Master's Degree in International Relations in Brno in Czech Republic

Find Masters Programs in International Relations 2019 in Brno in Czech Republic

International Relations

A masters refers to the completion of a graduate study program that prepares students to further their knowledge of a specific subject or advance their careers. The majority of masters are granted by state or public universities.

Those with an interest in large ideas such as globalization and human rights as they pertain to current events between nations, states, multinational corporations and other major entities should consider an education and career in international relations.

Czech Republic is in the heart of Europe is a neighbor of Slovakia, Austria, Germany, and Poland. Czech universities offer long-standing reputation and interesting specializations.

This city has produced prominent people; the founder of genetics Gregory Mendel has a university named after him. However, the city has that challenge still, and it’s striving through its higher education institutions, to produce other Mendels who can have an impact to the community.

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Master in Conflict and Democracy Studies

Masaryk University Faculty of Social Studies
Campus Full time 2 years September 2019 Czech Republic Brno

The Master’s Program in Conflict and Democracy Studies focuses on the discussion of the variety of potential relationships between democracy (and its quality), authoritarianism, totalitarianism, democratization, and conflict. We understand conflict to be a permanent, invariant feature of humankind, one that fuels both progress and failure. [+]

The Master’s Program in Conflict and Democracy Studies focuses on the discussion of the variety of potential relationships between democracy (and its quality), authoritarianism, totalitarianism, democratization, and conflict. We understand conflict to be a permanent, invariant feature of humankind, one that fuels both progress and failure. Since humans first began to establish rich social (and societal) ties, there have been struggles for power and a search for the best possible regime in any given time and place. Sometimes, to achieve their goals, conflicting parties use violence; sometimes they are able to come to a peaceful solution.

A key question, therefore, becomes whether it is possible to democratize (or decentralize) various (deeply divided) societies without fuelling ethnic, religious, or other conflicts. Following that is the question as to whether and how the threat of violent conflict is used by authorities to entrench, sustain, or even deepen autocratic tendencies. A focus on these questions is therefore natural and prudent.... [-]