Master's Degree in International Cooperation in South Moravian Region in Czech Republic

Compare Masters Programs in International Cooperation 2018 in South Moravian Region in Czech Republic

International Cooperation

The benefits of a Masters extend beyond improving your earning potential. They can provide you with personal and professional skills to accelerate your development. They are also an opportunity to differentiate yourself from your peers, many of whom will have similar A-level and undergraduate qualifications.

Those who study international cooperation may deal with a wide variety of subjects as they attempt to understand how different countries work together. These might include war, poverty, trade, the environment, law enforcement, terrorism, or even scientific exploration.

Czech Republic is in the heart of Europe is a neighbor of Slovakia, Austria, Germany, and Poland. Czech universities offer long-standing reputation and interesting specializations.

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Master in Conflict and Democracy Studies

Masaryk University Faculty of Social Studies
Campus Full time 2 years September 2018 Czech Republic Brno

The Master’s Program in Conflict and Democracy Studies focuses on the discussion of the variety of potential relationships between democracy (and its quality), authoritarianism, totalitarianism, democratization, and conflict. We understand conflict to be a permanent, invariant feature of humankind, one that fuels both progress and failure. [+]

The Master’s Program in Conflict and Democracy Studies focuses on the discussion of the variety of potential relationships between democracy (and its quality), authoritarianism, totalitarianism, democratization, and conflict. We understand conflict to be a permanent, invariant feature of humankind, one that fuels both progress and failure. Since humans first began to establish rich social (and societal) ties, there have been struggles for power and a search for the best possible regime in any given time and place. Sometimes, to achieve their goals, conflicting parties use violence; sometimes they are able to come to a peaceful solution.

A key question, therefore, becomes whether it is possible to democratize (or decentralize) various (deeply divided) societies without fuelling ethnic, religious, or other conflicts. Following that is the question as to whether and how the threat of violent conflict is used by authorities to entrench, sustain, or even deepen autocratic tendencies. A focus on these questions is therefore natural and prudent.... [-]