The MLitt in International Security Studies introduces international security through traditional and critical approaches. Students will learn to cultivate their own voice by engaging with different theoretical approaches and empirical case studies.

The MLitt in International Security Studies is a one year taught postgraduate programme run by the School of International Relations.

Highlights

  • This programme allows students to study critical and traditional security approaches.
  • It ensures that students grasp the cutting edge debates taking place in security studies.
  • It invites students to think originally and pushes them to ask alternative questions.
  • It provides opportunities for students to apply a wide array of theoretical lenses.
  • It encourages students to focus on specific empirical case studies and global security issues.

Teaching format

The programme consists of four taught modules taken over two semesters and a 15,000-word dissertation in an area of your choice. The two compulsory modules, International Security Studies and Critical Security Studies, will ground you in both long-standing and contemporary approaches to security issues.

Modules are taught through a mixture of lectures, seminars and tutorials with average lecture sizes ranging from 20 to 30 students and tutorial sizes ranging from 1 to 15 students. Assessment methods include a combination of examination and coursework.

Every MLitt student is assigned a dissertation supervisor who will advise on the choice of subject and provide guidance throughout the research process.

Modules

All International Security Studies MLitt students take two compulsory and two optional modules over the course of the programme.

The modules in this programme have varying methods of delivery and assessment.

Compulsory

  • Critical Security Studies: examines the challenge to traditional conceptions of security presented by the emergence of critical security studies since the end of the Cold War.
  • International Security: focuses on important issues and significant debates in security studies.

Optional

  • The Changing Face(s) of Diplomacy: highlights the role of emotions, persuasion and communication technology into the diplomatic arena.
  • Emergent Great Powers: provides a comparative analysis of the emergence of India and China as great powers within the international system.
  • Gender and Terrorism: deconstructs the gendered discourses of rationality and strategy that dominate Terrorism studies and overlook other sub-state violent actors.
  • The Global Politics of Everyday Life: explores how everyday life and global politics are co-constitutive by drawing on a range of interdisciplinary theoretical perspectives.
  • The Military in Politics: introduces students to civil-military relations and then analyses how armed forces impact states domestic politics.
  • Non-Western Political Thought: explores different elements of non-Western thought to understand assumptions about the body, political community and the world.
  • Political Economy of Conflict: provides a political economy perspective on conflict in a developing economy.
  • Religion and International Politics: investigates the so-called 'global resurgence' of politicised religion.
  • Security and Justice: examines the development and efficacy of institutions in the fields of peace, security and justice.
  • Spaces of Securitization: explores how securitization unfolds in theory and in practice by investigating the ‘spatial turn’ in IR.

Optional modules are subject to change each year, and some may only allow limited numbers of students. You may, with permission, take modules from other MLitt programmes in the School.

Dissertation

The final element of the MLitt is a 15,000-word dissertation. The dissertation should focus on an area of international security studies in which you are interested in. Each student is supported by a relevant supervisor from the School who will advise on the choice of subject and provide guidance throughout the research process.

If students choose not to complete the dissertation requirement for the MLitt, there is an exit award available that allow suitably qualified candidates to receive a Postgraduate Diploma. By choosing an exit award, you will finish your degree at the end of the second semester of study and receive a PGDip instead of an MLitt.

The modules listed here are indicative, and there is no guarantee they will run for 2019 entry.

Careers

Students who graduate from the MLitt in International Security Studies frequently find employment in the foreign service, non-governmental agencies and security consulting, or advance to a PhD to pursue an academic career.

The Careers Centre offers one-to-one advice to all students on a taught postgraduate course and offers a programme of events to assist students to build their employability skills.

Entry requirements

  • A strong 2.1 Honours degree. A background in political science and international relations is strongly encouraged.
  • If you studied your first degree outside the UK, see the international entry requirements.
  • English language proficiency.

The qualifications listed are indicative of minimum requirements for entry. Some academic Schools will ask applicants to achieve significantly higher marks than the minimum. Obtaining the listed entry requirements will not guarantee you a place, as the University considers all aspects of every application including, where applicable, the writing sample, personal statement, and supporting documents.

Application requirements

  • CV or résumé. This should include your personal details with a history of your education and employment to date.
  • personal statement indicating your knowledge of the programme and how it will benefit you (500 words).
  • a sample of academic written work (2,000 words).
  • two original signed academic references.
  • academic transcripts and degree certificates.
  • evidence of English language proficiency (required if English is not your first language).

Funding

Recent Graduate Discount

The University of St Andrews offers a 10% discount in postgraduate tuition fees to students who are eligible to graduate or who have graduated from St Andrews within the last three academic years and are starting a postgraduate programme with the University of St Andrews.

Program taught in:
English

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Last updated April 20, 2019
This course is Campus based
Start Date
Sep 9, 2019
Duration
1 year
Full-time
Price
10,880 GBP
UK and EU: £10,880; Overseas: £21,990
Deadline
Request Info
Applicants should apply as early as possible to be eligible for certain scholarships and for international visa purposes.
By locations
By date
Start Date
Sep 9, 2019
End Date
Sep 30, 2020
Application deadline
Request Info
Applicants should apply as early as possible to be eligible for certain scholarships and for international visa purposes.

Sep 9, 2019

Location
Application deadline
Request Info
Applicants should apply as early as possible to be eligible for certain scholarships and for international visa purposes.
End Date
Sep 30, 2020

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