MSc Clinical Skills in Integrative Psychotherapy

General

Read more about this program on the institution's website

Program Description

What evidence is there to support the effectiveness of psychodynamic interpersonal therapy? How does Socratic questioning affect a client’s perspective of their difficulties? What does practitioner self-care look like?

Explore the person-centred therapeutic process, brief interventions, and different approaches to psychotherapy. Practise core psychological skills, from therapeutic interventions to applied research and consultation. And, reflect on practitioner resilience and self-care.

On this course, you’ll explore the theories behind therapeutic methods related to promoting psychological wellbeing, and develop practical research skills.

You’ll study topics including the principles of therapeutic approaches (such as developing positive therapeutic relationships with clients and Person-Centred care), therapeutic strategies of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT), including cognitive restructuring, and brief interventions, such as Solution-Focused Brief Therapy (SFBT) and motivational interviewing.

In skills sessions, you’ll complete role-plays and scenario-based tasks to practise core therapeutic techniques, such as reflecting, identifying internal/external frames of reference, and Socratic questioning.

You’ll also reflect on practitioner wellbeing and development. Some of the themes you’ll consider include boundaries and safe practices, privilege and social responsibility, and core values and beliefs.

We’ll help you to develop your awareness of self-care through experiential learning groups based on your experiences and you’ll complete a practitioner log and reflective diary, too.

You’ll have the opportunity to complete a service-related dissertation, connecting theory and practice, influencing service design and delivery for statutory and third sector organisations or people with particular vulnerabilities.

At Manchester Met, our teaching team includes practitioner psychologists (clinical, counselling, health and sports) with experience in working in NHS and private settings in the UK and internationally.

Features and Benefits

  • You’ll develop the skills to begin a career in psychological therapies (such as counselling, psychotherapy, and clinical psychology).
  • You’ll connect research and practice through a service evaluation-based dissertation.
  • You’ll have access to our specialist facilities for psychology demonstration and practice, which includes an fNIR imaging research device, 12 experimental testing laboratories and 6 psychology laboratories.
  • Our teaching staff includes practising researchers and clinical, counselling, health and sports psychologists.
  • Our department is home to the Stress, Health and Performance Research Group and our staff engage in a wide range of research areas, including health and psychological interventions, and neuropsychobiology.

Course Information

Who is the course for?

Our MSc Clinical Skills in Integrative Psychotherapy is designed for developing and aspiring practitioners and researchers looking to update their skills and advance their knowledge. The course is for students hoping to develop a career in psychological therapies.

With further study and training, you might work in counselling, psychotherapy, clinical psychology, or as an allied healthcare practitioner using therapeutic skills. The MSc course is designed to provide an academic foundation and specialist knowledge on which to further your academic and/or practitioner career.

What will you study and how will you learn?

We aim to develop your understanding of the theoretical frameworks that form the basis of evidence-based practice, and your critical awareness of issues relating to promoting psychological wellbeing.

We look at innovative and inclusive approaches to promoting psychological wellbeing and consider self-awareness, reflective practice and practitioner resilience.

On this course, you’ll discuss, critique and compare therapeutic modalities, focusing on an integrated and person-centred approach. You’ll consider contemporary theories and practical issues in therapeutic services across both the NHS and private sectors. This is to help you critically appraise the variety of therapeutic provisions.

Some of the topics you’ll study include the evidence supporting the effectiveness of interventions (such as motivational interviewing), key policies and guidelines relating to common conditions, and contemporary psychodynamic approaches.

You’ll learn through a variety of teaching methods, including lectures, seminars and workshops, reflective groups, skills practice, and peer learning, where you’ll share your practice experiences.

We assess you through a range of methods, such as group presentations, essays, placement portfolio, and critical reports. You’ll submit a dissertation, too. This typically focuses on the experience of therapeutic interventions and processes within a range of therapeutic services.

You might consider group reflections with a therapeutic community or focus groups with clients and staff teams to explore therapeutic processes. You might conduct individual qualitative interviews with clients to explore their experiences of one-to-one counselling or psychological therapy.

What will your dissertation consist of?

For your dissertation, you’ll submit a report on service development and/or evaluation and a recommendations article written to the guidelines of an appropriate journal of your choice.

Usually, your evaluation is 6,000 words and presents the theoretical basis, undertakings and findings of your work. Your recommendations article is typically a 2,000-word piece that outlines implications and findings of your work, to help services develop.

When will you study?

Core course teaching takes place on Mondays and Tuesdays, although additional Study Skills teaching and supervisory meetings will take place throughout the week. Therefore, full-time students should ensure they are able to attend all teaching and supervision meetings to maximise their learning experience throughout the course.

Part-time students have core teaching on Mondays in year one and Tuesdays in year two. In year two, part-time students will also need to attend Wednesday lab classes and allow time for dissertation prep.

We recommend one day per week is allocated for independent study for the dissertation from the beginning of year two. 

All students should be available for meetings with tutors and supervisors on Wednesdays and Thursdays throughout the year.

Students should ensure they are available for the 40-hour integrated placement throughout the week during term two to accommodate the schedule offered by the placement provider.

Year 1

Over the duration of your course, you'll cover the following units:

Core units

  • Brief Intervention Models
  • Professional Practice Values (placement)
  • Therapeutic Relationships and Processes
  • Personal Development and Reflection
  • Research Principles and Methods
  • Service Evaluation and Development Research Dissertation
  • Core Therapeutic Principles 

Placement options

This course has an integrated placement and includes just over 300 hours of teaching, which together can form part of an individual application for registration with organisations such as the British Association of Counselling and Psychotherapy (BACP). However, it is predominantly an academic postgraduate degree and not a professional qualification. Further information about careers in therapy can be found on the BACP and UKCP careers webpages. 

Professional Practice Values

The learning outcomes for the Professional Practice Values unit are specifically practice-based and require the experiential learning of developing and implementing practitioner knowledge and values. Work-based learning will help you demonstrate your ability to work in the field of mental health and enhance your confidence in becoming practitioners. It will also deepen your experiential understanding of theory-practice links. Through the undertaking of work-based learning, you will gain work-based specific skills, contacts and knowledge to complement your academic learning. All students, irrespective of background, will be supported by members of staff in order to choose a suitable work-based learning provider.

For this unit, you will require a full Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) check to ensure you are able to undertake the suitable placement component. The cost of the DBS check is included in your academic fees and further information about the DBS policy at Manchester Met can be found here. The placement component will be discussed in detail during your course induction.

Study and assessment breakdown

10 credits equate to 100 hours of study, which is a combination of lectures, seminars and practical sessions, and independent study. A Masters qualification typically comprises of 180 credits, a PGDip 120 credits, a PGCert 60 credits and an MFA 300 credits. The exact composition of your study time and assessments for the course will vary according to your option choices and style of learning, but it could be:

Study

  • Full-time 20% lectures, seminars or similar; 11% placement; 69% independent study
  • Part-time 20% lectures, seminars or similar; 11% placement; 69% independent study

Assessment

  • Full-time 75% coursework; 25% practical; 0% examination
  • Part-time 75% coursework; 25% practical; 0% examination

Entry requirements

Entry requirements for this programme are as follows:

  • A 2:1 or above in an honours degree course or overseas equivalent related to the allied health/social care professions (e.g. psychology, medicine, nursing, occupational therapy, social work, speech and language therapy, physiotherapy, education). Each applicant will be judged on an individual basis.
  • Overseas applicants will require IELTS with an overall score of 6.5 with no less than 5.5 in any category, or an equivalent accepted English qualification. Accepted English qualifications can be viewed here.
  • Although not a requirement of this course, we recommend that students try to obtain some part-time paid or voluntary work in a relevant therapeutic service, which is beneficial the reflective exercises in the second-semester units and overall learning experience.
  • Successful completion of one unit within this course requires a full Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) check to ensure you are able to undertake a suitable placement component. The cost of the DBS check is included in your academic fees.
  • Finally, we will specifically look for applicants who can showcase their ability to develop skills in reflective and ethical practice. 

If you are unsure as to whether you meet the entry requirements for the course, please liaise with the admissions team who can provide further information. 

Fees and Funding

UK and EU Students

  • Full-time fee: £5,667 to £8,500 per year. Tuition fees will remain the same for each year of your course providing you complete it in the normal timeframe (no repeat years or breaks in study).
  • Part-time fee: £1417 per 30 credits studied per year. Tuition fees will remain the same for each year of your course providing you complete it in the normal timeframe (no repeat years or breaks in study).

Non-EU and Channel Island Students

  • Full-time fee: £10,667 to £16,000 per year. Tuition fees will remain the same for each year of your course providing you complete it in the normal timeframe (no repeat years or breaks in study).
  • Part-time fee: £2667 per 30 credits studied per year. Tuition fees will remain the same for each year of your course providing you complete it in the normal timeframe (no repeat years or breaks in study).

Additional Information

A Masters qualification typically comprises 180 credits, a PGDip 120 credits, a PGCert 60 credits, and an MFA 300 credits. Tuition fees will remain the same for each year of study provided the course is completed in the normal timeframe (no repeat years or breaks in study).

Additional Costs

Other costs

  • Optional estimate: £400

All of the books required for the course are available from the library. The University also has PC labs and a laptop loan service. However, many students choose to buy some of the core textbooks for the course and/or a laptop. Students may also need to print their assignments and other documents. Campus printing costs start from 5p per page. Estimated costs are £300 for a laptop of up to £100 each year for books and printing. 

Career Prospects

With further postgraduate training through a professional doctorate or practitioner training with an accrediting professional body (e.g. BPS, BACP), you could develop a career in psychological therapies.  We offer a comprehensive theoretical foundation upon which to build your professional skills and practitioner registration. You could go into clinical psychology, counselling or psychotherapy, or a psychological wellbeing practitioner, in the NHS or in private practice.

Last updated Aug 2020

About the School

Manchester Metropolitan University is home to a diverse international student population from more than 130 countries. The University is ranked amongst the world’s top 200 universities under 50 years ... Read More

Manchester Metropolitan University is home to a diverse international student population from more than 130 countries. The University is ranked amongst the world’s top 200 universities under 50 years old, which is a measure of its commitment to delivering and supporting quality research and teaching. Manchester Metropolitan provides its students with regular employability events including advice workshops, industry networking, guest speakers and careers fairs. The University also has industry links with many global companies, including IBM, Bentley Motors, Bosch, Microsoft, Nike, Adidas, Manchester City Football Club and Walt Disney. A range of scholarships exclusive to international students is also available, up to the value of £5,000. Read less