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Search Part time MSc Programs in Peace and Conflict Studies in Singapore 2019

Peace and conflict studies aim to understand the causes of violent and deadly conflict throughout numerous societies. Opportunities for study range from courses that last a few weeks to degrees that take a few years to attain.

Contact Schools Directly Best Part time Master of Science Degrees in Peace and Conflict Studies in Singapore 2019

3 Results in Peace and Conflict Studies, Singapore Filter

MSc Violence, Conflict & Development (Palestine Pathway)

SOAS University of London
Campus Full-time Part-time 1 - 2 years September 2019 United Kingdom London Singapore + 2 more

Applicants apply for the MSc Violence, Conflict and Development programme but can decide to follow the Palestine Pathway upon arrival by choosing the combination of modules required for this pathway (see Structure tab).

MSc Violence, Conflict & Development

SOAS University of London
Campus Full-time Part-time 1 - 2 years September 2019 United Kingdom London Singapore + 2 more

The MSc in Violence, Conflict and Development draws on the exceptional expertise at SOAS in the different disciplinary understanding of development challenges and processes as well as the strong commitment among all teaching staff to area expertise. Staff teaching on this programme are research active and have a range of links to international organisations.

MSc Politics of Conflict, Rights & Justice

SOAS University of London
Campus Full-time Part-time 1 - 3 years September 2019 United Kingdom London Singapore + 2 more

The programme is designed for Masters students who are interested in the politics of human rights, humanitarianism and international and transitional justice especially in conflict and post-conflict states. It is also highly relevant to anyone working or intending to work in international NGOs, international organizations, think tanks and advocacy groups in the areas of rights, humanitarian assistance and transitional justice. It also looks more broadly at the future of global human rights in a world where, many claims, the influence of the West is declining and asks critical questions about the legitimacy and effectiveness of transitional justice mechanisms and humanitarian intervention.