In the Autumn of Year 2, part-time students take two consecutive Writer’s Workshop modules. For part-time students, Dissertation preparation begins in Spring of Year 2. Delivery and assessment Assessment for the workshops will depend on the literary form chosen (prose or poetry) but will be based on reading journals and/or working notebooks, book reviews and in some cases completed pieces of creative work. Assessment for each option module will likewise vary but may include a critical essay, a journal, a creative project. The most significant piece of work in the course is the creative dissertation, due at the end of the summer. This will be circa 15,000 words of prose or a collection of circa 15 poems. A dissertation may be a portfolio of shorter texts – stories, personal essays, poems – or part of a novel. It is expected to be revised and polished original work, written and presented to professional standards. Those who do not embark on the dissertation may be awarded a Diploma. The work of the best students completing the course may be deemed worthy of an MLitt with Distinction. Modes of study Workshops and seminars and guest lectures are taught on campus. We also encourage students to embrace the wider literary life by attending – even organising – events and readings, festivals, libraries and the like. Strengths From September 2013 this course will be taught by Stirling’s Creative Writing team: poet and essayist Kathleen Jamie and fiction writer Liam Murray Bell. Kathleen Jamie is an internationally recognised poet, and winner of, amongst other awards, the Scottish Book of the Year Award, a Forward Prize, and the Costa Poetry Prize. Liam Murray Bell’s first novel ‘So It Is’ attracted Arts Council funding. Set in Belfast, it was hailed as ‘a beautifully written debut novel’ concerning the Troubles. His latest novel 'The Busker' is a Scottish Book Trust 'Pick' for 2014. Both tutors also write non-fiction, reviews, essays etc and are popular figures at festivals, literary events, and residencies. We offer a dynamic mix of youth and experience, and encourage students in an atmosphere which is both rigorous and creative. Regular visits from other established writers, publishers, editors etc offer a wide view of the literary life. Career opportunities Our Creative Writing students find a place for their creativity in many fields: teaching, broadcasting, publishing, community work. Many chose to become self-employed as writers and tutors. Some develop their interest further by studying for a PhD. Some actually publish books! Skills you can develop through this course Graduates in Creative Writing will be highly literate self-managers capable of realising sustained projects using their own initiative and creativity. They will be emotionally intelligent and diplomatic and have skills in: Communication and presentation - being able to articulate complex ideas and information in imaginative, comprehensible and entertaining forms. They will be able to present ideas in verbal and written forms to audiences in a range of situations; and to encourage, evaluate and assist with the work of others. Self-management – students will have the ability to work independently, set goals and meet deadlines. They will be able to work with creativity and imagination to meet challenges, and to respond positively to change and uncertainty. Critical engagement – students will have the ability to formulate independent judgements, articulate arguments and research relevant material, presenting their findings in engaging and creative ways. Chances to expand your horizons In any given year a number of course-specific talks and literary events are arranged for and by the students. These include but are not limited to: visits from literary agents and or publishers public events by poets and novelists (with students’ input and assistance) visits to research centres Where are our graduates now? As well as becoming professional writers our students find employment in many sectors. Some students have gone on to further study, in particular the creative writing PhD. Others are teachers, editors, librarians, some work in publishing. Our course is particularly attractive to students are already well established in careers, or even retired and who take our MLitt later in life to enhance their skills and develop new creative prospects. [-]

BA English, American and Postcolonial Literature with an Approved Year Abroad (Hons)

University of Kent, School of English
Campus Full time 4 years September 2017 United Kingdom Canterbury

English at Kent is challenging, flexible, and wide-ranging. It covers both traditional areas (such as Shakespeare or Dickens) and newer fields such as American literature, creative writing and recent developments in literary theory. In this degree programme (alongside a selection of literature modules) students [+]

English at Kent is challenging, flexible, and wide-ranging. It covers both traditional areas (such as Shakespeare or Dickens) and newer fields such as American literature, creative writing and recent developments in literary theory. In this degree programme (alongside a selection of literature modules) students will take modules that address the phenomenon of empire and its contemporary consequences: for example, nationhood, diaspora and migration. The material studied includes literary texts and theoretical texts as well as life-writing. Students are encouraged to consider how these texts reflect on the colonial experience and the construction of a narrative of its aftermath. You also offer you the opportunity to spend up to a year studying abroad in either America, Canada, Europe or Hong Kong. Staff in the School of English are internationally recognised for academic research which links closely with undergraduate teaching, and the School regularly hosts visits by a variety of international writers and critics. There are several published authors and poets in the School, and our students publish a magazine of creative writing, poetry and prose. A number of our students also write for InQuire, the student union newspaper. Entry requirements Home/EU students The University will consider applications from students offering a wide range of qualifications, typical requirements are listed below, students offering alternative qualifications should contact the Admissions Office for further advice. It is not possible to offer places to all students who meet this typical offer/minimum requirement. - A level: AAB including English Literature or English Language and Literature grade B - Access to HE Diploma: The University of Kent will not necessarily make conditional offers to all access candidates but will continue to assess them on an individual basis. If an offer is made candidates will be required to obtain/pass the overall Access to Higher Education Diploma and may also be required to obtain a proportion of the total level 3 credits and/or credits in particular subjects at merit grade or above. - BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma (formerly BTEC National Diploma): The university will consider applicants holding BTEC National Diploma and Extended National Diploma Qualifications (QCF; NQF;OCR) on a case by case basis please contact us via the enquiries tab for further advice on your individual circumstances. - International Baccalaureate: 34 overall or 17 at HL, including HL English A1/A2/B at 5/6/6 OR English Literature A/English Language and Literature A (or Literature A/Language and Literature A of another country) at HL 5 or SL 6. International students The University receives applications from over 140 different nationalities and consequently will consider applications from prospective students offering a wide range of international qualifications. Our International Development Office will be happy to advise prospective students on entry requirements. Please note that if you need to increase your level of qualification ready for undergraduate study, we offer a number of International Foundation Programmes through Kent International Pathways. If you are required to meet an English language condition, we offer a number of pre-sessional courses in English for Academic Purposes through Kent International Pathways. [-]

BA English and American Literature and Creative Writing with an Approved Year Abroad (Hons)

University of Kent, School of English
Campus Full time 4 years September 2017 United Kingdom Canterbury

English and Creative Writing at Kent is challenging, flexible, and wide-ranging. Literature modules cover both traditional areas (such as Shakespeare or Dickens) and newer fields such as American literature, postcolonial [+]

Best Masters in Literature in United Kingdom 2017. English and Creative Writing at Kent is challenging, flexible, and wide-ranging. Literature modules cover both traditional areas (such as Shakespeare or Dickens) and newer fields such as American literature, postcolonial literature and recent developments in literary theory. Creative Writing options allow you to choose from a range of poetry and prose modules and develop your own voice and style. The classes will teach you about writing and give you the chance to practise, through writing exercises, workshops and assignments, your own writing. There is also the opportunity to spend up to a year studying abroad in either America, Canada, Europe or Hong Kong. Staff in the School of English are internationally recognised for academic research which links closely with undergraduate teaching, and the School regularly hosts visits by a variety of international writers and critics both on campus and in the city of Canterbury. There is a weekly reading series during term time that plays host to a wide range of leading authors reading from their work, as well as publishing industry professionals. Our staff are all published writers and continue to write. Students publish a magazine of creative writing, poetry and prose. A number of our students also write for InQuire, the student union newspaper. Entry requirements Home/EU students The University will consider applications from students offering a wide range of qualifications, typical requirements are listed below, students offering alternative qualifications should contact the Admissions Office for further advice. It is not possible to offer places to all students who meet this typical offer/minimum requirement. - A level: ABB including English Literature or English Language and Literature grade B - Access to HE Diploma: The University of Kent will not necessarily make conditional offers to all access candidates but will continue to assess them on an individual basis. If an offer is made candidates will be required to obtain/pass the overall Access to Higher Education Diploma and may also be required to obtain a proportion of the total level 3 credits and/or credits in particular subjects at merit grade or above. - BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma (formerly BTEC National Diploma): The university will consider applicants holding BTEC National Diploma and Extended National Diploma Qualifications (QCF; NQF;OCR) on a case by case basis. - International Baccalaureate: 34 overall or 17 at HL, including HL English A1/A2/B at 5/6/6 OR English Literature A/English Language and Literature A (or Literature A/Language and Literature A of another country) at HL 5 or SL 6 International students The University receives applications from over 140 different nationalities and consequently will consider applications from prospective students offering a wide range of international qualifications. Our International Development Office will be happy to advise prospective students on entry requirements. Please note that if you need to increase your level of qualification ready for undergraduate study, we offer a number of International Foundation Programmes through Kent International Pathways. If you are required to meet an English language condition, we offer a number of pre-sessional courses in English for Academic Purposes through Kent International Pathways. [-]

Writing

Birmingham City University Faculty of Art, Design and Media
Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years September 2017 United Kingdom Birmingham + 1 more

The MA in Writing at Birmingham City University is aimed at emerging writers and can be taken over one year full-time or two years part-time. Key features of the course include: * The opportunity to learn from distinguished practitioners, with tuition from Ian Marchant, Gregory Leadbetter, Anthony Mellors, Andy Conway, and from among the Fellows of the Institute of Creative and Critical Writing (http://www.bcu.ac.uk/iccw), including Helen Cross, Caroline Jester, Sally Read, Patrick McGuinness and David Morley. * A flexible modular structure, with options in Fiction, Screenwriting, Creative Non-fiction, Scripting and Staging, and Poetry, taken together with the compulsory module Reading into Writing and a Final Project. * Direct contact with guest authors, literary agents, publishers, editors, and development agencies through the Institute of Creative and Critical Writing programme of seminars, readings and public events. * Our masterclass system, offering a detailed critique of your work by an established author – and the benefit of hearing other students’ work receive the same attention. * The opportunity for publication in our annual anthology of new writing, and to present your work in public at the end of year show in Birmingham city centre. * Online support through the Moodle e-learning interface. * Distance Learning modules in Fiction and Screenwriting, enabling you to study these options entirely from home, should you wish. [+]

Entry Requirements

Admission to the course is based on talent, potential and commitment. This is assessed through your application form, a sample of your written work (c. 2000 words of prose, or equivalent in script or poetry), and usually an interview, either in person or over the telephone.

 

Employability

We believe that the study of writing has an inherent personal and cultural value – but we also support those who wish to pursue a professional career as a writer, by preparing our students for the literary marketplace. The School of English is very active in research, with excellent 2008 RAE results. MPhil and PhD opportunities may be available.

... [-]

Master in Writing for Young People

Bath Spa University
Campus Full time 1 year September 2017 United Kingdom Bath

This specialist creative writing MA course enlists the expertise of our team of writer-lecturers, five of whom are currently published in the field of children's writing. [+]

Master in Writing for Young People

 

This specialist creative writing MA course enlists the expertise of our team of writer-lecturers, five of whom are currently published in the field of children's writing. It is supported by visiting speakers from the children's publishing world, including agents, editors, publishers and authors.

 

Books

 

Leading Children's Literary Agents, United Agents, offers an annual prize for the 'most promising writer for young people'. We have an excellent track record of graduates achieving publication. Novels by Elen Caldecott, Jim Carrington, Alex Diaz, Marie-Louise Jensen, Sally Nicholls and C.J. Skuse have all been published in the last four years. Ways to Live Forever by Sally Nicholls won the Waterstones Children's Book of the Year Award and the Glen Dimplex New Writers Award 2008. Marie-Louise Jensen and Elen Caldecott were both shortlisted for the 2009 Waterstones Prize, and Elen is also longlisted for the Carnegie award for How Kirsty Jenkins Stole the Elephant.... [-]


Master in Travel and Nature Writing

Bath Spa University
Campus Full time 1 year September 2017 United Kingdom Bath

The Master of Arts in Travel and Nature Writing is designed for writers seeking advanced skills in the growing field of creative non-fiction inspired by the natural... [+]

Master in Travel and Nature Writing

 

The Master of Arts in Travel and Nature Writing is designed for writers seeking advanced skills in the growing field of creative non-fiction inspired by the natural world and contemporary journeying. The course focuses on the application of writing skills to match the requirements of the travel and nature writing sector. To this end, students will learn from engagement, encounter, workshop, tuition and mentoring; they will develop their professional practice and produce a portfolio of work to help establish their careers in this highly competitive field.

Course Structure and Content

 

This is a low residency course over three semesters. It will consist of three week-long residential sessions, meeting visiting writers and industry specialists; distance learning modules designed to familiarise participants with the standards, interests and publishing requirements of the sector; one-to-one tutorials and mentoring providing the opportunity to turn experience into well-crafted writing of publication standard.... [-]


Master in Scriptwriting

Bath Spa University
Campus Full time 1 year September 2017 United Kingdom Bath

The MA in Scriptwriting is a professional training course for working writers. Most scriptwriters work across several media, and the course reflects this. [+]

Master in Scriptwriting

 

The MA in Scriptwriting is a professional training course for working writers. Most scriptwriters work across several media, and the course reflects this. All our tutors are working writers. We aim to turn out writers who understand the structure and craft of drama, have a finished script they can use as a calling card, know the industry in all its variety, and can pitch and sell their work.The MA is taught in seventeen weekends of intensive workshops. It is not, however, 'low residency'. There are as many hours of teaching as on Bath Spa University's established MA in Creative Writing.The course is taught at our beautiful Corsham Court campus where we are developing performance, capture and editing facilities. We also work closely with the School of Music and Performing Arts, and their students will have the opportunity to help act in and produce our work.Although this is an intellectually challenging postgraduate course, there is no 'academic' side detached from the working side. Everything theoretical is geared to help the students as writers.... [-]


Master in Creative Writing

Bath Spa University
Campus Full time 1 year September 2017 United Kingdom Bath

This course will help you to bring a novel, book of poems, book of short stories or work of non-fiction as near to publishable quality as possible. [+]

Master in Creative Writing

 

This course will help you to bring a novel, book of poems, book of short stories or work of non-fiction as near to publishable quality as possible. Located within the School of Humanities and Cultural Industries, the writing programme has established itself over the past 20 years as one of the most successful in the UK.

 

Course Structure and Content

 

The course is modular and is currently offered for full-time study only.Because of the reputation of the MA in Creative Writing, we are able to recruit excellent students who, every year, form an exciting and mutually supportive community of writers. Frequent visits by other writers, literary agents, publishers, broadcasters and other professionals connected with writing ensure that students are given plentiful advice about how to place work and make decisions about their careers as writers.The course is not for the writer whose only interest is in their own work, but rather for the writer who can benefit from working closely with fellow students and with tutors, many of whom are practising and published writers.... [-]


Master in Literature, Landscape and Environment

Bath Spa University
Campus Full time 1 year September 2017 United Kingdom Bath

The MA draws upon our staff's internationally-recognised expertise in the field; our location in a World Heritage site; and it offers tremendous opportunities... [+]

Master in Literature, Landscape and Environment

 

The MA Literature, Landscape and Environment examines how literature reflects and shapes the way in which we see the landscape and the environment and it gives students the opportunity to study the kind of analyses that are becoming increasingly important to the direction of modern English literary studies.

The MA draws upon our staff's internationally-recognised expertise in the field; our location in a World Heritage site; and it offers tremendous opportunities for students to access unique regional resources.

 

"The first hour was allotted to making themselves comfortable, for they complained of having a very dirty walk, as they came on foot from Snow-Hill, where Mr Branghton keeps a silver-smith's shop; and the young ladies had not only their coats to brush, and shoes to dry, but to adjust their head-dress, which their bonnets had totally discomposed."... [-]