MSc/PGDip Food Production Management

General

Program Description

Course overview

This masters course balances a scientific discipline with business acumen. You'll learn how to develop safe, nutritious and sustainable food. This is essential in an ever-changing global food supply chain.

You'll be taught by an experienced academic team with a technical background across the global food industry. Business School modules will also develop your management skills.

Factory visits and high-profile speakers ensure that you will get plenty of industry exposure throughout the year. We have links to global food companies and smaller companies through the Food Innovation Centre based on campus.

You'll learn through lectures and practical activities in our Food Processing Facility. Taking real scenarios from industry to problem-solve solutions. Core modules cover food manufacture, quality management and supply chain. You'll put these skills into practice to develop a new product. Presenting this as a team in a showcase with industry judges.

There is an opportunity to complete your research project in collaboration with the food industry.  Many students do this on an industry placement. Projects can be factory, laboratory or literature-based. 

Why choose this course?

  • Talent development: advance your career in food with our competency framework tool   
  • Food science facility: you'll use our Food Processing Facility to replicate industry and develop new product concepts
  • World-leading research: our research environment was awarded 100% for agriculture, veterinary and food science (Research Excellence Framework 2014)
  • Combined skills: study business and food science leading to technical and managerial careers 
  • Industry experience: through factory visits and guest lectures from leaders in the food industry

Course content

This course is divided into three parts:

120 credits of taught modules in both the autumn and spring semesters

60 credits research project in the summer

For a master, a total of 180 credits is required. A diploma is awarded if you choose to take only the taught element worth 120 credits.

In the autumn semester and spring semester, you will normally study 60 credits of food sciences modules and 60 credits of management modules. However, there is some flexibility to take into account your background and interests.

The research projects involve collaboration with the food industry, either at the university or working within a company. The project will provide an insight into the scientific principles of food production processes or the application of modern management techniques to food manufacture.

Modules

MSc

Core modules

  • Factory Design and Operations for Food Production 20 credits
  • Core Skills and Technologies of Food Manufacture 40 credits
  • Food Manufacturing Case Studies 10 credits
  • Postgraduate Research Project 60 credits
  • Quality Management and Quality Techniques for Industry 20 credits
  • Supply Chain Planning and Management

Optional modules

  • Managing Projects
  • The Global Food Industry 10 credits
  • Food Flavour 10 credits
  • E-Business
  • Service Operations Management
  • Managing Contemporary Operations: Fundamentals and Challenges

PGDip

Core modules

  • Quality Management and Quality Techniques for Industry 20 credits
  • Factory Design and Operations for Food Production 20 credits
  • Core Skills and Technologies of Food Manufacture 40 credits
  • Food Manufacturing Case Studies 10 credits
  • Supply Chain Planning and Management

Optional modules

  • Managing Projects
  • The Global Food Industry 10 credits
  • Food Flavour 10 credits
  • E-Business
  • Service Operations Management
  • Managing Contemporary Operations: Fundamentals and Challenges

Learning and assessment

How you will learn

  • Seminars
  • Lectures
  • Practical classes
  • Tutorials
  • Workshops
  • eLearning

Although lectures and practical classes still play an important role as the course progresses, your learning experience is enhanced by placing greater reliance on self-directed study, written dissertations and research project work.

How you will be assessed

  • Written exam
  • Lab reports
  • Presentation
  • Essay
  • Coursework
  • Dissertation

Modules are assessed using a variety of individual assessment types which are weighted to calculate your final mark for each module. Typically all taught modules have one piece of coursework in addition to a final exam.

You will need an average mark of 50% to pass the MSc overall. You will be given a copy of our marking criteria when you start the course and will receive regular feedback from your tutors.

Contact time and study hours

The number of formal contact hours varies depending on the optional modules you are studying. As a guide, in the autumn and spring semesters, you will typically spend around 25 hours per week in classes.

You will work on your research project between June and September, either based at the University or within an industry placement. You would be supervised for 3 hours per week, on average.

Teaching is provided by teaching fellows, assistant professors, associate professors and professors. Technical staff,  PhD students and post-doctoral researchers provide additional support in small group and practical classes.

There will be around 30 students on this course. Depending on your modules, you may study with around 50 other students.

Entry requirements

All candidates are considered on an individual basis and we accept a broad range of qualifications. The entrance requirements below apply to 2021 entry.

Home / UK students

  • Undergraduate degree: 2:2 level or above (or its international equivalent) in a natural or applied science discipline or in an engineering discipline such as chemical, agricultural or food engineering.

EU / International students

  • Undergraduate degree: 2:2 level or above (or its international equivalent) in a natural or applied science discipline or in an engineering discipline such as chemical, agricultural or food engineering.
  • International and EU equivalents: We accept a wide range of qualifications from all over the world.
  • IELTS: 6.5 (no less than 6.0 in any element)
  • English language requirements: As well as IELTS (listed above), we also accept other English language qualifications. This includes TOEFL iBT, Pearson PTE, GCSE, IB and O level English.

English language support

If you need support to meet the required level, you may be able to attend a presessional course. Our Centre for English Language Education is accredited by the British Council for the teaching of English in the UK.

For presessional English courses, you must take IELTS for UKVI to meet visa regulations.

If you successfully complete your presessional course to the required level, you can then progress to your degree course. This means that you won't need to retake IELTS or equivalent.

Fees

  • UK students: Confirmed August 2020 *
  • International students: Confirmed August 2020 *

The UK government has confirmed that EU, other EEA and Swiss nationals starting courses in the 2021/22 academic year will no longer be eligible for home/UK fee status or the same financial support as in previous years. We will update our guidance for students when more information becomes available.

Careers

Job prospects

Our graduates work in a wide range of roles across the world. Here are some recent examples:

  • Quality Manager, Greencore, UK
  • Technical Manager, AB World Food Ltd
  • Senior Scientist, Mondelēz International
  • Senior Sensory Scientist, GlaxoSmithKline
  • Scientific Officer and Policy Advisor, DEFRA, UK
  • Scientist, Research and Development, Unilever, China

Average starting salary and career progression

100% of postgraduates in the School of Biosciences secured work or further study within six months of graduation. £28,000 was the average starting salary, with the highest being £65,000.*

* Known destinations of full-time home postgraduates who were available for employment, 2016/17. Salaries are calculated based on the median of those in full-time paid employment within the UK.

Placements

You will complete a three-month research project, supervised by an experienced member of academic staff. The majority of projects involve collaboration with the food industry, as an industry placement within a company.

Previous students have completed placements with Kellogg’s, Nestle and Premier Foods.

Dedicated professional staff work on a one-to-one basis with you to help you find and prepare for the industry placement.

"My research interests lie in flavour management. This covers plant biology, agricultural techniques, food production and consumption. I work on fundamental food chemistry to support novel processing technologies and commercial products. I am actively involved in teaching at undergraduate and postgraduate level. I also teach on food flavour training courses and run a commercial flavour and food chemistry analysis service for the food industry." Professor Ian Fisk is Professor of Flavour Chemistry, and Director of Research, School of Biosciences

Last updated Sep 2020

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About the School

TheFaculty of Engineering at Nottinghamis known for its world-class research, inspirational teaching, and diverse academic community.

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