MLitt in Transnational, Global and Spatial History

General

Program Description

This course promotes new transnational perspectives and ways of seeing the past through an explicit appreciation of scale in space and time. Students explore a range of approaches to the study of global trade, the development of networks, comparative history and cross-cultural encounters.

The MLitt in Transnational, Global and Spatial History is a taught postgraduate programme run by the Institute for Transnational and Spatial History (ITSH) in the School of History.

Highlights

  • This programme provides a unique introduction to the emerging field of spatial history, including the study of representations of space, landscapes, mental maps, spatial practices and topographies of memory.
  • This programme promotes new transnational perspectives and ways of seeing the past through an explicit appreciation of scale in space and time.
  • Students will explore approaches to the history of cities as hubs, transfers and travel, the circulation of ideas and the migration of peoples.
  • Students will explore a range of approaches to the study of global trade, the development of networks, comparative history and cross-cultural encounters.
  • Students will gain proficiency in powerful tools for mapping, geographic analysis and the study of social networks as well as skills in the use of non-textual sources and overcoming the challenges of translation and multi-lingual archives.

Teaching format

Teaching methods include seminars, fortnightly tutorials and practical classes. Class sizes range from individual supervision up to 12 students. The modules are assessed by coursework only; there is no final exam.

Students will spend the final three months of the course focusing on researching and writing the final assessment piece for the MLitt, a dissertation of not more than 15,000 words.

Modules

The modules in this programme have varying methods of delivery and assessment.

Compulsory

  • Global Times Plural Spaces (1 and 2): offers a strong foundation in the major approaches to comparative and transnational history as well as the emerging field of spatial history.

Optional

Students choose two optional modules. Optional modules are subject to change each year, and some may only allow limited numbers of students.

  • Building Britain: The Construction and Deconstruction of Britishness since 1707: explores the concept of 'Britishness' and its construction and deconstruction from 1707 to 2000.
  • Directed Reading in Modern History: offers a directed reading project designed to encourage the development of skills of historical analysis through the concentrated study of a topic chosen by the student.
  • Disease and Environment (c.1500–2000): examines the manner in which sickness and death have shaped human history, both biologically and culturally, over the past 500 years.
  • Environmental History: Nature and the Western World, 1800-2000: studies environmental history over the past two centuries in an international context.
  • Perceptions of Central and Eastern Europe: studies the diverse ethnic and cultural characteristics of the region itself and its transformation since the emergence of modern nationalism in the mid-19th century.
  • Political Thought and Intellectual History: introduces the political theory and intellectual history of the early modern period.
  • Skills in Transnational, Global and Spatial History: the acquisition and development of skills in the digital humanities and skills required for using specific historical sources.
  • The Creation of an Atlantic World: introduces students to the concept of the Atlantic World, a unit of analysis used by historians to understand the changes wrought in the western hemisphere by the British, French, and Iberian discovery and settlement of the Americas, and by Europe's slave trade with Africa.
  • Themes in American History: the most important issues in the history of North America, from its foundations as European colonies onwards.
  • Themes in Middle Eastern History: looks at a variety of theoretical and disciplinary approaches, including Orientalism, as well as exploring questions of nationalism, statehood and identity.
  • War, State and Society in Early Modern Europe and New Worlds: explores the transformations in the size, scale and scope of European warfare between the late fifteenth and late eighteenth centuries.

Dissertation

Student dissertations will be supervised by members of the teaching staff who will advise on the choice of subject and provide guidance throughout the research process. The completed dissertation of no more than 15,000 words must be submitted by a date specified in August.

If students choose not to complete the dissertation requirement for the MLitt, there is an exit award available that allows suitably qualified candidates to receive a Postgraduate Diploma. By choosing an exit award, you will finish your degree at the end of the second semester of study and receive a PGDip instead of an MLitt.

The modules listed here are indicative, and there is no guarantee they will run for 2019 entry.

Careers

History postgraduates go on to pursue careers in a range of sectors including journalism, publishing, think tanks, government, law and teaching.

The Careers Centre offers one-to-one advice to all students on a taught postgraduate course and offers a programme of events to assist students in building their employability skills.

Entry requirements

  • A good 2.1 Honours undergraduate degree in a subject-related area.
  • If you studied your first degree outside the UK, see the international entry requirements.
  • English language proficiency.

The qualifications listed are indicative of minimum requirements for entry. Some academic Schools will ask applicants to achieve significantly higher marks than the minimum. Obtaining the listed entry requirements will not guarantee you a place, as the University considers all aspects of every application including, where applicable, the writing sample, personal statement, and supporting documents.

Application requirements

  • CV.
  • personal statement (optional).
  • a sample of academic written work (2,000 words).
  • two original signed academic references.
  • academic transcripts and degree certificates.
  • evidence of English language proficiency (required if English is not your first language).

Funding

The School of History is pleased to be able to offer a number of competitive scholarships which contribute to the fees and maintenance for postgraduate study.

  • Language Bursaries: enables students to undertake intensive language courses abroad during the summer before their programme begins.
  • School of History MLitt Awards: offers the cash equivalent of one year's home fees and cannot be held in conjunction with other awards offering full fees and maintenance.

Recent Graduate Discount

The University of St Andrews offers a 10% discount in postgraduate tuition fees to students who are eligible to graduate or who have graduated from St Andrews within the last three academic years and are starting a postgraduate programme with the University of St Andrews.

Last updated October 2019

About the School

Founded in the fifteenth century, St Andrews is Scotland's first university and the third oldest in the English speaking world. St Andrews is a unique place to study and live. Nestled on the east coas ... Read More

Founded in the fifteenth century, St Andrews is Scotland's first university and the third oldest in the English speaking world. St Andrews is a unique place to study and live. Nestled on the east coast of Scotland, students may find themselves crossing golf-courses on their way to class, or jogging along the beach after dinner. Not only does the University have a world-class reputation, but it also offers a diverse range of social activities, including over 140 student societies and 50 sports clubs. Historic buildings are juxtaposed against the modern facilities, and the many student traditions truly make studying at St Andrews an unforgettable experience. Read less
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