Master of Science in Applied and Computational Mathematics

General

Program Description

Overview

Sophisticated mathematical tools are increasingly used to solve problems in management science, engineering, biology, financial portfolio planning, facilities planning, control of dynamic systems, and design of composite materials. The goal is to find computing solutions to real-world problems. The applied and computational mathematics masterâs degree refines your capabilities in applying mathematical models and methods to study a range of problems, with an emphasis on developing and implementing computing solutions.

The ideas of applied mathematics pervade several applications in a variety of businesses and industries as well as the government. Sophisticated mathematical tools are increasingly used to develop new models, modify existing ones, and analyze system performance. This includes applications of mathematics to problems in management science, biology, portfolio planning, facilities planning, control of dynamic systems, and design of composite materials. The goal is to find computable solutions to real-world problems arising from these types of situations.

The masters of science degree in applied and computational mathematics provide students with the capability to apply mathematical models and methods to study various problems that arise in industry and business, with an emphasis on developing computable solutions that can be implemented. The program offers concentrations in discrete mathematics, dynamical systems, and scientific computing. Electives may be selected from the graduate course offerings in the School of Mathematical Sciences or from other graduate programs, with approval from the graduate program director. Students have the option to complete a thesis, which includes the presentation of original ideas and solutions to a specific mathematical problem. The proposal for the thesis work and the results must be presented and defended before the advisory committee.

Nature of Work

Mathematicians use mathematical theory, computational techniques, algorithms, and the latest computer technology to solve economic, scientific, engineering, physics, and business problems. The work of mathematicians falls into two broad classes â theoretical (pure) mathematics and applied mathematics. These classes, however, often overlap. Applied mathematicians start with a practical problem, envision its separate elements, and then reduce the elements to mathematical variables. They often use computers to analyze relationships among the variables, and they solve complex problems by developing models with alternative solutions.

Graduation Requirements

Until all course work is completed for both the bachelor's degree and masters degree, neither degree will be awarded to a dual-degree participant.

Types of Mathematics

Most often the work involving applied mathematics is done by persons whose titles are other than âmathematicianâ: Engineer, Economist, Analyst (e.g. Operations Research), Physicist, Cryptanalyst (codes), Actuary, Teacher, Market Researcher, and Financial Advisor.

Many mathematicians work for federal or state agencies. The Dept. of Defense accounts for about 81% of the mathematicians employed by the Federal Government. In the private sector, mathematicians are employed by scientific R&D services, software publishers, insurance companies, and in aerospace or pharmaceutical manufacturing.

Industries

  • Government (Local, State, Federal)
  • Insurance
  • Investment/Portfolio Management
  • Defense
  • Scientific and Technical Consulting
  • Biotech and Life Sciences
  • Telecommunications

Typical Job Titles

  • Engineer
  • Economist
  • Analyst (e.g. Operations Research)
  • Physicist
  • Cryptanalyst (codes)
  • Actuary
  • Teacher
  • Market Researcher
  • Financial Advisor

Curriculum

Applied and Computational Mathematics (thesis option), MS degree, typical course sequence

First Year

Choose four of the following core courses:

  • MATH-601 Methods of Applied Mathematics
  • MATH-602 Numerical Analysis I
  • MATH-605 Stochastic Processes
  • MATH-622 Mathematical Modeling I
  • MATH-645 Graph Theory
  • MATH-722 Mathematical Modeling II
  • MATH-606 Graduate Seminar I
  • MATH-607 Graduate Seminar II
  • Electives

Second Year

  • MATH-790Research & Thesis
  • Elective

Applied and Computational Mathematics (project option), MS degree, typical course sequence

First Year

Choose four of the following core courses:

  • MATH-601 Methods of Applied Mathematics
  • MATH-602 Numerical Analysis I
  • MATH-605 Stochastic Processes
  • MATH-622 Mathematical Modeling I
  • MATH-645 Graph Theory
  • MATH-722 Mathematical Modeling II
  • MATH-606 Graduate Seminar I
  • MATH-607 Graduate Seminar II
  • Electives

Second Year

  • MATH-790Research & Thesis
  • Elective

Admission Requirements

To be considered for admission to the MS program in applied and computational mathematics, candidates must fulfill the following requirements:

  • Complete a graduate application.
  • Hold a baccalaureate degree (or equivalent) from an accredited university or college in mathematics or a related field.
  • Submit official transcripts (in English) of all previously completed undergraduate and graduate course work.
  • Have knowledge of a programming language.
  • Have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 (or equivalent).
  • Submit a personal statement of educational objectives.
  • Submit two letters of recommendation from academic or professional sources.
  • International applicants whose native language is not English must submit scores from the TOEFL, IELTS, or PTE. A minimum TOEFL score of 79 (internet-based) is required. A minimum IELTS score of 6.5 is required. The English language test score requirement is waived for native speakers of English or for those submitting transcripts from degrees earned at American institutions.

Although the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores are not required, submitting them may enhance a candidate's acceptance into the program.

A student may also be granted conditional admission and be required to complete bridge courses selected from among RITâs existing undergraduate courses, as prescribed by the studentâs adviser. Until these requirements are met, the candidate is considered a nonmatriculated student. The graduate program director evaluates the studentâs qualifications to determine eligibility for conditional and provisional admission.

Last updated October 2019

About the School

With more than 80 graduate programs in high-paying, in-demand fields and scholarships, assistantships and fellowships available, we invite you to take a closer look at RIT. Don't be fooled by the word ... Read More

With more than 80 graduate programs in high-paying, in-demand fields and scholarships, assistantships and fellowships available, we invite you to take a closer look at RIT. Don't be fooled by the word "technology" in our name. At RIT, you will discover a university of artists and designers on the one hand, and scientists, engineers, and business leaders on the other – a collision of the right brain and the left brain. Read less