MA Program in Life Sciences in Asia

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Life Sciences

An MA or Master of Arts degree is obtained by students after completing a one- to two-year program studying History, English or other fine arts or humanities subjects. MA studies are most often a mix of research and coursework.

Biological & life sciences studies often prepare students for a career in healthcare. Sometimes programs will combine human biology classes with classes in physics, chemistry, and even geology to help students learn how living organisms work together.

Asia is the world's largest and most populous continent, located primarily in the eastern and northern hemispheres. It covers 8.7% of the Earth's total surface area and comprises 30% of its land area.

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M.A. in Land & Livelihood Studies

Srishti Institute of Art, Design and Technology
Campus Full time 2 years July 2018 India Bangalore

Access to land is a key determinant of livelihood security, and it is becoming highly contested in rural and urban areas. Increasingly, livelihoods based directly on land are becoming precarious; and land for the basic necessity of housing is also becoming unaffordable. In the last two decades, we have witnessed changes in the pattern of investments and the nature of industrialization, growth of the service sector, rapid urbanization, agrarian distress, and rather polarized environmental debates. These changes have added a new dimension to the set of relationships that have previously determined ownership of land, work based on land including labor, the environmental quality of land, and food security. The increasing commodification of land is contributing to widening inequalities in rural and urban communities. Moreover “livelihoods” are also being fetishized in many State and non-State interventions, where people are viewed only as beneficiaries, and not as real actors with their own sense of agency. [+]

M.A. in Land & Livelihood Studies

Access to land is a key determinant of livelihood security, and it is becoming highly contested in rural and urban areas. Increasingly, livelihoods based directly on land are becoming precarious; and land for the basic necessity of housing is also becoming unaffordable. In the last two decades, we have witnessed changes in the pattern of investments and the nature of industrialization, growth of the service sector, rapid urbanization, agrarian distress, and rather polarized environmental debates.

These changes have added a new dimension to the set of relationships that have previously determined ownership of land, work based on land including labor, the environmental quality of land, and food security. The increasing commodification of land is contributing to widening inequalities in rural and urban communities. Moreover “livelihoods” are also being fetishized in many State and non-State interventions, where people are viewed only as beneficiaries, and not as real actors with their own sense of agency.... [-]