University of Stirling

Introduction

The essence of the University of Stirling is its great people: our graduates, staff and students are helping to shape the world. Founded by Royal Charter in 1967, the University of Stirling was the first genuinely new university in Scotland for over 400 years. We retain our pioneering spirit and a passion for innovation and excellence in all we do.

We aim to be at the forefront of research and learning that helps to improve lives. Working with academic, commercial, public, private and voluntary sector partners, Stirling is one of the UK’s leading research universities in the fields of health and well-being, the environment and people, culture and society, enterprise and the economy, and sport.

Students are at the heart of what we do and we provide one of the best all round student experiences in the UK. In learning and teaching, we work with our student community to deliver high quality programmes that produce intellectually able graduates who are highly sought after by employers. We are ambitious for our students, and our flexible learning opportunities enable them to explore and discover new subjects and interests.

There is a vibrant and growing postgraduate community and we welcome students, researchers and staff from around the world. This gives our research and teaching a global outlook, while remaining relevant to our Scottish culture and economy.

Our vision

To be acknowledged worldwide as a distinguished University that addresses the social and environmental needs of society through innovative, interdisciplinary research and education.

Our mission

To be a University of distinction that is ambitious, accessible and self-reliant, and whose purpose is to develop these qualities in our students, staff and the communities we serve.

This school offers programs in:
  • English

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Programs

This school also offers:

Master

Master in Creative Writing (MLitt)

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 27 months September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

The MLitt Creative Writing offers the opportunity to produce a body of work – poetry, fiction, or creative non-fiction – over the course of a creative and stimulating year. The degree combines intensive writers’ workshops, technique-focused option modules, and one-to-one tuition by the distinguished writers on staff, along with stimulating visits from authors, agents and publishers. [+]

The MLitt Creative Writing offers the opportunity to produce a body of work – poetry, fiction, or creative non-fiction – over the course of a creative and stimulating year. The degree combines intensive writers’ workshops, technique-focused option modules, and one-to-one tuition by the distinguished writers on staff, along with stimulating visits from authors, agents and publishers. Course objectives The course is designed to develop the talents of creative individuals, allowing them to focus in-depth on a project while offering them creative encounters with a range of genres and working practices, drawing on Stirling’s rich expertise in contemporary literature, publishing, film, media, and journalism.
 Students learn skills in listening and diplomacy, advocacy, and in producing fine, nuanced writing. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. Applicants must supply a sample of their creative work: For the prose strand - up to eight pages of prose (fiction or creative nonfiction) or a portfolio of eight poems. A half-and-half mix is also acceptable. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Scholarships & funding University of Stirling Postgraduate Merit Scholarship The University of Stirling is offering any UK or European Union student with a First Class Honours degree (or equivalent) a £2,000 scholarship to study full-time on any taught Master's course or £1,000 for part-time study. Structure and content The teaching year at Stirling is divided into two semesters, which run from mid-September to late December, and from January to the end of May. Full-time students In the Autumn Semester, all full-time students take two consecutive core modules, the Writer’s Workshops. In these core modules, students and tutors read and discuss each other’s work and present their own creative work for discussion. Also in Autumn, full-time students will take a specialist option module, either Prose Fiction or Poetry. In Spring, full-time students will take a third core module the Writer’s Workshop and also a Research Skills module which entails visits to class by literary agents, editors etc. Also in Spring, we offer an option called ‘The Writing Life’ which covers non-fiction writing, memoir, and script-writing. The Summer is spent preparing and writing the Dissertation. Part-time students Part-time students take the MLitt over two years: Year 1: In the Autumn Semester of Year 1, part-time students take one core module, 'The Writer’s Workshop'. In these core modules, students and tutors read and discuss each other’s work and present their own creative work for discussion. Also in Autumn, part-time students will take a specialist option module, either Prose Fiction or Poetry. In Spring, part-time students take the option ‘The Writing Life’, plus the Research Skills module. Year 2: In the Autumn of Year 2, part-time students take two consecutive Writer’s Workshop modules. For part-time students, Dissertation preparation begins in Spring of Year 2. Delivery and assessment Assessment for the workshops will depend on the literary form chosen (prose or poetry) but will be based on reading journals and/or working notebooks, book reviews and in some cases completed pieces of creative work. Assessment for each option module will likewise vary but may include a critical essay, a journal, a creative project. The most significant piece of work in the course is the creative dissertation, due at the end of the summer. This will be circa 15,000 words of prose or a collection of circa 15 poems. A dissertation may be a portfolio of shorter texts – stories, personal essays, poems – or part of a novel. It is expected to be revised and polished original work, written and presented to professional standards. Those who do not embark on the dissertation may be awarded a Diploma. The work of the best students completing the course may be deemed worthy of an MLitt with Distinction. Modes of study Workshops and seminars and guest lectures are taught on campus. We also encourage students to embrace the wider literary life by attending – even organising – events and readings, festivals, libraries and the like. Strengths From September 2013 this course will be taught by Stirling’s Creative Writing team: poet and essayist Kathleen Jamie and fiction writer Liam Murray Bell. Kathleen Jamie is an internationally recognised poet, and winner of, amongst other awards, the Scottish Book of the Year Award, a Forward Prize, and the Costa Poetry Prize. Liam Murray Bell’s first novel ‘So It Is’ attracted Arts Council funding. Set in Belfast, it was hailed as ‘a beautifully written debut novel’ concerning the Troubles. His latest novel 'The Busker' is a Scottish Book Trust 'Pick' for 2014. Both tutors also write non-fiction, reviews, essays etc and are popular figures at festivals, literary events, and residencies. We offer a dynamic mix of youth and experience, and encourage students in an atmosphere which is both rigorous and creative. Regular visits from other established writers, publishers, editors etc offer a wide view of the literary life. Career opportunities Our Creative Writing students find a place for their creativity in many fields: teaching, broadcasting, publishing, community work. Many chose to become self-employed as writers and tutors. Some develop their interest further by studying for a PhD. Some actually publish books! Skills you can develop through this course Graduates in Creative Writing will be highly literate self-managers capable of realising sustained projects using their own initiative and creativity. They will be emotionally intelligent and diplomatic and have skills in: Communication and presentation - being able to articulate complex ideas and information in imaginative, comprehensible and entertaining forms. They will be able to present ideas in verbal and written forms to audiences in a range of situations; and to encourage, evaluate and assist with the work of others. Self-management – students will have the ability to work independently, set goals and meet deadlines. They will be able to work with creativity and imagination to meet challenges, and to respond positively to change and uncertainty. Critical engagement – students will have the ability to formulate independent judgements, articulate arguments and research relevant material, presenting their findings in engaging and creative ways. Chances to expand your horizons In any given year a number of course-specific talks and literary events are arranged for and by the students. These include but are not limited to: visits from literary agents and or publishers public events by poets and novelists (with students’ input and assistance) visits to research centres Where are our graduates now? As well as becoming professional writers our students find employment in many sectors. Some students have gone on to further study, in particular the creative writing PhD. Others are teachers, editors, librarians, some work in publishing. Our course is particularly attractive to students are already well established in careers, or even retired and who take our MLitt later in life to enhance their skills and develop new creative prospects. [-]

MLitt in English Language and Linguistics

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 27 months September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

The MLitt English Language and Linguistics offers students the opportunity to study the intricate workings of language and explore its central role in society. [+]

The MLitt English Language and Linguistics offers students the opportunity to study the intricate workings of language and explore its central role in society. We investigate how language works, how people use it, what people use it for, where it came from and how it changes. The range of research expertise represented by the three dedicated members of staff teaching on the course are reflected in a comprehensive suite of modules that include cognitive, sociolinguistic, historical, evolutionary, and discourse analytical topics. Course objectives Students will be expected to graduate with a knowledge of contemporary linguistic theories, including both generative and cognitive approaches to linguistic description, and the contexts in which these theories arose. They will also acquire knowledge and understanding in specialist selected areas of study (e.g. Old and Middle English, historical, social and regional varieties of English, language and cognition, discourse analysis and evolutionary linguistics), including critical understanding of research in these areas. They will be able to apply a variety of descriptive linguistic tools to language data and linguistic theories to selected specialist areas of study within English Language and Linguistics, according to their areas of interest. They will learn to plan and manage a Research Project under supervision, undertaking independent research, including keeping track of relevant developments in the chosen field(s) and being able to set them in an appropriate context; they will be able to structure and communicate ideas effectively; gather, evaluate and organise information from multiple sources; and engage with other researchers by writing, debating, and delivering oral and written presentations. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. Sample of work (e.g. English Essay) is required. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Scholarships & funding University of Stirling Postgraduate Merit Scholarship The University of Stirling is offering any UK or European Union student with a First Class Honours degree (or equivalent) a £2,000 scholarship to study full-time on any taught Master's course or £1,000 for part-time study. Delivery and assessment Teaching takes place in the form of small group tutorials, occasional lectures, and sometimes lab sessions, depending on the module taken. All modules offer close and careful supervision, but students are expected to take proper responsibility for their studies. Assessment is via module coursework and the dissertation. Each module is assessed by means of one assignment, some of which may involve practical research investigations. The most significant piece of work on the course will be a 15,000-word dissertation, written during the Summer under supervision. Modes of study Face-to-face, campus-based seminars and lectures; one-to-one guidance and supervision with tutors. Online content (in the form of study resources, lecture slides, discussion boards) is available via Succeed, the University of Stirling's chosen online learning environment. Strengths The English language grouping at Stirling (and staff in the cognate discipline of English Language Teaching in the Faculty of Social Sciences) offers between them a strong and varied set of expertise in linguistic topics, from Historical Linguistics to Evolutionary Linguistics and from Discourse Analysis to Corpus Linguistics. The breadth and range of topics make this an ideal introductory Master's to the subject of Linguistics. Career opportunities Postgraduate degrees in English Language and Linguistics are much sought-after by students across the world, providing a grounding in theories and methods essential for a range of research and teaching careers in disciplines including English Studies, Education, English as a Foreign Language and English for Specific Purposes. Students with postgraduate degrees in English Language and Linguistics are prized for their excellent communication and problem-solving skills, and their ability to analyse and synthesise information rapidly and accurately. They are generally very adaptable and go on to a wide range of careers in all sectors of the economy, such as: private and public sector management and research, marketing and advertising, government administration, journalism, banking and finance, speech therapy. Former graduates from the MLitt have gone on to, for instance, Linguistics Research (in the Healthcare sector) and further study in Speech Therapy (for which a Master's in Linguistics was a prerequisite). In a recent report, graduates of English were as likely (if not more) to be in professional or managerial jobs three to three and a half years after graduation than graduates in other subjects (including science and social science subjects). Almost fifty percent of English graduates pursue further education within three years of graduating from their undergraduate degree, often as a route to a professional career, such as teaching or law. Employability Your MLitt in English Language and Linguistics will provide you with important transferable skills which you will be able to make use of throughout your career. Our course will help you develop your oral and written communication skills so that you can engage in confident and informed debate with a range of audiences. You will be able to design, plan and manage your own independent research projects; you will develop your skills in collecting, analysing and interpreting information, and will be able to structure, contextualise and communicate your ideas and findings effectively. You will play an active part in our regular Language Research Group meetings, which discuss articles on important and controversial linguistic topics. You will have the opportunity to introduce articles of your choice to the group and will develop important skills in leading and managing open-ended discussions. Skills you can develop through this course An MLitt in English Language and Linguistics is acknowledged by potential employers as providing important skills, such as motivation, intelligence and the ability to meet deadlines. Although English is not a specifically vocational degree it offers a number of important transferable skills, such as the ability to write clearly, effectively, accurately and persuasively. Seminar discussion and oral presentations (required by many of our modules) help to develop your spoken communication skills. The critical and reflexive study of a variety of texts (literary and non-literary) teaches you how to analyse and interpret complex information and to apply abstract concepts and theories. Our criteria for assessment also require students to be able to synthesise conclusions, to assimilate existing research and to construct and defend an argument clearly and cogently. Throughout their degrees, our students are also trained to use library and bibliographic resources effectively and appropriately, to reference accurately, and to present their work professionally. All of these skills are essential to many kinds of work, which is why so many employers recognise the value of a MLitt in English Language and Linguistics. [-]

MLitt in Modern Scottish Writing

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 27 months September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

The Stirling Master's course views Scottish literature in the light of this ambiguity from a perspective shaped by critical theory as well as traditional literary history. Our focus is the unusually strong role played by literature in sustaining the reality and difference of Scottish culture over the past three centuries – not forgetting the role of novelists and poets in integrating Scottish identity into the project of Britishness. [+]

After more than a decade of devolution, Scotland’s national status ‘is both dangled before us and tantalisingly withheld’ (Don Paterson) The Stirling Master's course views Scottish literature in the light of this ambiguity from a perspective shaped by critical theory as well as traditional literary history. Our focus is the unusually strong role played by literature in sustaining the reality and difference of Scottish culture over the past three centuries – not forgetting the role of novelists and poets in integrating Scottish identity into the project of Britishness. As debate intensifies over Scotland’s political status, the time is ripe to examine the role of writing in shaping the image and reality of the nation. Scholarships & funding University of Stirling Postgraduate Merit Scholarship The University of Stirling is offering any UK or European Union student with a First Class Honours degree (or equivalent) a £2,000 scholarship to study full-time on any taught Master's course or £1,000 for part-time study. Structure and content The Autumn core modules provide a thematic and historical overview; the Spring core module explores Scottish Romantic and Modernist writing in relation to specific themes of authenticity, representation and democracy. Option modules allow students to pursue deeper knowledge of specific texts and issues. Full-time students take one option in each semester; part-time students take options in Year 2 of their course. It is now possible to study Modern Scottish Writing jointly with Creative Writing; students on this pathway do ‘critical’ modules in Modern Scottish Writing alongside Creative Writing workshops. Delivery and assessment Dissertation The most significant piece of work on the course will be a dissertation of 15,000 words, written during the summer on a subject of your choosing in consultation with a member of teaching staff. You may choose to develop work initiated on one of the modules you have studied. Those who do not embark on the dissertation may be awarded a Diploma. The work of the best students completing the course may be deemed worthy of an MLitt with Distinction. Career opportunities Completing a Master’s degree as a prelude to further academic research is an increasingly common pattern of study for young scholars and is a route encouraged by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC). Advanced education in the Arts, the practical experience of research and the production of a dissertation are significant transferable skills for many careers in business and the professions. Skills you can develop through this course An English degree is acknowledged by potential employers as providing important skills, such as motivation, intelligence and the ability to meet deadlines. Although English is not a specifically vocational degree it offers a number of important transferable skills, such as the ability to write clearly, effectively, accurately and persuasively. Seminar discussion and oral presentations (required by many of our modules) help to develop your spoken communication skills. The critical and reflexive study of a variety of texts (literary and non-literary) teaches you how to analyse and interpret complex information and to apply abstract concepts and theories. Our criteria for assessment also requires students to be able to synthesise conclusions, to assimilate existing research and to construct and defend an argument clearly and cogently. Throughout their degrees, our students are also trained to use library and bibliographic resources effectively and appropriately to reference accurately, and to present their work professionally. All of these skills are essential to many kinds of work, which is why so many employers recognise the value of an English Degree. In a recent report, graduates of English were as likely (if not more) to be in professional or managerial jobs three to three and a half years after graduation than graduates in other subjects (including science and social science subjects). Almost fifty percent of English graduates pursue further education within three years of graduating from their undergraduate degree, often as a route to a professional career, such as teaching or law. Chances to expand your horizons During the semester, the department runs a number of lively literary seminars for students and staff alike, in which writers, staff members, postgraduate students and distinguished visiting scholars give papers on their work and special interests. We are fortunate in that the macrobert Arts Centre is at the centre of the University, presenting a widely varied programme of film, drama and music throughout the year. Small magazines are published on campus and the Literary Society organises visits from distinguished creative writers each year, along with theatre trips to Glasgow and Edinburgh. Finally, the University Drama Society is very active, producing about seven plays a year, including performances at the Edinburgh Festival. Where are our graduates now? In a recent report, graduates of English were as likely (if not more) to be in professional or managerial jobs three to three and a half years after graduation than graduates in other subjects (including science and social science subjects). Almost fifty percent of English graduates pursue further education within three years of graduating from their undergraduate degree, often as a route to a professional career, such as teaching or law. Here are a few examples of the sorts of careers graduates of this course have gone on to, in recent years: Teaching and Research Assistant Doctoral research Teaching Freelance content editor Photographer Journalist Completing a Master’s degree as a prelude to further academic research is an increasingly common pattern of study for young scholars and is a route encouraged by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC). [-]

MLitt in Philosophy

Campus Full time 1 year September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling

The St Andrews and Stirling Graduate Programme in Philosophy (SASP) is taught by the Philosophy departments in the Universities of St Andrews and Stirling. The philosophy graduate programmes of St Andrews and Stirling are now fully merged for all postgraduate degrees and together form Scotland’s premier centre for philosophy and one of the top philosophy institutions in the United Kingdom. [+]

The St Andrews and Stirling Graduate Programme in Philosophy (SASP) is taught by the Philosophy departments in the Universities of St Andrews and Stirling. The philosophy graduate programmes of St Andrews and Stirling are now fully merged for all postgraduate degrees and together form Scotland’s premier centre for philosophy and one of the top philosophy institutions in the United Kingdom. The programme maintains a staff of authoritative researchers that is large enough to teach a comprehensive and flexible range of graduate courses, and to supervise research projects. It offers graduate teaching at a level that matches the best graduate programmes elsewhere in the world, in a wide range of areas, including the history of philosophy. Course objectives The taught MLitt provides the foundation year of the programme. Modules are offered in three fundamental areas of philosophy: logic and metaphysics, moral and political philosophy, and history of philosophy. The degree is primarily designed as a preparatory year for entry to postgraduate work in philosophy. It provides a firm foundation of general understanding and skills in philosophy which will serve as a basis for sound philosophical research. Graduate students are taught in dedicated graduate classes. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements Applicants for the MLitt should normally have a good first degree in philosophy: a UK upper second class Honours degree or its equivalent (or the equivalent level of pass in the SASP Conversion Diploma). Applicants with other qualifications may be admitted on the recommendation of the Programme Director. English language requirements All SASP courses are taught in English. Applicants who are NOT native speakers AND whose undergraduate degree was NOT taught in English must submit a recognised English Language test. We normally require a TOEFL score of 600 (paper-based). 250 (computer-based), or 100 (internet-based). A copy of your TOEFL certificate will be sufficient. Alternatively an IELTS score of 7.00 is also acceptable/sufficient. (Ideally we prefer the IELTS exam.) The University of St Andrews offers pre-sessional English courses - you can find out more about them on the website of the St Andrews University English Language Teaching Centre. If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 7.0 with minimum 6.0 in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade B Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade A Pearson Test of English (Academic): 67 with a minimum of 55 in each component IBT TOEFL: 100 with no sub test lower than 20 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Structure and content The programme involves a one-year taught MLitt, delivered largely in St Andrews by staff from both universities, after which you may progress to a PhD within the SASP programme. The MLitt programme lasts for one year and involves six modules over two semesters and a dissertation written over the summer. The Diploma involves a nine-month, taught programme and requires satisfactory completion of all taught modules. In addition to a Research Methods module and two core modules (one in each semester) on current issues in Philosophy, the programme offers a range of options in the history of Philosophy and in special areas of philosophy. The core modules are: Current Issues in Philosophy I (first semester) and Current Issues in Philosophy II (second semester): Over the two semesters the following four components are covered by these modules (two in each semester, not necessarily in the order given): Philosophy of Mind; Philosophy of Language; Epistemology; Ethics Research Methods: You take this module in Semester 1. It provides an introduction to the methods and practice of research in philosophy. It will be run as a book seminar, where you present and discuss chapters or sections of a major work chosen to be accessible and challenging for MLitt students. The module will provide the experience of philosophising together: vital for philosophical development but liable to take second place in standard taught modules; it will also leave you better prepared to undertake larger and more autonomous research projects, beginning with the 15,000-word MLitt dissertation You are required to take a History module from a list of those available. Those recently available includes the following: Classical Philosophy Philosophers of the Scottish Enlightenment Kant Origins and History of Analytic Philosophy Option modules recently available include the following: Advanced logic Philosophy of Mathematics Philosophy of Perception Aesthetics Political Philosophy Topics in Recent Moral Theory Wittgenstein Philosophy of Mind Intuitions and Philosophical Methodology Advanced Epistemology Delivery and assessment The programme is taught by seminars (normally one two-hour seminar each week for each module) and individual supervision. Assessment is normally by coursework: each full module is assessed by two essays. To gain the Diploma, you must satisfactorily complete all the taught modules. To gain the MLitt, you must satisfactorily complete the taught modules and write a dissertation of no more than 15,000 words. Career opportunities Students on the MLitt have proceeded to the further study of Philosophy at PhD level. Some have remained within the SASP Graduate Programme, either at Stirling or at St Andrews, and others have gone on to leading institutions in the UK and abroad. A large number of former MLitt students have secured permanent university teaching positions. The general training in research and analytical thinking it offers also prepares you for a wide range of careers in various areas of public policy, public administration and governance. [-]

MLitt in Publishing Studies

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 27 months September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

The MLitt in Publishing Studies teaching course is devised, and continually updated, to reflect current publishing industry practice and standards. It produces graduates who will have an enhanced opportunity to succeed in publishing and publishing-related careers. The course is demanding, stimulating and enjoyable, and many publishers now consider it to be the equivalent of a year’s experience within a publishing company. Our graduates occupy senior positions in both commercial and not-for-profit publication organisations throughout the world. [+]

The Stirling Centre for International Publishing and Communication provides a comprehensive and coherent approach to all forms of publishing. The course covers the whole process of planning, editing, production, marketing and publication management in print and digital environments. It is dedicated to teaching the best current publishing practice, so the detailed content is updated each year as a result of the rapid changes that are transforming the industry worldwide. The MLitt in Publishing Studies teaching course is devised, and continually updated, to reflect current publishing industry practice and standards. It produces graduates who will have an enhanced opportunity to succeed in publishing and publishing-related careers. The course is demanding, stimulating and enjoyable, and many publishers now consider it to be the equivalent of a year’s experience within a publishing company. Our graduates occupy senior positions in both commercial and not-for-profit publication organisations throughout the world. The MLitt in Publishing offers: Strong publishing industry links and networks Enhanced publishing career pathways International environment with a student cohort from all around the world Intensive publishing research environment Course objectives In close contact with publishing businesses and the changing needs of the industry worldwide, the teaching team equips you with the qualities — intellectual and prac What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. INTO University of Stirling offers a Graduate Diploma for those students who do not meet the required criteria for this course. If you successfully complete the Graduate Diploma in Media, Humanities and Social Sciences and meet the required progression grades, you will be guaranteed entry onto year one of this Master's degree. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Scholarships & funding University of Stirling Postgraduate Merit Scholarship The University of Stirling is offering any UK or European Union student with a First Class Honours degree (or equivalent) a £2,000 scholarship to study full-time on any taught Master's course or £1,000 for part-time study. Structure and content The MLitt in Publishing Studies is a one-year, full-time course (two years, part-time) designed to enable students' career development in Publishing. In Semester 1, students take compulsory modules in Publishing Dynamics, Editorial Practice and Content Creation, Marketing Management and Communications, Skills Training for Publishing, and the Publishing Project. These modules offer a coherent introduction to the publishing and related industries, offering students a thorough grounding in contemporary publishing. Part-time students take the course over two years. As well as the content of the modules, students attend a regular series of Visiting Speakers, have the opportunity to attend industry events such as the Publishing Scotland conference and the London Book Fair, go on field trips to locations including a printer and a book distributor, and to undertake a variety of internships and work placements. Delivery and assessment The MLitt in Publishing Studies is delivered through interactive lectures, seminars, workshops (including sessions in the Publishing Computer Lab) and one-to-one teaching. Assessment is based on a range of practical and academic activities, including the creation of a physical publishing product (a book, magazine, e-book or app), marketing plans, presentations, and a dissertation. Students have opportunities to undertake work experience and internships, and to go on industry visits and field trips. There is also a weekly series of visiting speakers. Strengths The Stirling Centre for International Publishing and Communication was established in 1982 and has since developed a global reputation for its postgraduate degrees in publishing, its research activities, and its industry links. Focusing on book, magazine, journal and digital publishing, the Centre trains the publishers of the future, provides opportunities for those currently working in the industry to reflect on their professional practice, and through its research, critically analyses the past, present and future of the publishing. The Centre undertakes a range of staff and student research activities, including collaborations with industry, publishing-related organisations and other Universities. We focus on the history of the book and publishing studies in the 20th and 21st centuries, both in Scotland, the UK and globally, including digital publishing, graphic novels and games, contemporary literary publishing, children’s publishing literary awards and book festivals. Our work has been funded by a number of funders including the AHRC, RSE, British Council, Nesta, and Creative Scotland, working with partners including Glasgow Life, the Saltire Society and Publishing Scotland. Career opportunities The Stirling Centre for International Publishing and Communication has over 30 years of graduates now working in the publishing and related industries. Entry level jobs our students have gone into in recent years include: Publicity Assistant, Canongate Publicity Assistant, Faber & Faber Marketing Assistant, Taylor & Francis Events & Marketing Assistant, The Bookseller Sales & Marketing Assistant, McGraw Hill Production Assistant, Oxford University Press Editorial Assistant, Oxford University Press Production Editor, Cicerone Press Publishing Assistant, Cengage Learning Web editor, Digital Publishing Department, China Social Sciences Press Foreign Rights Specialist, Suncolor Publishing Group Web Editor, BooksfromScotland.com Some of our alumni who have worked in the publishing industry have gone onto the following job roles: Group Sales Director and President (Asia Region), Taylor & Francis Chief Executive, Publishing Scotland Managing Editor, Little Island Books Higher Education Texts and eBook Sales Manager, Taylor and Francis (Asia Pacific) Director, World Book Day Production Editor, Taylor & Francis Founder and Publisher, Tapsalteerie and Lumphanan Press Employability The MLitt in Publishing Studies is built around developing and enhancing publishing careers for its students. The focus of the modules is on building skills and understanding of the contemporary publishing industry, with constantly updated content and access to industry expertise. All students have the opportunity to undertake work placements, with host organisations in recent years including: Alban Books Barrington Stoke Bloody Scotland International Crime Writing Festival Canongate Books Fledgling Press Floris Books Freight Books HarperCollins Luath Press Octopus Books Oxford University Press Saraband Books Tern Digital Industry connections The Centre is supported by an Industry Advisory Board, with members from Floris Books, Freight Books, Publishing Scotland, Oxford University Press and Taylor & Francis. Further industry support is provided by our regular visiting speaker series, and the internships and work placements provided for our students. The Centre is a Network Member of Publishing Scotland. [-]

MLitt in The Gothic Imagination

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 27 months September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

The MLitt in The Gothic Imagination at the University of Stirling provides students with the unique opportunity to steep themselves in the scholarly appreciation of this mode, providing a rigorous and intensive historical survey of its literary origins and developments, and charting its dispersal across a broad range of media and national contexts. [+]

Contemporary culture is characterised by nothing if not a reawakened interest in the Gothic, be that in the form of the current vogue for horror film, in the heightened preoccupation with terror and monstrosity in the media, the extraordinary success of writers such as Stephen King and Stephenie Meyer, or in manifestations of an alternative Gothic impulse in fashion, music and lifestyle. As the countless adaptations and retellings of texts such as Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (1818; 1831) and Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1897) in our own day attest, the Gothic, though once relegated to a dark corner of literary history, has assumed a position of considerable cultural prominence. The MLitt in The Gothic Imagination at the University of Stirling provides students with the unique opportunity to steep themselves in the scholarly appreciation of this mode, providing a rigorous and intensive historical survey of its literary origins and developments, and charting its dispersal across a broad range of media and national contexts. In so doing, the course equips its graduates with the necessary theoretical vocabulary to address, and critically reflect upon, the Gothic as a complex and multi-faceted cultural phenomenon, while also preparing them for further postgraduate research in the rich and vibrant field of Gothic Studies. In addition to these subject-specific objectives, the MLitt in The Gothic Imagination also provides its graduates with several invaluable transferable skills, including critical thinking, theoretical conceptualisation, historical periodization and independent research. Course objectives The MLitt in the Gothic Imagination consists of four core modules, two option modules, and a dissertation. Across these components, the course aims to provide students with a rigorous grounding in the work and thematic preoccupations of the most influential Gothic writers, both historical and contemporary. Supplemented by relevant historical and theoretical material throughout, the course aims to provide as rich and varied an exposure to the academic study of the Gothic as possible. The first two core modules seek to provide a searching historical overview of the genesis and development of the Gothic aesthetic, taking students systematically from the circulation of the term ‘Gothic’ in the political and aesthetic discourses of the late seventeeth and eighteenth centuries, through the late eighteenth-century writings of Horace Walpole, Ann Radcliffe, Matthew Lewis and Charlotte Dacre, and into the nineteenth-century fictions of writers such as Charles Maturin, Mary Shelley, Charles Dickens, the Brontës, Sheridan Le Fanu, Robert Louis Stevenson, Bram Stoker and Oscar Wilde. The second and third core modules, on Gothic in modern, modernist and postmodern writing, include texts by authors such as Gaston Leroux, Algernon Blackwood, H.P. Lovecraft, Djuna Barnes; Mervyn Peake, Shirley Jackson, Stephen King, Anne Rice, Joyce Carol Oates, Toni Morrison and Patrick McGrath. Option modules vary from year to year, depending on student interest and demand. Recent option topics have included the Gothic on the Romantic Stage; Nineteenth-century American Gothic; Transmutations of the Vampire; The Gothic in Children’s Literature; Monstrosity; The Female Gothic; Queer Gothic; and Gothic in/and Modern Horror Cinema. At the dissertation stage, students are encouraged to undertake independent, supervised research on any particular interest within Gothic studies that they might wish to pursue. Subject to the agreement of the course director, a creative writing dissertation may be undertaken at this stage. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. A sample of work (e.g. English Essay) is required. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Scholarships & funding University of Stirling Postgraduate Merit Scholarship The University of Stirling is offering any UK or European Union student with a First Class Honours degree (or equivalent) a £2,000 scholarship to study full-time on any taught Master's course or £1,000 for part-time study. Structure and content The teaching year at Stirling is divided into two semesters, which run from mid-September to late December, and from January to the end of May respectively. Both full-time and part-time students take four Gothic core modules over two semesters. For part-time students, these core modules are completed in year 1. The core modules in the Autumn semester are as follows: Early British Gothic, 1764-1820 (20 credits) and Victorian Gothic, 1820-1900 (20 credits). The core modules for the Spring semester are Twentieth-century British and American Gothic (20 credits) and Twenty-first-century Gothic (20 credits). In parallel with the core modules, students are required to take one optional module in each semester, each weighted at 20 credits. Part-time students take one optional module in each semester in the second year of study. In addition to allowing for the development of a range of subject-specific skills, these two optional modules are also designed to provide students with a rigorous training in research and employability skills. These modules vary depending on teaching staff, but in the past have included the following: American Gothic: An examination of the emergence and development of Gothic in 19th-century American fiction with particular attention to the ways in which these texts transform the optimistic narratives of the new American republic Gothic in Contemporary Film: An analysis of the ways in which Gothic tropes have been appropriated and reworked in a selection of contemporary films The Female Gothic: A study of selected contemporary texts as reworkings of the female Gothic tradition of Ann Radcliffe Transmutations of the Vampire: An investigation into the cultural significance of the vampire over the past 50 years The most significant piece of work on the course will be a dissertation of 15,000 words, written during the summer, on a subject of your choosing, in consultation with a member of English Studies. You may choose to develop work initiated on one of the modules you have studied. Those who do not embark on the dissertation may be awarded a Diploma. The work of the best students completing the course may be deemed worthy of an MLitt with Distinction. Delivery and assessment Two hours of seminars per module per week, plus individual consultations and supervisions with members of staff. Assessment is by means of a 4,000-word essay for each core module, and a variety of skills-based assessments (such as presentations; portfolios; blog-entries) for optional modules. All students complete a 15,000-word dissertation on a topic of their choice once optional and core modules have been completed. Strengths The MLitt in The Gothic Imagination at the University of Stirling is one of the few taught Master's degree courses worldwide that is devoted exclusively to the academic study of the dynamic, ever-expanding field of the Gothic. While aspects of the Gothic feature prominently on undergraduate and graduate university curricula across the globe, the MLitt in The Gothic Imagination at Stirling is unique in the advanced levels of specialisation and expertise with which it equips its graduates. Long acknowledged as a centre of excellence for the study of the Gothic aesthetic worldwide, the division of English Studies at Stirling has historically been the home of leading Gothic scholars for the last two decades; students on the course thus have the opportunity to work closely with some of the leading researchers in the field. As recruitment patterns reveal, the MLitt in The Gothic Imagination enjoys a strong international reputation, and Stirling in the past has been proud to welcome students from as far afield as Argentina, Canada, Greece, Mexico, India, Indonesia, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, South Africa, Spain, Sweden and the USA. With high levels of choice and flexibility built into it, the course structure allows students to develop their own critical interests, though always under the specialist guidance of recognised experts in the broad and exciting field of Gothic Studies. Employability With course-work assessed solely by means of independently devised, researched and executed essays, the MLitt in The Gothic Imagination equips students with a number of the skills and abilities that are prized and actively sought after by employers across the private and public sectors. These include the ability to process and reflect critically upon cultural forms; the ability to organise, present and express ideas clearly and logically; the ability to understand complex theoretical ideas; and the ability to undertake extended independent research. Previous graduates of the course have gone on to pursue successful careers in such fields as teaching, publishing, research, academia, advertising, journalism and the film industry. The 15,000-word dissertation that is submitted towards the end of the course allows students to devise, develop, support and defend their own academic ideas across an extended piece of written work; addition to the skills of independence, organisation and expression fostered by this exercise, the dissertation also provides an excellent point of entry into more advanced forms of postgraduate research, including the Doctoral degree. [-]

MPP in Public Policy

Campus Full time Part time August 2017 United Kingdom Stirling

The Master’s in Public Policy (MPP) provides an advanced qualification in research and policy analysis. It allows you to develop the conceptual, analytical and practical skills required to flourish in the policymaking world, preparing you for a career in the public sector and vocations that make a contribution to the development or delivery of public policy. [+]

The Master’s in Public Policy (MPP) provides an advanced qualification in research and policy analysis. It allows you to develop the conceptual, analytical and practical skills required to flourish in the policymaking world, preparing you for a career in the public sector and vocations that make a contribution to the development or delivery of public policy. The course can also be used as a springboard for further postgraduate research and combines core modules in policy and policy-making with optional modules in social research and policy-relevant disciplines. If you want to use the degree to pursue research, to PhD level for example, you can take three modules in Applied Social Research. If you want to pursue an interest in other policy-relevant disciplines, you can combine a focus on policy and research with options in areas such as: law economics behavioural science social marketing energy environmental and international politics The course is designed to meet your specific, individual requirements and the course is delivered by small weekly group seminars, with dedicated contact with the course leader. You complete the course by producing a dissertation which applies intellectual rigour to a real world policy problem to equip the policymakers of the future. Additionally, there is some scope to take modules from the new MSc in Gender Studies. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. If you are interested in applying for the course please contact Professor Paul Cairney in the first instance - p.a.cairney@stir.ac.uk. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 56 in each component IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View our range of pre-sessional courses. Scholarships & funding The University of Stirling is offering any UK or European Union student with a First Class Honours degree (or equivalent) a £2,000 scholarship to study full-time on any taught Master's course or £1,000 for part-time study. Structure and content The course (of 180 credits) combines core modules on Policy Theory and Practice with optional modules in Social Research and policy-relevant disciplines. Its core modules (45 credits) focus on multi-level policymaking, identifying the responsibilities and policies of local, devolved, national and international decision-makers. We then identify the concepts, models and theories used to study policy and policymaking, comparing theories in political science with a range of policy-relevant disciplines (including economics, communication, psychology, management and social marketing). We also combine theory and practice by inviting a range of policy actors to give guest seminars as part of the core modules. You can choose up to five 15-credit modules in Applied Social Research (ASR), including Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis, Research Design and the Philosophy of Science. You can choose two 15-credit modules in law, economics, behavioural science, social marketing, gender studies, energy, environmental and international politics. If appropriate, you can also choose to replace some ASR modules with research methods modules in your chosen subject (such as the Gender Studies course ‘Feminist Research’ which is a prerequisite for its Research Placement module). The norm is to maintain a generally high level of contact between students engaged in the MPP and a small cohort of staff (teaching core and common ASR courses), but with the flexibility to take your own path. You complete the course by producing a 60-credit dissertation (around 12,000 words) which applies intellectual rigour to a real world policy problem. You will have the option to pursue a placement with a relevant organisation to allow you to tailor your research to a policymaker or policy influencer audience. Delivery and assessment The core modules are delivered in weekly seminars and the assessment is one piece of coursework. The 15-credit module titled ‘How Does the Policy Process Work’ includes a two-hour seminar per week and 3,000 word report. The 30-credit ‘Policymaking: Theories and Approaches’ has two two-hour seminars per week (combining weekly political science theory discussions with weekly guest seminars from practitioners and other policy-relevant disciplines) and a 5,000-word report. Most ASR modules are delivered in a series of half-day, one-day or three-day blocks and involve coursework from 3,000-4,000 words. Most policy-relevant options follow the core module format of the core modules – weekly seminars and one piece of coursework. Modes of study Teaching methods are designed for each module to facilitate your acquisition of skills and progressive development. You are expected to participate in seminars, computer-based workshops and group work. Students experience a range of different forms of assessment across the taught modules. These include essays, critical review essays, book reviews, research proposals, a computer lab-based assessment for quantitative data analysis, group project reports and the research dissertation. There are no examinations. Strengths We have built up a wide range of connections with organisations in the public, private and third sectors. These can be used not only to pursue your placement-based coursework but also build your own personal networks. Academic strengths The course is run by Professor Paul Cairney, a specialist in public policy research. Paul will run both core modules, coordinate course choices and supervise the dissertations most relevant to his field. The Applied Social Research component is provided by the Faculty of Social Science, which is an ESRC-recognised postgraduate research training centre. 95 percent of its research was deemed ‘internationally excellent’ in the most recent Research Assessment Exercise and it received the highest possible score in the most recent teaching quality exercise. Career opportunities The course combines subject-specific knowledge of the policy process with transferable skills in research and analysis. These are the skills required to flourish in a range of organisations in the public, private and third sectors. It prepares students for a career in the public sector and vocations that make a contribution to the development or delivery of public policy. It is also flexible enough to allow students to continue their postgraduate studies. Although the MPP is new, it builds on successful courses taught by the Faculty of Social Sciences. Over the past five years, over half of the graduates from the MSc Applied Social Research course have entered social research-related careers in the public, voluntary and private sectors, including a manager commissioning research for a local authority, a research fellow at a university and a senior research executive for a European-wide commercial research organisation. Over one-third of its graduates continues with academic study and undertake a PhD. Employability The course combines subject-specific knowledge of the policy process with transferable skills in research and analysis. These are the skills required to flourish in a range of organisations in the public, private and third sectors. It prepares students for a career in the public sector and vocations that make a contribution to the development or delivery of public policy. It is also flexible enough to allow students to continue their postgraduate studies. Although the MPP is new, it builds on successful courses provided by the Faculty of Social Sciences. Over the past five years, over half of the graduates from the MSc Applied Social Research have entered social research-related careers in the public, voluntary and private sectors, including a manager commissioning research for a local authority, a research fellow at a university and a senior research executive for a European-wide commercial research organisation. Over one-third of its graduates continues with academic study and undertake a PhD. [-]

MRes in Applied Social Research

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 30 months January 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

The Master’s in Applied Social Research gives graduates the ideal preparation for undertaking social research and evaluation. There is a core of four shared modules in generic research skills, plus specialist disciplinary modules and a range of options. They combine high quality with flexibility and choice for students. [+]

The Master’s in Applied Social Research gives graduates the ideal preparation for undertaking social research and evaluation. There is a core of four shared modules in generic research skills, plus specialist disciplinary modules and a range of options. They combine high quality with flexibility and choice for students. Recognition The course has been recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as meeting its requirements for postgraduate research training. Fully funded places are available through the ESRC, details can be found on the pages of the Scottish Graduate School of Social Science website. Course objectives Provide you with the skills and knowledge base required to collect, analyse and report qualitative and quantitative data, taking account of ethics, reliability and validity Enable you to examine critically the theoretical foundations that underpin social scientific research Enable you to examine issues concerning comparative social research Develop your understanding of the relationship between research and policy, and the meanings of evaluation, its terminology, practice and use Provide you with the opportunity to tailor your programme with a choice of further research-based modules What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 56 in each component IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Structure and content The MRes/Postgraduate Diploma in Applied Social Research comprises four compulsory taught core modules, plus two other optional modules (from two available lists), and (for the MRes) a dissertation. The compulsory modules are: The Nature of Social Enquiry Research Design and Process Quantitative Data Analysis Qualitative Data Analysis You must also take two further modules from a list including the following: Comparative Social Research Research Placement Advanced Quantitative Data Analysis Policy Analysis and Evaluation Research Discourse Analysis Digital social research Social Statistics modules Gender Studies modules Policy Masters modules or other modules by arrangement with the Programme Director. In addition to the above modules, MRes students will complete the following: Research Dissertation: MRes students must undertake an original social science research study and complete a research dissertation with academic supervision Recent dissertation topics include: A Study of High Risk Behaviour Young People and National Identity Substance Use Prevalence and Looked-after Young People in Scotland Women’s Decisions about Returning to Work After Childbirth Delivery and assessment Teaching methods are designed for each module to facilitate your acquisition of skills and progressive development. You are expected to participate in lectures, seminars, tutorials, computer-based workshops, and group work. Full-time and part-time MRes/Diploma students experience a range of different forms of assessment across the compulsory taught modules. These include essays, critical review essays, book reviews, research proposals, presentations, a computer lab-based assessment for quantitative data analysis, and the research dissertation. There are no examinations. Career opportunities Employability an important focus of the course. Past graduates have entered social research-related careers in the public, voluntary and private sectors for example, commissioning research for local authorities, working on university research projects, and conducting research for charities and voluntary organisations. The course is suitable for those wishing to enhance their research practice in a current post. Others choose to continue their studies and undertake a PhD or Doctorate. The MRes offers a combination of high quality, flexibility and choice. Over the past five years, over half of our graduates have entered social research-related careers in the public, voluntary and private sectors, for example, a manager commissioning research for a local authority, a research fellow at a university and a senior research executive for a European-wide commercial research organisation. Over one third of our graduates continue with academic study and undertake a professional doctorate or PhD. [-]

MRes in Business and Management Research Methods

Campus Full time 1 year September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling

The MRes in Business and Management Research Methods is a specialised degree for those looking to develop the skills to conduct high quality research into business, management, organisations and related areas. Many take the MRes in preparation for undertaking a doctorate (or take MRes modules as part of their first year PhD training) but the skills developed on the MRes will also be invaluable to those looking to conduct, evaluate and commission research in non-academic settings (for example in consultancy, development and policy making roles). [+]

The MRes in Business and Management Research Methods is a specialised degree for those looking to develop the skills to conduct high quality research into business, management, organisations and related areas. Many take the MRes in preparation for undertaking a doctorate (or take MRes modules as part of their first year PhD training) but the skills developed on the MRes will also be invaluable to those looking to conduct, evaluate and commission research in non-academic settings (for example in consultancy, development and policy making roles). The emphasis is on producing researchers who are reflective and aware of the assumptions, strengths and limitations of their research; who are highly skilled in a multitude of management/organisational research techniques; and who are readily able to apply this knowledge in new and diverse domains. Whilst the programme provides specialist research training for those seeking academic careers employability is also key, with a strong practical focus. Accreditation The MRes in Business and Management Research Methods is accredited by the ESRC and the SGSS for training of PhD students. Top Reasons To Study With Us Accreditation — the course is accredited by the Economic & Social Research Council via the Scottish Graduate School of Social Science Develop high quality research skills – the course prepares students for study at doctorate level as well as research-based roles in business and the public sector Expert teaching team — the team publish regularly in major journals, have a strong track record of securing research funding and regularly advise governmental and policy bodies Stirling’s global research rating — we’re among the top 25 in the UK according to REF 2014 Build your global network — study alongside international students across a range of business disciplines Course objectives The MRes course in Business and Management Research Methods is aimed at students wanting to: Undertake doctoral research in business and management. Equip themselves for an academic or commercial career in business and management research. Undertake, evaluate, commission or manage research in the commercial, public, or voluntary sectors. Our philosophy is that postgraduate business and management students need the understanding and skills associated with high quality academic research. This approach applies equally to those who become either academic scholars or professional practitioners. This course also serves as a generic entry point for the Stirling Management School Doctoral Programme. The Stirling Management School is a member institution of the ESRC Scottish Doctoral Training Centre. It welcomes applications for +3 doctoral studentships in the following areas: Accounting and Finance and Business and Management. The MRes course provides you with broadly based, advanced research training that covers the social science research skills that are relevant for business, management, economic and policy research. On completion of the course students will: (a) Understand the ontological and epistemological basis of the various research approaches, their limitations and their implications for questions and design. (b) Be technically skilled in the use of qualitative, quantitative and experimental techniques and to collect and analyse data to an advanced level. (c) Have the transferable skills to apply this knowledge to the design, conduct and reporting of research projects. (d) Be able to critically analyse the methodologies used to conduct empirical research projects. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class honours degree or equivalent. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Scholarships & funding The MRes in Business and Management Research Methods is part of the application for the Doctoral Training Centre for Scotland by consortium of Scottish universities and replaces the prior recognition by the UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) under its 1+3 and +3 awards scheme. Under the Doctoral Training Scheme, UK students can apply to the ESRC for funded studentships that will cover fees and maintenance for the four-year programme (including the MRes), leading to the award of a PhD. Candidates from EU countries other than the UK are eligible to apply for a ‘fees only’ award. Further details of ESRC funding for postgraduates are available from: www.esrc.ac.uk Stirling Management School is committed to investing in academically talented students, enabling them to further their education with a reputable qualification from one of the many degree courses on offer at the University of Stirling. There are various categories of funding available to support the cost of your studies at the University of Stirling. Structure and content Stirling’s MRes in Business and Management Research Methods follows two taught semesters, which run from mid-September to late December, and from January until the end of May. Three modules are taken in each semester. After the Spring semester students undertake a dissertation over the summer months (see below). Students on the MRes in Business and Management Research Methods will start the semester at Stirling Management School with an intensive period of 'learning to learn' and teambuilding activities. This induction period (15th to 26th September) is introduced to enable students to develop new learning styles and understand the expectations that will be placed on them through an engaged and exploratory approach. Students will learn about themselves and their own interactional and learning styles. Students also learn about others and gain an appreciation of a diverse range of approaches to learning, along with cultural and individual differences. They will also discover more about the exciting year ahead, and what is expected of them. This induction period provides a foundation of activities to help students to fully integrate with the course and their fellow students so that they have the opportunity to gain the maximum out of the course and their interactions with others. The overall aim is for students to be fully engaged so that they are equipped to embark on the formal teaching course invigorated and committed to the journey ahead with newly developed intellectual, interactional and presentational skills. The taught content of the course furnishes students with expertise and skills across the whole range of techniques that are relevant for research in the areas of Business, Management and Organisations. Students learn the philosophical bases of research and how research questions may be developed and answered. The course then provides in depth coverage of quantitative, qualitative and experimental research methods, their uses and limitations and how they may be practically applied within research projects. The specific modules taken are: Autumn Semester Fundamentals and Philosophy of Management Research. Qualitative Methods for Management Research 1. Understanding and Using Statistics. Spring Semester Qualitative Methods for Management Research 2. Experiments for Decision making in Business and Policy. Survey Measurement and Analysis. Dissertation MRes students write a dissertation of up to 15,000 words on a topic approved in advance by the Course Director. The dissertation is the student’s chance to develop their own research questions and apply the methods they have learnt to their own research project. Students each have an expert supervisor for their dissertation who provides guidance and support throughout the process. The dissertation must be submitted within three months of completion of the taught course. The examiners may allow a dissertation which is considered unsatisfactory to be revised and submitted for re-assessment within a specified time period. Delivery and assessment Delivery takes the form of structured lectures, seminars and practicals that are supplemented by opportunities for independent learning and exploration. Assessment Assessment is by coursework, including written assignments and presentations, as well as the dissertation. Some modules also have an examination element (see detailed module descriptors). For the award of the Certificate - a student must complete at least 60 credits (3 modules), which must include the specified Certificate modules. For the award of the Diploma - a student must complete at least 120 SCQF credits (6 modules). For the award of the MRes - a student must successfully complete the Diploma programme and achieve a passing grade in the dissertation (at least 180 SCQF credits in total). Merit and Distinction- at the discretion of the Examination Board, exceptional candidates may be awarded the MRes or Diploma with Merit or Distinction if they perform at a suitable level across their modules and dissertation. Strengths The MRes in Business and Management Research Methods provides both a stand-alone Master of Research in Business and Management Research Methods and a programme of training for PhD researchers. It is part of a suite of very high prestige courses approved by the Economic and Social Research Council (the chief government sponsored agency that funds British-led economic and social research) for use in general research training of ESRC sponsored students undertaking PhD research. The course can be seen as equipping students for academic careers but it can also provide or enhance managers’ critical skills in both generating and evaluating the validity, reliability and limitations of evidence for decision making and implementation. Career opportunities The course is aimed at those who wish to embark on an academic or commercial career in business, management and related research. The course is also invaluable for those working in public policy areas who need to conduct, analyse and commission research. It also provides essential research training for those planning to study for a PhD. Employability Our students develop essential transferable skills, relevant to research. Skills include: critical thinking; analysis and interpretation of varied and complex data; making and supporting evidence based arguments; planning and implementing projects; self management; presentation skills; and self reflection. [-]

MRes in Criminological Research

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 30 months January 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

The course is suitable for applicants who see their future career in research, research management and commissioning or using research. Graduates are well equipped with the necessary competencies and knowledge to forge successful careers in the public, private and third sectors. With newly obtained skills in critical thinking, research methodologies, and analytical and communications skills.‌ [+]

The course is suitable for applicants who see their future career in research, research management and commissioning or using research. Graduates are well equipped with the necessary competencies and knowledge to forge successful careers in the public, private and third sectors. With newly obtained skills in critical thinking, research methodologies, and analytical and communications skills.‌ Recognition The course has been recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as meeting its requirements for postgraduate research training. Accreditation The course is recognised as research training by the ESRC for those who are studying or going on to study for a PhD (+3), and is also recognised by the ESRC for Master’s Course plus Research Studentship (1+3) purposes. MRes or MSc? Uniquely, we offer you the opportunity to graduate with an MRes or MSc Students undertaking the Master of Science or Master of Research follow the exact same pathways. The choice of award is designed to give students freedom in determining what outcome will suit their future aspirations. MSc Applied Social Research (Criminology) The Master of Science is the ideal preparation for social research and evaluation in criminal justice and criminology and will suit those who wish to pursue a career in academia and wish to use the MSc as a precursor to completing a PhD. MRes Criminological Research The Masters of Research is best suited for applicants who see their future career in research, research management and commissioning or using research. Course objectives The MRes Criminological Research provides training in the methods and approaches used in criminological research. The objectives are to: Provide you with the skills and knowledge base required to collect, analyse and report qualitative and quantitative data, taking account of ethics, reliability and validity Enable you to examine critically the theoretical foundations that underpin criminological and socio-legal research Enable you to examine issues concerning comparative criminological and socio-legal research Develop your understanding of the relationship between criminological research and policy, and the meanings of evaluation, its terminology, practice and use What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 56 in each component IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Delivery and assessment Teaching methods are designed for each module to facilitate your acquisition of skills and progressive development. You are expected to participate in lectures, seminars, tutorials, computer-based workshops and group work. Full-time and part-time MRes/Diploma students experience a range of different forms of assessment across the compulsory taught modules. These include essays, critical review essays, book reviews, research proposals, a computer lab-based assessment for quantitative data analysis and the research dissertation. There are no examinations. Students are responsible for proposing their own substantive research topic. The course Director and other academic staff will offer guidance on the feasibility of the project and methodologies used within it. A Supervisor is appointed for each dissertation and this member of staff will be able to lend support and their expert knowledge throughout the writing process. Career opportunities Our graduates are well equipped with the necessary competencies and knowledge to forge successful careers in the public, private and third sectors. With newly obtained skills in critical thinking, research methodologies, and analytical and communications skills, Stirling Criminology graduates are attractive to employers from a range of sectors. Recent graduates have gone on to pursue careers across the criminal justice system, joining organisations such as the Civil Service, the Crown Prosecution Service, Police Scotland and other services throughout the UK. Other graduates have steered their career towards academia, research management or gone on to do further study, such as the Applied Social Research (Doctorate) or PhD. Industry connections ‌‌‌The course is supported by staff from both the Scottish Centre for Crime and Justice Research (SCCJR) and Law. SCCJR hosts regular, state-of-the-art events to which students are invited. The Scottish Centre for Crime and Justice Research is a collaboration of several Scottish universities. It aims to produce excellent research and to develop excellent researchers so as to better the development of policy, practice and public debate about crime and justice. Though based in Scotland and determined to analyse and address crime and justice in Scotland, our work is international both in its influences and in its influence. We work for, with and through fellow academics, policymakers, practitioners and others involved with justice all over the world, believing that Scottish criminology and Scottish criminal justice has much to learn from and much to teach others. There are also strong links with the applied crime and criminal justice sector, including Police Scotland and the Scottish Prison Service. [-]

MRes in Educational Research

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 27 months September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

This innovative course prepares you for doctoral studies and a career in Educational Research through a series of taught modules and a dissertation. Under the expert guidance of a team of leading academics you will learn the skills of research, from conception through to design, methodology and data collection, to analysis, interpretation and dissemination. As part of the course you will engage closely with cutting edge research projects currently being undertaken by Education staff in the Faculty of Social Sciences. [+]

This innovative course prepares you for doctoral studies and a career in Educational Research through a series of taught modules and a dissertation. Under the expert guidance of a team of leading academics you will learn the skills of research, from conception through to design, methodology and data collection, to analysis, interpretation and dissemination. As part of the course you will engage closely with cutting edge research projects currently being undertaken by Education staff in the Faculty of Social Sciences. Accreditation The course has been recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council as meeting its requirements for postgraduate research training, and it now forms part of the recognised pathway in educational research for the Scottish Graduate School in the Social Sciences. Top Reasons To Study With Us You will be contributing to the overall research capacity in Education, thereby making a difference to practice and/or policy. You will gain a MRes from a Faculty whose Education programmes are ranked as one of the best in the UK You will be supported in developing the knowledge, skills and understanding of research by expert researchers in Education and the Social Sciences. You will be introduced to leading edge empirical and theoretical research in a multi-disciplinary and mutli-professional environment. You will have the benefits of a flexible programme that supports you through different stages of the research process. Course objectives The MRes is designed to equip you for a career in educational research or as preparation for doctoral study (as a 1 + 3 route to PhD). You will develop a range of research skills and will engage closely with current research projects in Education. The course will offer you: A structured taught course in educational research Excellent preparation for doctoral studies by research First-hand experience of current education research projects in the Faculty of Social Sciences The award of a Master’s degree A course recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) The Faculty of Social Sciences is committed to developing capable educational researchers as well as enabling you to improve your career prospects, employability is an important focus of this course. We aim to: Recruit people with a good degree in social sciences Enable you to undertake collaborative tasks and assignments Enable you to successfully undertake a viable research project, relevant to existing interests in Education, and to fulfil your aims and aspirations for your future doctoral studies or work What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 56 in each component IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Delivery and assessment The course is designed to meet the Economic and Social Research Council’s requirements for broad knowledge, practical skills and both generic and specific competencies in educational research. It comprises taught modules and a dissertation. The taught modules are delivered Education and Social Science experts from the Faculty of Social Sciences. Summative assessment for modules will be based on coursework and will be assessed through assignments approximately 3000 words in. length. Dissertation Students will be required to conduct a small piece of educational research and write this up as a 15,000-word dissertation to be completed during May to September (May to December for part-time students). Career opportunities The MRes in Education Research is designed to enhance the career prospects of researchers in education, training and related areas of work, and professionals requiring the capacity to understand and commission research in these fields. It is essential preparation for doctoral research in education and is recognised by Economic and Social Research Council as meeting its criteria for postgraduate research training that helps students improve their employability while acquiring core research skills. Employability is an important focus of this course, with the opportunity for a research placement offered to all MRes students. [-]

MRes in Historical Research

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

The Master's of Research in Historical Research is a one-year course that is research-oriented and allows specialisation in particular research areas. Students are allocated an individual supervisor to direct their independent study and plan the curriculum to reflect their interests and needs. Students should maintain regular contact with supervisors through email and an agreed schedule of meetings to discuss their work and review draft submissions. [+]

The Master's of Research in Historical Research is a one-year course that is research-oriented and allows specialisation in particular research areas. Students are allocated an individual supervisor to direct their independent study and plan the curriculum to reflect their interests and needs. Students should maintain regular contact with supervisors through email and an agreed schedule of meetings to discuss their work and review draft submissions. The Master's of Research (MRes) is designed to enable students to become well-trained historians and to demonstrate their fitness to undertake research to doctoral level at Stirling or other universities in Britain and overseas. Both are achieved through the completion of independent study modules, field seminars and skills training, under supervision. It is also possible to follow an Environmental History pathway and complete an MRes in Historical Research: Environmental History Students are allocated an individual supervisor to direct their independent study and plan the curriculum to reflect their interests and needs. Accreditation The MRes programme and all constituent modules are constructed in line with the University's academic procedures and are fully assessed and externally examined. The programme is recognised by both the Arts and Humanities Research Council and the Economic and Social Research Council both of whom have given PhD awards to outstanding Stirling graduates of the MRes. Course objectives This programme prepares you for further research: to co-ordinate the provision of additional or external skills training and to develop the application of research skills students will obtain practical experience of devising and applying a research method to interrogate primary sources qualitative and quantitative analyses the application of IT in information retrieval, especially bibliographical database software, communication skills, written and oral project design involving the conceptualisation of research questions and the presentation of data and data analysis What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. Research proposal required (1,500 word maximum). English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 56 in each component IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20 Scholarships & funding University of Stirling Postgraduate Merit Scholarship The University of Stirling is offering any UK or European Union student with a First Class Honours degree (or equivalent) a £2,000 scholarship to study full-time on any taught Master's course or £1,000 for part-time study. If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Structure and content The Master of Research in Historical Research is a one-year programme that is research-oriented and allows specialisation in particular research areas. Students are allocated an individual supervisor to direct their independent study and plan the curriculum to reflect their interests and needs. Students should maintain regular contact with supervisors through email and an agreed schedule of meetings to discuss their work and review draft submissions. Historiography: Students taking the MRes undertake independent study of the historical literature of a chosen field. Coursework comprises a 10,000-word paper that critically reviews historians' works and identifies a topic suitable for original research in a dissertation (module 4 below). There are no classes; one-to-one supervisory sessions are scheduled at mutually convenient times. Research Skills Training: Students plan a personal itinerary, with direction, that entails attendance at events organised by the Stirling Graduate School and Stirling historians through training modules. Sessions include personal development and career planning, making grant applications, undertaking qualitative and quantitative analyses and database management. An intensive, one-week programme covers history-specific related discipline skills including historical approaches, documentary editing, palaeography, and using biographical sources. Extra classes in languages can be arranged. Students attend History research seminars and present a short working paper at the History postgraduate symposium in June. Coursework involves the preparation of a research bibliography for the dissertation and due performance at skills workshops. Sources and Methods: Students discuss with their supervisor how to apply and develop their research skills. This may entail further training, such as in languages or palaeography, or attendance at external courses on relational database construction or social theory. Students also examine a body of sources related to their research topic, and practice the methods that they have been learning. Coursework comprises: a 5,000-word paper explaining the research 'value' and significance of the selected sources and setting out the appropriate concepts, theories and methods to be used in analysis and interpretation; and a skills test based on methods and sources. Dissertation: Having researched the existing secondary literature and the primary sources, and having received training in appropriate research skills, students now go on to complete a dissertation of up to 20,000 words. Delivery and assessment Delivery is primarily through one to one sessions with the member of staff who will supervise your dissertation and provide direct feedback on Historiography and Sources and Methods. Training and skills elements are planned in discussion with your supervisor and these will comprise activities in four areas: generic skills; employability skills' breadth of knowledge, subject-specific skills. Students must attend the one-week programme and history and related discipline skills in early December and must give a short paper on their own research at the Stirling postgraduate conference in early June. Modes of study The Master's of Research in Historical Research is a one-year taught programme that is research-oriented and allows specialisation in particular research areas. Students are allocated an individual supervisor to direct their independent study and plan the curriculum to reflect their interests and needs. Students should maintain regular contact with supervisors through email and an agreed schedule of meetings to discuss their work and review draft submissions. Study abroad opportunities A significant proportion of our graduates continue their studies abroad, mainly in the USA. Students who have undertaken the MRes have been successful in securing external funding to help their research abroad. Chris Minty, who graduated from the MRes in 2011 and was awarded a PhD from Stirling in 2015 was awarded two prestigious Fellowships. They were the William A. Dearborn Fellowship in American History, Houghton Library, Harvard University, and a Robert L. Middlekauff Fellowship at the Huntington Library. Chris also held a number of other fellowships: Larry J. Hackman Research Residency, New York State Archives, 2012-2013 Eccles Centre Fellowship, British Library Gilder Lehrman Fellowship, John D. Rockefeller, Jr. Library, Colonial Williamsburg Foundation Jacob M. Price Short-Term Visiting Fellowship, William L. Clements Library, University of Michigan United Empire Loyalists Association of Canada Scholarship for 2012-2014 Career opportunities The MRes has been designed with three career destinations in mind: to prepare graduate students for further research at doctoral level as a route to an academic career as a higher degree in its own right The MRes will also enhance continuing professional development, particularly in teaching, journalism, marketing, and heritage management through in-depth study of particular fields; by aiming to develop critical analytical skills and research techniques, the programme provides preparation for a wide variety of research-based careers in the public and private sectors. Most of our graduates go on to study for a PhD either by continuing at Stirling or at another University in the UK, Europe or North America. Recent graduates have secured posts in firms and institutions as varied as Historic Scotland, Sea World, and the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl). Chances to expand your horizons There is a lively series of guest lectures which students can attend on this programme. Where are our graduates now? The MRes has been designed with three career destinations in mind: to prepare graduate students for further research at doctoral level and as a route to an academic career as a higher degree in its own right to enhance continuing professional development, particularly in teaching, journalism, marketing, and heritage management through in-depth study of particular fields; by aiming to develop critical analytical skills and research techniques, the programme provides preparation for a wide variety of research-based careers in the public and private sectors Employability Skills you can develop through this programme command of a substantial body of historical knowledge understand how people have existed, acted and thought in the context of the past read and use texts and other source materials critically and empathetically appreciate the complexity and diversity of situations, events and past mentalities recognise there are ways of testing statements and that there are rules of evidence which require integrity and maturity reflect critically on the nature and theoretical underpinnings of the discipline marshal an argument, be self-disciplined and independent intellectually express themselves orally and in writing with coherence, clarity and fluency gather, organise and deploy evidence, data and information analyse and solve problems use effectively ICT, information retrieval and presentation skills exercise self-discipline, self-direction and initiative work with others and have respect for others’ reasoned views show empathy and imaginative insight prepare for further academic research such as a Phd In addition, our students have the opportunity to further develop their transferable skills through voluntary internships working on collections of material held within the Division (The Scottish Political Archive and the University's own archive (e.g. UNESCO recognised Royal Scottish National Institution for mentally disabled children). 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MRes in Humanities

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

The MRes in Humanities is a research preparation Master's programme that offers students the opportunity for Master's study within Arts and Humanities, structured according to personal research interests that are either wholly of one's own design or structured through one of three specified pathways. [+]

The MRes in Humanities is a research preparation Master's programme that offers students the opportunity for Master's study within Arts and Humanities, structured according to personal research interests that are either wholly of one's own design or structured through one of three specified pathways: Hermeneutics Religion and Politics Cultural Representation of Spain and Latin America. It also offers the opportunity to prepare for a PhD through concentrated research in an interdisciplinary environment. Top Reasons To Study With Us You will be taught by experienced staff who are leading experts in their fields. Flexibility in the programme enhances your own independent research in your own areas of interest across disciplines. All contributing staff are engaged in on-going research at the forefront of their disciplines, and are the authors of numerous books, articles and studies on a wide range of relevant subjects. You will be part of a thriving academic community that includes a rich research culture and seminar programmes of visiting academics and industry speakers. You will develop skills that become immensely transferable in a market awaiting competent and innovative thinkers and leaders. Course objectives The MRes offers you the opportunity to pursue a personalised, tailor-made programme of Master’s study in a structured, interdisciplinary, and research-driven environment. Even within the specified pathways, much latitude is provided for your own individual pursuits in each of the areas. The programme is designed to enable you to become a well-trained researcher in a Humanities subject area, showing strong capacity for self-directed work and initiative. Should you wish to do a PhD, the programme enables you to demonstrate fitness in undertaking doctoral research. But it also qualifies you with specialised expertise at the postgraduate level for a professional career within a wide range of employment areas. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Scholarships & funding The University of Stirling is offering any UK or European Union student with a First Class Honours degree (or equivalent) a £2,000 scholarship to study full-time on any taught Master's course or £1,000 for part-time study. Structure and content The MRes in Humanities offers two tracks: a bespoke research track, in which students develop, in conjunction with their supervisor(s), their own research agenda from beginning to end; and a specified pathway with a taught element in Semester 1 (in either Hermeneutics, Religion and Politics, or Cultural Representation of Spain and Latin America), which then leads to personalising the respective areas of interest in the remainder of the course. The programme follows two semesters - which run from mid-September to late December and from January to the end of May - and a summer period for dissertation writing. The first track of personalised research is composed of the following elements: Research Preparation: A tailor-made programme of study in Semester 1 taught by at least five individual supervisions, on a subject of your choice agreed with the subject areas concerned. This may involve interdisciplinary supervision across subject areas where appropriate. The module allows students to begin work on a topic of particular significance to them personally, one that is cognate to but not identical with their subsequent dissertation. It is assessed by a written assignment of 5,000-6,000 words. Dissertation Preparation: Taken in Semester 2, this module consists in developing the theme and outline for the dissertation itself, which may include a detailed outline of the proposed argument, a literature review or an extended relevant book review, a description or proposal for the application of a methodological framework, or some combination thereof, depending upon the exact nature or the research in question. It will be supervised by the same member of staff whose expertise correlates with the research interest in Module 3. The module will feature a structure of five supervisions and one written assessment. The written assessment will be tailored to the student’s proposed dissertation focus in consultation with the supervisor(s). Research Skills: Our innovative Arts Graduate Training for graduates, which stretches over both semesters, enables students to build up a portfolio of skills that prepare them for academic and professional life. The portfolio is adaptable to individual experience and requirements, and as such covers basic skills (e.g. presentation, bibliography, specific research methods, library research), employability skills (e.g. teaching experience, marking student work, career development event, broaden language knowledge), breadth of knowledge (e.g. conference attention, reading participation group, prepare essay of presentation on a topic beyond own research). You will work with your supervisor(s) to select tasks from a menu of activities relevant to your future ambitions and their necessary qualifications. Dissertation: Subject to successful completion of all elements of the assessment in both Semesters 1 and 2, you will embark on an in-depth dissertation exploring the research topic of your choice, as agreed by and with your supervisor(s), thus building upon the tailor-made tuition or specified pathway. Where feasible, you will be encouraged to present your theme at an appropriate forum such as a Postgraduate conference. The second track of a specified pathway is the same as the first track above, except that it replaces the Semester 1 Research Preparation module with the following: Specified Pathway: A subject-specific module of study in Semester 1, in a weekly, two-hour seminar format, on one of three possible areas: Hermeneutics, Religion and Politics, or Cultural Representation of Spain and Latin America. The module allows students to begin work on a topic with particular focus that can then be personalised in the subsequent semester’s module and in the dissertation. It is assessed by one written essay of 5-6,000 words. The content and concerns for each of the pathways are as follows: Hermeneutics: This pathway deals with key primary texts in the hermeneutical tradition, beginning with the ancient Greeks, and ending with contemporary theory and a play directly to do with questions of interpretation. Principal emphasis, however, will be on modern and late modern theorists. The seminars will cover texts related to history, philosophy, theology and religion, literary criticism, feminism, postcolonialism and theatre. It will be interdisciplinary in scope, therefore, but will be grounded in matters that pertain directly to interpretation and how it is to be understood and theorised. All texts are primary sources, so as to encourage students to interpret and analyse directly from original material, and to address the challenges that reading such demanding texts requires. This is a unique set of seminars covering a vital area rarely taught, if at all, anywhere else. Religion and Politics: This pathway is formulated on the critical assumption that discourses on religion and politics are not timeless, neutral or disinterested, but have emerged in a specific, colonial-oriented context and are therefore intimately related to the power formations of capitalism, becoming integral to contemporary understandings of modernity. By engaging with particular aspects of colonial and postcolonial history and theory in different regions of the world, the seminars seek to enable a critique of these discourses, which will in turn enable a better understanding of the global dynamics of conflict in the contemporary world, including manifestations of neo-colonial power. Engaging in this pathway will allow students to explore in a concentrated form newer approaches to questions of both religion and politics than encountered in the past. Cultural Representations of Spain and Latin America: This pathway offers you the opportunity to study in a comparative and methodologically interdisciplinary framework how Spanish and Latin American cultures are represented through different periods, expressive forms and media. It comprises selected aspects of Spanish and Latin American Studies as embedded in the theoretical debate of cultural representation. The seminars will deepen your understanding of methodological approaches to the fields by focussing upon history, language, literature and visual cultural practices. A long shared past, converging traditions and a common language connect Spain and Spanish-speaking America, but through the broad spectrum of these manifestations it also becomes apparent that there are considerable, perceived differences and cultural diversities between Spanish and Latin American cultures. In this pathway you will study these complex interrelations as they characterise and combine different forms of cultural representation. Delivery and assessment You will attend individual supervisory sessions and/or weekly seminars (specified pathway). The research skills training will provide opportunities for various different learning environments, including Divisional and Faculty seminars, Graduate School workshops, off-campus visits, etc. In addition, students are entitled to take existing advanced level (level 10 or 11) tuition in the subject areas concerned and/or to undertake language tuition at all levels in French and Spanish, or in earlier varieties of English (Old and Middle English), if appropriate. Assessment will include essays, reports (which may take the form of written documents, websites or PowerPoint presentations, depending in your particular research interest), and a research skills portfolio that includes personal reflection. At the end of the second semester, if and where possible, we encourage you to give a presentation of your intended dissertation to an appropriate forum such as a conference or workshop. Strengths In the most recent Research Assessment Exercise, around half of the research submitted from the subject areas that now make up the Faculty of Arts and Humanities was judged to be world-leading or internationally excellent in quality, with over 10% of that research placed in the highest (world-leading) category. 85% of the assessed research from the Arts and Humanities was judged to be recognised internationally. Career opportunities Skills you can develop through this programme If an academic career in teaching and research seems like an alluring prospect, this degree will help you to gain the skills for future research work at the doctoral level and give you necessary training in and insight into the research environment of Higher Education. But even if academia is not your professional goal, this MRes or Postgraduate Certificate, with its strong interdisciplinary emphasis, opens up a wide range of fascinating and exciting career possibilities. The skills you will develop here – including close critical analysis of texts and ideas, synthetic thinking that allows you to transfer a set of concepts from one framework or context to another, close reading and dissection of several different discourses, the expression of your ideas in lucid writing and argumentation – become immensely transferable in a market awaiting highly competent and highly innovative thinkers and leaders. Where are our graduates now Students who have graduated from this degree have emerged highly qualified for employment in manifold areas, including the public sector, the voluntary sector, the civil service, the foreign office, non-governmental organisations, international relations, primary and secondary teaching, journalism, the civil service and publishing, the media, the arts, and in many other professional fields and positions well-suited to the training and knowledge gained in the programme. Employability The MRes in Humanities is a research preparation Master’s course that offers students the opportunity for Master’s study within Arts and Humanities, structured according to personal research interests that are either wholly of one’s own design or structured through one of three specified pathways: Hermeneutics, Religion and Politics, and Cultural Representation of Spain and Latin America. It also offers the opportunity to prepare for a PhD through concentrated research in an interdisciplinary environment. [-]

MRes in Media Research

Campus Full time 1 year September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling

The Master’s degree in Media Research, which can also provide the first year of the doctoral course, is designed to give you the necessary skills to carry out advanced interdisciplinary research in the broad field of media studies. [+]

Our graduate media studies Master's award, Media Research (MRes), has an illustrious background, and with our other degrees has received awards. 1st in Scotland for research in Communication, Cultural and Media Studies (most recent Research Assessment Exercise) 1st in Scotland for Communications and Media (The Independent Complete University Guide, 2011, and The Guardian University Guide, 2011) The Master’s degree in Media Research, which can also provide the first year of the doctoral course, is designed to give you the necessary skills to carry out advanced interdisciplinary research in the broad field of media studies. Course objectives A suite of MRes courses has been developed concurrently by six subject areas: Applied Social Science, Education, Communications, Media and Culture, Management, Nursing, Midwifery and Health and Sports Studies. These courses have a shared core of four modules in generic research skills, plus specialist disciplinary modules and a range of options. They combine high quality with flexibility and choice for students. Employability is another important focus, with the opportunity for a research placement offered to all MRes students. This course is designed to provide a basic but extensive training in media research methods. The training provided is multidisciplinary, covering social sciences and humanities approaches. Ideal candidates are those looking for employment in the media for which research training is seen as valuable, as well as those intending to pursue academic careers in the field. The course: Provides a structured analysis of established practices in film and media studies research Offers a critical overview of the intellectual frameworks that inform media research to enable you to develop your own approach to researching media institutions, texts and audiences Encourages you to explore your personal research interests and support the development of original enquiry through student-centred teaching and assessment What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 56 in each component IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Scholarships & funding The University of Stirling is offering any UK or European Union student with a First Class Honours degree (or equivalent) a £2,000 scholarship to study full-time on any taught Masters course or £1,000 for part-time study. Delivery and assessment The course involves lectures, seminars, tutorials, a research project and case study work. Assessment is by means of coursework as specified for each module and includes essays, a literature review, a research report, a seminar presentation and a media text. A dissertation proposal must be submitted by the beginning of the Spring Semester when supervisors are allocated (you will be expected to stay within the areas of current staff interest and expertise). Each dissertation is approximately 12,000 words in length and may take the form of a written publishable academic article or a project report, depending on its focus. Research interests Research interests in Communications, Media and Culture currently include: film theory and analysis; television studies; creative industries and cultural policy; media economics and regulation; digital media and activism; journalism; political communication; sport and the media; public relations; national identity and globalisation; representations of gender and ethnicity; celebrity culture; new media and intellectual property and other aspects of media and popular culture. Employability The MRes provides students with both theoretical and practical knowledge of social science research methods and an ability to apply these to the study of the media. The degree is primarily targeted at students needing research training prior to registration for a higher research degree, such as a PhD. The course also offers an excellent grounding in social science methods which are transferable to media research for industry, marketing and advertising research, production research and wider aspects of social research consultancy. Former graduates have successfully developed careers as academic researchers and a range of media industry related careers. Industry connections The Division of Communications, Media and Culture actively supports and encourages its staff to engage with a wider non-HEI audience for its research evidenced through contributions to policy fora, funded research for government agencies, collaborative work with NGO’s, engagement with the trade associations, unions and institutes of communications, media and culture professionals, active dialogue and contributions to media organisations across the spectrum of broadcasting, the press, film and the Internet, professional contributions to charities and pressure groups in relation to public media issues and policies, and a range of cultural heritage activities at national and international film festivals and exhibitions. [-]

MRes in Renaissance Studies

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 27 months September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

The MRes Renaissance Studies is aimed at those who are interested in the literary and broader cultural aspects of the Renaissance and who wish to acquire a more specialised knowledge of this field. A primary objective is to investigate factors that contribute to the distinctiveness of the cultural productions of Northern Europe, including Scotland. [+]

Suspended for 2016/17 entry The MRes Renaissance Studies is aimed at those who are interested in the literary and broader cultural aspects of the Renaissance and who wish to acquire a more specialised knowledge of this field. A primary objective is to investigate factors that contribute to the distinctiveness of the cultural productions of Northern Europe, including Scotland. Course objectives The research-based MRes course aims to: Introduce you to key areas of critical debate in Renaissance Studies by comparing different canonical accounts of the period Explore the distinctiveness of northern Renaissance culture, including Scotland. Develop a critical understanding of the variety of genres, media and signifying practices employed by Renaissance writers and visual artists Equip you with the technical skills necessary for conducting research in this field, presenting information and constructing scholarly arguments What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. A sample of work (e.g. English Essay) is required. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 56 in each component IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View our range of pre-sessional courses. Scholarships & funding University of Stirling Postgraduate Merit Scholarship The University of Stirling is offering any UK or European Union student with a First Class Honours degree (or equivalent) a £2,000 scholarship to study full-time on any taught Master's course or £1,000 for part-time study. Structure and content The core of this MRes course is a sustained period of independent study, assessed by coursework over two semesters. This involves a course of directed reading and research, to be agreed by each individual student with his/her supervisor, and tailored to his/her interests. In addition, students take two taught modules from a menu including: Politics and Renaissance Drama: Shakespeare and His Contemporaries Renaissance Sovereignty: Politics and Representation Writing and National Identity Please note that not all these optional modules may be offered in each academic year. Arts Research Training Our innovative training for graduates enables students to build up a portfolio of skills that prepare them for academic and professional life. All graduate students will work with their supervisors to select what’s right for them from a menu of activities. Each student will build up a portfolio of skills every year. On a taught postgraduate degree, you may be given specific guidance on what activities you need to undertake for those qualifications. Dissertation The most significant piece of work on the course will be a dissertation of 15,000 words on a subject of your choosing in consultation with a member of English Studies. You may choose to develop work initiated on one of the modules you have studied. Those who do not embark on the dissertation may be awarded a Diploma. Career opportunities Completing a Master’s degree as a prelude to further academic research is a route encouraged by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC). Advanced education in the Arts and the practical experience of research and the production of a dissertation are significant transferable skills for many careers. [-]

MRes in Translation Studies

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 27 months September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

A postgraduate degree in Translation Studies is of the highest value. Not only will it equip you with professional level translation skills in international dialogues, enabling you to play your part in developing a global community, it will also give you an opportunity to fine-tune your communication skills and awareness of the wide range of challenges and opportunities that arise every time intercultural dialogue occurs. [+]

Available in six languages pairings, one of which must be your native language: English and one of French, German, Mandarin, Polish, Russian and Spanish. A postgraduate degree in Translation Studies is of the highest value. Not only will it equip you with professional level translation skills in international dialogues, enabling you to play your part in developing a global community, it will also give you an opportunity to fine-tune your communication skills and awareness of the wide range of challenges and opportunities that arise every time intercultural dialogue occurs. Recent research has shown that the fall in the number of language learners over the past decade has come at a big cost to the UK economy. While we may be able to continue to trade and to develop partnerships with countries, regions and companies whose first language is English, we’ve been cutting ourselves off from large swathes of the new markets emerging in East Asia, in Latin America, and in West Africa, to name but three regions. This trend has had an impact even at EU level, according to a recent CFA Skills report. The reasons for this recent decline in language learning are varied, but the tide is turning as Scottish and UK business and industry recognises the benefits of speaking the languages of truly global trade. Accreditation We are proud members of the ‌. The ITI is the UK's only dedicated association for practising translation and interpreting professionals. Our membership of the ITI allows us to help you to keep abreast of the full range of exciting developments and opportunities in the languages services industry. Course objectives The Master’s in Translation Studies has a strong focus on practical translation and on specific situations in which people communicate with one another across different cultures. We offer the following languages: Chinese, French, German, Polish, Russian and Spanish (available subject to demand and availability). The course provides extensive practical translation work on a theme or topic of your choice. It is structured so that you can have considerable flexibility in choosing what areas of translation you wish to specialise in, as you build up a portfolio of translations with your tutor. You may also choose to undertake an extended translation as part of your final dissertation and will be given an opportunity to examine some of the key topics in contemporary Translation Studies. Students on the course examine some major debates surrounding the opportunities and problems that arise when people from different cultures communicate and translate, through seminars led by experts in the field of intercultural communication. There will also be some opportunity for work-based study and exercises, as well as a chance to develop your skills using translation software packages. If you wish to study for a PhD subsequently, you have the opportunity to demonstrate you have attained a level that prepares you for a higher research degree. And for candidates of a suitable level, there is an opportunity to continue in Stirling with a practice-led doctorate involving translation. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. Language competence requirement; a native speaker of or holding a degree in French, German, Spanish, Chinese, Russian or Polish. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 56 in each component IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Scholarships & funding A variety of scholarships and bursaries may be available in any given year, including scholarships in the Faculty of Arts and Humanities. University of Stirling Postgraduate Merit Scholarship The University of Stirling is offering any UK or European Union student with a First Class Honours degree (or equivalent) a £2,000 scholarship to study full-time on any taught Master's course or £1,000 for part-time study. Structure and content Stirling’s MRes in Translation Studies has all the taught elements of an MSc course, while still retaining the flexibility of research-led learning and teaching. This established course has a number of features which will enhance your learning experience. The teaching year follows the two semesters, which run from mid-September to late December, and from January to the end of May. During the summer, students complete a dissertation. Portfolio of Translation: This module develops critical ability and autonomy in applying theories and approaches to different types of translation texts. It will also introduce students to the core translation theories, research methods and approaches in Translation Studies. After that, the students will develop, with their tutor, their own portfolio of practical translation exercises, relating to their own interests. The portfolio will consist of four pieces of translation, each approx. 500 words in length. Students will also discuss and comment on the issues arising in translating your portfolio in a commentary of around 1,250 words. Cultural Translation and Transfer: This module naturally features literary translation, but it also considers cultural translation more broadly. You will engage in seminar discussions with experts, analysing the opportunities and problems that arise when information is communicated across cultures in a variety of settings. You will be assessed by means of essays reflecting on a major topic of debate, as well as a report based on a site visit to one of our partner institutions engaged in cultural translation. Terminology and Translation Project Management: This module focuses on introducing students to the theoretical framework of the disciplines of terminology and project management, familiarising them with the practice of terminological research and glossary compilation - both essential adjuncts to the work of a professional translator - and developing the students’ career awareness and enterprise skills. Specialised Translation: The half-module addresses the significant and growing demand for specialised translation within human situations and professional contexts, across different degrees of specialisation in a range of subject matters, including business, legaltechnical, audiovisual, journalistic and PR texts either from two languages into English or one language into and out of English, at a professional level. It is offered in combination with Translation and Computer Technology. Translation with Computer Technology: This half-module trains students to apply their theoretical and conceptual background to a practical approach to translation and to address the significant and growing demand for basic skills in translation studies. The module will include translation corpora, terminology bank, machine translation (MT) and computer-aided translation (CAT) tools in the fields of translation memory (TM) management, translation project management, translation of documentation, and software localisation, to exploiting translation resources available on the internet and legacy translation data. Research Skills: Our innovative Arts Graduate Training modules enable students to build up a portfolio of skills that prepare them for academic and professional life. All graduate students will work with their supervisors to select what’s right for them from a menu of activities. For many of our students a key part of these modules involves participating in work placements and work experience with local businesses, museums and film festivals. Dissertation Subject to successful completion of all elements of the assessment in both Semesters, you will choose one of the following as your dissertation project: an extended piece of translation and related research and commentary based on it a ‘traditional’ dissertation on a topic drawn from Translation Theories a ‘traditional’ dissertation focusing on a topic drawn from the field of Cultural Translation You are expected to begin collating materials during the Spring. The main writing period will follow on from the end of teaching in May, and all dissertations are submitted at the end of August. Delivery and assessment You will attend seminars and workshop sessions which will focus on translation theories, cultural translation and transfer, but also on the practical activity of translation. One of the modules in the autumn semester will also feature a site visit to one of our partner institutions which engages in cultural translation, broadly construed. Assessment will include essays, reports (which may take the form of written documents, websites or PowerPoint presentations), the portfolio of translation, and the dissertation. Modes of study You will attend seminars and workshop sessions which will focus on translation theories, cultural translation and transfer, but also on the practical activity of translation. One of the modules in the autumn semester will also feature a site visit to one of our partner institutions which engages in cultural translation, broadly construed. Assessment will include essays, reports (which may take the form of written documents, websites or PowerPoint presentations), the portfolio of translation, and the dissertation. Strengths The MRes Translation Studies is accredited by the Institute of Translation and Interpreting (ITI), meaning it is professionally recognised throughout the world. In addition to offering valuable training in translation practice, the MRes is also a particularly appropriate qualification for those intending to pursue subsequent doctoral and/or practice-led research. You are taught by staff with a strong background in the teaching of language and Translation Studies, and of translation itself. ​ Career opportunities Our taught MRes in Translation Studies is, first and foremost, a fantastic gateway into a career in Translation, whether you want to work freelance or in-house, and there’s much more that you could end up doing with a qualification in Translation. In a world of globalisation, criss-crossing travel and trade routes, and multi-lingual, multi-platform media, your translation skills will set you apart from the crowd. Whether you’re interested in developing a career overseas, or working for one of the many international companies with offices in Scotland and the UK, or playing your part in the ever-expanding global economy, this is the course for you. Here in Scotland, exports increased by £1.6 billion over the course of 2010 according to the latest Global Connections Survey (2013) and the upward trend looks set to continue. For organisations such as Scottish Enterprise, up and coming translators who can expand Scotland’s business partners and look towards new horizons are extremely highly valued. And our course's six, in-demand languages (French, Spanish, German, Chinese, Polish and Russian) are indicators of some of these new horizons towards which the country is turning with an increase of more than 14% in exports to the EU, strong growth in emerging Asian markets, and a marked interest in new, innovative areas such as renewables. And wherever Scottish businesses seek to expand their marketplace, they call on translators to help smooth the path. Industry connections Our translation course has developed industry links with the translation profession through: ITI Chartered Institute of Linguists, National Network for Translation National Network for Interpreting Professional Language University Group [-]

MSc

MRes in Publishing Studies

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 27 months January 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

The MRes in Publishing offers strong publishing industry links and networks, enhanced publishing career pathways, international environment with a student cohort from all around the world and intensive publishing research environment [+]

The Stirling Centre for International Publishing and Communication is a world-leading centre for postgraduate publishing studies, offering expertise in contemporary and historical publishing in the UK and beyond. The MRes in Publishing Studies is a course which enables students to develop strong research skills in the fields of publishing studies, either with regard to contemporary publishing issues and trends or to the history of the book and print culture. It enables and encourages an analytical and research-driven approach to publishing, leading either towards further study and research, or allowing publishing practitioners to examine in depth issues affecting their current practice. The MRes in Publishing offers: Strong publishing industry links and networks Enhanced publishing career pathways International environment with a student cohort from all around the world Intensive publishing research environment Course objectives The MRes Publishing Studies is a research preparation Master’s course that offers students the opportunity for tailor-made Master’s study in the field of publishing studies. It also offers the opportunity to prepare for a PhD through concentrated research with a specialism in publishing. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. Applicants should submit a research proposal of 2000 words. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Scholarships & funding University of Stirling Postgraduate Merit Scholarship The University of Stirling is offering any UK or European Union student with a First Class Honours degree (or equivalent) a £2,000 scholarship to study full-time on any taught Master's course or £1,000 for part-time study. Structure and content The MRes in Publishing Studies is a one-year, full-time course (two years part-time) designed to enable students to research aspects of contemporary or historical publishing. The course offers maximum flexibility so that students can tailor their course to fit their research interests and professional practice. The course has both a September and a February intake, and benefits from access to the modules in the MLitt in Publishing Studies, independent research modules, and a long dissertation. As well as the content of the modules, students attend a regular series of visiting speakers, have the opportunity to attend industry events such as the Publishing Scotland conference and the London Book Fair, and go on field trips to locations including a printer and a book distributor. Delivery and assessment The delivery of modules is via a variety of teaching and learning methods, including lectures, seminars, self-guided study and one-to-one supervision. Assessment includes a variety of written assignments and presentations, including a portfolio of publishing research and an extended dissertation. Strengths The Stirling Centre for International Publishing and Communication was established in 1982 and has since developed a global reputation for its postgraduate degrees in publishing, its research activities, and its industry links. Focusing on book, magazine, journal and digital publishing, the Centre trains the publishers of the future, provides opportunities for those currently working in the industry to reflect on their professional practice, and through its research, critically analyses the past, present and future of the publishing. The Centre undertakes a range of staff and student research activities, including collaborations with industry, publishing-related organisations and other Universities. We focus on the history of the book and publishing studies in the 20th and 21st centuries, both in Scotland, the UK and globally, including digital publishing, graphic novels and games, contemporary literary publishing, children’s publishing literary awards and book festivals. Our work has been funded by a number of funders including the AHRC, RSE, British Council, Nesta, and Creative Scotland, working with partners including Glasgow Life, the Saltire Society and Publishing Scotland. Career opportunities The Stirling Centre for International Publishing and Communication has over 30 years of graduates now working in the publishing and related industries. Entry level jobs our students have gone into in recent years include: Publicity Assistant, Canongate Publicity Assistant, Faber & Faber Marketing Assistant, Taylor & Francis Events & Marketing Assistant, The Bookseller Sales & Marketing Assistant, McGraw Hill Production Assistant, Oxford University Press Editorial Assistant, Oxford University Press Production Editor, Cicerone Press Publishing Assistant, Cengage Learning Web editor, Digital Publishing Department, China Social Sciences Press Foreign Rights Specialist, Suncolor Publishing Group Web Editor, BooksfromScotland.com Some of our alumni who have worked in the publishing industry have gone onto the following job roles: Group Sales Director and President (Asia Region), Taylor & Francis Chief Executive, Publishing Scotland Managing Editor, Little Island Books Higher Education Texts and eBook Sales Manager, Taylor and Francis (Asia Pacific) Director, World Book Day Production Editor, Taylor & Francis Founder and Publisher, Tapsalteerie and Lumphanan Press Employability The MRes in Publishing Studies focuses on research and can be used to enhance existing publishing careers or to position students effectively for further study at PhD level. The Stirling Centre for International Publishing and Communication has an active research profile, including the following current PhD topics: Developing Literary Glasgow (an AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Award with Glasgow Life) Writing Culture and Cultural Value: Ethnographies of Contemporary Publishing The Saltire Society Book Awards (an AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Award with The Saltire Society) The Scottish Diaspora and the Book Business The Nesta/Creative Scotland/AHRC Digital R&D Fund for Arts & Culture in Scotland (co-supervised with the University of St Andrews; co-funded by the University of Stirling, St Andrews and the Nesta/Creative Scotland/AHRC Digital R&D Fund) The Literary Festival: The Festivalisation of Contemporary Literary Culture (AHRC studentship) Industry connections The Centre is supported by an Industry Advisory Board, with members from Floris Books, Freight Books, Publishing Scotland, Oxford University Press and Taylor & Francis. Further industry support is provided by our regular visiting speaker series, and the internships and work placements provided for our students. The Centre is a Network Member of Publishing Scotland. [-]

MSc, Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma in Professional Education and Leadership

Online & Campus Combined Part time 3 years September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling

Members of Education from the Faculty of Social Sciences have worked in partnership with local authorities over a number of years to develop a suite of highly-regarded professional education programmes designed to impact directly on professional practices and pupils’ learning experiences and outcomes. [+]

Members of Education from the Faculty of Social Sciences have worked in partnership with local authorities over a number of years to develop a suite of highly-regarded professional education programmes designed to impact directly on professional practices and pupils’ learning experiences and outcomes. During 2013-15 Education researchers at the Faculty of Social Sciences worked with a wide range of practitioners from our partner local authorities on three government-funded research and development projects. The findings of these have greatly informed this exciting new programme, which is offered for the first time in 2015. It offers an opportunity for participants to further develop their professional learning and leadership practices in a supportive, flexible, creative and challenging learning environment. Building on the success and impact of previous programmes, it is also designed taking account of current policy and the Professional Standards framework (GTCS, 2012) to offer participants the opportunity to develop leadership at all levels through developing a critical and enquiring stance to practice. The benefits of the programme will extend not only to participants but also to colleagues and the wider school community and will lead to the development of strong professional networks both within and beyond the course. The following optional pathways have been developed to meet individuals’ professional learning interests and career aspirations. Advanced Professional Practice Middle Leadership Curriculum Coaching and Mentoring Digital Social Trends and Professional Practices (Autumn 2016) Course objectives The programme offers the opportunity for participants to further develop their professional learning and leadership practices in a supportive, flexible, creative and challenging learning environment. What makes us different? ... [-]

MSc, Postgraduate Diploma, Postgraduate Certificate, University Certificate in Applied Professional Studies

Online & Campus Combined Part time 12 - 30 months August 2017 United Kingdom Stirling

This part-time, flexible course is for post-qualifying Social Work professional study. The MSc programme accommodates a range of modules to allow students to build credit towards either a “generic” Masters qualification (MSc in Applied Professional Studies) or a range of specialist qualifications by following prescribed pathways of study. [+]

This part-time, flexible course is for post-qualifying Social Work professional study. The MSc programme accommodates a range of modules to allow students to build credit towards either a “generic” Masters qualification (MSc in Applied Professional Studies) or a range of specialist qualifications by following prescribed pathways of study. Child Welfare and Protection Management and Leadership in Social Services Adult Support and Protection Advanced Practice Skills in Child Welfare and Protection Social Work Practice Education Accreditation Our qualifications are recognised and accredited by organisations such as Scottish Social Services Council (SSSC). By mainlining strong links with key stakeholders we ensure that our programmes anticipate learning needs in the workforce and that we are at the forefront of contemporary practice and thinking. Top Reasons To Study With Us Reputation – The University of Stirling is the highest ranked provided of Social Work qualifications in Scotland and 3rd in the UK, The Complete University Guide, 2016. Quality – Our academic staff are qualified social workers with a wealth of experience and commitment to the highest standards in teaching and research. Currency – We have strong partnerships with professional agencies, ensuring that our programmes continue to reflect up-to-date research, theory and responses to contemporary practice issues. Value – we provide pathways to build credit from modules towards exit awards at Certificate, Diploma or Masters-level Accessibility – Part-time study, utilising a blended approach of direct teaching and guided study, gives you the opportunity to gain a qualification whilst maintaining your personal and professional life. Study pathways Child Welfare and Protection (MSc, Postgraduate Diploma, Postgraduate Certificate) Safeguarding their future This is a post-qualifying course for staff working in child welfare and protection, including those in social work, health, education, the police and associated disciplines. With a focus on improving outcomes for children, this course tackles core challenges in practice including assessment, planning and effective practice. The course builds professional knowledge and competence sequentially through consideration of key frameworks (such as attachment theory and resilience), critical reflection on multi-professional judgement and decision-making, through to examination of the latest research and practice developments in care planning and intervention. The Certificate consists of three 20 credit modules (Scottish Qualifications and Credit Framework) which are designed to be taken sequentially across one year of study. Each module is delivered over seven days through a blend of direct teaching and structured learning activities. Modules are structured to accommodate the pressures experienced by professionals combining adult learning with demanding workloads. Unique to this course, there is a final day in the timetable which provides students with the tools and opportunity to review their learning across the course. This review of learning is designed to facilitate embedding of learning in practice and to dovetail the learning outcomes from the course with the student’s ongoing professional development. Management and Leadership in Social Services (MSc, Postgraduate Diploma, Postgraduate Certificate) A flexible programme of study recognised by the Scottish Social Services Council (SSSC) as an appropriate qualification for registered managers. The programme is appropriate for frontline managers and supervisors working in diverse roles and specialisms. Participants on the course may come from a health, social work, education, occupational therapy or housing background and may be working in residential, day services or fieldwork settings. The modules involve direct teaching days which include group discussions and activities; structured learning sessions for independent study and action learning sets. There are extensive online learning materials to complement the teaching sessions and to support collaborative learning. Adult Support and Protection (MSc, Postgraduate Diploma, Postgraduate Certificate) Reflecting, developing and improving Practitioners and managers are required to deliver support and protection services to a varied population, in imaginative ways and within a challenging wider context. The pace of change in law, policy and service structures adds to this complexity. Our courses offer a valuable space where health and social care practitioners and managers from across Scotland will: Bring their knowledge around law and policy right up to date. Explore and develop their theoretical, ethical and practical understanding of delivering individual support and contributing to service delivery Engage with leading researchers and practice experts Exchange and debate varying approaches to policy and practice with professionals from across Scotland Reflect and refresh their own framework for thinking about adult services, support and protection that they can then share with their team and agency Advanced Practice Skills in Child Welfare and Protection (Postgraduate Certificate) Every Childhood is worth fighting for Delivered by representatives of the University of Stirling, the NSPCC and a range of experts from across Scotland, this fully accredited programme has been introduced to enable students to develop advanced skills in child welfare and protection practice with children and families. Unlike most other postgraduate courses in the field, this course has an emphasis on gaining practical skills and experience. In particular the course is designed to bridge an existing gap in practice skills development, and students will gain knowledge, skills and experience for working within the most challenging settings. The syllabus will provide access to the latest insights, from experts in fieldwork and clinical practice across a range of settings, which inform contemporary practice in Scotland. It will include a variety of innovative learning and assessment methods including videotaped role-play, extended case study work, peer review. Introducing a more intensive model of skills validation for experienced practitioners, the course will encourage criticality and a culture of evidence informed practice and interventions, and approaches to self-evaluation. Social Work Practice Education (Postgraduate Certificate) This is a new postgraduate level course for professionals who want to become Practice Educators with social work students on practice placements. It promotes analytical & reflective practice and aims to equip Practice Educators and, in turn, students for effective practice in complex contemporary social work environments. The course is positioned within the MSc in Applied Professional Studies structure. Students can choose to combine this award with other postgraduate level study in order to achieve the MSc in Applied Professional Studies. Course objectives This course is a post-qualifying award designed to support experienced professional staff in developing advanced knowledge, skills and understanding. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. Students must be working in or have experience of working in a relevant profession. Please note: If you are a student from overseas and applying with a Tier 4 student visa, we unfortunately can not accept your application for this course as it falls into the category of being part-time, delivered online or a distance learning course. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 56 in each component IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View our range of pre-sessional courses. If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View our range of pre-sessional courses. Structure and content Modules take a blended learning approach using contact teaching days, structured learning making use of the University’s online learning platform, and self-directed private study. The student groups are small and the class room sessions are delivered in a seminar style with a mixture of PowerPoint presentations, small group work activity and a high level of interaction between presenter and students. Classroom sessions are led by University academics and researchers who are actively involved in the social work field; and by external practice subject experts. Their contribution enhances the contemporary relevance of the teaching and brings a critical perspective to the topics covered. This exchange of practice and knowledge expertise is replicated between teaching days through structured learning tasks, online discussion boards and peer assessment. The online learning platform provides a wide range of learning resources that act as a starting point for self- directed study. This programme encourages a high level of reflection on students’ own practice; and application of learning to their roles and responsibilities. Career opportunities Our students are already qualified professionals employed in health and/or social services; working either in the public sector or in third sector organisations. Post-qualifying awards provide an opportunity to build on existing skills and experience; to reflect on the challenges of practice in contemporary social services; and to develop enhanced capabilities as analytical practitioners for application in existing work roles or for future career development. Our post-qualifying awards are a valuable addition to the curriculum vitae and are widely recognised as a mark of rigour and depth in professional learning and practice development. Child Welfare and Protection The programme is designed to enhance the careers and practice of experienced professionals working in a number of child protection related fields, including social workers, health workers, police officers and teachers. The Certificate in Child Welfare and Protection has been a benchmark qualification for over 25 years now and provides practitioners with the skills and knowledge required to work with confidence and competence. The Certificate is therefore an important qualification for practitioners to have on their CV when applying for posts in safeguarding and wellbeing. Employers are increasingly seeking individuals with a specialist knowledge and skills in child protection when seeking to appoint leaders in this key area. The Diploma supports Certificate students to take their studies further and develop areas of professional expertise so the award is a recognition of advanced skills and knowledge in specialised areas of practice such as practice teaching, risk analysis, supervision and direct practice. For practitioners leading in practice and knowledge development, the Masters dissertation signifies to employers that you have research capacity and professional-level thinking built on secure foundations of theory and research. These awards provide a clear pathway for your investment in study to build over time and enhance employability in frontline and senior positions. Students can also opt to progress onto Advanced Practice Skills which aims to develop enhanced knowledge and skills for direct work with children and families. Management and Leadership in Social Services University of Stirling has offered post qualifying courses in social services management for over twenty years and has an established reputation for supporting both new and experienced managers to develop their skills and confidence as effective leaders. The opportunity to study alongside peers from diverse sectors and specialisms enables course participants to deepen their understanding of integrated services and the boundary spanning roles which are essential to contemporary practice. Successful attainment of a social services management qualification has been seen to enhance participants’ future career opportunities. Our courses are recognised by the Scottish Social Services Council (SSSC) as approved awards for registered managers. During their study and on completion candidates have experienced the benefits of undertaking a post qualifying award by securing promotion or moving into strategic planning or senior management posts. Course participants span supervisors and managers from Children’s Services, Criminal Justice Social Work and Adult Health and Social Care. They include staff with varying professional backgrounds e.g. social work, nursing and occupational therapy and they work across fieldwork, residential and day service settings." Adult Support and Protection Post qualifying study is increasingly important to developing a career in health and social services, whether that be in the public, private or third sector. Successful completion of this course demonstrates, to current or future employers, a commitment to updating knowledge, developing analytical skills and seeking out research that is relevant to improving practice and service delivery Social Work Practice Education This programme is designed to equip experienced practitioners with the knowledge and skills to support the learning and professional development of others. Candidates will gain skills in supervision; promoting reflective and analytical thinking and writing; promoting integration of knowledge, skills and values in practice as well as assessing competence. The Postgraduate Certificate in Social Work Practice Education is, therefore, a valuable qualification to enable practitioners to further their careers in practice education, staff supervision, learning and development and as practitioners with enhanced analytical and reflective practice skills. Industry connections The team at Stirling has developed close and enduring links with agency representatives and employers who sponsor staff to undertake our post-qualifying awards. This helps to ensure that courses remain up-to-date and relevant to contemporary practice. Links are maintained through agency liaison events, strong agency representation on the course committee and collaborative mentoring and assessment opportunities. By maintaining strong links with stakeholders we ensure that our programmes anticipate learning needs in the workforce. Our commitment to partnership working not only supports student retention and completion but also makes Stirling's programmes highly effective in embedding learning and contributing to longer-term practice development. [-]

MSc, Postgraduate Diploma, Postgraduate Certificate in Housing Studies

Online & Campus Combined Part time 2 - 3 months September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling Inverness Stornoway + 2 more

The course fully integrates all of the academic and practice components of the professional qualification of the Chartered Institute of Housing, which sets up graduates for a ‘fast track’ into a career with housing organisations in the social, private and voluntary sectors. [+]

The Diploma in Housing Studies offers academic study for those working in housing to further develop their careers. The course covers all aspects of housing services, sustaining communities, governance and law, housing organisations and health and well-being. Many Scottish students are eligible for a SASS postgraduate loan which covers the fee for the postgraduate Diploma elements. The course fully integrates all of the academic and practice components of the professional qualification of the Chartered Institute of Housing, which sets up graduates for a ‘fast track’ into a career with housing organisations in the social, private and voluntary sectors. Our courses make a substantial contribution to supplying the housing sector with new, qualified staff, who are known to be ready to ‘hit the ground running’. Our graduates usually find relevant work very quickly after completing their studies. Already have your diploma? We cater for those who wish to come back and extend to MSc here at the University of Stirling. There are also options to do a standalone module to complete your MSc in Housing Studies. Accreditation The Chartered Institute of Housing is the professional body for housing and validates the Stirling Housing Studies course. On successful completion of the Diploma, you will have satisfied the requirements for corporate membership of the Chartered Institute of Housing. Housing Studies attracts people from a variety of disciplines who are committed to achieving better housing for all. Top Reasons To Study With Us On successful completion of the Diploma or Masters, you will have satisfied the requirements for corporate membership of the Chartered Institute of Housing, recognised throughout the UK. Our Housing Studies graduates acquire the cutting-edge knowledge and competencies needed to tackle issues in housing and homelessness in Scotland and throughout the UK. The programmes available are designed to suit those who are new to the housing sector alongside those who are already employed within it. Our modules aim to empower students to take charge of their learning, pursue their own interests and make an impact within the housing sector. You will be taught by a team of academics with extensive experience in the housing sector and world-class research records We provide a cost effective opportunity to gain a postgraduate qualification in Housing, both at Diploma and Masters level. The programme follows a structured route of learning but flexibility and choice are afforded to students; and to employers who wish to sponsor their employees. Course objectives With a staff group which comprehensively covers the multi-disciplinary nature of housing, research, policy and practice the University of Stirling is in an excellent position to provide you with the skill sets required to make good a career in a highly competitive age. Our research-led teaching draws on our specialist expertise in policy analysis, homelessness and housing rights, social theory, housing and land market analysis. Students are introduced to the most up-to-date ideas and debates in housing. We offer students the opportunity to learn about the cutting edge of housing practice. This route blends occasional sessions on campus with a significant element of online study giving the student the ideal learning experience in a format which is accessible and engaging. This course equips you with the tools to become a competent and effective housing practitioner and increases your chances of interesting and rewarding work and future employment. Anyone who completes the Diploma requirements may register for further study towards a Master’s of Science degree (MSc). This would require completion of either a research-based dissertation or the demonstration of advanced level reflective skills. The Chartered Institute of Housing is the professional body for housing and validates the Housing Studies course. On successful completion of the Diploma, you will have satisfied the requirements for corporate membership of the Chartered Institute of Housing. Housing studies attracts people from a variety of disciplines across the social sciences, humanities and built environment. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements Usually a minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with relevant work or voluntary experience, an understanding of the importance of housing in society, and a commitment to improved housing for all are encouraged to apply. This course is aimed at those already working in Housing if you are interested in this programme but do not work in Housing please look at our other programme Housing Studies (with internship). English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 56 in each component IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Scholarships & funding This course is currently approved for Postgraduate Tuition Fee Loan (PTFL) funding from SAAS. Full details of the PTFL fund and how to apply online can be found here: www.saas.gov.uk Tuition fees and other associated expenses are normally met by sponsoring employers. Students and employers may wish to take into account other costs in budgeting for the course such as: book purchase and travelling expenses and costs of accommodation for visits to campus. Students who pay their own fees may be entitled to claim tax relief on fees or receive support with fee payment from an ILA. Structure and content The Postgraduate Diploma is taught over two years and you will study six academic modules Providing Housing Services Sustainable Communities Housing Governance Housing Finance and Strategy Healthy Housing Organisational Behaviour Exit Points Students may build up to the full Masters (MSc) of 180 credits in stages, or exit at any stage and receive an award. six modules plus a dissertation for 180 credits (SCQF Level 11) - Masters degree + requirements for corporate membership of the Chartered Institute of Housing six modules for 120 credits (SCQF Level 11) - Postgraduate Diploma + requirements for corporate membership of the Chartered Institute of Housing three modules for 60 credits (SCQF Level 11) - Postgraduate Certificate Delivery and assessment You attend induction over three days at the beginning of September to commence the course. Academic learning is then undertaken through a combination of private study and interactive online sessions. There is a day on campus at the beginning of each academic module and a programme of visits. The course requires full participation. Classes are held mainly on Tuesday in year one and Thursday in year two - with the rest of the week for private study. (Studying part-time equates to approximately 18 hours on average which includes all structured learning, personal study and assessments). Most of the time you have flexibility about where you can study and you do not need to travel to Stirling for online classes. Please ensure that your IT specification meets the requirements for the course - see technical checklist available here: Succeed You can, however, access IT facilities on campus. Assessment on the Diploma course takes a variety of forms including essays, reports, group work and a seminar presentation. Each module has one or two assessments (rather than end of semester examinations). Students who do not complete the Diploma course may be eligible for the award of the Postgraduate Certificate. Masters of Science degree (MSc) Anyone who completes the Diploma requirements may register for a further period of study towards a Master's of Science degree (MSc. This would require completion of either a research-based dissertation or the demonstration of advanced level reflective skills. Strengths In this current climate, a professional qualification is exactly the advantage you need, to stay ahead of the game. The University of Stirling offers people working in practice the opportunity to achieve housing qualifications in ways which meet their needs and fit in with the demands of their lives. Career opportunities Stirling graduates have a strong track record of making rapid career progress on completion of the Masters or Diploma. Potential career opportunities include management in housing organisations, specialist research and policy and strategy work. Increasingly, there are opportunities linked to key government initiatives and policy areas. Our students come from all parts of Scotland, in different roles at different levels. Studying online at Stirling enables you to: carry out your current job with greater confidence and effectiveness have a comprehensive knowledge of how your job links to the rest of your organisation and the work of other agencies in Scotland be well prepared to take advantage of opportunities for promotion or new directions in your work gain a professional qualification in a crucial policy area build a network minimise time spent travelling Stirling housing graduates normally move immediately into employment, e.g. in housing associations, local authorities, trade organisations, government agencies and research and consultancy. Employability Our students learn great transferable skills such as: academic skills in analysis and writing; technical skills in the appraisal and evaluation of housing development, design and construction in the built environment; professional skills in housing: communication skills, in report writing and group presentations; self-management skills, in organising work, and meeting deadlines; interpersonal skills, in group discussion and listening. Industry connections A very substantial number of housing organisations across Scotland support student internships and sponsor their staff to undertake the Housing Studies course at Stirling. Teaching staff also work with organisations across the country in their research activities. Through student membership of the Chartered Institute of Housing, you will have access to information and news about housing organisations across Scotland as well as being able to attend major conferences in the sector. [-]

MSc, Postgraduate Diploma, Postgraduate Certificate in Housing Studies (with Internship)

Online & Campus Combined Full time Part time 12 - 21 months September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

Our courses make a substantial contribution to supplying the housing sector with new, qualified staff, who are known to be ready to ‘hit the ground running’. Our graduates usually find relevant work very quickly after completing their studies. The sections below include comments on career prospects from previous students. [+]

The Diploma in Housing Studies, with internship offers a unique combination of academic study and professional work experience for those seeking to enter a career in housing. The course covers all aspects of housing services, sustaining communities, governance and law, housing organisations and health and well-being. Many Scottish students are eligible for a SASS postgraduate loan which covers the fee for the postgraduate Diploma elements. The course fully integrates all of the academic and practice components of the professional qualification of the Chartered Institute of Housing. This includes a structured, assessed work experience internship, which sets up graduates for a ‘fast track’ into a career with housing organisations in the social, voluntary and private sectors. Our courses make a substantial contribution to supplying the housing sector with new, qualified staff, who are known to be ready to ‘hit the ground running’. Our graduates usually find relevant work very quickly after completing their studies. The sections below include comments on career prospects from previous students. Accreditation The Chartered Institute of Housing is the professional body for housing and validates the Stirling Housing Studies course. On successful completion of the Diploma, you will have satisfied the requirements for corporate membership of the Chartered Institute of Housing. Housing Studies attracts people from a variety of disciplines who are committed to achieving better housing for all. Top Reasons To Study With Us On successful completion of the Diploma or Masters, you will have satisfied the requirements for corporate membership of the Chartered Institute of Housing, recognised throughout the UK. Our Housing Studies graduates acquire the cutting-edge knowledge and competencies needed to tackle issues in housing and homelessness in Scotland and throughout the UK. Those who choose the internship option gain valuable work experience in the housing sector. The programmes available are designed to suit those who are new to the housing sector alongside those who are already employed within it. Our modules aim to empower students to take charge of their learning, pursue their own interests and make an impact within the housing sector. You will be taught by a team of academics with extensive experience in the housing sector and world-class research records We provide a cost effective opportunity to gain a postgraduate qualification in Housing, both at Diploma and Masters level. The programme follows a structured route of learning but flexibility and choice are afforded to students; and to employers who wish to sponsor their employees. Course objectives With a staff group which comprehensively covers the multi-disciplinary nature of housing, research, policy and practice, the University of Stirling is in an excellent position to provide you with the skill sets required to make good a career in a highly competitive age. Our research-led teaching draws on our specialist expertise in policy analysis, homelessness and housing rights, social theory, housing and land market analysis. Students are introduced to the most up-to-date ideas and debates in housing. We offer students the opportunity to learn about the cutting edge of housing practice. This route blends occasional sessions on campus, with a significant element of online study giving the ideal learning experience in a format which is accessible and engaging. This course is aimed at graduates wishing to pursue a career in housing. The Diploma course combines academic study and professional practice over a 12-month period for full-time students (21 months for part-time students). It equips you with the tools to become a competent and effective practitioner and increases your chances of gaining rewarding work in housing and developing your long-term career. Anyone who completes the Diploma requirements may register for further study towards a Master’s of Science degree (MSc). This would require completion of either a research-based dissertation or the demonstration of advanced level reflective skills. The Chartered Institute of Housing is the professional body for housing and validates the Stirling housing studies course. On successful completion of the Diploma, you will have satisfied the requirements for corporate membership of the Chartered Institute of Housing. Housing studies attracts people from a variety of disciplines across the social sciences, humanities and built environment. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements Usually a minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with relevant work or voluntary experience, an understanding of the importance of housing in society, and a commitment to improved housing for all are encouraged to apply. English language requirements If English is not your first language, you must provide evidence of your proficiency such as: IELTS score of 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill. We consider the following as equivalent test scores: Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C or above Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B or above Pearson Test of English Academic (PTE): 60 with 56 in each component IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View our range of pre-sessional courses. Scholarships & funding Postgraduate Tuition Fee Loan This course is currently approved for PTFL (Postgraduate Tuition Fee Loan) funding from SAAS. Individual Learning Accounts Individual Learning Accounts can offer help with fee payment. Structure and content The Postgraduate Diploma is taught over 12 months full-time or alternatively over 21 months part-time, with the professional practice element – internship – running June to September. You will study six academic modules: Providing Housing Services Sustainable Communities Housing Governance Housing Finance and Strategy Healthy Housing Organisational Behaviour Professional Practice The course also includes a module on reflective practice, preparation for professional practice and attachment to a social landlord to facilitate workplace learning. These precede an internship of at least 10 weeks, full-time work experience, linked to the practical requirements of the Chartered Institute of Housing. Workplace attachments and internships are arranged by tutors, taking account of student preferences and interests. Exit Points Students may build up to the full Masters (MSc) of 180 credits in stages, or exit at any stage and receive an award. six modules plus a dissertation for 180 credits (SCQF Level 11) - Masters degree + requirements for corporate membership of the Chartered Institute of Housing six modules for 120 credits (SCQF Level 11) - Postgraduate Diploma + requirements for corporate membership of the Chartered Institute of Housing three modules for 60 credits (SCQF Level 11) - Postgraduate Certificate Delivery and assessment You attend induction in Stirling over three days at the beginning of September to commence the course. Academic learning is then undertaken through a combination of private study and interactive online sessions. There is a day on campus at the beginning of each academic module and a programme of required visits for the practice module, to build experience for your internship. The course requires full-time participation. Classes are held on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday - with the rest of the week for private study. (Studying full-time equates to approximately 35 hours on average which includes all structured learning, personal study and assessments). Most of the time you have flexibility about where you can study and you do not need to travel to Stirling for online classes. Please ensure that your IT specification meets the requirements for the course - see technical checklist available here: Succeed You can, however, access IT facilities on campus. Assessment on the Diploma course takes a variety of forms including essays, reports, group work and a seminar presentation. Each module has one or two assessments (rather than end of semester examinations). During the period June – September, your internship will consist of full-time attendance at an agreed workplace. Students need to complete 400 hours work which amounts to approximately 10 weeks or 50 days full-time. Internships are assessed through a series of practice reports and a reflective practice diary. Students who do not complete the Diploma course may be eligible for the award of the Postgraduate Certificate. Masters of Science degree (MSc) Anyone who completes the Diploma requirements may register for a further period of study towards a Master's of Science degree (MSc). This would require completion of either a research-based dissertation of advanced level reflexive skills. Study abroad opportunities Field visits and internships are typically organised in Scotland. Specific requests for internships outside of Scotland can be considered but have to be met within the course funding arrangements. Strengths The course provides a comprehensive academic and professional qualification, with structured work experience, which offers a direct route into employment in the housing sector. We have an excellent track record in the employability of our graduates, with many progressing to senior and influential roles in the housing sector. A unique strength of the Stirling course is the combined delivery to students who are new to housing alongside those already working in housing – facilitating strong networks for mutual learning across student groups and on into professional life. e.g. University of Stirling, Housing Studies Student wins Malcolm Smith Award Career opportunities Stirling graduates have a strong track record of making rapid career progress on completion of the Masters or Diploma. Potential career opportunities include management in housing organisations, specialist research and policy and strategy work. Increasingly, there are opportunities linked to key government initiatives and policy areas. Our students come from all parts of Scotland, in different roles at different levels. Studying online at Stirling enables you to: carry out your current job with greater confidence and effectiveness have a comprehensive knowledge of how your job links to the rest of your organisation and the work of other agencies in Scotland be well prepared to take advantage of opportunities for promotion or new directions in your work gain a professional qualification in a crucial policy area build a network minimise time spent travelling Stirling housing graduates normally move immediately into employment, e.g. in housing associations, local authorities, trade organisations, government agencies and research and consultancy. Employability Our students learn great transferable skills such as: academic skills in analysis and writing; technical skills in the appraisal and evaluation of housing development, design and construction in the built environment; professional skills in housing: communication skills, in report writing and group presentations; self-management skills, in organising work, and meeting deadlines; interpersonal skills, in group discussion and listening. Industry connections A very substantial number of housing organisations across Scotland support student internships and sponsor their staff to undertake the Housing Studies course at Stirling. Teaching staff also work with organisations across the country in their research activities. Through student membership of the Chartered Institute of Housing, you will have access to information and news about housing organisations across Scotland as well as being able to attend major conferences in the sector. [-]

MSc/MLitt in Gender Studies (Applied)

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 27 months September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

The MSc/MLitt in Gender Studies (Applied) equips students with conceptual and practical skills in gender analysis and research, underpinned by feminist theory. Through core modules – Understanding Gender, Feminist Research, and Key Feminist Thinkers – students are exposed to a range of theoretical and methodological approaches for studying gender. We give history and context to the development of key feminist debates, exploring commonalities and differences in the ways they have played out in different disciplines. [+]

The MSc/MLitt in Gender Studies (Applied) equips students with conceptual and practical skills in gender analysis and research, underpinned by feminist theory. Through core modules – Understanding Gender, Feminist Research, and Key Feminist Thinkers – students are exposed to a range of theoretical and methodological approaches for studying gender. We give history and context to the development of key feminist debates, exploring commonalities and differences in the ways they have played out in different disciplines. At the heart of the course is a concern about how academic debate informs, is shaped by, and is – at times – distanced from, how gender ‘works’ in real world contexts. Students explore these issues through a seminar-based course and are offered the opportunity to apply their learning in real world contexts through the Research Placement module. This course is interdisciplinary, but, within this, students can emphasise Arts and Humanities (MLitt) or Social Science (MSc) approaches. The MSc places a greater emphasis on research methods and data analysis, and is the recommended route for students interested in PhD study in Social Sciences. The MLitt offers students more optional modules and is better suited to students looking for an all-round education in Gender Studies and/or is interested in PhD study in the Arts and Humanities. The MSc/MLitt in Gender Studies (Applied) at the University of Stirling is unique in the UK in that it places the application of learning to real-world contexts at the heart of its course. It is housed within the Centre for Gender and Feminist Studies and students have access to its seminar course of visiting academics and practitioners working on gender and feminist issues in a variety of professional contexts. Students have the opportunity to apply their learning to a real-world research placement and the course team have established links with potential placement providers from the feminist third sector as well as with a number of organisations who are committed to gender equality as part of their work in arts, culture and sport. Top Reasons To Study With Us You will be taught by experienced and committed staff, teaching in a field they are passionate about. You will have one-to-one supervision from staff engaged in ongoing research at the forefront of their disciplines: from Kirstein Rummery’s work on care policies and gender equality in small states, to Kat Lindner’s work on queer film festivals. You will engage with debates from a wide variety of different disciplines and work with unique materials in feminist archival collections. You will have the opportunity to apply your knowledge and skills in a real world setting. You will become a member of the Centre for Gender & Feminist Research and have access to its seminar programme of visiting academics and practitioners working on gender and feminist issues in a variety of professional contexts. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 56 in each component IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Scholarships & funding The University of Stirling is delighted to announce two scholarships specifically for students on the Msc/Mlitt in Gender Studies (Applied) for study beginning in September 2016: the Dr Dee Amy-Chinn Gender Studies Scholarship and the Gender Studies Community Bursary. Structure and content Gender Studies (180 credits) combines interdisciplinary core courses on gender theory, feminist research and the history of feminist thought, with optional courses within a range of disciplinary traditions. Its core modules (60 credits) focus on providing students with an interdisciplinary frame for the critical study of gender that is underpinned by feminist theory and acknowledges the ways in which gender informs – and is informed by – other structural inequalities. Collectively, they equip students with a knowledge and understanding of key feminist debates about ontology, epistemology and methodology, and enable them to identify both commonalities and differences in the ways these debates have played out in different disciplinary contexts. Students following the MSc route take two further core modules in Quantitative Data Analysis and Qualitative Data Analysis (worth an additional 40 credits), which provide advanced Social Science-oriented research methods training, essential for students considering undertaking further postgraduate research (e.g. at PhD level) in the Social Sciences. The optional courses – of which MLitt students take three (totalling 60 credits) and the MSc students one (20 credits) – offer opportunities for more discipline-based learning, collectively providing a multi-disciplinary perspective for the study of gender issues. The Gender Studies Research Placement module is open to both MLitt and MSc students and allows students the chance to put their learning into practice in diverse real-world contexts. Students complete the course by producing a 60-credit dissertation (12,000-15,000 words) on a topic of their choice within Gender Studies. Given the disciplinary reach of the course team, we are well qualified to provide expert supervision in a range of fields. Delivery and assessment The core modules are delivered in weekly seminars and the assessment is all in the form of coursework. The assessments are designed to allow students to develop and enhance academic skills in writing and research. The Understanding Gender, Feminist Research and Key Feminist Thinkers modules all have more than one assessment point to allow for feedback and improvement. In the Research Placement module, students will deliver their research in a form agreed in advance with the placement provider so as to best meet their needs and give students the opportunity to develop skills in delivering research in real-world contexts. Strengths Only course of its kind in Scotland Offers both an MLitt and MSc route to allow for different specialisms and research-training needs A genuinely interdisciplinary course, which reaches beyond the Faculty of Arts & Humanities and involves colleagues in the Faculty of Social Science and the Stirling Management School, with further collaborations planned as the course develops. Research Placement offers opportunities for applied research in real-world contexts. We have connections with a wide range of potential placement providers, from the leading feminist organisations in the third sector within Scotland to a number of organisations who are committed to gender equality as part of their work in arts, culture and sport. Academic Strengths The MSc/MLitt in Gender Studies (Applied) is intellectually robust and, with a trio of core courses, developed and delivered by a course team with a range of research and teaching specialisms but with a core commitment to feminist and gender analysis and issues, it is genuinely interdisciplinary. The course is co-ordinated by Karen Boyle – Professor of Feminist Media Studies – who brings more than 20 years of both academic feminism and active involvement in the feminist anti-violence sector to the role. Career opportunities The course combines subject-specific knowledge of Gender Studies with transferable skills in research and analysis. These are the skills required to flourish in a range of organisations in the public, private and third sectors, with the subject specialism being particularly advantageous for graduates seeking to work on gender and equality issues. The Research Placement allows students to develop skills in delivering research in real-world contexts and will be valuable in enabling students to build relevant networks in sectors in which they might be seeking employment post graduation. The course is also flexible enough to allow students to continue their postgraduate studies. Although the MLitt/MSc is new, the MSc builds on successful courses provided by the Faculty of Applied Social Science. Over the past five years, over half of the graduates from the MSc Applied Social Research have entered social research-related careers in the public, voluntary and private sectors, including a manager commissioning research for a local authority, a research fellow at a university and a senior research executive for a European-wide commercial research organisation. A third of its graduates continue with academic study and undertake a PhD. [-]

MSc in Applied Social Research

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 30 months January 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

This course prepares students for undertaking social research and evaluation, leading to careers in research, research management and commissioning or using research. Our MSc is recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as meeting the research training guidelines for undertaking a PhD in Sociology, Social Policy, Social Work or Socio-legal Studies, as well as preparing you for an ESRC-recognised interdisciplinary PhD in Families, Relationships and Demographic Change and Social Care. A course on Applied Social Research (Criminology) is also available. [+]

This course prepares students for undertaking social research and evaluation, leading to careers in research, research management and commissioning or using research. Our MSc is recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as meeting the research training guidelines for undertaking a PhD in Sociology, Social Policy, Social Work or Socio-legal Studies, as well as preparing you for an ESRC-recognised interdisciplinary PhD in Families, Relationships and Demographic Change and Social Care. A course on Applied Social Research (Criminology) is also available. Accreditation The course is recognised as research training by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) for those who are studying or going on to study for a PhD (+3), and is also recognised by the ESRC for Master’s Course plus Research Studentship (1+3) purposes. Course objectives Provide you with the skills and knowledge base required to collect, analyse and report qualitative and quantitative data, taking account of ethics, reliability and validity Enable you to examine critically the theoretical foundations that underpin social scientific research Enable you to examine issues concerning comparative social research Develop your understanding of the relationship between research and policy, and the meanings of evaluation, its terminology, practice and use What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. INTO University of Stirling offers a Graduate Diploma for those students who do not meet the required criteria for this course. If you successfully complete the Graduate Diploma in Media, Humanities and Social Sciences and meet the required progression grades, you will be guaranteed entry onto year one of this Master's degree. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 56 in each component IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Scholarships & funding ESRC awards are available on a competitive basis via the Scottish Doctoral Training Centre for students who wish to pursue the MSc plus a PhD on a 1+3 basis. Please contact the Faculty of Social Sciences for details +44 (0)1786 467681 Structure and content The MSc/Postgraduate Diploma in Applied Social Research comprises six compulsory taught core modules, and (for the MSc) a dissertation. The modules are: The Nature of Social Enquiry; Research Design and Process; Introduction to Information Technology and Library Services (not formally assessed); Quantitative Data Analysis; Qualitative Data Analysis; Comparative Social Research; Policy Analysis and Evaluation Research. These modules comprise a series of reading groups in which a number of central ideas are debated. In addition to the modules, you will complete the following: Research Dissertation: MSc students must undertake an original social science research study and complete a research dissertation with academic supervision. Examples of recent dissertation topics include: A Study of High Risk Behaviour Young People and National Identity Substance Use Prevalence and Looked-after Young People in Scotland Women’s Decisions about Returning to Work After Childbirth Delivery and assessment Teaching methods are designed for each module to facilitate your acquisition of skills and progressive development. You are expected to participate in lectures, seminars, tutorials, computer-based workshops and group work. Full-time and part-time MSc/Diploma students experience a range of different forms of assessment across the compulsory taught modules. These include essays, critical review essays, book reviews, research proposals, a computer lab-based assessment for quantitative data analysis and the research dissertation. There are no examinations. Career opportunities Employability an important focus of the course. Past graduates have entered social research-related careers in the public, voluntary and private sectors for example, commissioning research for local authorities, working on university research projects, and conducting research for charities and voluntary organisations. The course is suitable for those wishing to enhance their research practice in a current post. Others choose to continue their studies and undertake a PhD or Doctorate. The MRes offers a combination of high quality, flexibility and choice. Over the past five years, over half of our graduates have entered social research-related careers in the public, voluntary and private sectors, for example, a manager commissioning research for a local authority, a research fellow at a university and a senior research executive for a European-wide commercial research organisation. Over one third of our graduates continue with academic study and undertake a professional doctorate or PhD. [-]

MSc in Applied Social Research (Criminology)

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 30 months January 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

The course is suitable for applicants who see their future career in research, research management and commissioning or using research. Graduates are well equipped with the necessary competencies and knowledge to forge successful careers in the public, private and third sectors. With newly obtained skills in critical thinking, research methodologies, and analytical and communications skills. [+]

The course is suitable for applicants who see their future career in research, research management and commissioning or using research. Graduates are well equipped with the necessary competencies and knowledge to forge successful careers in the public, private and third sectors. With newly obtained skills in critical thinking, research methodologies, and analytical and communications skills. Recognition The course has been recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as meeting its requirements for postgraduate research training. Accreditation The course is recognised as research training by the ESRC for those who are studying or going on to study for a PhD (+3), and is also recognised by the ESRC for Master’s Course plus Research Studentship (1+3) purposes. MRes or MSc? Uniquely, we offer you the opportunity to graduate with an MRes or MSc Students undertaking the Master of Science or Master of Research follow the exact same pathways. The choice of award is designed to give students freedom in determining what outcome will suit their future aspirations. MSc Applied Social Research (Criminology) The Master of Science is the ideal preparation for social research and evaluation in criminal justice and criminology and will suit those who wish to pursue a career in academia and wish to use the MSc as a precursor to completing a PhD. MRes Criminological Research The Masters of Research is best suited for applicants who see their future career in research, research management and commissioning or using research. Course objectives This MSc has been designed to run concurrently with the MSc Applied Social Research, a long-standing course that is recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as meeting the standards of their Research Training Guidelines. The objectives are to: Provide you with the skills and knowledge base required to collect, analyse and report qualitative and quantitative data, taking account of ethics, reliability and validity Enable you to examine critically the theoretical foundations that underpin criminological and socio-legal research Enable you to examine issues concerning comparative criminological and socio-legal research Develop your understanding of the relationship between criminological research and policy, and the meanings of evaluation, its terminology, practice and use What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. INTO University of Stirling offers a Graduate Diploma for those students who do not meet the required criteria for this course. If you successfully complete the Graduate Diploma in Media, Humanities and Social Sciences and meet the required progression grades, you will be guaranteed entry onto year one of this Master's degree. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 56 in each component IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Delivery and assessment Teaching methods are designed for each module to facilitate your acquisition of skills and progressive development. You are expected to participate in lectures, seminars, tutorials, computer-based workshops and group work. Full-time and part-time MSc/Diploma students experience a range of different forms of assessment across the compulsory taught modules. These include essays, critical review essays, book reviews, research proposals, presentations a computer lab-based assessment for quantitative data analysis, and the research dissertation. There are no examinations. Students are responsible for proposing their own substantive research topic. The course Director and other academic staff will offer guidance on the feasibility of the project and methodologies used within it. A Supervisor is appointed for each dissertation and this member of staff will be able to lend support and their expert knowledge throughout the writing process. Modules The MSc/Diploma in Applied Social Research (Criminology) comprises six compulsory taught core modules and (for the MSc) a dissertation. The modules are: Research Design and Process; Introduction to Information Technology and Library Services (not formally assessed); Quantitative Data Analysis; Qualitative Data Analysis; Research Methods in Criminology and Socio-legal Studies; Criminological Perspectives; and Criminalisation, Social Control and Human Rights. In addition to the modules, you will complete the following: Research Dissertation: MSc students must undertake an original criminological or socio-legal research study and complete a research dissertation with academic supervision. Examples of recent dissertation topics include: Explaining Crime through Narrative Nurses Perceptions of Workplace Violence and Aggression within an A&E Department Policing a Democracy The Effect of Anti-Terror Legislation on Liberty Career opportunities Our graduates are well equipped with the necessary competencies and knowledge to forge successful careers in the public, private and third sectors. With newly obtained skills in critical thinking, research methodologies, and analytical and communications skills, Stirling Criminology graduates are attractive to employers from a range of sectors. Recent graduates have gone on to pursue careers across the criminal justice system, joining organisations such as the Civil Service, the Crown Prosecution Service, Police Scotland and other services throughout the UK. Other graduates have steered their career towards academia, research management or gone on to do further study, such as the Applied Social Research (Doctorate) or PhD. Industry connections The course is supported by staff from both the Scottish Centre for Crime and Justice Research (SCCJR) and Law. SCCJR hosts regular, state-of-the-art events to which students are invited. The Scottish Centre for Crime and Justice Research is a collaboration of several Scottish universities. It aims to produce excellent research and to develop excellent researchers so as to better the development of policy, practice and public debate about crime and justice. Though based in Scotland and determined to analyse and address crime and justice in Scotland, our work is international both in its influences and in its influence. We work for, with and through fellow academics, policymakers, practitioners and others involved with justice all over the world, believing that Scottish criminology and Scottish criminal justice has much to learn from and much to teach others. There are also strong links with the applied crime and criminal justice sector, including Police Scotland and the Scottish Prison Service. [-]

MSc in Applied Social Research (Social Statistics and Social Research)

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years January 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

This course provides an understanding of social research, with a particular focus on social statistics and quantitative methods. The course includes orientation material on social research methods as a whole, and detailed training on a wide range of statistical methods, with advanced modules on data management and emerging priority research areas, such as big data and social network analysis. [+]

This course provides an understanding of social research, with a particular focus on social statistics and quantitative methods. The course includes orientation material on social research methods as a whole, and detailed training on a wide range of statistical methods, with advanced modules on data management and emerging priority research areas, such as big data and social network analysis. Teaching covers the theories behind the methods, and the practical work in using datasets and analysing them with statistical software. Students will gain a variety of highly marketable skills in the areas of social research and social statistics. Course objectives This course provides an understanding of social research, with a particular focus on social statistics and quantitative methods. The course includes orientation material on social research methods as a whole, and detailed training on a wide range of statistical methods, with advanced modules on data management and emerging priority research areas, such as big data and social network analysis. Teaching covers the theories behind the methods, and the practical work in using datasets and analysing them with statistical software. Students will gain a variety of highly marketable skills in the areas of social research and social statistics. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant social science subject. Applicants without such qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. A willingness to learn advanced statistical methods is more important than a strong background in the area. Basic experience of a statistical software, such as SPSS, Stata, R or Excel is useful but not essential. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 56 in each component IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Structure and content Students will undertake four core modules, two option modules and complete a 15,000 word dissertation. In the full time programme, 3 modules are completed during the Autumn semester, 3 in the Spring, and the dissertation submitted in the summer. Module either cover wider topics in social research, or focus on understanding and implementing advanced quantitative methods. Core modules Research Design and Process Quantitative Data Analysis Advanced Data Analysis Advanced Data Management Using Big Data in Social Research Option modules Students will also select two option modules from a range of applied social research topics. The recommended option is Social Network Analysis. Other options include The Nature of Social Enquiry, Policy Analysis and Evaluation Research, Qualitative Analysis and Research Methods in Criminology and Socio-Legal Studies. Some of these modules will be particularly suitable for students with an interest in mixed methods research. Delivery and assessment Modules are generally a combination of lectures and workshops. Teaching largely takes place on Tuesdays, although some components might take place on other days. The contact hours are sympathetic to those working alongside their studies. Most teaching is performed in smaller classes, with group activities. Modules are usually assessed by an examination, software based assignments, and essays. Modes of study 1 Year (full-time) Students will take three modules in each the Autumn and Spring semesters, completing their dissertation over the summer. The course runs from September to August each year. 2 Year (part-time) The course can be taken over two years with students studying 1 or 2 modules per semester. Career opportunities Social statistics are an important area within applied social research, offering employment opportunities within the private, public and voluntary sectors, as well as further study. Students will develop thorough knowledge of software and learn a range of sought-after technical skills, including accessing, preparing, analysing and summarising complex quantitative datasets. The course is also designed to provide the technical skill set required for further PhD study. [-]

MSc in Aquaculture: Sustainable Aquaculture

Campus Full time 1 - 5 years September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling

The Institute of Aquaculture is one of a handful of institutions world-wide wholly devoted to aquaculture science and is the only university department of its kind in the UK. The Institute is internationally recognised for both research and teaching and has more than 70 staff and 80 postgraduate students. [+]

The Institute of Aquaculture is one of a handful of institutions world-wide wholly devoted to aquaculture science and is the only university department of its kind in the UK. The Institute is internationally recognised for both research and teaching and has more than 70 staff and 80 postgraduate students. Our goal is to develop and promote sustainable aquaculture and in pursuit of this carry out research across most areas of aquaculture science including: Reproduction and Genetics Health Management Nutrition Environmental Management Aquaculture Systems and International Development Course objectives Students will attain background knowledge in the principles of aquaculture and key factors influencing viability of aquatic animal production systems, including an understanding of aquatic animal biology, environmental issues, nutrition, reproduction and genetics, disease and health management. The course provides advanced knowledge in chosen areas from; advanced broodstock management, aquaculture policy and planning, livelihoods analysis, geographic information systems, environmental management and biodiversity, feed formulation and resources, economics, marketing and business studies, shrimp culture, aquaculture engineering, aquatic animal health control, epidemiology, and ecotoxicology. Students will be able to appraise aquaculture operations and contribute to management decision making. The student will have the skills necessary to establish, manage and appraise aquaculture enterprises and development projects from within the industry or public sector. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Scholarships & funding Scottish Funding Council Masters Scholarships The Scottish Funding Council is funding Home/EU tuition fees for a number of places on this course. Funded places are open to applicants domiciled in Scotland and the EU. Postgraduate Tuition Fee Loan This course is currently approved for PTFL (Postgraduate Tuition Fee Loan) funding from SAAS Structure and content The MSc course at the Institute of Aquaculture is highly modularised and is designed to give considerable flexibility for learning, while maintaining a high standard of training. This structure allows students to make more subject choices which will benefit their future career and also have greater flexibility of learning over time. There is a number of degree outcomes available. These differ primarily in their defined path of required modules; specialised outcomes have more compulsory modules where the Sustainable Aquaculture degree has greater choice. The degree outcomes are: Master of Science/Postgraduate Diploma/Postgraduate Certificate in Sustainable Aquaculture Master of Science/Postgraduate Diploma in Aquaculture and the Environment Master of Science/Postgraduate Diploma in Aquaculture Business Management Master of Science/Postgraduate Diploma in Aquaculture and Development Master of Science/Postgraduate Diploma in Aquaculture Biotechnology The full Master’s course for each degree outcome is divided into six taught modules, containing 18 subject areas or topics, and a single research project module. The overall course is divided into three parts: Foundation modules (September to December) There are three compulsory modules consisting of six topics of study, taken consecutively, giving instruction in basic aquaculture concepts and skills. Successful completion of all foundation modules will qualify you for a Postgraduate Certificate in Sustainable Aquaculture. Students select a particular named degree outcome at the end of the foundation modules. Topics of study within the advanced modules are then chosen appropriately. Advanced modules (January to April) You must choose three advanced modules which cover six from 18 topics of study offered (choices are dependent on the final degree outcome to be awarded). Successful completion of the advanced modules, subsequent to the foundation modules, will qualify the student for a Postgraduate Diploma in a selected named degree outcome. Delivery and assessment In addition to lectures, tutorials and seminars, a number of assignments must be completed. Laboratory-based practical sessions and fieldwork are also important elements of the course. Taught module assessment is continuous, involving short tests, seminars, essays, practical reports, critical and computational analysis, field assignments and set project reports. The Research Project module is examined through written dissertation and seminar presentations by both examiners and the external examiner. Modes of study A variety of teaching approaches are used in the course. In addition to lectures, workshops, seminars, case studies, field and laboratory exercises, a number of minor projects are assigned throughout the course. These are an integral part of the teaching and will involve the students working alone or in groups. These projects may require a written outcome or a presentation to peers and other staff and students Strengths The Institute has been closely associated with the global expansion of aquaculture initially through developing and improving the existing production systems and the development of new farmed species. In recent years our research has focused on increasing the sustainability and security of aquaculture development and practice, and improving the efficiency of utilising natural resources. This gives out students the unique opportunity to be associated with these activities and obtain an insight into all aspects of aquacultural sciences and development worldwide. Career opportunities This course has run for over 30 years and has trained over 620 students from all over the world. The comprehensive nature of the course and our close links with UK and overseas industry allows good potential for employment in any aspect of commercial aquaculture. Approximately 30 percent of our students follow a direct route into industry. Additionally, the course is an excellent grounding for research and further education, often building on the dissertation, and about 30 percent of graduates choose this route. Links with government departments throughout the world allow many of our graduates to establish careers in aquaculture development and aquaculture management in developing countries. Employability We have designed our taught postgraduate courses so that, in addition to learning about your specialist discipline, you will be exposed to, and trained in, a number of skills which are not specific to aquaculture but which employers increasingly expect. During your course you will develop capabilities in the following areas: Academic: researching information information retrieval evaluative and analytical skills problem solving experimental design and statistics computing modelling Communication skills: oral presentation skills scientific and business report writing presentation of reports and research findings writing for a range of readers dealing with people, interviews teamwork, group-work, leadership Personal management skills: time management organisation, planning and prioritisation working under pressure working to deadlines The majority of our MSc research projects are developed in association with industry and are aimed at solving problems for the aquaculture industry. We also have an informal internship programme with industry, which will involve suitable students in real commercial projects. In the past these have included: development projects in Thailand and Vietnam, investigating carrying capacity for Indonesian aquaculture, and working with aqua-treatments within the pharmaceutical industry. Research Project module (April to August) The Research Project module is completed in a subject area which complements the chosen course of advanced study or your named degree outcome. These projects can be lab based, field based, or involve a desk study analysis/report. Successful completion of the module, subsequent to foundation and advanced modules, will qualify the student for an MSc in a selected degree outcome. Industry connections We work closely with the aquaculture industry in more than 20 countries, including every major company in Scotland, giving many of our students an opportunity to carry out industry-based research projects. During the course there are visits to various companies. Lectures and workshops in a number of modules are given by aquaculture professionals from Scotland. [-]

MSc in Aquaculture: Sustainable Aquaculture (Named Degree Outcomes)

Campus Full time September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling

As part of the highly flexible method of learning, the following degree outcomes are offered, all of which offer a route to an MSc, Postgraduate Diploma and Postgraduate Certificate qualification. All students will register for the degree in Sustainable Aquaculture in the first instance and be given the opportunity to change degree outcome at the end of the Foundation modules. All avenues to achieving your qualification are possible on a full-time or discontinuous basis to fit with your individual needs. [+]

As part of the highly flexible method of learning, the following degree outcomes are offered, all of which offer a route to an MSc, Postgraduate Diploma and Postgraduate Certificate qualification. All students will register for the degree in Sustainable Aquaculture in the first instance and be given the opportunity to change degree outcome at the end of the Foundation modules. All avenues to achieving your qualification are possible on a full-time or discontinuous basis to fit with your individual needs. Aquaculture Business Management Aquaculture and Development Aquaculture and the Environment Aquaculture Business Management Aquaculture Business Management provides appropriate and flexible learning opportunities to allow students to understand the economics of aquaculture and set up business plans necessary to establish and consolidate new and existing aquaculture enterprises. The course places an emphasis on investment, financial management and marketing considerations, fundamental to the success of commercial aquaculture operations in any operating context. The course is modularised, so SCQF credits can be accumulated (at the end of each assessed module) towards a postgraduate qualification. As a student of Aquaculture Business Management, there are two compulsory advanced topics of study: Business and Financial Management, and Policy, Planning and Management. The student must also complete a research project in a field relevant to the degree outcome. Aquaculture and Development The Aquaculture and Development course offers students the opportunity to hone skills necessary to plan, manage and evaluate aquaculture development projects. This course places an emphasis on ensuring the sustainability of aquaculture development initiatives in environmental, social and economic terms. The course is modularised, so SCQF credits can be accumulated (at the end of each assessed module) towards a postgraduate qualification. As a student of Aquaculture and Development, there are three compulsory advanced topics of study: Environmental Management; Livelihoods and Aquatic Resource Management and Policy; and Planning and Management. The student must also complete a research project in a field relevant to the degree outcome. Aquaculture and the Environment Environmental management of aquaculture to enhance sustainability is becoming ever more important. The MSc course in Aquaculture and the Environment provides flexible learning opportunities to acquire and extend the knowledge and expertise to develop environmental assessment strategies, management systems and regulation frameworks for the aquaculture industry or development projects throughout the world. The course is modularised, so SCQF credits can be accumulated (at the end of each assessed module) towards a postgraduate qualification. As a student of Aquaculture and the Environment, there are two compulsory advanced topics of study: Environmental Management and Environmental systems modelling. The student must also complete a research project in a field relevant to the degree outcome. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View our range of pre-sessional courses. Scholarships & funding Scottish Funding Council Masters Scholarships The Scottish Funding Council is funding Home/EU tuition fees for a number of places on this course. Funded places are open to applicants domiciled in Scotland and the EU. Postgraduate Tuition Fee Loan This course is currently approved for PTFL (Postgraduate Tuition Fee Loan) funding from SAAS Delivery and assessment In addition to lectures, tutorials and seminars, a number of assignments must be completed. Laboratory-based practical sessions and fieldwork are also important elements of the course. Taught module assessment is continuous, involving short tests, seminars, essays, practical reports, critical and computational analysis, field assignments and set project reports. The research project module is examined through written dissertation and seminar presentations by both examiners and the external examiner. Strengths The Institute has been closely associated with the global expansion of aquaculture initially through developing and improving the existing production systems and the development of new farmed species. In recent years our research has focused on increasing the sustainability and reducing the environmental impact of these activities. This gives out students the unique opportunity to be associated with these activities and obtain an insight into all aspects of aquacultural sciences and development worldwide. Career opportunities 90.5% of Stirling graduates are in employment or further study six months after graduation. [-]

MSc in Aquatic Food Security

Campus Full time 1 - 5 years September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling

This course is designed to introduce the global issues affecting seafood production and trading, and will promote an understanding of the key factors affecting aquatic food production, post-harvest protocols, post-mortem metabolic events and microbial/chemical processes key for food safety and quality. Sensory assessment and shelf-life extension technologies will also be covered. This is the only aquatic food security MSc currently available in the UK. It will comprehensively follow the food chain from production through to consumer health and welfare. [+]

Food security is a complex issue of global significance and understanding the role and contribution of seafood within food security is an emerging research area. Seafood products are provided by both aquaculture and capture fisheries and are one of the most highly traded food products globally. Including seafood in our daily diet provides an affordable source of macro and micronutrients required for optimal human health and development. This course is designed to introduce the global issues affecting seafood production and trading, and will promote an understanding of the key factors affecting aquatic food production, post-harvest protocols, post-mortem metabolic events and microbial/chemical processes key for food safety and quality. Sensory assessment and shelf-life extension technologies will also be covered. The course will also examine other key issues in seafood trading such as traceability systems, certifications as well as the impact of governance and legislation on the global seafood sector. This is the only aquatic food security MSc currently available in the UK. It will comprehensively follow the food chain from production through to consumer health and welfare. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Scholarships & funding Scottish Funding Council Masters Scholarships The Scottish Funding Council is funding Home/EU tuition fees for a number of places on this course. Funded places are open to applicants domiciled in Scotland and the EU. Structure and content This course shares some modules with the MSc in Sustainable Aquaculture and there is flexibility within the system to change the degree title depending on what advanced modules are taken. The course is divided into four taught modules, containing 18 subject areas or topics, and a single Research Project module. The overall course is divided into three parts: Semester 1 - Foundation modules There are two compulsory modules consisting of six topics of study, taken consecutively, giving instruction in basic aquaculture concepts and skills. Successful completion of both Foundation modules will qualify you for a Postgraduate Certificate in Sustainable Aquaculture. Students select a particular named degree outcome at the end of the Foundation modules. Topics of study within the Advanced Modules are then chosen appropriately. Semester 2 - Advanced Modules In order to graduate with an MSc in Aquatic Food security students must take a module in Food Quality and Safety for the first six weeks and can then chose one module from three for the second six weeks of teaching (choose from Animal Health and Breeding, Aquaculture Development and Numerical Skills). Semester 3 - Research Project module Projects can be lab based, field based, or involve a desk study analysis/report or mathematical modelling exercise. Successful completion of the module will qualify the student for the MSc in Aquatic Food security. Delivery and assessment In addition to lectures, tutorials and seminars, a number of assignments must be completed. Laboratory-based practical sessions are also important elements of the course. Taught module assessment is continuous, involving short tests, seminars, essays, practical reports, critical and computational analysis, field assignments and set project reports. The Research Project module is examined through written dissertation and seminar presentations by both supervisors and an external examiner. Strengths This MSc brings a unique perspective to the expertise that already exists in Stirling on global seafood production. It is the only MSc in the UK that focusses on how seafood can contribute to global food security. We have a number of links in the production, processing and retail industries and this will provide students with the opportunity to interact with industry and potentially carry out a project which is of direct relevance to the sector. We also have links within Asia and Europe which will allow the opportunity to undertake the Research Project overseas. Academic strengths The Institute of Aquaculture has been closely associated with the global expansion of aquaculture initially through developing and improving the existing production systems and the development of new farmed species. In recent years our research has focused on increasing the sustainability and reducing the environmental impact of these activities. In addition, we have recently invested in new posts in Aquatic Food Security whose activities also include research into food safety and quality post harvest, aquatic animal nutrition, as well as developing mathematical models of production systems. We therefore have expertise that covers the whole production cycle from farm to fork. The Institute of Aquaculture is internationally recognised for both research and teaching and is one of only a handful of institutions devoted to aquatic food security. The goal is to develop and promote aquatic food security building on the Institute staff expertise in sustainable aquatic animal production. Career opportunities Demand for well qualified postgraduates to contribute to food production and the supply chain will continue to increase in line with demand to double food production over the coming decades. This course provides each student with the appropriate knowledge and practical experience important for a career in aquatic food security. The course has been developed to provide students with core knowledge and practical skills on aquaculture, food safety/quality, numerical analysis and legislation appropriate to aquatic food security. These skills will be equally applicable to those wishing to pursue an academic career as well as those seeking employment in Government or industry. Employability This course has been developed to provide students with core knowledge and practical skills on aquaculture, food safety/quality, numerical analysis and legislation appropriate to aquatic food security. These skills will be equally applicable to those wishing to pursue an academic career as well as those seeking employment in Government or industry. Industry connections We have a number of links in the production, processing and retail industries which provides students with the opportunity to interact with industry and potentially carry out a project which is of direct relevance to the sector. We also have links within Asia and Europe which allows the opportunity to undertake the research project overseas. [-]

MSc in Aquatic Pathobiology

Campus Full time 1 - 5 years September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling

The Institute of Aquaculture is one of a handful of institutions worldwide wholly devoted to aquaculture science and is the only university department of its kind in the UK. The Institute is internationally recognised for both research and teaching and has more than 70 staff and 80 postgraduate students. [+]

The Institute of Aquaculture is one of a handful of institutions worldwide wholly devoted to aquaculture science and is the only university department of its kind in the UK. The Institute is internationally recognised for both research and teaching and has more than 70 staff and 80 postgraduate students. Our goal is to develop and promote sustainable aquaculture and in pursuit of this carry out research across most areas of aquaculture science including: Reproduction and Genetics Health Management Nutrition Environmental Management Aquaculture Systems and International Development Course objectives You will gain an understanding of the biology, husbandry and environment of farmed aquatic species, in addition to specialist expertise in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of aquatic animal diseases in cultured organisms. It is also intended as preparation for students who plan to pursue a PhD in the area of aquatic animal health or disease. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Scholarships & funding Scottish Funding Council Masters Scholarships The Scottish Funding Council is funding Home/EU tuition fees for a number of places on this course. Funded places are open to applicants domiciled in Scotland and the EU. Postgraduate Tuition Fee Loan This course is currently approved for PTFL (Postgraduate Tuition Fee Loan) funding from SAAS. Structure and content The full Master's course for each degree outcome is divided into six taught modules containing 12 subject areas or topics; three foundation modules, three advanced modules and a single Research Project module. The overall course is divided into three parts: Foundation modules The Foundation modules are taught between September and December. There are six compulsory topics of study within three taught modules, taken consecutively, giving instruction in basic aquaculture concepts and skills. Successful completion of all of the Foundation modules will qualify you for a Postgraduate Certificate in Sustainable Aquaculture. Advanced modules The three advanced modules consisting of six compulsory topics of study are taught between January and April. Successful completion of the advanced modules, subsequent to the Foundation modules, will qualify you for a Postgraduate Diploma in Aquatic Pathobiology. Research Project module The Research Project module is normally completed between April and August, and involves research in many areas of aquatic animal health. These projects are mostly laboratory based and often result in peer-reviewed publications. Successful completion of the module, subsequent to foundation and advanced modules, will qualify you for an MSc in Aquatic Pathobiology. Delivery and assessment The course is delivered though a variety of formats including lectures, practical classes, seminars, field visits and directed study. Assessment consists of a number of assignments in a range of formats. The Research Project is graded on your activities during the project, your dissertation and a seminar presentation made in front of your peers, supervisors and examiners. The dissertation is examined by Aquaculture and external examiner. Strengths The degree has been taught for almost 40 years and only one of its kind. It give students the unique opportunity to study the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of aquatic animal diseases in cultured organisms in one of the top institutions of the world. Career opportunities This course has run for almost 40 years and has trained over 200 students (in combination with Aquatic Veterinary Studies) from all over the world. It equips graduates with expertise applicable to a wide range of potential careers. The career path selected depends on your personal interests, as well as your previous experiences. Our graduates generally find employment in their area of interest and the world employment market in the area of aquatic animal health remains buoyant. The course provides a natural career progression for most candidates and a conversion course for others wishing to enter the field. It also provides training for those who wish to pursue a PhD, especially in aquaculture, aquatic health, fisheries and aquatic resources management. Over the last five intakes, in combination with the Aquatic Veterinary Studies degree, about 30 percent of graduates have gone on to a PhD or further research, about 25 percent have taken employment as aquatic health consultants, about 20 percent work in government fisheries departments, about 15 percent are university lecturers and the remainder are managers of farms or aquaria or have other types of employment. [-]

MSc in Banking and Finance

Campus Full time 1 year September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling

This MSc gives you the knowledge and analytical skills you’ll need for a successful career in banking or finance, or a related role. It’s suitable for students who already have related qualifications or experience, and those who don’t. It will also support your progress towards recognised professional qualifications. [+]

This MSc gives you the knowledge and analytical skills you’ll need for a successful career in banking or finance, or a related role. It’s suitable for students who already have related qualifications or experience, and those who don’t. It will also support your progress towards recognised professional qualifications. You’ll develop an understanding of the concepts and methodologies of banking practice, an appreciation of the value and limitations of research, and a critical awareness of the current and potential problems facing the industry. You’ll also develop your ability 
to read, understand and compile economic reports, company accounts and financial forecasts. Graduates aren’t limited to careers in banking; studies in finance equip students to succeed in the financial world in general. Accreditation The MSc Banking and Finance programme is accredited by the Chartered Banker Institute The Chartered Banker Institute recognises the relevance of our programme and offers graduates credit against its professional qualifications. Once you graduate you can apply for Associate membership of the Institute. If you decide to work towards Chartered status you can follow an accelerated route. This fast-track means you only have to study two further modules to attain a globally recognised, professional qualification. Top Reasons To Study With Us Chartered Banker Institute accreditation — offers graduates credits against its professional qualifications Real work experience opportunities — through the Santander Universities Work Skills Programme Flexible course structure — build on the core curriculum from a suite of optional modules Week long masterclass — run by Amplify Trading this will give you practical experience of trading markets Stirling’s global research rating — we’re among the top 25 in the UK according to REF 2014 Course objectives The overall objective of the course is to impart the knowledge and skills needed for a successful career in banking and finance, or a related field. A particular strength is the focus on the practical application of key banking and finance concepts, financial reporting, risk management tools and professional ethics in the banking industry. The course includes developing your understanding of the different types of banking and financial systems that exist globally, including those in emerging countries and countries in transition. As a Masters programme, the course also covers theory, methodology and research techniques within the dissertation module. You’ll develop a: Systematic understanding of knowledge in banking and finance Critical awareness of current problems and new insights in banking and finance Practical understanding of the techniques of enquiry and research used in banking and finance, and how they are used to create and interpret knowledge Conceptual understanding for evaluating current research and scholarship in banking and finance What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements You will need a lower second class honours degree in economics, finance or a related area. An upper second class honours degree in an unrelated discipline, or significant and relevant work experience. A background in banking and finance is not required but you should feel comfortable with the level of numeracy required to interpret statistics and financial reports. International students The University of Stirling welcomes students from around the world. Find out what studying here could be like for you. English language requirements If English isn’t your first language, you must have one of these qualifications: IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17 If you don’t meet the requirements, you might be able to attend one of our English courses before your main course begins. If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Scholarships & funding Stirling Management School Postgraduate Scholarships Stirling Management School is committed to investing in academically talented students, enabling them to further their education with a reputable qualification from one of the many degree courses on offer at the University of Stirling. There are various categories of funding available to support the cost of your studies at the University of Stirling. Other scholarships and funding You may qualify for University funding as well as funding from government bodies, the European Commission, funding trusts, research councils, industry and employers. Structure and content Begin your new course in the best possible way, with our unique Flying Start Leadership programme. This programme is exclusively for new students about to start one of our postgraduate courses. You’ll take part in activities, workshops and information sessions to help you prepare for the year ahead, and make the most of their time at Stirling. Participate in the Flying Start Leadership programme and you will: Discover more about the exciting period of learning ahead Understand what is expected of you in your course Get to know the teaching and support staff Learn more about a diverse range of approaches to learning Work as part of a successful team Activities range from practical skills – like effective public speaking – to developing ways to work under pressure in difficult situations and manage conflict. It’s also a chance to discover all that the University and the vibrant city of Stirling has to offer, and to make new friends. Delivery and assessment You will be taught through a combination of lectures and small group teaching, in the form of seminars, workshops or computing labs. Most of your module assessments include coursework, a mid-semester test and an end-of-semester examination. Resit examinations are available. When you successfully complete the taught element of the course you will be awarded a Postgraduate Diploma in Banking and Finance – or you will be awarded the MSc by going on to successfully complete a dissertation based on an original research question agreed by yourself and your supervisor. The dissertation project should reflect your own understanding and knowledge of selected topics covered in the taught modules. Strengths Our global reputation: research rating The University of Stirling Management School was ranked among the Top 25 in the UK for business and management in the Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014). Industry accreditation Our MSc Banking and Finance degree is recognised by the Chartered Banker Institute. The Institute will award subject specific credits to graduates who go on to study for their chartered status. Further, those who successfully complete the MSc programme are eligible to apply for Associated Chartered Banker status with the Institute. Our students have the opportunity to participate in the Santander Universities Work Skills Programme – this gives you invaluable experience of working for a leading UK bank. We’re also members of the Association of Business Schools and the European Foundation for Management Development. We work in partnership with the Chartered Management Institute and are signatories to the Principles for Responsible Management Education. Wide-ranging expertise Our lecturers have global reputations for advancing knowledge in the fields of banking and finance. The course reflects current developments in banking and finance and students, and we encourage our students to explore contemporary challenges with academic staff in seminars and workshops. Flexible course structure The flexible design of the degree programme means you can build on the core curriculum from a suite of optional modules. Enhanced employment opportunities Banking and finance qualifications, especially with a focus on the ability to analyse and solve problems with ethical dimensions, are highly attractive to today’s employers. Professional development for long-term success Our Flying Start Leadership programme helps you develop self-awareness about your strengths and acquire new competencies in a supportive environment. You can also participate in a course for professional stock market traders. Career opportunities The University of Stirling is ranked 7th in the UK for graduate employability. MSc Banking & Finance graduates work around the world in countries such as Kenya, Indonesia, China, India, Norway, Ghana, Turkey, Greece and Malta. Our graduates have enjoyed success within different financial organisations, including Alpha Bank, Ministry of Finance (Greece), Citibank, Santander, Ernst & Young, HSBC, Jones, Lang LaSalle, Grant Thornton UK LLP, Bank of China, Vodafone, CITIC Trust, and Emporiki Asset Management. Alumni who have built their careers after graduating more than 10 years ago today hold posts such as regional head of Novartis in Switzerland, credit partner at Santander Corporate Banking and head of banking trends at Egnatia Bank in Greece. Developing real-world expertise The Santander Universities Work Skills Programme helps students to develop their skills across a range of competencies including risk management, world class service ethics, sales management and HR. It provides students with an excellent opportunity to learn more about the industry, gain new skills and demonstrate their commitment to a career in banking We also offer an innovative week-long global financial trading and training boot camp for Masters students on our finance-related courses. Run by Amplify Trading, specialist trainers for the financial markets, its aim is to bridge the gap between academic understanding of financial markets and implementing trading strategies in the real world. Students work with live market data and can to trade across multiple asset classes to gain experience of how intra-day trading actually works. [-]

MSc in Behavioural Science for Management

Campus Full time 1 year September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling

This course teaches you the core theory and methods of behavioural science and behavioural economics, and how these can be applied to business and policy-relevant issues. It offers you the opportunity to gain advanced training in behavioural theory, to learn a comprehensive suite of behavioural methods, and to understand how this ‘toolkit’ can be applied to explain and inform the decisions made by stakeholders, workers and consumers. [+]

This course teaches you the core theory and methods of behavioural science and behavioural economics, and how these can be applied to business and policy-relevant issues. It offers you the opportunity to gain advanced training in behavioural theory, to learn a comprehensive suite of behavioural methods, and to understand how this ‘toolkit’ can be applied to explain and inform the decisions made by stakeholders, workers and consumers. Top Reasons To Study With Us The Course has been developed in consultation with the Behavioural Science Centre at Stirling. The centre holds grants from the EU Commission, SIRE, ESRC and Templeton foundation and aims to become a leading research centre in Behavioural Science in Europe. You will benefit from the vibrant research environment and the links with Industry and Policy groups being developed by Stirling Management School. External collaborations include the RAND Corporation in Santa Monica and Gallup Europe. The Stirling Behavioural Science Centre produces strong research in this area, published in leading journals and disseminated widely through the press (including The Financial Times and Time Magazine). Students will benefit from expert lectures and specialist guest lectures from leading researchers and policy-makers. Course objectives The course is designed to help you pursue a career in business in areas such as human resource management, advertising, regulation, social marketing and survey research. It’s also for those who wish to inform the design and implementation of public policy. The course provides an excellent entry point if you’re considering progressing to PhD research in this area. The course draws from the extensive experience of the academic staff from the university’s Behavioural Science Centre. The centre is an interdisciplinary hub, which enables economics, psychology, management and policy-design to be strongly integrated into the course. The course aims to enable students to produce innovative solutions to important challenges that transcend any single discipline. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements You’ll need minimum of a second class Honours degree or equivalent. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant and relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. International students The University of Stirling welcomes students from around the world. Find out what studying here could be like for you. English language requirements If English is not your first language, you must have one of the following qualifications: IELTS: 7.0 with minimum 6.0 in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade B Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade A Pearson Test of English (Academic): 67 with a minimum of 55 in each component IBT TOEFL: 100 with no sub test lower than 20 If you don’t meet the requirements, you might be able to attend one of our English courses before your main course begins. If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Structure and content This full-time course consists of two 15-week semesters of taught modules and a three-month dissertation period. Content: The course provides key skills and experience including: Core training in areas of psychological science most relevant to business and policy In-depth knowledge of the key concepts of behavioural economics How behavioural science can be applied to business and policy questions Sound understanding of growing areas such as experimental approaches to business and policy questions and strategies to enable behaviour change Detailed statistical and methodological training The design and analysis of surveys and survey data Using advanced experimental and empirical techniques Presenting research confidently Conducting independent research projects that test hypotheses in applied settings Preparation and support: Begin your new course in the best possible way, with our unique Flying Start Leadership programme. It’s exclusively for new students about to start one of our postgraduate courses. You’ll take part in activities, workshops and information sessions to help you prepare for the year ahead, and make the most of their time at Stirling. Attend the Flying Start Leadership programme and you will: Discover more about the exciting period of learning ahead Understand what is expected of you in your course Get to know the teaching and support staff Learn more about a diverse range of approaches to learning Work as part of a successful team Activities range from practical skills – like effective public speaking – to developing ways to work under pressure in difficult situations and manage conflict. It’s also a chance to discover all that the University and the vibrant city of Stirling has to offer, and to make new friends. Delivery and assessment Delivery includes lectures, seminars, guest speakers, article discussion groups, and presentations. Assessment is by a mixture of examination and coursework, including written assignments and presentations. When you successfully complete the taught element of the programme you’ll be awarded a Diploma. You can then continue for the award of the MSc by completing a 15,000-word dissertation. Strengths Our global reputation: research rating The University of Stirling Management School was ranked among the Top 25 in the UK for business and management in the Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014). The course has been developed in consultation with the university’s Behavioural Science Centre. The centre holds grants from the EU Commission, SIRE, ESRC and Templeton foundation and aims to become a leading research centre in Behavioural Science in Europe. You’ll benefit from the vibrant research environment and the links with industry and policy groups being developed by Stirling Management School. External collaborations include the RAND Corporation in Santa Monica and Gallup Europe. The Stirling Behavioural Science Centre produces strong research in this area, published in leading journals, including The Financial Times and Time Magazine. Students will benefit from expert lectures and specialist guest lectures from leading researchers and policy-makers. Career opportunities Once you complete this course you’ll be ready and able to contribute innovative solutions to many businesses, governments and society. The specialist knowledge you’ll gain will be invaluable in building a long-term career in business areas such as human resource management, advertising, regulation, consumer marketing, social marketing and survey research. It will also help you to inform the design and implementation of public policy. The course provides an excellent entry point if you’re thinking about progressing to doctoral research in this area. By the end of the course, you’ll have the skills and understanding to: Carry out complex statistics, design behavioural experiments and implement behavioural research methods Integrate the knowledge and understanding gained throughout the course and use this to tackle substantive issues in business and policy Use your knowledge of complex conceptual, design and statistical issues to understand, critically evaluation and apply insights from emerging research in behavioural economics and related disciplines Alongside acquiring an in-depth knowledge of the concepts and methods of behavioural science, your future development and employability will benefit from a set of core communication, analysis and problem-solving skills. Industry demand for skills Policy: The UK Behavioural Insights Team, originally set up within the Cabinet Office, draws on insights from the growing body of academic research in the fields of behavioural science and psychology. The concepts and methods used by the team are now being adopted by insights units in other countries and large organisations, and among those involved in policy implementation more generally. Marketing and market research: Key skills needed in marketing and market research include the ability to apply behavioural theory and methods to understand product pricings, promotion, and consumer perceptions. Part of this involves understanding the characteristics of customers, so that they can be grouped and targeted in customised ways. Human resources: There is a demand for skills within organisation development and design, resourcing and talent development as well as employee engagement within the HR environment. Survey research: High quality survey data is always needed by governments, state agencies, and businesses. Companies delivering this service seek sophisticated survey operations skills, including knowledge of data collection modes, survey design, survey completion behaviour, formatting, quality control, and distribution. Business: Business and management careers now place increasing value on the capacity to apply behavioural insights to business challenges and to gather evidence using experimental methods. Employability By the end of the course, students will possess the following understanding and skills: an ability to carry out complex statistics, design behavioural experiments and implement behavioural research methods; a capacity to integrate the knowledge and understanding amassed throughout the course and apply this to successfully tackle substantive issues in business and policy; an ability to use a conceptual understanding of complex conceptual, design and statistical issues to understand, critically evaluation and apply insights from emerging research in behavioural economics and related disciplines. Alongside acquiring an in-depth knowledge of the concepts and methods of behavioural science, students future development and employability will benefit from a set of core skills that the course aims to foster. These include the ability to: Written and oral communication skills present arguments clearly and concisely both in writing and orally; give a direct and concise answer to a question; present both brief summaries that identify the key points and fuller treatments of a topic that are well structured; present a balanced view of different opinions on an issue; use suitable means of presenting arguments, e.g. visual aids in oral presentations, diagrams in written work; contribute constructively to a group discussion; communicate concisely to different audiences, including those with no academic training. Analysis and problem-solving The ability to: deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively; abstract and simplify in order to identify the essence of a problem; analyse, reason and develop logical arguments; identify what should be taken as given or fixed for the purpose of solving a problem; set up and analyse a model; marshal and evaluate evidence; make sound judgements in the absence of complete data; assimilate, structure and analyse qualitative and quantitative data; think critically about the limits of any analysis; draw policy conclusions and recognise the potential constraints on their implementation; evaluate alternative strategies; keep an open mind about different methodological approaches; relate issues to a wider context; think imaginatively and creatively. Learning The ability to: search out relevant material; frame and ask questions that elicit the information required; synthesise relevant material; learn independently; make use of the services of libraries and other sources of help and information; continue to advance knowledge and understanding; develop new skills to a higher level. Self-management The ability to: work under pressure and meet deadlines; work methodically and manage time effectively; plan projects and prioritise tasks; set personal goals and evaluate personal performance; demonstrate self-direction and the capacity to work without supervision; take initiative and develop ideas independently. Computing and statistics The ability to: use information technology; use and interpret statistics. [-]

MSc in Big Data

Campus Full time 1 year September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling

If you want to become a data scientist, this is the course for you. Around 88% of data scientists have an MSc, making it a passport to jobs in this field. Get the skills in Python, R, Hadoop, NoSQL, Spark, and machine learning you need to land your dream job. All you need to join us is a degree in a numerate subject. We will teach you the coding skills and give you a firm basis in the maths and statistics you need. [+]

If you want to become a data scientist, this is the course for you. Around 88% of data scientists have an MSc, making it a passport to jobs in this field. Get the skills in Python, R, Hadoop, NoSQL, Spark, and machine learning you need to land your dream job. All you need to join us is a degree in a numerate subject. We will teach you the coding skills and give you a firm basis in the maths and statistics you need. This is a one year, full time taught MSc. designed to lead to a job in data science or analytics. Big Data skills are in high demand and they attract high salaries. The MSc Big Data at the University of Stirling is a taught advanced Master's degree covering the technology of Big Data and the science of data analytics. The course is taught in the beautiful Stirling campus in the heart of Scotland with support from companies who recruit data scientists. The course covers Big Data technology, advanced analytics and industrial and scientific applications. The syllabus includes: Mathematics for Big Data Python scripting Business and scientific applications of Big Data Big databases and NoSQL including MongoDB, Cassandra and Neo4J Analytics, machine learning and data visualisation using Weka, R and ScikitLearn Optimisation and heuristics for big problems Cluster computing with Hadoop, Spark, Hive and MapReduce Student projects including paid internships We are also proudly part of the DataLab MSc, which supports our students with funding, networking and routes into employment. Course objectives An understanding of the issues of scalability of databases, data analysis, search and optimisation The ability to choose the right solution for a commercial task involving big data, including databases, architectures and cloud services An understanding of the analysis of big data including methods to visualise and automatically learn from vast quantities of data An appreciation of the size of search spaces in large problems and the ability to choose an appropriate heuristic to find a near optimal solution The programming skills to build simple solutions using big data technologies such as MapReduce and scripting for NoSQL, and the ability to write parallel algorithms for multi processor execution. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree or equivalent in a numerate subject such as maths, computing, engineering or an analytic science. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate work experience are encouraged to apply. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Scholarships & funding Fees Paid for Scottish/EU Students We have a number of funded places available for Scottish/EU students, covering the full cost of the fees. Simply apply for a place on the programme and, if you qualify, you will be considered for the award. Places will be awarded on a first come, first serve basis. Structure and content Our Big Data MSc is a mix of practical technology such as Hadoop, NoSQL, and Map-Reduce, important maths and computing theory, and advanced computational techniques. The course will teach you what you need to know to collect, manage and analyse big, fast moving data for science or commerce. Foundation Maths and Computing Our foundation maths and computing courses make sure you have the theoretical grounding to build on for the rest of the course. Big Databases After a recap of SQL, this course takes you through the various NoSQL databases such as document stores like MongoDB, column stores like Cassandra and graph databases like Neo4j. You'll learn to pick the right database for your application and how to build, search and distribute the data in them. Big Data Analytics Sometimes, the more data you have, the better hidden the important facts become. Distilling information from big data needs fast, parallel analytics. We guide you through machine learning, data visualisation, web analytics and sentiment analysis. You'll learn the practicalities of big data analytics with techniques from data mining, machine learning, statistics, data visualisation and web analytics. Learn how we are training computers to understand the present and predict the future with data from finance, marketing, and social media. Hadoop and MapReduce This course covers distributed data processing with Hadoop and MapReduce in addition to the use of Condor for distributed computation. Heuristics for Big Problems Many big problems from scheduling a large airport to routing a fleet of trucks cannot be solved to perfection. This course covers computational heuristics for function optimisation where the search space is far too large to search exhaustively. Scientific and Commercial Applications With guest lectures from science and industry, this course presents a set of case studies of Big Data in action. You'll learn first hand how companies are using big data in fields such as banking, travel, telecoms, genetics and neuroscience. Projects Each student will carry out a project using a Big Data technology of their choice. With support from our staff you will choose a specialist topic and become a real expert. You'll start with an in-depth analysis of the topic and its technology. Then you'll build a solution that will showcase your skills to employers and give you the knowledge to win a high level, high pay job. Assessment This is a practical course and the assessment reflects that. Each module has an assignment and an exam, but the emphasis is on the course work. Technology Here are some of the technologies you will learn about on our Big Data MSc: mongoDB Cassandra Neo4j hadoop High Throughput Computing Analytics Analytical and problem solving methods you will learn include: Maths and Statistics Probability and likelihood Information theory Linear algebra Statistics Data Mining Neural networks Bayesian networks Decision Trees DM project management Optimisation Local search Genetic algorithms Particle swarm optimisation Genetic programming Strengths Industry and Employer Partnerships Stirling is a member of The Data Lab, which is an Innovation Centre with the aim of developing the data science talent and skills required by industry in Scotland. The data lab with facilitate industry involvement and collaboration and provide funding and resources for students. You can find out more about the Data Lab from their web site: www.thedatalab.com The Stirling MSc in Big Data has been developed in partnership with global and local companies who employ data scientists. HSBC have a development centre in Stirling and have provided some very interesting Big Data projects to our students. Amazon’s development centre in Scotland is close by in Edinburgh. The course features a long summer project, generally in partnership with a company or technology provider, that provides students with a showcase of their skills to take to employers or launch online. We also have a programme of invited speakers from industry who give the students a chance to ask questions of people who are doing data science every day. Recent companies have included MongoDB, SkyScanner and HSBC. Career opportunities Demand for people with big data skills is projected to grow rapidly in the coming years. Average salaries are higher in Big Data jobs than the IT average and the skills shortage will make that gap bigger. The Stirling Big Data MSc is run in partnership with industry and is designed to produce graduates with the skills that companies need. e-Skills UK estimate that: The number of Big Data jobs in the UK rose by 41% from 2012 - 2013 By 2020 there will be 56,000 Big Data jobs in the UK alone Big Data professionals earn on average 31% more than other IT professionals 77% of companies say it is difficult to recruit people with the Big Data skill they need [-]

MSc in Business and Management

Campus Full time 1 year September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling

This course gives you an insight into modern management practice and an opportunity to develop the functional, creative, strategic and leadership skills you’ll need to manage a responsible business. There’s an emphasis on entrepreneurship, innovation and strategic management that helps inform you on the contemporary debates and tensions around managing limited resources effectively and with maximum impact. [+]

This course gives you an insight into modern management practice and an opportunity to develop the functional, creative, strategic and leadership skills you’ll need to manage a responsible business. There’s an emphasis on entrepreneurship, innovation and strategic management that helps inform you on the contemporary debates and tensions around managing limited resources effectively and with maximum impact. In addition to industry visits, you’ll have the opportunity to undertake consultancy projects, developed in consultation with businesses across public, private and non-profit sector. Accreditation Stirling’s Masters in Business and Management course is accredited by the Association of MBAs (AMBA) ,the international impartial authority on postgraduate business education. Established in 1967, it aims to raise the profile of business education and the MBA qualification in UK and Europe. Top Reasons To Study With Us Focus on practical skills and knowledge to build confidence to work in any organisation in the future AMBA accreditation — our course is accredited by the Association of MBAs — the international impartial authority on postgraduate business education 5-star ranking — in the QS World University Rankings 2014 Expert academic staff — who are known worldwide, respected in their fields and have extensive business and consultancy experience Stirling’s global research rating — we’re among the top 25 in the UK according to REF 2014 Build your global network — study alongside international students across a range of business disciplines Course objectives MSc Business & Management gives graduates an insight into modern management practice and an opportunity to develop the functional, strategic and leadership skills required for managing a business. The course provides you with key skills and experience through: Examining the functional areas of management and their inter-relationship in organisations Exploring topical issues in management, comparing different management techniques to understand work issues Developing expertise in the use of key management tools, such as techniques for operations management, strategic and marketing analysis and financial analysis Developing personal skills and capabilities relevant to management, such as critical thinking, report writing, presentation, negotiation, networking, problem-solving and group working skills An emphasis on personal and professional development (PPD) to enhance learning throughout the academic year What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements You’ll need minimum of a second class Honours degree or equivalent. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant and appropriate work/life experience are encouraged to apply. INTO University of Stirling offers a Graduate Diploma for those students who do not meet the required criteria for this course. If you successfully complete the Graduate Diploma in Business, Finance and Sport and meet the required progression grades, you will be guaranteed entry onto this Master's degree. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications: IELTS: 6.5 with 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C or above Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B or above Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with a minimum of 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 90 with no sub test lower than 17 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Scholarships & funding Stirling Management School Postgraduate Scholarships There’s a range of scholarships available to you to help you fund your studies. Visit the School web page for more information. Postgraduate Tuition Fee Loan This course is currently approved for PTFL (Postgraduate Tuition Fee Loan) funding from SAAS Structure and content At Stirling Management School we understand the importance of your postgraduate degree to help you with your career choices. We understand the skills and personal qualities that recruiters look for in an individual. The course focuses on the major functions of organisations – accounting, marketing, operations, people and talent management. Finance and economics are integrated through our strategic orientation, which is complemented by our emphasis on personal and professional development to develop group and team management, organisational analysis and communications and influencing skills. Begin your new course in the best possible way, with our unique Flying Start Leadership programme. The programme is exclusively for new students about to start one of our postgraduate courses. You’ll take part in activities, workshops and information sessions to help you prepare for the year ahead, and make the most of your time at Stirling Management School. Attend the Flying Start Leadership programme and you will: Discover more about the exciting period of learning ahead Understand what is expected of you in your course Get to know the teaching and support staff Learn more about a diverse range of approaches to learning Work as part of a successful team Develop your personal goals for the year ahead Activities range from practical skills – like effective public speaking – to developing ways to work under pressure in difficult situations and manage conflict. It’s also a chance to discover all that the University and the vibrant city of Stirling has to offer, and to make new friends. As one current postgraduate student recently commented: “At Stirling you educate us, whilst back home they teach us” – a clear understanding of the approach we take to our teaching, how it empowers the individual to develop the capability for independent thinking. Delivery and assessment The course consists of two semesters of taught courses and a three-month dissertation period. Delivery includes lectures, seminars, guest speakers, article discussion groups, and presentations. Assessment is by a mixture of examination and coursework, including written assignments and presentations. When you successfully complete the taught element of the course you’ll be awarded a Diploma. You can then continue for the award of the MSc by completing either a 12,500-word dissertation or undertake a consultancy project with a Scottish business. Strengths You will have the benefit of learning from academic staff who are known worldwide, are respected in their fields and have extensive business and consultancy experience. Our global reputation: research rating The University of Stirling Management School was ranked among the Top 25 in the UK for business and management in the Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014). Career opportunities Where are our graduates now? Since the introduction of the course in 2008, our graduates have gone on to build careers in a variety of sectors around the world. In doing so, they are contributing to the performance of a range of organisations including central government offices, public sector bodies such as the NHS and universities, IKEA Trading, Parabola Ltd (Consultancy), and BDO International. Stirling is ranked 7th in the UK for graduate employability with 96% of our graduates in employment, or further study, within six months of graduating. (Telegraph/HESA, 2015) The University has achieved a 5-star excellence award for Employability. (QS Stars, 2014) Industry connections Senior executives from the private, public and third sectors, as well as entrepreneurs, engage throughout the year with our postgraduate students. This provides you with a practical perspective on contemporary business topics. In addition, we have a series of guest lectures and workshops which provide many networking opportunities. [-]

MSc in Child Development

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

This MSc is taught by our expert team of psychologists specialising in early childhood development. The course covers a range of topics from social and cognitive development, to autism and other atypical developmental issues, to the health psychology of infant feeding practices. Teaching is grounded in practice with input from social psychologists, health psychologists, neuropsychologists and primatologists. As well as a month-long placement, you will also benefit from hands-on learning through our in-house playgroup which is integral to teaching and research on the MSc. [+]

This MSc is taught by our expert team of psychologists specialising in early childhood development. The course covers a range of topics from social and cognitive development, to autism and other atypical developmental issues, to the health psychology of infant feeding practices. Teaching is grounded in practice with input from social psychologists, health psychologists, neuropsychologists and primatologists. As well as a month-long placement, you will also benefit from hands-on learning through our in-house playgroup which is integral to teaching and research on the MSc. Course objectives What the MSc is for: To train you how to conduct research into child development. How the brain and mind develop is critical to our understanding of human psychology. Studying this requires special skills and knowledge that you will acquire on this course. Who the MSc is for: Graduates in Psychology or related subjects and professionals working with children as continued professional development. How the MSc is taught: In addition to core research methods modules, the course includes a seminar series with topics ranging from social and cognitive development to autism and other atypical developmental issues and the health psychology of infant feeding practices. The research placement allows direct experience tailored to each student’s career aspirations, and the dissertation allows extensive research into a chosen aspect of child development. What you get Office space and equipment, a personal academic supervisor, and inclusion in a vibrant, stimulating and friendly research community. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Scholarships & funding There are typically five £1,000 bursaries to contribute towards fees or maintenance costs for students beginning a taught MSc course. All students, including international students, formally accepted onto the MSc course are eligible to apply for these awards. Awards will be decided on both previous experience and academic record but preference will be given to applicants intending to stay at Stirling to pursue a PhD following the MSc course. Structure and content The course is made up of the following modules: Child Development: A series of participatory seminars with developmental psychologists covering a range of topics in child development: socio-cognitive development in pre-school children; the social and cognitive characteristics of Autistic Spectrum Disorders; the health psychology of infant feeding practices; representation and social learning in infancy; cross-cultural differences in cognition; language and communication development and assessment. Psychological Research Methods I and II: Covers a wide range of techniques used in psychological research and demonstrates these techniques in relation to topics in a range of areas. Advanced Statistics: Assumes a reasonable knowledge of statistics, although an additional introductory module is available. The main statistics teaching is aimed at introducing advanced methods such as multivariate statistics and the rationale of using statistical methods. Key Skills for Psychology Researchers: Focuses on the research process, including ethical reviews, professional conduct and disseminating research effectively to specialist and non-specialist audiences. Qualitative Research Methods: Provides a broad but solid grounding in qualitative research methodology. Research Placement: This month-long placement, which can be in an applied setting in a children's charity, school or child services or within an academic setting such as a Research Assistant, is carried out in the Spring Semester, allowing students to broaden their practical research experience and enhance their employability skills. The Division of Psychology also has its own Playgroup which supports developmental research and teaching. We also offer some flexibility, allowing students to opt for a module from another subject area if this can meet personal training needs. Dissertation For those who go onto the MSc, approximately half of the course of study is devoted to a research project, leading to a 12,000-word dissertation. Delivery and assessment Teaching is delivered using a variety of methods including tutorials, demonstrations and practical classes, but the majority is seminar-based. Students are typically taught in small groups in specialist classes, with first-year PhD students or other postgraduate students (for example, in modules from other MSc courses). The individual module components contribute towards 60 percent of the MSc grade, with the research dissertation contributing the remaining 40 percent. Strengths Psychology at Stirling is one of the leading psychology departments in the UK. It ranked in the top 20 in the recent research assessment (REF 2014) and is one of only seven non-Russell group universities to do so (Birkbeck, Royal Holloway, Sussex, Essex, St Andrews and Bangor; source Times Higher Education magazine). Its quality of research publications ranked third in Scotland after Aberdeen and Glasgow. Furthermore, the relevance of its research activity to society received the highest possible rating which only four other psychology departments in the UK achieved (REF 2014 results). Psychology at Stirling University is small enough to fully involve MSc students in our lively and collegial community of research excellence. Your three month full-time dissertation is supervised by leading UK academics. Career opportunities The course is designed for those going on to do further research in developmental psychology and careers where a knowledge of developmental research is beneficial. The research placement enables you to gain direct experience tailored to your career aspirations and the dissertation allows extensive research into a chosen aspect of child development. [-]

MSc in Computing for Business

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 27 months September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

Combine business and management skills with computing expertise. Gain specialist, up-to-date computing, business and management knowledge with this intensive MSc. The course covers the application and development of key computer technologies, as well as business management principles. You will be offered a choice of computing modules, so that you can adapt the course to your previous computing experience. [+]

Combine business and management skills with computing expertise. Gain specialist, up-to-date computing, business and management knowledge with this intensive MSc. The course covers the application and development of key computer technologies, as well as business management principles. You will be offered a choice of computing modules, so that you can adapt the course to your previous computing experience. Computing Science at Stirling has strong links with industry. Students can get a first hand industrial experience through placements and internships with local enterprises and organisations. More specifically, we offer company-based MSc projects to our students where our students can work with an employer to gain valuable commercial experience. We usually place more than 50% of our students with a company for the MSc project duration. We also regularly invite industry experts to share their expertise with students through seminars and talks. The course is designed to complement and extend a student’s previous education and experience. As such the course offers a high degree of flexibility. You will also get prepared for finding and securing a great job after completing this course through an integrated structured personal and professional development programme. This course covers crucial topics such as self-image, body language, interview techniques, assessment centre strategies, conflict resolution as well as CV preparation and job targeting techniques. Course objectives The course is aimed at students from a variety of backgrounds, especially those that do not have any previous training in computing or management. This MSc will equip you with required knowledge in management and computing to embark on a successful career in the management of IT systems and teams. Our company sponsored MSc projects will provide an ideal pathway into the industry. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree or equivalent. No formal qualifications in Computing Science or Management are required. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. INTO University of Stirling offers a Graduate Diploma for those students who do not meet the required criteria for this course. If you successfully complete the Graduate Diploma in Science, Computing and Engineering and meet the required progression grades, you will be guaranteed entry onto year one of this Master's degree. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Structure and content This course comprises two 15-week semesters of taught modules, a winter programming assignment over three weeks in January, and the MSc dissertation project over three months at the end. Practical work is a key component in this course. It builds from self contained tasks in the first semester, over the larger winter programming assignment, to a group project in Semester 2. Finally, the dissertation project (possibly with a company) is the largest piece of work leading to your MSc dissertation. We usually place more than 50% of our students with a company for the MSc project duration. In Semester 1 you will take the following core module: Managing Across Cultures: This module introduces you to key concepts in managing different activities in international organisations. This module will help you to develop an appreciation of the different cultures and how this will impact on the way business is conducted and managed in different parts of the world. Plus either: Principles and Practice of Programming: Design and test programs written in Java. You will study good practice in program construction, programming with data structures and graphical user interfaces Database Principles and Applications: Provides a critical understanding of the role of database management systems and the ability to creatively design and implement practical databases or: Concurrent and Distributed Systems: Discusses how concurrent and distributed systems may be constructed and how parallelism in applications is handled. This module contains extensive lab exercises to illustrate the problems and for you to work on solutions. and one of Representing and Manipulating Data: This module focuses on technologies such as Python for data manipulation and JSON together with XML and HTML for data representation. Relational and non-Relational Databases: This module investigates the difference between SQL and non-relational (NoSQL) databases. It uses technologies such as MongoDB, Cassandra, and Neo4j. You will also learn about using MapReduce on databases. During the winter break there is an extended programming assignment using Java. In Semester 2 you will study three core modules: Business in Europe and the Competing Economies: This module will strengthen your understanding of the context and operation of international business in Europe and the competing economies such as the BRIC nations. Furthermore, you will critically reflect on the dynamics of these regions within the global market place and identify some of the key issues and challenges faced by the European and Asian businesses and societies. International Strategy: In this module you will develop an understanding of the nature of the environment facing organisations in international settings and its impact on strategy. You will also develop general management and team skills and reinforce the links between theory and practice. Plus one elective from: Object-oriented Software Design: How to analyse and model requirements and develop object-oriented software, through the use of UML and CASE tools Data Analytics: This module looks at Reasoning Systems, Data Mining and the use of probability information in predicting data values. Cluster Computing: In this module you will learn about the need for distributed data processing and distributed computing across clusters of computers. You will learn about the Hadoop ecosystem, including Pig and Hive, as well as distributing processes using Condor. You may graduate with the Postgraduate Diploma after two semesters, or you may continue with a three-month project and dissertation to qualify for the MSc degree. The subject of the dissertation will usually be a computer application for a financial purpose. Delivery and assessment You will learn about computing and management approaches through lectures, tutorials/seminars and practical sessions. Lectures involve the whole class, while tutorials and practicals are for small groups. Practical work is a key component in our degrees, and provides the opportunity for hands-on experience. It builds from self-contained tasks in the first semester, over a larger programming assignment in the winter break to a group project in Semester 2. Finally, the dissertation project is your largest single piece of work leading to your MSc dissertation. After two semesters of classes you will embark on a three-month project working on your dissertation topic. At the end of the project you will write up your findings as your MSc dissertation. For the MSc projects, we will make a number of industrial placements available. We usually place more than 50% of our students with a company for the MSc project duration. To support your work in and outside of classes, our computing laboratories offer 24-hour, seven-days-a-week access to state-of-the-art networked PCs, with full internet access. Throughout the course, a mixture of assessment techniques are used to allow you to give your best. Assessment on individual modules is usually based on both examination and practical work during the semester. Strengths Hands on experience & industrial placements Practical work is a key component in our degrees, and provides the opportunity for hands-on experience. It builds from self contained tasks in the first semester, over a larger programming assignment in the winter break to a group project in Semester 2. Finally, the dissertation project is your largest single piece of work leading to your MSc dissertation. We usually place more than 50% of our students with a company for the MSc project duration. After two semesters of classes you will embark on a three month project working on your dissertation topic. At the end of the project you will write up your findings as your MSc dissertation. For the MSc projects, we will make a number of industrial placements available. These will be offered to the best students in the class. Stirling is also partner in the Making the Most of Masters initiative, which organises company lead MSc projects. Other project suggestions both from external bodies and from within the university are also offered. Furthermore, students' own ideas for projects are encouraged and welcomed. Computing Science at the University of Stirling supports the Scottish e-Placement project which provides short and long term (one-year) placements with Scottish high-tech companies. These placements typically are paid and thus a good way of gaining commercial experience and helping with your living expenses. At Stirling, computing students are prepared for the employer-based MSc projects and the workplace more generally through an integrated structured personal and professional development programme called ‘Lift-Off’. This programme covers crucial topics such as self-image, body language, interview techniques, assessment centre strategies, conflict resolution as well as CV preparation and job targeting techniques. Career opportunities The MSc in Computing for Business will greatly enhance the employment prospects of students. As a graduate of Computing for Business, you will be in demand to manage and lead IT projects in a range of sectors including IT software organisations, service enterprises, large corporates, financial institutions. Previous postgraduate students in the department have been very successful in obtaining suitable employment in the computing field in a considerable diversity of posts - with small companies, with major international organisations including Accenture, IBM, HP, Yammer, Google, Microsoft, Reuters and major financial institutions such as HBOS, as well as with Local Authority and Government bodies. A number of graduates of the MSc Advanced Computing have continued their studies towards a PhD. More generally, common job profiles of our graduates are: As a Systems Analyst, you will work on solving computer problems. This might involve adapting existing systems or using new technologies designing a new software solution. In doing so, you will design software, write code, and test and fix software applications. You might also be involved in providing documentation for users. Typically, you would work as part of a larger team. IT Consultants closely work with clients (often at the clients premises) and advise them on how to use computer technology and applications to best meet their business needs. You will work with clients to improve their efficiency of using computer systems. This may involve the adaptation/customisation of software applications or the development of custom applications for the specific needs of the customer. As well as technical duties, you may be involved in project management. Applications Developers translate software requirements into programming code and will usually specialise in a specific area, such as computer games or web technology. Often developers work as part of a larger team. You may be in charge of developing a certain component or part of a larger application. [-]

MSc in Computing for Financial Markets

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 27 months September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

This course provides knowledge in key areas involving three subjects: Computing, Economics, and Finance. Together they offer a unique combination of expertise required for a successful career in the financial sector. This MSc offers a choice of computing modules so that the student can adapt the course to their previous computing experience. [+]

This course covers the application and development of computer technologies as used in banking and financial systems, as well as financial and economic principles. This course provides knowledge in key areas involving three subjects: Computing, Economics, and Finance. Together they offer a unique combination of expertise required for a successful career in the financial sector. This MSc offers a choice of computing modules so that the student can adapt the course to their previous computing experience. The course has a distinct international dimension as financial markets today are international in scope: trading in equities, bonds, derivatives and other securities occurs across borders and on a global scale. It emphasises the key characteristics of today's globalised financial world. Computing Science at Stirling has strong links with industry. Students can get a first-hand industrial experience through placements and internships with local enterprises and organisations. More specifically, we offer company-based MSc projects to our students where our students can work with an employer to gain valuable commercial experience. We also regularly invite industry experts to share their expertise with students through seminars and talks. You will also get prepared to find and secure a great job after completing this course through an integrated structured personal and professional development programme called ‘Lift-Off’. This course covers crucial topics such as self-image, body language, interview techniques, assessment centre strategies, conflict resolution as well as CV preparation and job targeting techniques. Course objectives The course is aimed at students from a variety of backgrounds, especially those that do not have any previous training in computing, economics or finance. The course is designed to complement and extend a student’s previous education, training and experience. Appropriate module choices facilitate adjusting the course of study according to a student’s preferences and prior expertise. The MSc in Computing for Financial Markets will greatly enhance the employment prospects of students. On completion of this course, you will be ideally placed to embark on an IT career in the financial sector. Our company sponsored MSc projects will provide an ideal pathway into the industry. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree or equivalent. No formal qualification in economics, finance or computing is required. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. INTO University of Stirling offers a Graduate Diploma for those students who do not meet the required criteria for this course. If you successfully complete the Graduate Diploma in Science, Computing and Engineering and meet the required progression grades, you will be guaranteed entry onto year one of this Master's degree. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Scholarships & funding Postgraduate Tuition Fee Loan This course is currently approved for PTFL (Postgraduate Tuition Fee Loan) funding from SAAS Structure and content This course comprises two 15-week semesters of taught modules, a winter programming assignment over three weeks in January, and the MSc project over three months at the end. Semester 1 concentrates on fundamental techniques. Semester 2 integrates, develops and applies these skills. Practical work is a key component in this course. It builds from self contained tasks in the first semester, over the larger Winter programming assignment, to a group project in Semester 2. Finally, the dissertation project (possibly with a company) is the largest piece of work leading to your MSc dissertation. We usually place more than 50% of our students with a company for the MSc project duration. In the Semester 1 you will take the following two core modules: Corporate Finance: Provides an understanding of how corporations raise finance (debt and equity) and invest money (capital budgeting). Also examines other major decision areas of corporate finance and how these affect the value of the firm Plus either: Principles and Practice of Programming: The design and testing of programs written in Java. You will study good practice in program construction, programming with data structures and graphical user interfaces Database Principles and Applications: Provides a critical understanding of the role of database management systems and the ability to creatively design and implement practical databases or: Concurrent and Distributed Systems: Discusses how concurrent and distributed systems may be constructed and how parallelism in applications is handled. This module contains extensive lab exercises to illustrate the problems and for you to work on solutions. one of Representing and Manipulating Data: This module focusses on technologies such as Python for data manipulation and JSON together with XML and HTML for data representation. Relational and non-Relational Databases: This module investigates the difference between SQL and non-relational (NoSQL) databases. It uses technologies such as MongoDB, Cassandra, and Neo4j. You will also learn about using MapReduce on databases. During the winter break there is an extended programming assignment using Java. Computing Science at Stirling has strong links with industry. We offer commercially linked projects for the MSc dissertation period. Topics include mobile phone app development (iPhone, Android, and also cross platform environments), bespoke Java applications, .net applications, and advanced website development projects. In the Semester 2 you will study three core modules: Derivatives: Provides an understanding of the uses and the valuation of the main derivative financial instruments. It covers the trading mechanisms used on derivative markets and explains the fundamental principles underlying the pricing of derivatives and their use in portfolio management, and risk management Investments and Portfolio Management: Provides an understanding of portfolio management principles and the valuation of equities and fixed-interest securities Plus one elective from: Object-oriented Software Design: How to analyse and model requirements and develop object-oriented software, through the use of UML and CASE tools Data Analytics: This module looks at Reasoning Systems, Data Mining and the use of probability information in predicting data values. Cluster Computing: In this module you will learn about the need for distributed data processing and distributed computing across clusters of computers. You will learn about the Hadoop ecosystem, including Pig and Hive, as well as distributing processes using Condor. You may graduate with the Postgraduate Diploma after two semesters, or you may continue with a three-month project and dissertation to qualify for the MSc degree. The subject of the dissertation will usually be a computer application for a financial purpose. Delivery and assessment Students will learn about computing, finance and economics topics through lectures, tutorials/seminars and practical sessions. Lectures involve the whole class, while tutorials and practicals are for small groups. Practical work is a key component in our degrees, and provides the opportunity for hands-on experience. It builds from self-contained tasks in Semester 1, over a larger programming assignment in the winter break to a group project in Semester 2. Finally, you will embark on a three-month project working on your dissertation topic. At the end of the project you will write up your findings as your MSc dissertation. For the MSc projects, we will make a number of industrial placements (usually unpaid) available through the Making the Most of Masters scheme (www.mastersprojects.ac.uk). We usually place more than 50% of our students with a company for the MSc project duration. Other project suggestions both from external bodies and from within the University are also offered. Furthermore, students' own ideas for projects are encouraged and welcomed. Often students bring in their previous expertise. Strengths Practical experience and industrial placements Practical work is a key component in our degrees, and provides the opportunity for hands-on experience. It builds from self-contained tasks in Semester 1, over a larger programming assignment in the winter break to a group project in Semester 2. Finally, the dissertation project is your largest single piece of work leading to your MSc dissertation. We usually place more than 50% of our students with a company for the MSc project duration. After two semesters of classes you will embark on a three month project working on your dissertation topic. At the end of the project you will write up your findings as your MSc dissertation. For the MSc projects, we will make a number of industrial placements available. These will be offered to the best students in the class. Stirling is also partner in the Making the Most of Masters initiative, which organises company lead MSc projects. Other project suggestions both from external bodies and from within the university are also offered. Furthermore, students' own ideas for projects are encouraged and welcomed. Computing Science at the University of Stirling supports the Scottish e-Placement project which provides short and long term (1-year) placements with Scottish high-tech companies. These placements typically are paid and thus a good way of gaining commercial experience and helping with your living expenses. At Stirling, computing students are prepared for the employer based MSc projects and the workplace more generally through an integrated structured personal and professional development programme called ‘Lift-Off’. This programme covers crucial topics such as self-image, body language, interview techniques, assessment centre strategies, conflict resolution as well as CV preparation and job targeting techniques. Career opportunities The MSc in Computing for Financial Markets will greatly enhance the employment prospects of students. As a graduate of Computing for Financial Markets, you will be in demand in a range of sectors including banks, insurance business, IT software organisations, and service enterprises. Previous postgraduate students have been very successful in obtaining suitable employment in the computing field in a considerable diversity of posts - some with small companies, others with major organisations such as HBOS, Prudential and RBS, with Local Authority and Government bodies. A number of graduates of the MSc Computing for Financial Markets have continued their studies towards a PhD. Common job profiles of our graduates are: As a Systems Analyst, you will work on solving computer problems. This might involve adapting existing systems or using new technologies designing a new software solution In doing so, you will design software, write code, and test and fix software applications. You might also be involved in providing documentation for users. Typically you would work as part of a larger team. IT Consultants closely work with clients (often at the clients premises) and advise them on how to use computer technology and applications to best meet their business needs. You will work with clients to improve their efficiency of using computer systems. This may involve the adaptation/customisation of software applications, or the development of custom applications for the specific needs of the customer. As well as technical duties, you may be involved in project management. Applications Developers translate software requirements into programming code, and will usually specialise in a specific area, such as computer games or web technology. Often developers work as part of a larger team. You may be in charge of developing a certain component or part of a larger application. [-]

MSc in Data Science for Business

Campus Full time 12 months September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling

This exciting new course is the first in Scotland to be run in partnership with SAS, a global leader in business analytic solutions. It has been developed in close collaboration with leading financial services organisation HSBC and The Data Lab, to produce graduates with the skills that industry needs. [+]

This exciting new course is the first in Scotland to be run in partnership with SAS, a global leader in business analytic solutions. It has been developed in close collaboration with leading financial services organisation HSBC and The Data Lab, to produce graduates with the skills that industry needs. The course addresses the acknowledged shortage of business leaders and managers with a detailed working knowledge of data analytics. It provides students with a deep understanding of the industrial and scientific relevance of advanced analytics and their application in strategic and operational decision making. In doing so it develops graduates with highly sought after blend of data analytics, business acumen and advanced management skills. The course gives you the opportunity to develop specialist skills by choosing elective modules from finance, marketing, data science and management. You’ll work in real life consultancy-style projects alongside industry leaders in data analytics. Our extensive network of external organisations across all sectors provides opportunities to build your knowledge, skills and experience for a successful career in business analytic roles. SAS partnership Our partnership gives students access to SAS educational material and licensed software, plus the opportunity for engaging in projects with an industry leader in the field of business analytics. Global organisations from all sectors use SAS to support strategic decision making. We’re confident that this partnership will make students stand out in their chosen career path. The Data Lab We work closely with The Data Lab, an internationally leading research and innovation centre in data science. Established with an £11.3 million grant from the Scottish Funding Council, TheDataLab will enable industry, public sector and world-class university researchers to innovate and develop new data science capabilities in a collaborative environment. Its core mission is to generate significant economic, social and scientific value from data. Our students will benefit from a wide range of learning and networking events that connect leading organisations seeking business analytics skills with students looking for exciting opportunities in this field. www.thedatalab.com Top Reasons To Study With Us Flexible course structure — specialise in finance, marketing, data science or management Industry partnership — gives our students access to SAS educational materials and licensed software Endorsed by The Data Lab — one of Scotland’s innovation centres that helps universities develop new data science capabilities in a collaborative environment Stirling’s global research rating — we’re among the top 25 in the UK according to REF 2014 Build your global network — study alongside international students across a range of business disciplines What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements You’ll need a minimum of a second class honours degree in any subject, or an equivalent qualification. However, you can still apply if you don’t have these formal qualifications, but bring significant work experience in a relevant area. If you don’t meet the required criteria for this course, you can complete the Graduate Diploma in Business, Finance and Sport to gain a guaranteed entry onto this Master's degree. INTO University of Stirling offers a Graduate Diploma for those students who do not meet the required criteria for this course. If you successfully complete the Graduate Diploma in Business, Finance and Sport and meet the required progression grades, you will be guaranteed entry onto this Master's degree. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C or above Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C or above Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Scholarships & funding Stirling Management School postgraduate scholarships Stirling Management School is committed to investing in academically talented students, helping them to further their education with one of our degree courses. There are various categories of funding available to support the cost of your studies. Other scholarships and funding You may qualify for University funding as well as funding from government bodies, the European Commission, funding trusts, research councils, industry and employers. Find out more with our Scholarship finder. Postgraduate Tuition Fee Loan This course is currently approved for PTFL funding from SAAS. Fully funded masters scholarships In partnership with the Scottish Funding Council (SFC), Scottish Aquaculture Innovation Centre and The Data Lab, the University of Stirling is currently offering up to 82 fully funded places on a select range of Masters Programmes during 2016/17. For each place, the full cost of tuition will be covered across a diverse set of courses. All of the cutting-edge programmes supported by this funding have been handpicked because they arm graduates with all the skills necessary to impact Scotland's key up-and-coming industries – and each scholarship is supported by a set of inclusive eligibility requirements. How do I apply? You don't. So long as you apply for one of the listed postgraduate courses, accept an unconditional offer and meet all eligibility requirements, you will automatically be considered for one of the SFC's 82 masters scholarships. Successful candidates will then be notified via email by the University's Admissions Office. Structure and content Begin your course in the best possible way, with our unique Flying Start Leadership programme. It’s exclusively for new students about to start one of our postgraduate courses. You’ll take part in a wide range of group and individual activities, workshops and information sessions to help you prepare for the year ahead, and make the most of your time at the University of Stirling Management School. Attend the Flying Start Leadership programme and you will: Discover more about the exciting period of learning ahead Understand what is expected of you in your course Get to know the teaching and support staff Learn more about a diverse range of approaches to learning Work as part of a successful team Develop your personal goals for the year ahead Activities range from practical skills – such as effective public speaking – to developing ways to work in groups with other students. The programme is also a chance to discover all that the University and the vibrant city of Stirling has to offer, and to make new friends. Other learning activities to prepare you for study in the UK Prepare for Success is an interactive web learning tool for international students who are coming to the UK to study. The aim of the course is to equip graduates with a highly sought after blend of data analytics, business acumen and advanced management skills. Through a series of core modules, you’ll acquire the knowledge, skills and experience for a successful career in data analytic roles. You’ll also develop an understanding of the ways data analytics is used in organisations across different sectors. This will be achieved through data analytics theory and practice, with many opportunities to work with real data sets. You’ll also have the opportunity to work with industry partners, through consultancy projects, as well bringing their expertise into the classroom. Over the two semesters, you will: Acquire knowledge, skills and experience for a successful career in data driven roles Understand the applications and implications of data analytics in organisations across different sectors Develop knowledge and skills of data analytics tools and techniques for business decision making Enhance your capabilities and confidence for championing data analytic projects Enhance and develop critical, analytical, interpersonal and other transferable skills Delivery and assessment The one-year MSc course is delivered via a mix of lectures, tutorials, case studies, role playing, computer simulations, fieldwork exercises, site visits, guest speakers and company projects. Much of the assessment is continuous. Assessed work is often conducted in groups, developing your teamwork and communication skills. During the second semester you’ll carry out a consultancy project with an external organisation tackling a critical business challenge. This will give you an opportunity to integrate and apply the knowledge and skills you develop throughout your degree. Strengths Wide-ranging expertise This programme has been developed in close collaboration with key business and research partners across private and public sector. The course has been endorsed by the DataLab, Scotland’s leading Data Science Innovation Centre. It aims to enable industry, public sector and researchers to innovate and develop new data science capabilities in a collaborative environment. The strength of the programme is twofold: It combines data science with business, including personal and professional skills development The practical application of the modules helps students make a difference in the workplace from day one Flexible course structure The flexible design of the degree course means you can specialise in finance, marketing, data science and management. Networking opportunities Many of our postgraduate students come from overseas. Studying at Stirling offers an excellent opportunity to establish your own global network of contacts at the outset of your career. Professional development for long-term success Our Flying Start Leadership programme helps you develop self-awareness about your strengths and acquire new competencies in a supportive environment. Career opportunities Demand for people with data analytics skills is projected to grow rapidly. Average salaries are higher in data analytics jobs than the IT average and the skills shortage will make that gap bigger. The Stirling MSc Data Science for Business is run in partnership with industry and is designed to produce graduates with the skills that companies need. The Tech Partnership UK estimate that: By 2020 there will be 56,000 big data jobs in the UK alone Big data professionals earn on average 31% more than other IT professionals 77% of companies say it is difficult to recruit people with the big data skills they need A 2014 report by Egon Zehnder and the Kellog School of Management states that “all leaders need a working knowledge of data science” and that “there is no lack of data scientist, rather a lack of data-ready managers”. This is the specific issue that the proposed programme is going to address. There’s a clear need for high-quality graduates with a blend of skills in data analytics and business management. This MSc will develop graduates with the necessary specialist knowledge, technical skills and experience for a successful career in roles requiring data-driven decision making across a range of sectors. This course combines the latest theories with their application in real organisations and brings together two areas of expertise within the University – big data analytics (Computing Science and Mathematics, Faculty of Natural Sciences) and management and leadership (Management). The course has a high level of engagement with industry, research and recruitment partners in the course design, delivery, project work and skill development activities. You’ll have the opportunity to gain first-hand practical experience by working on consultancy style projects with external clients. [-]

MSc in Educational Leadership (with Specialist Qualification for Headship)

Online & Campus Combined Part time 3 - 5 years September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling

The MSc in Educational Leadership (with Specialist Qualification for Headship) is a work-based Master’s course designed to enable aspiring school leaders and managers to gain a Master’s degree which contributes to the development of the knowledge, understanding and skills required to allow them to articulate and enact informed strategic vision, values and aims in relation to professional practice. [+]

The MSc in Educational Leadership (with Specialist Qualification for Headship) is a work-based Master’s course designed to enable aspiring school leaders and managers to gain a Master’s degree which contributes to the development of the knowledge, understanding and skills required to allow them to articulate and enact informed strategic vision, values and aims in relation to professional practice. The MSc in Educational Leadership course has at its heart the Specialist Qualification for Headship (SQH) which is embedded in the Into Headship modules. This element of the programme will be accredited by the General Teaching Council for Scotland (GTCS) and so this work-based Master’s course incorporates both a professional and academic award. The development of the Into Headship modules is the result of an ongoing formal collaboration with the Scottish College for Educational Leadership (SCEL), Local Authorities, the General Teaching Council for Scotland (GTCS), Education Scotland, four other Universities and the highly successful SQH Western Consortium (Universities of Glasgow, Stirling and Strathclyde). Building on the success and impact of previous programmes, including the MSc in Educational Leadership (with Scottish Qualification for Headship), this new programme is designed to take account of current policy and the professional standards framework (GTCS, 2012) to offer participants an opportunity to develop strategic leadership and management competencies. The programme offers opportunities for participants to further develop their professional learning and strategic leadership and management practices in a supportive, flexible, creative and challenging learning environment. Accreditation The Into Headship modules EDUP021 (Into Headship 1) and EDUP022 (Into Headship 2) will be accredited by the General Teaching Council for Scotland (GTCS). Course objectives The course supports the professional growth of aspiring leaders and enables them to contribute effectively to the improvement of practice in their own professional setting and the wider professional community. Specifically, the course will enable participants to develop the means of using critical reflection to enhance their practice, develop the strategic leadership and management competencies specified by the appropriate professional standards provided by the GTCS and gain a sound understanding of school leadership and management practice and theory as it applies in school settings. The programme is designed to support the development of strong professional networks both within and beyond the course. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 56 in each component IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View our range of pre-sessional courses. If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Scholarships & funding The SQH modules are normally funded by the employing local authority of the candidate, though individual applications are accepted. Structure and content The MSc in Educational Leadership (with Specialist Qualification for Headship) programme will comprise three stages: Middle Leadership Into Headship Extended Induction Prior to 2018 candidates may undertake EDUP021 Into Headship 1 and EEDUP022 Into Headship 2 as a Postgraduate Certificate. After 2018 these modules will form the Diploma stage of this qualification. Delivery and assessment This course is offered on a part-time basis only. The period of study is normally three years for the MSc, although this programme is unlikely to be taken over three consecutive years. Candidates must complete six modules for the MSc degree. Strengths When attending study days on campus at the University of Stirling, a number of facilities are available to make your stay easier and more enjoyable. The University of Stirling has an outstanding range of accommodation and catering facilities. Located within the historic Airthrey Estate, the stunning 330 acre campus grounds include an 18th Century Castle, loch and golf course and have been described as ‘an exceptional place to study and work’. Accommodation The Stirling Court Hotel - one of only two venues in Scotland awarded the highly coveted Conference Centre of Excellence Award provides 100 bedrooms, 365 days a year and features conference, accommodation and dining facilities. Other accommodation options in and around Stirling can be found at Destination Stirling. Catering The University of Stirling offers a wide range of catering options for students, staff and visitors, to suit all tastes and budgets. The Pathfoot and Haldane's eateries are ideally suited for larger group lunches while other smaller coffee shop/café outlets such as Stir Café and The Bite Costa offer a lighter ‘on the move’ option. Situated in the Atrium: Haldanes Eatery Stir Café Market Street Sidewalk Pathfoot Eatery Willow Court ‘Refresh Bar & Bistro’ Bite Costa Café bars within the Macrobert arts centre and Sports Centre Stirling Court Hotel Abbeycraig restaurant Bar menu Facilities University of Stirling students have access to a wide range of facilities and activities within the stunning campus grounds including: Shopping area with bank, bookshop, gift shop, newsagent, pharmacy and mini-supermarket. Macrobert arts centre with theatre, cinema, café bar and award-winning entertainment. on-site car parking library 50m swimming pool Fitness centre Indoor and outdoor tennis courts 9-hole golf course Putting green Squash courts Athletics track Lochside walks Fishing Art collection (guided tours available on request) Career opportunities The Specialist Qualification for Headship is a nationally approved course for demonstrating the Standard for Headship. Employability The MSc in Educational Leadership (with SQH) develops knowledge, understanding and skills to enhance leadership and management practices and support career-long professional development. Industry connections The MSc in Educational Leadership (with SQH) has been designed and developed in partnership with SCEL and other stakeholders across the education community and will be accredited by the GTCS. Graduates may also wish to pursue further education in the form of the Doctorate in Education. [-]

MSc in Education Studies and TESOL

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

The MSc in Education Studies and TESOL combines a broad exploration of educational issues, practical experience of observing local schools, and training in TESOL theory, practice and research. [+]

The MSc in Education Studies and TESOL combines a broad exploration of educational issues, practical experience of observing local schools, and training in TESOL theory, practice and research. On the TESOL side, the degree will provide you with a solid grounding in the principles of language learning and teaching and an understanding of research methods in TESOL, as well as giving you the opportunity to pursue an interest in teaching young learners, computer-assisted and online language learning, or English grammar and discourse analysis. In education studies, you will join a programme of visits to local schools and learn about the wider pastoral role of being an educator in a professional context. You will engage in discussions around the issues of difference and diversity and consider critically some of the wider theoretical and policy-based contexts for professional practice. You will also explore different approaches to educational research and their underlying assumptions. Who is this course for? This degree is particularly appropriate for teachers (with at least one year’s experience) who want to study for a post-graduate degree with a strong education element as well as a focus on TESOL. You may be attracted by a broader qualification than the MSc TESOL, or you may want to extend your teaching experience with knowledge about TESOL. You may be planning to teach in a state school or in an international school, and you may teach other subjects as well as English. The degree will also be relevant to you if you wish to go on to study for a PhD or to work in teacher education or school management. TOP Reasons To Study With Us You will gain a Master’s level TESOL qualification in teaching from an Education centre for excellence that is ranked 9th in the UK, The Times Good University Guide, 2016. The qualification combines a focus on TESOL with a broader understanding of educational theory and practice. It involves visits to local schools, which will give you a first-hand experience of the pastoral role of teachers in schools. You will have the opportunity to work with home and international students from a wide range of backgrounds. You will be taught by TESOL professionals who have combined experience of living and teaching in all continents of the world What Makes Us Different ... [-]

MSc in Environment, Heritage and Policy

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 24 months September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

The MSc in Environment, Heritage and Policy has been developed to provide interdisciplinary training at an advanced level for existing practitioners in the heritage sector or those seeking a career in that sector. [+]

The MSc in Environment, Heritage and Policy has been developed to provide interdisciplinary training at an advanced level for existing practitioners in the heritage sector or those seeking a career in that sector. The course offers an ideal balance between the practical and intellectual elements of heritage and heritage policy. Students both explore cultural, natural, tangible and intangible heritage through the lens of environmental history, whilst also developing a strong practical skills-base. The course provides a foundation in the concepts, ideas, theory, practice and application of heritage and heritage policy skills in the principal subject areas contributing to the study of cultural and natural heritage advanced study in the main subject areas of candidates’ primary disciplines training in appropriate quantitative and qualitative research, interpretative and presentational methodologies. Students have the opportunity to work with members of staff on a one to one basis, and experience the Scottish cultural and natural environments first-hand on a number of field trips designed to enhance class based teaching. The course of study prepares students in the concepts and ideas of the field and in one year enables them to investigate issues such as: Protected Spaces/Legislative Framework Designation; Heritage, Identity and Place ‘The Highlands and the Roots of Green Consciousness’ World Heritage and National Parks Public Relations and Marketing and Interpretation Media and apply their skills in an individual research project. Placement opportunities will be available in a range of venues across the sector. These will include heritage attractions and outdoor centres, museums, galleries and libraries, NGOs, and private sector industry partners. Top Reasons To Study With Us The course has a strong emphasis on both the conceptual and the intellectual study of heritage, which provides a fascinating and unique approach to studying the subject. The interdisciplinary nature of the programme means you can straddle more than one discipline and gain wider, more diverse skills. Field trips will allow you to take your learning outside of the classroom, while providing the opportunity to experience the Scottish environment first hand. You will be taught by a strong team, with excellent industry links, from a number of different disciplines. You will benefit from the opportunity to work with staff on a one-to-one basis but will be encourage to conduct independent work and bring ideas back to the classroom What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 56 in each component IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Scholarships & funding Scottish Funding Council Masters Scholarships The Scottish Funding Council is funding Home/EU tuition fees for a number of places on this course. Funded places are open to applicants domiciled in Scotland and the EU. The University of Stirling is offering any students from the UK or European Union with a First Class Honours degree (or equivalent) a £2,000 scholarship to study full-time on any taught Masters course or £1,000 for part-time study. Delivery and assessment Depending on module content, delivery is by weekly, three-hour seminar or workshop and/or field visit/class. Assessment for both 30-credit core modules and 15-credit options is 100% coursework including assessed oral presentations, plus a 15,000-word traditional dissertation (100% of final grade) or work-based project portfolio (70% of the final grade) and a 5,000-word critical essay (30% of final grade) Strengths The Faculty of Arts and Humanities has an established tradition of interdisciplinary teaching up to and beyond Master’s level and of close teaching and research collaborations with the Faculty of Natural Sciences, embodied in the Centre for Environmental History and Policy. The course is delivered by an interdisciplinary team who possess strong connections with a range of historical and archaeological sector employers, and heritage and tourism industries, including members who have recent experience working within or for the heritage sector nationally and internationally. Individual team members have significant connections with national agencies and charities within the historic and built environment fields of the heritage sector and have served on NGOs and advisory councils in those areas. Others have close professional links with the communications and media sector, including specialists in travel writing and travel journalism, PR and marketing. Contacts are also strong with natural heritage agencies including National Parks authorities, Scottish Natural Heritage/Natural England, and leading conservation charities nationally and internationally. Academic strengths The academic subjects contributing to this course have a range of academic expertise in the area of cultural and natural heritage, and the interpretation and communication of heritage significance to broad audiences. Innovative course development within the departments is nurtured by a strong research ethos sustained by the staff. The host department, History, has a strong focus on historic built environment, environmental impacts on cultural landscapes, computer applications for management of historical data, scripting of historical content for heritage interpretation and, in association with colleagues in Natural Sciences, remote sensing technologies and GIS applications for historical/archaeological and natural environment data. This course offers a unique interdisciplinary training at Master’s level that draws on the expertise of a range of subject specialists and professional practitioners with experience across the broad heritage sector. Unlike at other institutions, this course is not delivered from within a Heritage and Tourism Management context, drawing instead on applied and academic skills from within the Faculties of Arts and Humanities, Social Sciences and Natural Sciences, thereby encouraging the development of interdisciplinary skills, application of interdisciplinary methods, and broader awareness of the distinct contribution of different disciplines and skill-sets to management, curation and public interpretation of heritage. It is designed to provide advanced-level academic skills in both theoretical frameworks and the contextual application of those theories to enhance candidates’ existing qualifications and provide them with a range of graduate attributes desirable for careers within an expanding economic sector. Targeted also at those already working within the broadly-defined heritage professions, this course has been constructed to expand their professional experience beyond the area of the sector within which they have specialised, enabling them to advance into upper-level management positions within the heritage sector more widely. Employability This course is designed to produce graduates with advanced skills for careers in the Cultural and Natural Heritage sectors, particularly in cultural heritage resource management and curation, interpretation and presentation of heritage, promotion and marketing of heritage, and sustainable tourism. Typical careers would include management roles within NGOs working in the cultural and natural heritage sectors, National Parks authorities, local and national government agencies, and heritage-focused charities (especially historic and built environment), senior education, interpretation and marketing roles in similar bodies. It is also designed to provide an advanced-level academic qualification for those already employed within the sector seeking professional development opportunities for the step into middle and upper management roles. [-]

MSc in Environmental Management

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 24 months September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

This course was established over 25 years ago and is now widely recognised as an international leader in training environmental managers for work in both the public and private sectors. Environmental managers play a vital role in the protection and sustainable use of resources. Students learn to address issues such as adaptation to climate change, biodiversity and sustainable energy management. At the local level Environmental Management focuses on conservation and protection of land and water resources and natural habitats. [+]

This course was established over 25 years ago and is now widely recognised as an international leader in training environmental managers for work in both the public and private sectors. Environmental managers play a vital role in the protection and sustainable use of resources. Students learn to address issues such as adaptation to climate change, biodiversity and sustainable energy management. At the local level Environmental Management focuses on conservation and protection of land and water resources and natural habitats. Stirling’s graduates work for organisations such as the Environment Protection Agencies, major conservation bodies, local authorities and independent environmental consultancies, many in senior positions. Degree pathways The following degree pathways are offered, all of which provide a route to an MSc, Postgraduate Diploma or Postgraduate Certificate qualification. All students will register for the MSc in Environmental Management in the first instance their exit pathway being determined by the choice of modules selected. MSc Environmental Management MSc Environmental Management (Conservation) MSc Environmental Management (Energy) Course objectives Our course gives students: An understanding of the scientific principles that underpin environmental management An understanding of the economic, social, political and legal frameworks for environmental management A sound training in relevant practical, investigative, research and generic skills that are the most sought after by employers. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants from other disciplines with a 2:1 or 1st but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.5 with 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 17 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Scholarships & funding Scottish Funding Council Masters Scholarships The Scottish Funding Council is funding Home/EU tuition fees for a number of places on this course. Funded places are open to applicants domiciled in Scotland and the EU. Structure and content The basic structure is three modules in each of Semesters 1 and 2 followed by a dissertation, with each module worth 20 SCQF credits at level 11 and the dissertation worth 60 credits. Students who meet the requirements of the taught course will qualify for the Diploma and may proceed to the MSc. This involves completion of a three-month Research Project, often in collaboration with an outside agency. Students frequently choose a topic complementary to their option selection, allowing them to develop a high level of competence in aspects of environmental management relevant to their future employment. Delivery and assessment The course is taught primarily by staff within Biological and Environmental Sciences, but also by staff from other departments of the University and visiting professionals from outside agencies. Assessment is via coursework and examination, and may include teamwork and presentations. Exams are held in December and May, and MSc research projects are submitted in early September. Strengths The University of Stirling is a hub for environmental bodies in Scotland. Several environmental consultancies and NGOs have offices in or around the University, including RSPB, British Trust for Ornithology and The Conservation Volunteers, and we work closely with these organisations in conducting research. We have excellent links with government e.g. SEPA, and have senior Scottish Natural Heritage and RSPB staff among our Honorary professors. Career opportunities Students on our courses have an excellent record in gaining employment in the environmental sector and many of our former graduates now hold senior positions. Typical jobs include: Environmental Consultant (e.g. Jacobs), Environmental Protection Officers and Scientific Advisers in environment agencies (EA, SEPA), Environmental Managers within local authorities, national industries (e.g. Northumbrian Water) and trusts (e.g. Tweed Forum). Employability Early on in this course, students take a residential field module and immediately begin to learn practical identification, surveying, measuring and sampling skills. Having learned how to collect data they are then taught how to analyse, report and present them through the modules Analysis of Environmental Data (using R), GIS and Remote Sensing. Transferable skills often required within Environmental agencies/consultancies include the ability to translate theory into practice, to work in a team and independently, plan and coordinate research, and engage with a variety of different users. Industry connections We have excellent links with many organisations, particularly in Scotland. Visiting speakers are invited, both for stand-alone seminars and as an integral part of some modules. We make full use of our alumni and industry and government research contacts to assemble a diverse and topical seminar programme. We strive to keep the course in tune with the needs of employers and changes occurring in the field of environmental management and policy. A networking event is held annually when students can meet with local employers to discuss work placements and future job opportunities. [-]

MSc in Environmental Management (Conservation)

Campus Full time 1 year September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling

The University of Stirling has offered an innovative postgraduate course in Environmental Management with a Conservation specialisation since 2013, leading to the qualification of Diploma or MSc. The course provides the scientific knowledge and approaches for conservation science and practice and the opportunity to specialise in particular areas via the selection of relevant modules and the research project. [+]

The University of Stirling has offered an innovative postgraduate course in Environmental Management with a Conservation specialisation since 2013, leading to the qualification of Diploma or MSc. The course provides the scientific knowledge and approaches for conservation science and practice and the opportunity to specialise in particular areas via the selection of relevant modules and the research project. Areas of potential specialisation include ecosystem services, environmental economics, conservation conflicts, habitat and biodiversity management and application of GIS and remote sensing. There is a compulsory residential course in field techniques, which takes place in the Cairngorm National Park. The MSc course is equally relevant to recent and mature graduates seeking a career in conservation science, governmental and non-governmental organisations. Our course gives students: An understanding of the science that underpin conservation and sustainability An understanding of the ecological, economic, social, political and legal frameworks for conservation A comprehensive training in quantitative, theoretical, analytical and practical and generic skills. Course objectives Graduates from this course will have gained knowledge in the broad field of conservation science, including collecting and analysing relevant data for sustainable decision-making and transferable skills relevant to future employment at national and international level. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants from other disciplines with a 2:1 or 1st but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.5 with 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 17 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Structure and content The basic structure is three modules in each of Semesters 1 and 2 followed by a dissertation with each module worth 20 credits at level 11 and the dissertation worth 60 credits. Students who successfully complete the taught course over two semesters will qualify for the Diploma and may proceed to the MSc. This involves completion of a three-month Research Project, often in collaboration with an outside agency. Students frequently choose a topic complementary to their option selection, allowing them to develop a high level of competence in aspects of conservation science relevant to their future employment. Delivery and assessment Contact hours in all modules will be 27-30 hours. Delivery will include a mixture of conventional lectures, workshop sessions, field excursions, student-led debates and oral presentations. A variety of means of assessment will be used as appropriate to the content and outcomes of the individual modules. For example, the Field Techniques module is a practical skills-based course, so assessment will be based on tests of these skills and on a collection of specimens put together by the student. Other modules are based on lectures and seminars and have a more traditional mix of essay assessments and exams. Strengths Biological and Environmental Sciences at Stirling specialises in studies of man’s interactions with the environment, and conservation science and sustainability is one of our core strengths. We have leading researchers working on various aspects of evidence-based conservation, including habitat management and restoration, population genetics of endangered species, tropical community ecology and impacts of invasive species. Our areas of research include human-wildlife conflict (cranes), forest management (pine marten), urban ecology (bats), and the reintroduction of species (beavers). We also work on a diverse range of study systems such as African and South American forests, bushmeat and local livelihoods across Africa. Career opportunities Graduates from our School traditionally move swiftly into employment in the conservation and environmental sectors. The Stirling area has a greater than average number of jobs in the conservation and environment sector. Examples of organisations where former students from our masters' courses are employed are: Scottish Wildlife Trust, Scottish Natural Heritage, Keep Scotland Beautiful, Historic Scotland, and the RSPB. Employability Early on in this course, students take a residential field module in Scotland and immediately begin to learn practical identification, surveying, measuring and sampling skills. In addition, there is the option of a 2-week field course in tropical ecology and conservation in Gabon focusing on collecting data at the interface between climate change, forest dynamics and people’s use of the forest. Having learned how to collect data they are then taught how to analyse and report them and to work in a team to produce oral presentations. There are modules in Analysis of Environmental Data (using the free software R), GIS and Remote Sensing delivering transferable skills often required within environmental agencies, consultancies and international conservation organisations. Industry connections The University of Stirling is a hub for conservation activity in Scotland. Several conservation NGOs have offices in the University or on campus, including RSPB, Scottish Natural Heritage, British Trust for Ornithology and the Bumblebee Conservation Trust, and we work closely with these organisations in conducting research which provides the evidence upon which they base their conservation strategies. We also have very good links with international organization such as Wildlife Conservation Society, with governmental organization such as Gabon National Park Agency and Scottish Natural Heritage and staff from these among our Honorary professors. [-]

MSc in Environmental Management (Energy)

Campus Full time 1 year September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling

The MSc in Environmental Management (Energy) builds on the success of our respected and long-running Environmental Management course (600 graduates). It utilises new and existing expertise or research strengths in Environmental Impact Assessment, carbon trading, planning and impacts of wind, hydro and nuclear power within Biological and Environmental Science, and expertise in Energy Management and Environmental Economics within the School of Management with which Biological and Environmental Science have an established teaching link. [+]

Britain seeks to be a world leader in renewable energies and its generating potential is recognised globally, but it is equally renowned for the quality of its natural environment. This creates the potential for conflict and a need to better understand the various environmental costs associated with 21st-century energy technologies, whether renewable or non-renewable and how these costs can be evaluated, managed and mitigated. The course draws on the University’s existing expertise or research strengths in environmental impact assessment, carbon trading, planning and impacts of wind, hydro and nuclear power as well as its expertise in energy management and environmental economics. The University also has long established links with regulators, consultancy and the energy industry. We work closely with a variety of relevant organisations including SEPA, Environment Agency, the nuclear industry, Scottish Coal and Scottish Renewables. The MSc in Environmental Management (Energy) builds on the success of our respected and long-running Environmental Management course (600 graduates). It utilises new and existing expertise or research strengths in Environmental Impact Assessment, carbon trading, planning and impacts of wind, hydro and nuclear power within Biological and Environmental Science, and expertise in Energy Management and Environmental Economics within the School of Management with which Biological and Environmental Science have an established teaching link. Course objectives Our course gives students: an understanding of the scientific principles (atmospheric, hydrological, geomorphological and ecological) that underpin current environmental issues related to energy production an understanding of the economic, political, social and legal frameworks for managing the environment a sound training in relevant practical, investigative, research and generic skills that managers in the energy and environment sector should possess. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants from other disciplines with a 2:1 or 1st but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.5 with a 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 17 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Scholarships & funding Scottish Funding Council Masters Scholarships The Scottish Funding Council is funding Home/EU tuition fees for a number of places on this course. Funded places are open to applicants domiciled in Scotland and the EU. Structure and content The basic structure is three modules in each of the autumn and spring semesters followed by a dissertation, with each module worth 20 SCQF credits at level 11. Students who successfully complete the taught course over two semesters will qualify for the Diploma and may proceed to the MSc. This involves completion of a three-month Research Project, often in collaboration with an outside agency. Students frequently choose a topic complementary to their option selection, allowing them to develop a high level of competence in aspects of environmental management relevant to their future employment, for example, a project chosen in summer 2013 was Monitoring and assessment of the radioactivity levels around Chapelcross Nuclear Power Plant, Dumfries and Galloway. Delivery and assessment The course is taught primarily by staff within Biological and Environmental Sciences, but also by staff from other departments of the University and visiting professionals from outside agencies. Delivery will include a mixture of conventional lectures, workshop sessions, field excursions, critiques of environmental statements, student-led debates and oral presentations. These activities may be undertaken in teams. Both examinations and coursework will be used with a focus on the use of case studies on different aspects of environmental impact, assessment and monitoring in relation to energy production. Modules will be assessed either by examination and coursework (typically 50:50 weighting) or, where appropriate, by coursework alone. Coursework will be based on written work and/or oral presentation. Strengths Biological and Environmental Sciences at Stirling specialises in studies of human interactions with the environment, and environmental assessment and management are our key strengths. We have long established links with regulators, consultancy and the energy industry and leading researchers working on various aspects of energy and environmental management including Environmental Impact Assessment, carbon trading, and planning and the impacts of wind, hydro and nuclear power. A unique aspect of this course is the input of staff from external organisations and the opportunities for work-based placements in the energy sector. Career opportunities While this course is still in its early years our long-standing MSc Environmental Management has a very good record with most students swiftly moving on to employment in the environmental sector. As an indicator, we have students working for the following companies: Enertrag - renewable energies, Ventus Green Energy, Wind Prospects, Scottish Power. Employability Early on in this course, students take a residential field module and immediately begin to learn practical identification, surveying, measuring and sampling skills. Having learned how to collect data they are then taught how to analyse, report and present them through the modules Analysis of Environmental Data (using R), GIS and Remote Sensing. Transferable skills often required within Environmental agencies/consultancies include the ability to translate theory into practice, to work in a team and independently, plan and coordinate research, and engage with a variety of different users. Industry connections Stirling has strong links with a variety of relevant organisations including SEPA, Environment Agency, the nuclear industry, Scottish Coal and Scottish Renewables. This is, therefore, a sector that we know well. The public sector is likely to contract significantly as a potential source of employment for students on our current ‘environment-based’ taught postgraduate courses during the next few years whilst it is expected that growth will continue in the commercial sector, especially in relation to energy-based projects. [-]

MSc in Environmental Science (Integrated Masters)

Campus Full time Part time 4 years September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

This is the first Environmental Science MSci to be offered in Scotland. The course leads directly to a postgraduate qualification and is designed specifically for students who want to pursue a career in the environment sector. The course offers an environmental placement and an industrial linked final year project, and equips students with the key knowledge, skills and career awareness they need to go on and forge successful and rewarding careers within the rapidly growing environment sector. [+]

The world's growing population places great pressure on environmental resources. How do we meet our needs for food, clean air and water, energy and materials, whilst safeguarding resources for future generations? Environmental Science as a discipline has grown out of increasing concern for the environment and the need for a scientific approach to the study of human impacts on natural resources. Today’s environmental scientists are challenged to find solutions to some of the world’s most pressing problems, such as climate change, pollution, energy, loss of biodiversity and lack of food and clean water. Our course provides the necessary scientific grounding science and technical training to investigate these problems and find appropriate management solutions. University of Stirling was one of the first universities to establish a degree course in Environmental Science in 1980 and we are still committed today to training graduates with the skills valued by employers. This focus has created genuine career opportunities with a wide range of organisations including water authorities, research institutes, conservation bodies, businesses, local authorities and government agencies. Previous graduates have gone on to enjoy successful careers in areas such as environmental consultancy, transport planning, waste management, education and ecotourism. This is the first Environmental Science MSci to be offered in Scotland. The course leads directly to a postgraduate qualification and is designed specifically for students who want to pursue a career in the environment sector. The course offers an environmental placement and an industrial linked final year project, and equips students with the key knowledge, skills and career awareness they need to go on and forge successful and rewarding careers within the rapidly growing environment sector. For those students that don't have the grades to enter directly into the MSci programme, transferral onto the programme after the end of the 1st year of the BSc Environmental Science degree programme is also possible. This subject may be studied in combination with a number of other subjects Accreditation The MSci Environmental Science programme is accredited by the Institution of Environmental Science (IES) and Committee Heads of Environmental Science (CHES). Accreditation demonstrates to potential employers that the teaching, learning and research is aligned to the high quality professional development of future environmental scientists. What makes us different? Biological and Environmental Sciences (BES) is a multi-disciplinary department within the Faculty of Natural Sciences. The principle focus of our research is at the interface between the environment and society. Within BES, staff conduct research in areas as diverse as the reconstruction of past landscapes, conservation, environmental impact and environmental management, evolutionary ecology of plants and animals, cellular biology and immunology. BES is a friendly, vibrant and dynamic place in which to learn and research with a great sense of belonging engendered in our students from their very first days at the University. Research-led teaching is the key to deep learning and understanding. The academic staff in BES are typically world leaders in their respective fields, thus ensuring that research led teaching is at the core of all our courses. Many students work closely with academics throughout their time and benefit from actively participating in research programmes. We have strong contacts with external conservation and environmental organisations who also contribute to the undergraduate experience. This approach ensures that our students appreciate the transferable nature of a science degree and see how their learning can be applied to the real world. Entry requirements Academic requirements ‌Standard entry onto the MSci programme is the equivalent of year 2 of the standard BSc programme. This requires ABB at advanced highers or A level to include one of biology, environmental science, geography or geology. IB diploma 35 points. Entry may also be possible with a HND in a Science based subject. General entrance requirements apply. Mathematics Standard Grade (2), National 5 (B), Intermediate 2 (C), GCSE (C) or equivalent required. If examinations are taken over two sittings, or there are repeats or upgrades, the entrance requirements may be higher. ‌ English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17 If you need to improve your English language skills before you enter this course, our partner INTO University of Stirling offers a range of English language courses. These intensive and flexible courses are designed to improve your English ability for entry to this degree. Alternative routes Entry into equivalent year via BSc Environmental Science programme is available from the end of year 1 until the end of year 3. Scholarships & funding Altijar Scholarships of £500 each are awarded annually to the two highest performing Environmental students in year 3 of the BSc / MSci programme. Structure and content Semesters 1-2 The first year of the programme gives students the basic knowledge and analytical skills in environmental science, geoscience, ecology and physical geography that underpin the degree. Students take three modules in each semester, two are core to the programme and the third will be chosen to best complement the skills and experience they bring with them. Semesters 3-4 In the second year students begin to take more specialised modules in environmental systems, environmental management and environmental technologies. They will also be offered more choice in their module selection to allow them to explore areas of personal interest. Semesters 5-8 This choice of advance modules continues in the third year with a wider range of subjects available. In addition there is an emphasis on career development and employability skills with core modules in professional development and a placement. The students also have to organise and present at a symposium on environmental careers for students in earlier years. In year 4 the students undertake a significant piece of independent research in partnership with an environmental organisation and alongside this choose from a range of specialist environmental management modules that are focussed on the energy, conservation and environmental sectors. Delivery and assessment Our teaching methods are diverse and include lectures, field and laboratory practical exercises, tutorials, seminars and group projects, a placement and individual research project. Most modules include both lectures and practical work and are assessed by a combination of coursework and examinations. Many of the assessments are designed to give experience in the work-related procedures and practices. A wide range of natural and human-modified landscapes in the Stirling area are used in our field teaching. Residential field classes are currently held in Year 1 in the Scottish Highlands and in Year 2 in southern Spain or Iceland. Combined degrees This course is not available as a combined degree. Modes of study Full-time (3 modules per semester) Part-time (1 or 2 modules per semester) Study abroad opportunities As well as the exchange opportunities available to all Stirling students, Environmental Science has a well established programme with the University of Guelph in Canada. Other popular study abroad options include Alaska, Washington, California, Sydney. You can spend either one or two semesters there during your third year, studying courses equivalent to those taken at Stirling and have the opportunity to broaden your environmental and cultural experience. We also offer Erasmus exchanges to Sweden and Germany.‌ Strengths We were one of the first universities to offer UK degrees in Environmental Science and we are the first in Scotland to offer an integrated Masters programme in Environmental Science: our teaching gives a solid grounding in science disciplines and integrates subject-specific and transferable skills. This focus creates genuine career opportunities with a wide range of organisations including water authorities, research institutes, conservation bodies, businesses, local authorities and government agencies. Career opportunities This programme is directly aimed at students that want to gain employment in the environmental sector whether that is in research institutes, environmental consultancies, environmental protection agencies, water authorities, or conservation bodies. Others may go on to further their careers through postgraduate research culminating in the award of a PhD. We place great importance on teaching subject-specific and transferable skills that enhance your employability. Regular careers sessions and professional development skills are embedded into our core teaching. The placement module allows students to gain experience and all important contacts within the environmental sector and this will be built on during their dissertation, which is undertaken as an industry partnership. [-]

MSc in Evolutionary Psychology

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

You will benefit from the expertise of our leading researchers in evolutionary psychology, who have particular interests in cultural evolution and language, social learning, and mate choice. Our staff are also at the forefront of new developments in applying evolutionary principles to address real world issue. [+]

You will benefit from the expertise of our leading researchers in evolutionary psychology, who have particular interests in cultural evolution and language, social learning, and mate choice. Our staff are also at the forefront of new developments in applying evolutionary principles to address real world issue. Students interested in comparative approaches and animal behaviour will benefit from other members of our Behaviour and Evolution Research Group whose world-leading research on behaviour and cognition in primates, dogs and elephants are also being applied to real world problems, including conservation, human-animal interaction, and animal welfare. Under the group's expert guidance you will undertake specialists modules, a research placement and a research project. You will also be able to take advantage of our on-site and overseas labs, field sites and links with industrial partners. For example, the University works closely with the Living Links to Human Evolution Research Centre at Edinburgh Zoo. Course objectives The course provides advanced training as a preparation for a research career in Psychology, primarily for those intending to proceed to a PhD in the area of evolutionary psychology, comparative cognition or animal behaviour. It may also be suitable for meeting continuing professional development needs for those working in related applied contexts. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Scholarships & funding There are typically five £1,000 bursaries to contribute towards fees or maintenance costs for students beginning a taught MSc course. All students, including international students, formally accepted onto the MSc course are eligible to apply for these awards. Awards will be decided on both previous experience and academic record but preference will be given to applicants intending to stay at Stirling to pursue a PhD following the MSc course. Structure and content The course consists of a number of different modules designed to provide training in the fundamentals of research methods. They emphasise different types of skills, from explicit hands-on demonstrations of tools to discussion of different approaches to research. Students may select some alternative modules from the other taught MSc courses at the discretion of the Programme Coordinator. This course includes the following modules: Evolutionary Psychology: A series of seminars will address both theoretical and practical issues relating to the study of evolution and behaviour across topics and research settings. Students will also be expected to participate in our weekly Behaviour and Evolution Research Group meetings, in which they will hear about the current work of staff, other graduate students and also regular presentations from external speakers. Psychological Research Methods I and II: These modules cover a wide range of techniques used in psychological research and to demonstrate these techniques in relation to topics in a range of areas. Advanced Statistics: This module assumes a reasonable knowledge of statistics, although an additional introductory module is available for those who wish. The main statistics teaching is aimed at introducing advanced methods such as multivariate statistics and at the rationale of using statistical methods. Key Skills for Psychology Researchers: This module focuses on the research process, including ethical reviews, professional conduct and disseminating research. Qualitative Research Methods: This module provides a broad but solid grounding in qualitative research methodology. Research Placement This month-long placement is carried out in January/February, allowing students to broaden their practical research experience. The placement may be external to Psychology and can be in a non-academic environment. Dissertation For those who go onto the MSc, approximately half of your time is devoted to a research project, leading to a 12,000-word dissertation. Delivery and assessment Teaching is delivered using a variety of methods including tutorials, demonstrations and practical classes, but the majority is seminar-based. Students are typically taught within small groups in specialist classes, with first-year PhD students or other postgraduate students (for example, in modules from other MSc courses). Both taught and research postgraduates are integral to our research group and expected to participate in our regular meetings. All students allocated a peer mentor are provided with appropriate office space and equipment. In addition, each student is associated with an academic from Psychology. The individual modules contribute towards 60 percent of the MSc grade, with the research dissertation contributing the remaining 40 percent. Strengths Psychology at Stirling is one of the leading psychology departments in the UK. It ranked in the top 20 in the recent research assessment (REF 2014) and is one of only seven non-Russell group universities to do so (Birkbeck, Royal Holloway, Sussex, Essex, St Andrews and Bangor; source Times Higher Education magazine). Its quality of research publications ranked third in Scotland after Aberdeen and Glasgow. Furthermore, the relevance of its research activity to society received the highest possible rating which only four other psychology departments in the UK achieved (REF 2014 results). Psychology at Stirling University is small enough to fully involve MSc students in our lively and collegial community of research excellence. Your three month full-time dissertation is supervised by leading UK academics. Career opportunities This course provides advanced training to prepare you for a research career in evolutionary approaches to behaviour, especially for those intending to proceed to a PhD. You will become an integral member of our lively and active research group and we will support you in making the complex transition towards being an independent research scientist. The placement also allows considerable scope for those interested in more applied areas to develop relevant skills for these careers. The course also seeks to meet the continuing professional development needs of those already working in related applied contexts. [-]

MSc in Finance

Campus Full time 1 year September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling

The MSc Finance provides a thorough grounding in the theory and analytical techniques required by finance professionals. It offers students a global perspective on the process of financial decision-making and practical knowledge of the workings of financial markets and the price-setting process. Students will also learn to critically evaluate research and advanced scholarship in finance. [+]

The MSc Finance provides a thorough grounding in the theory and analytical techniques required by finance professionals. It offers students a global perspective on the process of financial decision-making and practical knowledge of the workings of financial markets and the price-setting process. Students will also learn to critically evaluate research and advanced scholarship in finance. Top Reasons To Study With Us Students undertake the free Amplify Trading week long masterclass giving practical experience of financial markets. The course includes full access to financial databases such as DataStream, providing real life, real-time information and insights into current research and analysis within the UK and international financial environment. The course is led by Dr Isaac Tabner, who is a senior lecturer in finance, a holder of the CFA Charter, a full member of the CFA Institute, the CFA Society of the UK and of the Personal Finance Society from which he and has a diploma in financial planning (DipPFS). He prepares Digest Summaries for the CFA Institute and is an Academic Advisor on the IMC Panel for the CFA Society of the UK. In the most recent Research Excellence Framework (REF), the Stirling Management School was placed in the UK’s top 25 institutions for Business and Management, out of 101 business schools. In Scotland, the School was ranked in the top five. Course objectives The course provides essential understanding of the theory of finance and of the skills required in practice. You learn about corporate finance, techniques of quantitative analysis, global financial markets, analysis of financial statements, derivatives, portfolio management, investment analysis, risk management and behavioural finance. You will develop spreadsheet skills and learn econometric techniques for analysing corporate performance and identifying trends in financial markets and have access to financial databases, including DataStream. The dissertation, completed in the summer, enables development of your individual interests. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree or equivalent. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. INTO University of Stirling offers a Graduate Diploma for those students who do not meet the required criteria for this course. If you successfully complete the Graduate Diploma in Business, Finance and Sport and meet the required progression grades, you will be guaranteed entry onto this Master's degree. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Scholarships & funding Stirling Management School Postgraduate Scholarships Stirling Management School is committed to investing in academically talented students, enabling them to further their education with a reputable qualification from one of the many Postgraduate degree courses on offer at the University of Stirling. There are various categories of funding available to support the cost of your studies at Stirling Management School. Postgraduate Tuition Fee Loan This course is currently approved for PTFL (Postgraduate Tuition Fee Loan) funding from SAAS. Structure and content This one-year, full-time course has an initial taught component of two, 15-week semesters, involving lectures, practical case study work and workshops, followed by a supervised dissertation. As soon as you arrive at Stirling you are introduced to your course, fellow students and the University by taking part in the Stirling Management School Flying Start Leadership Programme. This induction enables you to develop skills to get the most out of your studies and to progress quickly in your career. Delivery and assessment Successful completion of the taught modules leads to the award of a Postgraduate Diploma. The Master’s degree is awarded on satisfactory completion of a dissertation, following the Diploma examinations. Dissertation topics range over all areas of relevance to finance and allow completion of a case study or research topic dissertation. Career opportunities Where are our graduates now? Stirling Management School is unique in having a dedicated Employability Manager and from the very beginning of the course your career is our focus. The MSc Finance opens up a range of exciting career opportunities which include fund management, security dealing, financial market regulation, treasury management, financial engineering and corporate finance work within merchant banking firms. Our graduates are currently contributing to the performance of major financial organisations such as Morgan Stanley, Standard Charted Bank, ABC Bank of China, and HSBC. They are located in countries around the globe including China, Saudi Arabia, Germany, New Zealand, Vietnam, Greece, Taiwan, India and the UK. To provide you with an indication as to what you can do with your MSc Finance degree, the following are examples of roles secured by those graduating from the course in the last three years: Business Manager, CITICs Futures (China) Interest Rate Swaps Dealer, Tullett Prebon (UK) Banker, ABC Bank of China Assistant to Country Chief Risk Officer, Standard Chartered Bank (Vietnam) Building on that foundation, alumni who graduated between five and ten years ago have advanced into positions such as: Investment Analyst, Ajeej Capital (Saudi Arabia) Head, Secured Lending, Stanard Chartered Bank (Taiwan) Settlements Associate, Titanium Capital (UK) Senior Lecturer, University of Waikato (New Zealand) [-]

MSc in Information Technology

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 27 months August 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

The MSc Information Technology is an intensive, practically-oriented course. It provides an opportunity for graduates of non-computing subjects to develop key specialist skills for a career in Computing. It is ideal for complementing your expertise with core computing skills. [+]

The MSc Information Technology is an intensive, practically-oriented course. It provides an opportunity for graduates of non-computing subjects to develop key specialist skills for a career in Computing. It is ideal for complementing your expertise with core computing skills. Computing Science at Stirling has strong links with industry. Students can get a first-hand industrial experience through placements and internships with local enterprises and organisations. More specifically, we offer company-based MSc projects to our students where our students can work with an employer to gain valuable commercial experience. We usually place more than 50% of our students with a company for the MSc project duration. We also regularly invite industry experts to share their expertise with students through seminars and talks. You will also get prepared for finding and securing a great job after completing this course through an integrated structured personal and professional development programme. This programme covers crucial topics such as self-image, body language, interview techniques, assessment centre strategies, conflict resolution as well as CV preparation and job targeting techniques. Accreditation British Computer Society logoThe BCS, the Chartered Institute for IT, is the foremost professional and learned society in the field of computers and information systems in the UK. The Division of Computing Science and Mathematics is an Educational Affiliate of the BCS. The MSc in Information Technology course is accredited by the BCS as partially meeting the educational requirements for Chartered Information Technology Professional (CITP) registration. CITP is the professional member level of the BCS ('partially meeting' is the normal level of accreditation for such MSc courses, and does not indicate a shortcoming! Additional training/experience is required for full registration.) Course objectives This is an intensive 12-month course which provides an opportunity for non-computing graduates to develop key specialist skills suitable for a career in Computing. It is ideal for those who wish to complement their knowledge and expertise with core computing skills in order to apply them to a new career. Our company sponsored MSc projects will provide an ideal pathway into the industry. The MSc Information Technology is an intensive, practically-oriented course. By studying this course students will study in depth key topics including: software development enterprise database systems web technologies benefit from research-led teaching demonstrate acquired research and development skills by undertaking a substantial piece of software project work prepare for positions in the IT industry What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree or equivalent in any subject other than Computing/IT related subjects. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work experience are encouraged to apply. INTO University of Stirling offers a Graduate Diploma for those students who do not meet the required criteria for this course. If you successfully complete the Graduate Diploma in Science, Computing and Engineering and meet the required progression grades, you will be guaranteed entry onto year one of this Master's degree. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Scholarships & funding Postgraduate Tuition Fee Loan This course is currently approved for PTFL (Postgraduate Tuition Fee Loan) funding from SAAS. Scotland’s Saltire Scholarships Scotland’s Saltire Scholarships (SSS) is a substantial programme of scholarships, offered on a matched funding basis between the Government and Scottish Higher Education Institutions. The scheme offers up to 200 awards, each worth £2000. These are towards the tuition fees, for any one year of study, on an Undergraduate, Masters or PhD course at any of Scotland’s higher education institutions. Structure and content This course comprises two 15-week semesters of taught modules, a winter programming assignment over three weeks in January, and the MSc project over three months at the end. Semester 1 concentrates on fundamental techniques. Semester 2 integrates, develops and applies these skills. Practical work is a key component in this course. It builds from self-contained tasks in the first semester, over the larger winter programming assignment, to a group project in Semester 2. Finally, the dissertation project (possibly with a company) is the largest piece of work leading to your MSc dissertation. In the Semester 1 you will take the following modules: Principles and Practice of Programming: Covers the designing and testing of programs written in Java. You learn good practice in program construction, programming with data structures and graphical user interfaces Foundations of Information Technology: Covers central topics including machine architecture, operating systems, networks, algorithm efficiency, the limits of computation, software engineering, user interface design, as well as professional and ethical issues Database Principles and Applications: Provides a critical understanding of the role of database management systems and the ability to creatively design and implement practical databases During the winter break there is an extended programming assignment. Semester 2 modules: Networking and Technologies for Ecommerce: Discusses computer networks and their layered architecture. You also study web scripting using PHP, Java script and XML Object-oriented Software Design: Discusses how to analyse and model requirements and develop software using object-oriented analysis and design, through the use of UML and CASE tools for software design Data Analytics: This module looks at Reasoning Systems, Data Mining and the use of probability information in predicting data values. You may graduate with the Postgraduate Diploma after two semesters, or continue with a three-month project and dissertation for the MSc. Computing Science at Stirling has strong links with industry. We offer a number of commercially linked projects for the MSc dissertation period. Topics include mobile phone app development (iPhone, Android, and also cross platform environments), bespoke Java applications, and advanced website development projects. Delivery and assessment You will learn about key areas in computing through lectures, tutorials and practical sessions. Lectures involve the whole class, while tutorials and practicals are for small groups. Practical work is a key component in our degrees, and provides the opportunity for hands-on experience. It builds from self-contained tasks in Semester 1, over a larger programming assignment in the winter break to a group project in Semester 2. Finally, the dissertation project is your largest single piece of work leading to your MSc dissertation. After two semesters of classes you will embark on a three-month project working on your dissertation topic. At the end of the project you will write up your findings as your MSc dissertation. For the MSc projects, we will make a number of industrial placements available. We usually place more than 50% of our students with a company for the MSc project duration. Stirling is also partner in the Making the Most of Masters initiative, which organises company lead MSc projects. Other project suggestions both from external bodies and from within the University are also offered. Furthermore, students' own ideas for projects are encouraged and welcomed. Strengths Hands on experience & industrial placements Practical work is a key component in our degrees, and provides the opportunity for hands-on experience. It builds from self-contained tasks in Semester 1, over a larger programming assignment in the winter break to a group project in Semester 2. Finally, the dissertation project is your largest single piece of work leading to your MSc dissertation. After two semesters of classes you will embark on a three month project working on your dissertation topic. At the end of the project you will write up your findings as your MSc dissertation. For the MSc projects, we will make a number of industrial placements available. We usually place more than 50 percent of our students with a company for the MSc project duration. Stirling is also partner in the Making the Most of Masters initiative, which organises company lead MSc projects. Other project suggestions both from external bodies and from within the university are also offered. Furthermore, students' own ideas for projects are encouraged and welcomed. Computing Science at the University of Stirling supports the Scottish e-Placement project which provides short- and long-term (one-year) placements with Scottish high-tech companies. These placements typically are paid and thus a good way of gaining commercial experience and helping with your living expenses. At Stirling, computing students are prepared for the employer-based MSc projects and the workplace more generally through an integrated structured personal and professional development programme called ‘Lift-Off’. This programme covers crucial topics such as self-image, body language, interview techniques, assessment centre strategies, conflict resolution as well as CV preparation and job targeting techniques. Career opportunities The MSc in Information Technology will greatly enhance the employment prospects of students. As a graduate of Information Technology, you will be in demand in a range of sectors including health, IT software organisations, service enterprises, engineering and construction firms as well as in the retail sector. Previous students have been very successful in obtaining suitable employment in the Information Technology field in a considerable diversity of posts - some with small companies, others with major UK organisations, with Local Authority and Government bodies as well as in the field of Higher Education. Here are some recent posts that IT students have taken up: IBM, Perth: Junior IT Specialist CAP-GEMINI, Glasgow AIT, Henley-on-Thames: Graduate Trainee Database Administrator Bank of Scotland, Edinburgh: MVS Team (Mainframe Support) British Airways, Hounslow: Programmer Ark Computing Solutions Ltd, Perth: Programmer/Developer Lancaster University, English Dept: Java programmer Rothes Infographics, Livingston: Trainee Software Developer More generally, common job profiles of our graduates are: As a Systems Analyst, you will work on solving computer problems. This might involve adapting existing systems or using new technologies designing a new software solution In doing so, you will design software, write code, and test and fix software applications. You might also be involved in providing documentation for users. Typically, you would work as part of a larger team. IT Consultants closely work with clients (often at the clients premises) and advise them on how to use computer technology and applications to best meet their business needs. You will work with clients to improve their efficiency of using computer systems. This may involve the adaptation/customisation of software applications, or the development of custom applications for the specific needs of the customer. As well as technical duties, you may be involved in project management. Applications Developers translate software requirements into programming code, and will usually specialise in a specific area, such as computer games or web technology. Often developers work as part of a larger team. You may be in charge of developing a certain component or part of a larger application. [-]

MSc in International Accounting and Finance

Campus Full time 1 year September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling

The increasing influence of international financial reporting standards and the shortage in some countries of international accounting expertise have led to significant demand for relevant education. In the EU the speed and significance of recent reforms have also led to a demand for Master’s level education which reflects these developments and facilitates transition. [+]

Globalisation, the growth of multinational enterprises, the convergence of international accounting practices and the expansion of the European Union all contribute to the importance of an international focus in accounting and finance education. The increasing influence of international financial reporting standards and the shortage in some countries of international accounting expertise have led to significant demand for relevant education. In the EU the speed and significance of recent reforms have also led to a demand for Master’s level education which reflects these developments and facilitates transition. Accreditation Logo ACCA 2014The global accounting body ACCA recognises the MSc International Accounting and Finance giving graduates of the course automatic exemption from four of their papers, F1-F4 with a fifth and sixth, F7 and F9, possible based on the spring semester options that are chosen. Top Reasons To Study With Us The global accounting body ACCA recognises the MSc International Accounting and Finance, giving graduates of the course exemption from up to six of their papers. In addition, the course provides an ideal base for progression to PhD level study. Students undertake the free Amplify Trading week long masterclass giving practical experience of financial markets. The course is led by Professor David McMillan, an internationally respected expert in modelling and forecasting of asset returns as well as identifying the links between stock markets and the macro economy. He has published more than 100 papers in peer-reviewed journals including the Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, the International Journal of Forecasting and the Journal of Business Finance. The course attracts a high proportion of students from overseas, presenting invaluable opportunities to establish a global network of contacts at the outset of a career in International Accounting and Finance. In the most recent Research Assessment Exercise, the School was placed in the UK’s top 25 institutions for Business and Management, out of 101 business schools. In Scotland, the School was ranked in the top five. Course objectives Globalisation, the growth of multinational enterprises, the convergence of international accounting practices and the expansion of the European Union all contribute to the importance of an international focus in accounting and finance education. The increasing influence of international financial reporting standards and the shortage in some countries of international accounting expertise have led to significant demand for relevant education. The ACCA Accredited MSc International Accounting & Finance from the University of Stirling Management School reflects these developments and provides a solid foundation for a career in accounting or finance. The course attracts students from every continent presenting a valuable opportunity to establish a worldwide network of contacts that last beyond the time spent studying on our beautiful campus. In 2014/15 the ACCA recognised MSc in International Accounting and Finance was the most popular Master’s degree at Stirling. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree or equivalent. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. INTO University of Stirling offers a Graduate Diploma for those students who do not meet the required criteria for this course. If you successfully complete the Graduate Diploma in Business, Finance and Sport and meet the required progression grades, you will be guaranteed entry onto this Master's degree. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Scholarships & funding Stirling Management School Postgraduate Scholarships Stirling Management School is committed to investing in academically talented students, enabling them to further their education with a reputable qualification from one of the many postgraduate degree courses on offer at the University of Stirling. There are various categories of funding available to support the cost of your studies at Stirling Management School. Postgraduate Tuition Fee Loan This course is currently approved for PTFL (Postgraduate Tuition Fee Loan) funding from SAAS. Structure and content The Master’s course is a one-year, full-time course with an initial taught component of two, 15-week semesters, involving lectures, practical case study work and workshops, with a supervised dissertation in the final period. As soon as you arrive at Stirling you are introduced to your course, fellow students and the University by taking part in the Stirling Management School Flying Start Leadership Programme. This induction enables you to develop skills to get the most out of your studies and to progress quickly in your career. Delivery and assessment Successful completion of the taught modules leads to the award of a Postgraduate Diploma. The Master’s degree is awarded on satisfactory completion of a dissertation following the Diploma examinations. Dissertation topics range over all areas of relevance to accounting and finance and allow completion of a case study or research topic dissertation. Career opportunities Where are our graduates now? Stirling Management School is unique in having a dedicated Employability Manager and from the very beginning of the course your career is our focus. Since the introduction of the course in 2007, our graduates have gone on to build their careers in a variety of sectors around the world in countries such as Malaysia, China, UK, Ethiopia, Italy, Oman, Kazakhstan and Taiwan. In doing so, they are contributing to the performance of organisations including investment banks, universities, car manufacturers and pharmaceutical companies. Some of the roles that our alumni currently hold include: Head of Internal Audit, University of Putra (Malaysia) Accountant, Beijing Benz Automotive Co. Ltd (China) Multi-Functional Financial Analyst, Lockheed Martin (UK) PhD Students in Universities around the world Relationship/Business Development Manager, BGL Plc. (Nigeria) [-]

MSc in International Business

Campus Full time 1 year September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling

This course is designed to help you prepare for a successful career in international management — in either a broad general management role, or as a specialist in international marketing or international human resources. [+]

This course is designed to help you prepare for a successful career in international management — in either a broad general management role, or as a specialist in international marketing or international human resources. The course will help you to understand how international business is conducted, with a focus on developing the managerial skills you’ll need in an interconnected world. You will learn how to develop your problem-solving and critical thinking skills within the context of trading across national boundaries. By the end of this course you’ll understand how organisations operate across economies, currencies and regulatory frameworks. In addition, you’ll develop skills to help you engage with stakeholders from different cultures and work effectively in a multi-location team. International Business International Business with Human Resource Management International Business with Marketing Degree pathways The MSc International Business offers a choice of pathways, all of which provide a route to an MSc or Postgraduate Diploma. The pathways are: International Business — covers core business subjects such as accountancy, finance and strategic management International Business with Human Resource Management — for students who wish to blend general business skills with people management International Business with Marketing — helps you develop marketing expertise that will support your future career in a global business context When you register you’ll be applying for the MSc in International Business. You can select a specialist pathway at the end of the first semester. International Business What is International Business? International Business is the specialisation of core business subjects, adding theoretical and practical dimensions relevant to operating in an increasingly globalised economy. Foundation content, from accountancy and finance to strategic management, is explored in the context of international regulatory frameworks and business practices. Analytical and problem-solving skills are developed from multi-cultural and multi-national perspectives. Students are exposed to the challenges and opportunities that result from globalisation. An MSc International Business from Stirling is designed to develop deep understanding of different approaches to managing businesses across national boundaries and create awareness of new trading blocs and the pressures they inflict on businesses and managers. Postgraduate education in International Business equips graduates to work in roles that require an understanding of how businesses are financed and taxed in different jurisdictions as well as other legislative issues that must be taken into account. A strong emphasis on ethical and environmental issues of relevance to commercial operators with international interests is a major strength of this course. International Business with Human Resource Management The International Business with Human Resource Management pathway is ideally suited to individuals who wish to blend their interests in general business strategy with the management of people. International Business with Marketing The International Business with Marketing pathway enables students to develop marketing expertise that will enable them to thrive in a global business context. Course objectives Main Objectives The course is designed to help you develop a deep understanding of the different approaches to managing businesses across national boundaries. It will also help develop your awareness of new trading blocs and their impact on businesses and managers. The course covers core business subjects, such as accounting, finance and strategy, in the context of international regulatory frameworks and business practices. It will also help you develop your analytical and problem-solving skills from multi-cultural and multi-national perspectives. Through the course you’ll learn about: The relevance of international trade in today’s business environment The challenges and opportunities that result from globalisation Different approaches to managing businesses in the global environment The ethical and environmental issues that have emerged as a result of globalisation, and its impact on consumers What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements You’ll need a minimum of a second class honours degree in any subject, or an equivalent qualification. However, you can still apply if you don’t have these formal qualifications, but bring significant work experience in a relevant area. International students The University of Stirling welcomes students from around the world. Find out what studying here could be like for you. Other learning activities to prepare you for study in the UK Prepare for Success is an interactive web learning tool for international students who are coming to the UK to study. INTO University of Stirling offers a Graduate Diploma for those students who do not meet the required criteria for this course. If you successfully complete the Graduate Diploma in Business, Finance and Sport and meet the required progression grades, you will be guaranteed entry onto this Master's degree. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of these qualifications : IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View our range of pre-sessional courses. Scholarships & funding Stirling Management School Postgraduate Scholarships Stirling Management School is committed to investing in academically talented students, helping them to further their education with one of our university degree courses. There are various categories of funding available to support the cost of your studies. Other scholarships and funding You may qualify for University of Stirling funding as well as funding from government bodies, the European Commission, funding trusts, research councils, industry and employers. Structure and content Begin your new course in the best possible way, with our unique Flying Start Leadership programme. This programme is exclusively for new students about to start one of our postgraduate courses. You’ll take part in activities, workshops and information sessions to help you prepare for the year ahead, and make the most of your time at Stirling. Participate in the Flying Start Leadership programme and you will: Discover more about the exciting period of learning ahead Understand what is expected of you in your course Get to know the teaching and support staff Learn more about a diverse range of approaches to learning Work as part of a successful team Activities range from practical skills – like effective public speaking – to developing ways to work under pressure in difficult situations and manage conflict. It’s also a chance to discover all that the University and the vibrant city of Stirling has to offer, and to make new friends. Structure, teaching, assessment and awards This is a one-year full-time course of two semesters followed by a dissertation. You will be taught in lectures, seminars, workshops, study visits and case study exercises. You’ll be assessed by a combination of coursework and examination, including written assignments and presentations. Following success in your examinations at the end of the second semester, you will be awarded a Diploma in your chosen pathway. If you successfully complete a dissertation project, you’ll be awarded an MSc. Delivery and assessment Teaching involves lectures, seminars, workshop-based sessions and presentations. You are assessed by a combination of coursework and examination, including written assignments and presentations. Successful completion of the taught element of the programme leads to the award of Diploma or allows you to continue for the award of MSc in International Business by completing a 15,000-word dissertation on a topic agreed with the Course Director. This must be submitted by the end of August. Strengths Why study at Stirling? Our global reputation: research rating The University of Stirling Management School was ranked among the Top 25 in the UK for business and management in the Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014). Industry engagement You’ll have the chance to enhance your career prospects by participating in work-based multi-disciplinary projects that will help prepare you for your next step on the career ladder. Expert teaching In the last published Research Assessment Exercise, most of the research (85%) produced by our academics was rated as being of international significance. This reflects the high quality of lectures who teach at the university. Flexible course structure The flexible design of the degree programme means you focus on the core management modules or specialise in marketing or human resources. Networking opportunities Many of our postgraduate students come from overseas. Studying at Stirling offers an excellent opportunity to establish your own global network of contacts at the outset of your career. Expertise in Corporate Social Responsibility The course emphasises ethical and environmental issues, which are increasingly important within the global business environment. Professional development for long-term success Our Flying Start Leadership programme helps you develop self-awareness about your strengths and acquire new competencies in a supportive environment. MSc International Business Dissertation Prize A research-based prize of £200 is open to all students undertaking the MSc in International Business dissertation and is awarded to the student who submits the best dissertation. The prize may be shared if more than one dissertation achieves the highest mark. Career opportunities The University of Stirling is ranked 7th in the UK for graduate employability. Stirling Management School is unique in having a dedicated employability manager. From the very beginning of the course, your career is our focus. MSc International Business graduates have forged successful careers in the public, private and voluntary sectors around the world. Employers include the World Wildlife Fund, Lufthansa, RBS, Proctor & Gamble, Ernst & Young, EBSCO Publishing and Accenture. Our masters graduates have skills and knowledge that sought after by organisations with global operations. Whichever pathway you select, you’ll feel equipped to take on demanding leadership roles in general business areas or in the specialist areas of marketing and human resources. [-]

MSc in International Conflict and Cooperation

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 27 years September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

The MSc combines core modules in International Conflict and Cooperation and International Organisation in Semester 1 with a research methods course. In Semester 2, research methods continues and students take two option modules from a range of choices that focus on the Middle East, Africa, Migration and Resource Conflicts amongst others. [+]

The MSc combines core modules in International Conflict and Cooperation and International Organisation in Semester 1 with a research methods course. In Semester 2, research methods continues and students take two option modules from a range of choices that focus on the Middle East, Africa, Migration and Resource Conflicts amongst others. Top Reasons To Study With Us You will be taught a range of core and options modules in key areas of international conflict and cooperation. You will develop a range of research skills that enhance further study and employability. You will experience a study trip to international organisations to network with policymakers and practitioners. Course objectives The course looks at the dynamics of international conflict and cooperation in light of major developments such as the end of the Cold War, the 9/11 terror attacks and the Arab Spring. The course takes a thematic approach to conflict resolution and the role of international organisations to focus on the role of conflict prevention and management in specific geographical areas in addition to the development and regulation of conflict in relation to factors such as natural resources and migration. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Scholarships & funding The University of Stirling is offering any UK or European Union student with a First Class Honours degree (or equivalent) a £2,000 scholarship to study full-time on any taught Masters course or £1,000 for part-time study. Structure and content The MSc contains core modules related to international conflict and cooperation as well as a range of options modules to explore issues in more depth. It also features a research skills module. Delivery and assessment Modules will typically be delivered in the evenings by lecture and seminar, although the emphasis will be on student participation and discussion, workshop sessions, as well as a variety of formal and informal presentations. Assessment is by presentations, essays and the dissertation. Career opportunities The MSc in International Conflict and Cooperation is a gateway to employment in government agencies, the NGO sector and international organisations as well as into PhD study, research and academia. The course provides a background in conflict study, the role of international organisations and a thematic and geographical focus on distinct areas and problems as well as analysis of solutions. The academic skills aspects of the course also provide a background to undertake further research. Skills you can develop through this course read and use texts and other source materials critically and empathetically appreciate the complexity and diversity of situations, events and mentalities recognise there are ways of testing statements and that there are rules of evidence which require integrity and maturity reflect critically on the nature and theoretical underpinnings of the discipline marshal an argument, be self-disciplined and independent intellectually express themselves orally and in writing with coherence, clarity and fluency gather, organise and deploy evidence, data and information analyse and solve problems use effectively ICT, information retrieval and presentation skills exercise self-discipline, self-direction and initiative work with others and have respect for others’ reasoned views work collaboratively and participate effectively in group discussions show empathy and imaginative insight. prepare for further academic research such as a Phd Chances to expand your horizons The MSc course seeks to provide opportunities for students to meet key figures involved in international organisations as a means to understand what a career in an International Organisation or NGO would involve. The MSc seminar series, as well as the visits to international organisations, are also intended to facilitate contacts between students and potential employers. The course also tries to put students in touch with the voluntary sector. Volunteering not only provides work experience and networking opportunities in a relevant field, it allows students to exhibit a range of general skills that they acquired at university including­ researching, report-writing and presentations. Where are our graduates now? This course is designed to meet the needs of both current and future practitioners as well as those intending to further their knowledge on a specific subject by pursuing a research degree after the completion of their MSc thesis. On completing the course, graduates may expect to find employment in organisations that are governmental (FCO, MoD and the respective ministries in other countries), inter-governmental (EU, NATO, UN, NAFTA, WTO) and non-governmental (Amnesty International, Red Cross, Human Rights Watch). Since the International Conflict and Cooperation course began in 2007, students have followed a range of post-MSc careers. The largest group especially evident in 2007 and 2010 ­ were those who used the MSc as a means to pursue further postgraduate study in this field, with a group of graduates from the course going on to pursue PhD study at a range of universities. Other graduates have pursued careers in the NGO sector, public affairs and political research. Employability Our students learn a variety of skills to enhance their attractiveness to employers such as presentation skills, the ability to undertake research, analysis of complex data, writing skills, team work and communication, in addition to a variety of knowledge associated with international politics in relation to global issues, international organisations, concepts and theories. [-]

MSc in International Human Resource Management

Campus Full time 1 year September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling

This course will help you prepare for a career as an HR professional in an organisation with an international workforce. [+]

This course will help you prepare for a career as an HR professional in an organisation with an international workforce. You will develop the knowledge and skills you’ll need to deliver a responsible, participatory and sustainable HR service. It’s also suitable for anyone seeking further academic study in the subject, or to update the knowledge and qualifications of personnel and HR practitioners, managers and trade unionists. The course content addresses contemporary debates on HR management practices, and business organisation governance and strategy in an international context. It provides a solid foundation if you’re seeking a career where you’ll have responsibility for developing local and global HR systems that incorporate corporate social responsibility, innovation and participatory practices. Accreditation The Management School has associated PhDs including those funded by ESRC/Skills Development Scotland. Course objectives This course provides a critical academic assessment of the approaches international employers take to human resource management (HRM). It pays particular attention to understanding how responsibility and sustainability impact on HR management, as well as exploring how organisations influence HR practices. It will also equip you with a wider perspective on the principal issues and concerns affecting work, which will provide the basis for making effective decisions as managers in the future. The curriculum builds on mainstream HRM scholarship and incorporates specialist subjects which are regularly updated to ensure topicality and relevance. The course doesn’t assume that students have previously studied management. The core modules provide students with a working knowledge of HRM practice in a global context. The elective modules allow students the opportunity to explore wider HRM topics. Stirling Management School is committed to the principles of the PRiME (Principles for Responsible Management Education) agenda. The MSc International HRM reflects this by integrating social responsibility and sustainability issues in the core curriculum. PRiME’s mission is to encourage responsible management education, research and thought-leadership globally. Entry requirements Academic requirements You’ll need a minimum of a second class honours degree in any subject, or an equivalent qualification. However, you can still apply if you don’t have these formal qualifications, but bring significant work experience in a relevant area. If you don’t meet the required criteria for this course, you can complete the Graduate Diploma in Business, Finance and Sport to gain a guaranteed entry onto this Master's degree. English language requirements If English is not your first language, you must have one of these qualifications: IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Scholarships & funding Stirling Management School Postgraduate Scholarships Stirling Management School is committed to investing in academically talented students, helping them to further their education with one of our university degree courses. There are various categories of funding available to support the cost of your studies. Other Scholarships and Funding You may qualify for University of Stirling funding as well as funding from government bodies, the European Commission, funding trusts, research councils, industry and employers. Structure and content This is a one-year full-time course of two semesters, followed by a three-month dissertation period. You’ll be taught in lectures, seminars, workshops, presentations and through practical case study exercises. The course uses a variety of assessment methods ranging from the more traditional individual examinations and essays, but also includes some group presentations and reports. Following success in your assessments at the end of the second semester, you’ll be awarded a Diploma in International HRM. If you also successfully complete the research dissertation, or a consultancy project, you’ll be awarded an MSc. Preparation and Support Begin your new course in the best possible way, with our unique Flying Start Leadership programme. It’s exclusively for new students about to start one of our postgraduate courses. You’ll take part in a wide range of group and individual activities, workshops and information sessions to help you prepare for the year ahead, and make the most of your time at the University of Stirling Management School. Attend the Flying Start Leadership programme and you will: Discover more about the exciting period of learning ahead Understand what is expected of you in your course Get to know the teaching and support staff Learn more about a diverse range of approaches to learning Work as part of a successful team Develop your personal goals for the year ahead Activities range from practical skills – such as effective public speaking – to developing ways to work in groups with other students. The programme is also a chance to discover all that the University and the vibrant city of Stirling has to offer, and to make new friends. Other learning activities to prepare you for study in the UK Prepare for Success is an interactive web learning tool for international students who are coming to the UK to study. Semester one involves three compulsory modules. There are also three compulsory modules in semester two, plus two other modules of your choice. Semester 1 Compulsory Modules: Strategic and Operational HRM in Context: introduces you to the foundational concepts and perspectives in HRM. Managing Organisations with an International Outlook: helps you appreciate the interactions between organisations and their global socio-economic context. Responsible Business in a Global Economy: encourages you to reflect on the role of business in society. Semester 2 Compulsory Modules: Managing and Developing a Diverse Workforce: helps you understand the practical aspects of managing the challenging elements of diversity in the workforce. Comparative Employment Systems: provides you with knowledge of various employment systems and their economic, social and legal framework around the world. Research Methods: introduces you to the conceptual and practical skills needed to undertake a small research project in a relevant HRM topic. Semester 2 Optional Modules: You can select two modules from those available across the School. These include: Leadership and Decision-Making Current Challenges in HRM Managing in NGOs and the Third Sector Managing Change and People Developing an International Workforce Dissertation: During the dissertation period you’ll work, with guidance from an academic supervisor, on a HRM project of your choice. Students who meet the relevant criteria may also have the opportunity to work with an external organisation to tackle a critical business challenge. These projects give you the opportunity to apply the knowledge and skills you develop during the degree. Projects usually last three months — from May/June to September. This work experience helps you develop your technical, personal and key transferable skills while you gain a detailed insight into the dynamics of a particular business sector. Strengths Inspired curriculum The course fully prepares our graduates to play leadership roles in all types of organisations that are required to increasingly report on corporate social responsibility and other non-financial performance indicators. Employment-ready graduates The course emphasises transferable skills and knowledge that is highly relevant to business and industry. Teaching methods give you opportunities to apply theoretical concepts to real world challenges. Strong links with industry You’ll have the chance to enhance your career prospects by participating in work-based multi-disciplinary projects designed to prepare you for your next step on the career ladder. Networking opportunities Many of our postgraduate students come from overseas. Studying at Stirling offers an excellent opportunity to establish your own global network of contacts at the outset of your career. Professional development for long-term success Our Flying Start Leadership programme helps you develop self-awareness about your strengths and acquire new competencies in a supportive environment. You can also participate in a course for professional stock market traders. MSc International Human Resource Management Prize A research-based prize of £200 is open to all students undertaking the MSc in International Human Resource Management dissertation and is awarded to the student who submits the best dissertation. The prize may be shared if more than one dissertation achieves the highest mark. Career opportunities The University of Stirling is ranked 7th in the UK for graduate employability. Stirling Management School is unique in having a dedicated employability manager. From the very beginning of the course, your career is our focus. Our alumni include graduates whose successful careers have seen them work in various capacities. These include HR specialists and other managers for public, private, for-profit and not-for-profit organisations operating in many industry sectors across the world, such as: Central and local government Ernst & Young Heineken Nestle NHS Royal Bank of Scotland Sun Microsystems United Nations Some of our more established alumni (who completed the MSc HRM) are currently leading and shaping the strategy of global organisations at director level. Graduating with an MSc in International HRM gives you the foundations you need to progress into a career in HRM. Equally, it offers the skills and knowledge to pursue a career in different areas related to business practice, or to local or international socio-economic development policy-making and implementation. Employability At least 94% of our graduates are in work or further studies within six months of graduating. Throughout the course, you’ll be introduced to a broad range of topical issues. These enable you to better understand the challenges of work in various types and sizes of organisations operating locally and globally. As a student on the MSc in International HRM, you’ll learn significant transferable skills that are valued by employers. These include: The ability to research relevant data How to critically analyse data to inform contextual decisions Teamwork How to carry out projects and deliver effective presentations You’ll also develop your ability to reflect on contemporary management practice in an informed manner. Your learning and development is further supported by contact with guest-speakers, field trips, and the opportunity to take part in business simulations with fellow students across the Management School. [-]

MSc in Investment Analysis

Campus Full time 1 year September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling

The MSc Investment Analysis is the UK’s longest-established postgraduate level course in the field of investment management education. It is one of the very few Master’s degrees in the UK to have CFA® Institute Program Partner status and one of a select group of partner institutions worldwide. [+]

The MSc Investment Analysis is the UK’s longest-established postgraduate level course in the field of investment management education. It is one of the very few Master’s degrees in the UK to have CFA® Institute Program Partner status and one of a select group of partner institutions worldwide. Accreditation As a CFA® Institute Program Partner, at least 70% of the learning outcomes of all three levels of the CFA® Programme are covered and so the course is ideally suited to those who wish to become qualified as a CFA® Charter-Holder. Top Reasons To Study With Us The MSc in Investment Analysis at Stirling was the UK’s first postgraduate programme in the field, and is one of the few such programmes in the world to have CFA® Institute Programme Partner status. 70% of the learning outcomes of the CFA® Charter Programme are covered, the course is ideally suited to students who wish to qualify as CFA® Charter holders. Students undertake the free Amplify Trading week long masterclass giving practical experience of financial markets. The Course Director, Dr Kevin Campbell, is an internationally respected expert with specialist research interests in corporate finance and governance. University of Stirling students have reached the final of the CFA® Institute Research Challenge on eight out of the last nine years, a record unique amongst the UK Partner Programme universities. In 2016 Stirling won the UK final. In the most recent Research Excellence Framework (REF) the School was placed in the UK’s top 25 institutions for Business and Management, out of 101 business schools. In Scotland, the School was ranked in the top five. Course objectives The syllabus has a distinctly international orientation that reflects the increasingly globalised nature of financial markets and the investment management profession. Such is the international reputation of the course that students come from a wide variety of educational and professional backgrounds and cultures, providing a unique opportunity for the development of worldwide contacts. The Stirling MSc in Investment Analysis team has an unrivalled record in the UK CFA© Institute Research Challenge. Stirling has won the UK final of this competition and reached the final in eight out of nine years. As a Programme Partner we are also able to offer on a competitive basis CFA Scholarships for the CFA level 1 exam. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree or equivalent. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. INTO University of Stirling offers a Graduate Diploma for those students who do not meet the required criteria for this course. If you successfully complete the Graduate Diploma in Business, Finance and Sport and meet the required progression grades, you will be guaranteed entry onto this Master's degree. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Scholarships & funding Stirling Management School Postgraduate Scholarships Stirling Management School is committed to investing in academically talented students, enabling them to further their education with a reputable qualification from one of the many Postgraduate degree courses on offer at the University of Stirling. There are various categories of funding available to support the cost of your studies at Stirling Management School. The Investment Analysis course has two specific scholarship opportunities: The Karen Napier Scholarship and the Wauton Scholarship. The Karen Napier Scholarship will meet the course fees and will also provide a £3,500 maintenance award and the Wauton Scholarship provides £1,000 funding towards tuition fees. Scholarship applications for 2016 entry are now closed. Postgraduate Tuition Fee Loan This course is currently approved for PTFL (Postgraduate Tuition Fee Loan) funding from SAAS. More information Structure and content This one-year full-time course has an initial taught component of two 15-week semesters involving lectures, practical case study work and workshops followed by a supervised dissertation. As soon as you arrive at Stirling you are introduced to your course, fellow students and the University by taking part in the Stirling Management School Flying Start Leadership Programme. This induction enables you to develop skills to get the most out of your studies and to progress quickly in your career. Delivery and assessment Students experience lectures, small group seminars, problem-solving classes, drop-in sessions, computer labs and group working during their studies. Successful completion of the taught modules leads to the award of a Postgraduate Diploma. The Master’s degree is awarded on satisfactory completion of a dissertation, following the Diploma examinations. Dissertation topics range over all areas of relevance to investment analysis and allow completion of a case study or research topic dissertation. The top student on the course receives the Walter Scott Global Investment Management Prize. Career opportunities Where are our graduates now? Stirling Management School is unique in having a dedicated Employability Manager and from the very beginning of the course your career is our focus. MSc Investment Analysis graduates work around the world and the following are examples of the organisations they are employed by: Aegon Asset Management Alliance Trust Andersen Baillie Gifford Barclays Global Investors Citibank Ernst & Young Honeywell HSBC Investec Securities JP Morgan Russell Investments Silk Invest Ltd Standard Charted Bank Walter Scott Global Investment Management Graduates entering into employment in the recent years have secured positions such as: Financial Consultant, e-FSW (Greece) Relationship Adviser (Private Banking), Royal Bank of Scotland (UK) Quantitative Analyst, Silk Invest Ltd (UK) Investment Banking Analyst, Government Savings Bank (Thailand) Alumni of Investment Analysis who graduated between five and ten years ago have advanced into positions such as: Partner, Corporate Services Bureau Limited (Zambia) Senior Broker (Retail Sales & Trading), National Securities (Greece) Portfolio Manager – High Yield, Fortis Investments (UK) Senior Analyst, Bank of Thailand Risk Analyst, RBS Insurance (UK) Investment Researcher, Jiajing Investment Company (China) Our alumni are leading and shaping the strategy of global financial organisations: Managing Director, Citi – Global Banking (Hong Kong) Head of Asset Management, Allemby Hunt (UK) Fund Manager, MCB Investment Management (Mauritius) Chief Financial Officer, Nanyang Press Holding (Malaysia) Vice President, MCB Bank Ltd (Pakistan) Senior Equity Analyst, Atlantic Investment (USA) [-]

MSc in Management and English Language Teaching

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

The MSc in Management and English Language Teaching (MELT) is one of only a few such degrees in the UK and is distinguished by the fact that Management skills are taught in the Stirling School of Management. The course is designed around a recognition that well trained, professional teachers can progress into management positions within a few years of graduation, but they often lack management training. [+]

The MSc in Management and English Language Teaching (MELT) is one of only a few such degrees in the UK and is distinguished by the fact that Management skills are taught in the Stirling Management. The course is designed around a recognition that well-trained, professional teachers can progress into management positions within a few years of graduation, but they often lack management training. Management of ELT involves multi-cultural workforces where success depends more on management skill and cultural sensitivity than on teaching ability. At Stirling, we focus on training both novice and experienced teachers, balancing theory and practice, and taking an innovative approach to teaching which includes special support for non-native speakers of English. Novice teachers on the MELT programme will get a thorough grounding in the theory and research underlying English language teaching and also in teaching methodology, while experienced teachers will benefit from a range of module choices. This is combined with input on management skills relevant to the multicultural working environments that are commonly experienced in language teaching today. The content of your course will vary to suit your experience, so whatever your starting point, you are challenged to acquire knowledge and skills that you can apply in teaching and managing in 21st century ELT. Who is this Course For? This degree is particularly appropriate for novice teachers (less than two years’ experience) who want a balance of training in English language teaching and management skills. It is also ideal for experienced teachers who plan to move into a management position. You may have a medium to long term plan to run a commercial language school or a language teaching department in a school, college or university. The degree will also be relevant to you if you intend to go on to study for a PhD. TOP Reasons To Study With Us You will gain a Masters level qualification in teaching from a department of Education that is the highest ranked in Scotland and one of the best in the UK. You will be taught Management skills by specialists in a highly ranked Management School We specialise in training both novice and experienced teachers. The course offers an excellent combination of English Language Teaching and Management skills. You will experience university life in the historic city of Stirling and one of the most beautiful campuses in Europe. Course objectives The programme aims to provide students with a strong foundation in TESOL and a focus on management issues within the discipline. What Makes Us Different ... [-]

MSc in Marine Biotechnology

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

This skills-focussed MSc provides students with a thorough knowledge of the biodiversity in our oceans while receiving practical training in cutting-edge techniques and experimental approaches underpinning on-going developments in marine biotechnology. [+]

This skills-focussed MSc provides students with a thorough knowledge of the biodiversity in our oceans while receiving practical training in cutting-edge techniques and experimental approaches underpinning on-going developments in marine biotechnology. Students learn about existing products developed by marine biotechnologists and gain insight into new and emerging global market opportunities. Seminars led by distinguished industrialists and commercial marine biotechnologists encourage the entrepreneurial spirit, provide inspiration and allow for appreciation of commercial realities. In addition, students are equipped with key employability skills, including: problem solving and critical thinking information retrieval, evaluation and presentation data interpretation and report writing group working, organisation and leadership Through an active approach to learning, students develop confidence to work independently and are encouraged to pursue their main interests. Course objectives This course provides students with: An awareness of the diversity of marine organisms and the adaptations that enable them to prosper in their natural habitats. A thorough knowledge of the fundamental science and methodologies underpinning on-going developments in marine biotechnology. An understanding of the latest advances and global opportunities that exist in the burgeoning field of marine biotechnology. Training in practical, investigative and research skills, as well as commercialisation and intellectual property protection. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements Second class Honours degree, or equivalent, in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with appropriate/relevant work experience are encouraged to apply. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Scholarships & funding Scottish Funding Council Masters Scholarships The Scottish Funding Council is funding Home/EU tuition fees for a number of places on this course. Funded places are open to applicants domiciled in Scotland and the EU. Structure and content The MSc is achieved through the satisfactory completion of 180 SCQF credits. There are two 30-credit taught Foundation modules in Semester 1 (September to December) and two 30-credit taught Advanced modules in Semester 2 (January to April). The remaining 60 credits are achieved by undertaking a Research Project (April to August) on an area of expertise within the Faculty of Natural Sciences. Students completing just the taught modules qualify for a Postgraduate Diploma. Delivery and assessment The course is taught primarily by staff at the Institute of Aquaculture, with numerous seminars given by leading figures from industry. Student performance is evaluated by continuous assessment via various coursework tasks, including written and oral presentations. Career opportunities The course provides each student with knowledge and practical experience important for a career in marine biotechnology. The course content has been developed by experienced academic staff in partnership with industrialists from the marine biotechnology sector and is designed to meet the demands of employers in this rapidly expanding industry. Employability Students are equipped with key employability skills, including: problem solving and critical thinking information retrieval, evaluation and presentation data interpretation and report writing group working, organisation and leadership. Through an active approach to learning, students develop confidence to work independently and are encouraged to pursue their main interests. Industry connections Research projects may be performed in collaboration with industrial and academic partners from outside Stirling. In addition to study tours to commercial biotechnology operations, numerous seminars are give by leading figures from industry. [-]

MSc in Marketing

Campus Full time 1 year September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling

Marketing is about creating, communicating and delivering exchanges of value between an organisation and its customers that satisfy the customer, the organisation and society at large. The MSc Marketing course offers students from a wide variety of educational and cultural backgrounds the opportunity to understand and combine academic concepts and practice-related marketing issues. This unique combination of academic and practice allows for students to be well-positioned for future success in the field of marketing. [+]

Top Rankings for Marketing The University of Stirling Management School’s Marketing Division ranks among the top in the country. We are positioned 2nd in Scotland and among the top 20 in the UK. Complete University Guide 2016. Marketing is about creating, communicating and delivering exchanges of value between an organisation and its customers that satisfy the customer, the organisation and society at large. The MSc Marketing course offers students from a wide variety of educational and cultural backgrounds the opportunity to understand and combine academic concepts and practice-related marketing issues. This unique combination of academic and practice allows for students to be well-positioned for future success in the field of marketing. MSc Marketing MSc in Marketing with Brand Management MSc in Marketing with Retail Accreditation The MSc Marketing course at Stirling was one of the first in the country to be accredited by the Chartered Institute of Marketing (CIM). Upon the successful completion of the MSc Marketing Course, two modules will be waived, meaning students need only complete the remaining two modules (versus completing all four required modules) in order to gain a Professional Diploma in Marketing. This exciting opportunity will provide you with the competitive edge you are looking for to embark on a successful career. Top Reasons To Study With Us The MSc Marketing course at Stirling is part of the University’s Management School, and follows the research-led approach that the School is recognised for. In the most recent Research Assessment Exercise, 85% of our research activity was found to be of international significance. The course was one of the first in the country to be accredited for the Chartered Institute of Marketing’s Multi-Award Pathway (MAP) which, as well as endorsing the MSc qualification with considerable authority, also allows candidates to gain the CIM Professional Diploma in Marketing by undertaking two modules rather than the normal four. As a Marketing MSc student you will have access to the Markstrat simulation platform, a web-based approach to testing strategies in a realistic competitive environment. The course includes training events designed to build leadership and personal effectiveness, and you will have opportunities to work with our consultants to create a personal profile that offers invaluable insights into their approach to decision-making, communication and working relationships. Different interests, different pathways This is an MSc programme in Marketing aimed primarily at students wishing to convert from other disciplines or those who wish to gain a qualification that will validate their work experiences. However, you can gain recognition of your interest in a specific area of Marketing through our named Pathways in Brand Management and Retail if you wish. MSc Marketing The MSc in Marketing is a specialist, 12-month full-time taught postgraduate course. The course is designed for those seeking to develop their knowledge of Marketing but it is not restricted to those who have already studied Marketing or related Business subjects. As such it offers students from a wide variety of educational and cultural backgrounds the opportunity to understand and combine academic concepts and practice-related marketing issues. Participants are encouraged to draw on their own backgrounds and any existing management skills and work-based experience throughout this course. The course is modular, so the credits awarded at the end of each assessed module can be accumulated towards a postgraduate qualification. As a student of Marketing, there are three core topics of study in the Autumn Semester which will provide you with a depth of relevant and up-to-date knowledge. In the Spring Semester you will gain an appreciation of contemporary issues in Marketing through your choice of four elective modules. The pool of elective subjects is refreshed on a regular basis; in 2016-17 we will include new modules on Innovation in Marketing and Multichannel Marketing and Retail. In the core Marketing Management Applications module, our MSc in Marketing students have to apply this knowledge through a project undertaken for an external company. Over the Summer you will then complete the MSc by showcasing your learning through either an individual dissertation or group research project in the area of Marketing. MSc in Marketing with Brand Management The MSc in Marketing with Brand Management offers students the opportunity to focus more on the specifics of developing and using brands and branding in the marketing context. All students will register for the MSc in Marketing in the first instance and will then have the opportunity to change degree pathway by the end of the Spring semester. The course is modular, so the credits awarded at the end of each assessed module can be accumulated towards a postgraduate qualification. As a student of Marketing with Brand Management you will study three core topics in Marketing in the Autumn Semester before deciding on your final course of study. To specialise in Brand Management in the Spring semester you must complete the modules on Brand Marketing and Digital Marketing and Advertising as well as two other elective modules. The pool of elective subjects is refreshed on a regular basis; in 2016-17 we will include new modules on Innovation in Marketing and Multichannel Marketing and Retail. In the core Marketing Management Applications module, you will be asked to apply this knowledge through a project undertaken for an external company. Over the Summer you will then complete the MSc by showcasing your learning through either an individual dissertation or group research project in the field of Branding. MSc in Marketing with Retail The MSc in Marketing with Retail provides students with the opportunity to acquire and extend their knowledge and expertise in the area of retailing. The retail sector is a major employer throughout the world and one which requires a sound skill set in order to be able to manage profitable interactions with suppliers and consumers. All students will register for the MSc in Marketing in the first instance and will then have the opportunity to change degree pathway by the end of the Spring semester. The course is modular, so the credits awarded at the end of each assessed module can be accumulated towards a postgraduate qualification. As a student of Marketing with Retail you will study three core topics in Marketing in the Autumn Semester before deciding on your final course of study. To specialise in Retail in the Spring semester you must complete the modules on Retail Marketing and Marketing and the Supply Chain as well as two other elective modules. The pool of elective subjects is refreshed on a regular basis; in 2016-17 we will include new modules on Innovation in Marketing and Multichannel Marketing and Retail. In the core Marketing Management Applications module, you will be asked to apply this knowledge through a project undertaken for an external company. Over the Summer you will then complete the MSc by showcasing your learning through either an individual dissertation or group research project in a field relevant to the Retail sector. Course objectives The MSc provides you with an understanding of the concepts and systems underlying marketing practice and allows you to develop your skills of diagnosis and implementation in marketing management and research processes. On completion you will be able to: Nurture and consolidate a customer-focused management approach in a variety of different market settings, organisation types and policy situations Design, plan, implement and evaluate research-based marketing strategies Gain exposure to ethical issues that arise from marketing activities and to understand the impact marketing has on society in general Conduct research into contemporary marketing practice What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree or equivalent. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encourage to apply. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View our range of pre-sessional courses. Scholarships & funding Stirling Management School Postgraduate Scholarships Stirling Management School is committed to investing in academically talented students, enabling them to further their education with a reputable qualification from one of the many postgraduate degree courses on offer at the University of Stirling. There are various categories of funding available to support the cost of your studies at Stirling Management School. Postgraduate Tuition Fee Loan This course is currently approved for PTFL (Postgraduate Tuition Fee Loan) funding from SAAS. Structure and content The course begins with the two-week Flying Start Leadership Programme. This programme introduces all MSc students in the Stirling Management School to the University and explores what will be expected from them over their year at Stirling. Through discussions, group work, team-building exercises and meetings with local business people, it provides a solid platform for their future studies. After completion of the Flying Start Leadership Programme, a series of three core modules in the Autumn semester will equip you with the essential skills needed to understand the theory and practice of marketing/brand management/retail. These skills are practised using marketing cases and the Markstrat computer-based marketing simulation which allows students to develop and run a portfolio of brands in the safety of the classroom. Our links with various commercial industries in Scotland and throughout the world allow our staff to draw on a wide range of marketing experiences and practices as well as providing guest lectures by practitioners and site visits to local businesses. The MSc in Marketing is a one-year full-time course where you can choose to specialise in Brand Managment or Retail. Delivery and assessment The taught modules of the MSc course are delivered using a variety of methods, for example, lectures, tutorials, case studies, role playing, computer simulations, fieldwork exercises, site visits, guest speakers and company projects. Much of the assessment is continuous and may include research reports, essays, briefings, management reports, case analyses, debates, literature reviews, marketing communication plans, poster sessions and presentations. Assessed work is often conducted in groups, as developing teamwork and communication skills are seen as important. Strengths ‌The MSc courses at Stirling provides students with a strong academic grounding in fundamental marketing concepts. This grounding is accomplished through our research-led teaching approach. In addition to consistently engaging in academic literature through weekly readings and module assessments, the course provides the students with a number of opportunities to apply these concepts, theories and frameworks to practical aspects. Importantly, the students are offered the opportunity to partner with organisations across a wide-variety of organisations including non-profits, third-sector and small-medium enterprises (SMEs). ‌Listed below, you will find additional details of unique elements of the course that will position you for future success. Current knowledge Our academic staff aim to link marketing theory with current trends in business in areas such as innovation, brand identity creation, multi-channel marketing, social marketing and sport marketing. By discussing not just the current situation but how we got there, we aim to establish an awareness of the need for ‘learning to learn’ and ‘knowledge reinvention’ that will help you throughout your subsequent career. To this end, we draw on our own staff research, our industry links and the wider marketing sphere through the Chartered Institute of Marketing and our corporate membership of the Marketing Society Scotland. Our MSc students are often invited to attend either our own internal research seminars or the presentations put on by industry bodies. Our undergraduate and postgraduate students have won the Marketing Society Scotland’s Award for Star Marketing Student on several occasions in recent years. A rich blend of theory and practice The programme incorporates a range of mechanisms by which you can use the ideas taught in class and so better understand what they mean and how to use them in the future. These include the ‘risk-free’ management practice in the marketing strategy simulation in the Autumn semester, the public defence of your own ideas in our Research Poster Session, and the consultancy-style marketing project in the Spring semester. Marketing strategy In the Autumn semester you will participate in the Markstrat simulation, a web-based platform for developing marketing strategy and planning practice in a competitive environment. By means of various performance standards and protocols, you will get to test and improve your skills in market analytics, decision-making, budgeting, planning and performance assessment. If you are going to lose a million dollars, then this is the place to do it because you can learn from your mistakes without the stress. Research Methods Poster Session All students on our MSc course present their evolving ideas for their individual dissertations or group projects in visual form as a ‘scientific’ poster with an accompanying presentation. You must defend the ideas presented in your poster to both staff and to the other MSc students. This event is held in the University Atrium each year and it has proved to be a very successful event, particularly for building your confidence in your own ideas. Consultancy-style marketing project The Marketing Management Applications core module in the Spring semester aims to provide you with an equivalent experience to an industry placement. It gives you the opportunity to gain knowledge and increase your confidence working on a ‘live’ marketing topic as you operate within the management boundaries and budget of an external client organisation. In short, each group has a client organisation that provides a real problem that matters to them and asks the group to explore that topic and to come back with various suggestions or solutions. The range of topics typically come from a mixture of private, public and Third Sector organisations, such as charities and social enterprises. The projects can cover anything from identifying potential customers through to the opportunities for international expansion. It will be up to you, working with an academic supervisor, to set up the study, to investigate the issues that arise and to present your findings back to the client. The combination of academic frameworks and theories within the constraints of what can feasibly be done by the organisation within its own resources, will prepare you for similar tasks that will be required of you in your future career. In some cases, a student conducting a project has been employed subsequently by the organisation with which they partnered during the module. ‘Brand Me’ You will be encouraged to explore your personal brand and the directions in which you want to develop. Beginning with the creation of an Insights® Discovery Personal Profile, the aim is to encourage independent, creative thinkers who know how to communicate their views and values to others, including potential employers. Working with our team of consultants, you will receive your own Insights® Discovery Personal Profile which offers an engaging, reinforcing and transformational insight into your personality and how you compare to others. Based on the model of personality developed by Carl Jung, the Insights® Discovery profile offers our students a framework for self-understanding and personal development. The profile can help you to learn about your approach to decision-making; your key strengths and weaknesses in working relationships; your value to the team, as well as your communication style and possible blind spots. There is a significant amount of required group and team work on the MSc which we use to reinforce this positive start by providing areas for self-development and career planning. You will be encouraged to become more effective communicators and supportive team members in a professional business environment. To help you, you receive feedback from other group members through formal peer assessment procedures and you will write reflective statements that consider why and how you made certain decisions and how they relate to the concepts you have been learning. This is an MSc programme in Marketing aimed primarily at students wishing to convert from other disciplines or those who wish to gain a qualification that will validate their work experiences. However, you can gain recognition of your interest in a specific area of Marketing through our named Pathways in Brand Management and Retail if you wish. Different interests, different pathways This is an MSc Programme in Marketing aimed primarily at students wishing to convert from other disciplines or those who wish to gain a qualification that will validate their work experiences. However, you can gain recognition of your interest in a specific area of Marketing through our named Pathways in Brand Management and Retail if you wish. Career opportunities Why become an expert in brand management? Brands add value For a firm, having a positive and strong brand is a critical success factor. If created and managed correctly, a brand can add value to a firm’s business activities, serve as a form of protection from its competitors’ offerings, entice consumers and build loyalty. Brands are more than names and symbols Brands are a key element in a firm’s relationships with their consumers. Brands represent consumers’ perceptions, experiences and feelings about a firm’s offerings to the marketplace and everything the firm means to the consumer. Brands are expressive devices As consumers, we purchase particular brands to express who we are. We also avoid those brands that we believe have negative connotations; whether psychological, social or emotional. Brands are not just products Traditionally, brands related only to products and their performance. Nowadays, brands and branding is considered vitally important for financial services, retailers, politicians, celebrities, religions, towns, cities and countries – even ourselves, for example, as a method to differentiating who we are relative to others in the workplace and job market. Brand management is exciting and interesting Brand management is one of the most exciting and interesting career paths. Whatever the size of the organisation, brand management offers daily challenges and stimulus. Why become an expert in retailing? Retailers lead economies Retailers are some of the largest and most powerful organisations within national economies, and increasingly influential in a global context. Examples include Tesco (based in the UK) and Walmart (in the USA). Their scale, complexity and growth result in an increasing demand for highly professional staff. Retailers influence what people buy Two thirds of all decisions on what to buy are made at the point-of-sale. Knowing how to win the bodies, minds and money of shoppers impacts on the success of retailers, manufacturers and everyone else involved in the supply chain. Retailers dominate marketing Retailers have taken over marketing leadership from manufacturers. The increasing number of highly successful retail brands, their role in new product introduction, their promotional power and their ability to leverage information about the customer illustrate exceptional marketing leadership. Retailers lead innovation and change Retailers are highly innovative and their operations increasingly sophisticated. Examples include multi-channel e-commerce trading, IT-driven Customer Relationship Programmes, merchandising systems, automated product ordering systems and flexible supply chains. Retailers are now more than sellers of product Retailers are very close to consumers and so enjoy huge influence on the placing and promoting of products and services. Thanks to this privileged position, retailers have been able to diversify their businesses into the service sector (insurance, mobile communications and banking) and manufacturing (clothes, consumer electrics, food and so on). Zara, H&M and IKEA, for example, have become large manufacturers in their fields, while Tesco has achieved a dominant position in market research by using its sales data. Understanding retail means understanding other sectors and parts of the supply chain. Retailers offer excitement and interest Retailers are now amongst the most exciting and interesting of organisations to work for whatever the size of the organisation, retail management offers daily challenges, stimulus. Where are our graduates now? MSc graduates are currently working around the world in countries such as Japan, China, Netherlands, Australia, South Africa, Switzerland, Germany, Mexico, India. They are currently contributing to the performance of the following organisations: Yves Saint Laurent Nokia Unilever eBay Pepsico Bloomberg NCR Corporation Intelligent Media Ltd Nestle Capital Group UK Google To provide you with an indication as to what you can do with your Master's degree, graduates in the past three years are currently employed as: Marketing & Communications Officer, Stirling Council (UK) Sales Consultant, Yves Saint Laurent (UK) Marketing Communications Associate, Eugenides Foundation (Greece) Global Sales, Karma Medical Products (Taiwan) Social Media Manager, Liquorice - Digital Innovation for Brands (Africa) Building on that foundation, alumni of Stirling’s MSc Marketing degree who graduated between five and ten years ago have since advanced into some of the following positions: Brand Manager, Unilever (Greece) Senior PR Specialist, National Education Association (USA) Sales & Marketing Executive, Alma Lasers (Japan) Senior Marketing Specialist, Symantec (Mexico) Account Manager, Cheil (Taiwan) Account Executive, McCann Erickson (Greece) Senior Lecturer, University of Roehampton (UK) Some of our more established alumni are currently leading and shaping marketing strategy across many different sectors – here is an example of how a few former Stirling MSc students have advanced in their careers: Marketing Manager, Nestle (Greece) Supply Chain Manager, Aibel Pte Ltd (Singapore) Director of Marketing & E-Business, Elsevier (Hong Kong) International Sales Manager, Importaco, S.A. (Spain) Industry connections Stirling Management School has excellent links with local and national organisations. Guest speakers from across the private, public and third sectors regularly engage with our MSc students, providing a practical perspective on contemporary marketing topics through a series of guest lectures and workshops. Speakers include: Garry Lace - Manchester University, Martin Raymond - Cloudline PR Agency and Ken Thompson – Breakthrough Business Research. Students have recently worked on projects with representatives from EASA Training Ltd, Indigo Lighthouse, RD Support, Snowsports Scotland, Scottish Biomedical, Stirling Art and Waterski Scotland. Stirling MSc students have also benefitted from recent site visits to external organisations such as ASDA, Blue Sky Experience (Specialist team building and team development company) and New Lanark Visitor Centre. [-]

MSc in Media and Communications Management (Vietnam)

Campus Full time Part time 16 - 27 months April 2017 Vietnam Ho Chi Minh City + 1 more

The course is delivered in English by Stirling academics with teaching assistantship by Western-educated local media specialists, which involves both intensive face-to-face teaching and online instruction. Throughout the course, students will attend lectures, seminars and discussions by/with leading media personalities in Vietnam. The full-time course takes 16 months to complete and the part-time version takes 27 months. Students completing the course will be awarded a University of Stirling’s MSc in Media and Communications Management degree. We are currently recruiting for the next intake, to be started in October 2015. [+]

The course is delivered in English by Stirling academics with teaching assistantship by Western-educated local media specialists, which involves both intensive face-to-face teaching and online instruction. Throughout the course, students will attend lectures, seminars and discussions by/with leading media personalities in Vietnam. The full-time course takes 16 months to complete and the part-time version takes 27 months. Students completing the course will be awarded a University of Stirling’s MSc in Media and Communications Management degree. We are currently recruiting for the next intake, to be started in October 2015. Course objectives Students completing the course will be awarded a University of Stirling’s MSc in Media and Communications Management degree (180 Scottish Qualifications Framework points [SCQF]). We also offer the Diploma for those who successfully complete six modules (120 SCQF) and the Certificate for those who successfully complete three modules (60 SCQF). Internationally oriented and comparative in approach, the learning outcomes include: a theoretical and case study-based foundation in communications management, including marketing, branding, internal and crisis management; media economics, finance and business management strategy appropriate management skills and an analytical perspective on the communications and media industries training in appropriate research methodologies, both quantitative and qualitative What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View our range of pre-sessional courses. Structure and content The Media and Communications Management course includes six face-to-face and two online courses, plus a dissertation of 12,000 words at the end of the coursework period. Dedicated UK-based academics will visit Vietnam at regular intervals to lecture students. Western-educated local academics will conduct tutorials and moderate guest lectures and seminars. Leading the course will be Professor Matthew Hibberd. Delivery and assessment Lectures, seminars, guest lectures, essays, exams, reports. Career opportunities Many Film, Media and Journalism graduates are successful practitioners, entrepreneurs and executives in the media and communications industries, and active in numerous other occupations. They regularly return to share their professional experience with current students. The department’s strong relationships with screen industries, public relations and journalism professionals are among its core strengths, along with its high-profile activities within international research communities. [-]

MSc in Media Management

Campus Full time 1 year September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling

Meeting an emerging need for specialist research and teaching on the media industries, the full-time Media Management course focuses on the UK in a European and global context. It was the first course of its kind in the UK, running successfully since 1993. Applications are particularly welcome from those employed in the media industries. [+]

Meeting an emerging need for specialist research and teaching on the media industries, the full-time Media Management course focuses on the UK in a European and global context. It was the first course of its kind in the UK, running successfully since 1993. Applications are particularly welcome from those employed in the media industries. Top Reasons To Study With Us The University of Stirling has delivered a qualification in Media Management since 1993 and was the first in the UK – probably in Europe and even globally – to do so. The course has been strengthened with the appointment of new, dedicated staff and the development of new modules. It continually evolves to keep up with the changing media world. Benefit from being taught by high quality, international–standard researchers. Their own study of the media is translated into the modules. The University has strong industry links and you will have the chance to mix with people within the media and gain first-hand experience of the industry. The course will equip you with the practical skills and attributes highly sought after by prospective employers in a variety of careers. Course objectives Internationally-oriented and comparative in approach, the course provides: a theoretical and case-study based foundation in media economics, finance and business strategy appropriate management skills and an analytical perspective on the media industries an understanding of the evolution of the regulatory and policy environment in which media operate advanced study in contemporary media and cultural theories training in appropriate research methodologies What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. INTO University of Stirling offers a Graduate Diploma for those students who do not meet the required criteria for this course. If you successfully complete the Graduate Diploma in Media, Humanities and Social Sciences and meet the required progression grades, you will be guaranteed entry onto year one of this Master's degree. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View our range of pre-sessional courses. Scholarships & funding GREAT - MSc Media Management University Scholarship -India 2016 GREAT Britain Scholarships India is a joint programme part funded through GREAT funds and part funded by the University of Faculty of Arts and Humanities. One GREAT Britain India Scholarship of £5,500 will be awarded to a student on the MSc in Media Management in 2016/17. Structure and content The MSc in Media Management has been developed to prepare media managers to meet the challenges posed by unprecedented change and increased competition in the media environment. This full-time academic course is designed to provide media practitioners with a wider analytical perspective on the main issues affecting their work and offers graduates a rigorous foundation for a career in the media industry. The course builds on Communications, Media & Culture's extensive links with the media industry and draws on a range of related disciplines including media studies, economics, marketing and business studies. The MSc consists of two components: a taught course followed by a Dissertation. Based primarily in the Communications, Media & Culture division, the taught component also involves postgraduate modules offered by, or in collaboration with, the Stirling Management School. The taught course takes place within the University's two 15-week semesters and involves lectures, seminars, tutorials and case-study work. Students will take two core modules and one elective module concurrently in the Autumn Semester, plus two core modules and one elective module concurrently in Spring Semester making a total of six taught modules across the year. Delivery and assessment The course is taught with a combination of lectures, seminars, workshops and tutorials. Formal teaching is augmented by occasional guest speakers, usually experienced practitioners from the media industry who are able to provide a strategic or practical insight into current management issues. Strengths Stirling's media research has been awarded a rating of Grade 5 three times in succession in the Higher Education Funding Councils' research assessment exercise and had 70% of it's research considered to be 'World Leading' or 'International excellence' in the most recent RAE. The Stirling Media Research Institute (SMRI) enjoys an international reputation for the quality of its work, regularly attracting many foreign visitors. The Institute has a purpose-built research facility for the use of its members. Current research in the Institute is focused on: Cultural Creativity Film and Television Journalism Media and Communications Policy Public Relations Sport Media Digital Media Media Archives and Cultural Memory All research active members of the Division are members of the SMRI. The Institute is a long established centre for research in both humanities and social science approaches to film, broadcasting, journalism and digital media. Members of the Institute work to understand the role of the media in culture and society, taking interdisciplinary approaches to our knowledge on creative and cultural industries, media policy and regulation, public relations and communications management, heritage and media archives, digital transformations of news and journalism, and a range of media-centred studies on sport, health, the environment, terrorism, gender and identity. Much of this work is aimed at improving our knowledge of media and communications theory and practice. Projects have focused on the media in contexts involving, for example, sports broadcasting, public relations practice, environmental NGO's, film and media archives, and policy review settings. Our research outputs and public engagement have connections to changes to public policy on broadcasting, the press and digital media or improved education and training of media and communications managers. Our research has helped shape a national policy on broadcasting in Scotland, curricula relating to the training of public relations professionals, the public communication of environmental and conservation initiatives and public activities focused on media archives held by both the University and other external organisations. Research impact Communications, Media and Culture actively supports and encourages its staff to engage with a wider non-HEI audience for its research evidenced through contributions to policy for funded research for government agencies, collaborative work with NGO’s, engagement with the trade associations, unions and institutes of communications, media and culture professionals, active dialogue and contributions to media organisations across the spectrum of broadcasting, the press, film and the internet, professional contributions to charities and pressure groups in relation to public media issues and policies, and a range of cultural heritage activities at national and international film festivals and exhibitions. Active involvement in various media agencies and organisations can be seen in Professor Blain’s role as a member of Skillset’s National Board for Scotland, Professor Hibberd’s Chairing of the Voice of the Listener and Viewing in Scotland, and Professor Haynes’s (2011-12) role on the Advisory Network of Mind Waves, a mental health media project run by the Mental Health Partnership of Glasgow and Clyde NHS, as well as Dr. Kääpä's work on environmental media management with a range of industry an regulatory organizations in the UK and Nordic countries. Career opportunities Where are our graduates now? Our graduates are spread throughout the world. At present we are in contact with graduates in 30 countries around the world. Media Management graduates are currently contributing to the performance of the following organisations: BBC Worldwide Channel 4 China Radio HIT FM Vodafone Greece Radio One India (A Midday/BBC Joint Venture) MTV ERT S.A. Southerna Africa Development Community Skattedirektoratet Wyeside Arts Centre MTV Networks UK Summerhouse Publishing Jetlag Advertising Motorpress Hellas SA Google India Pvt Ltd Dagavisen Mobistar - Orange Group Ministry of Education & European Commission Asia Reach Media Tele2 Norway ThinkDigital Indian Music Industry McCann Universal Media Cooperative Bank of Chania, Crete Adcosp - Simeka TWS Communications Corporate Communications, Avon Giacometti: Branding e Arquitetura de Negócios Vodafone Bòrd na Gàidhlig To provide you with an indication as to what you can do with your Media Management degree, graduates entering into employment in the past two years are currently working with: Editor-in-Chief Reputation Executive Social Media Researcher Communications Executive Lecturer Internship in Online Marketing Building on that foundation, alumni of Stirling’s Media Management degree who graduated between five and ten years ago have since advanced into some of the following positions: Director, International Marketing Researcher Business Analyst Chief Executive General Manager Associate Account Director Vice President Head, Magna Home Video and Magna Films Some of our more established alumni are currently leading and shaping Media Management strategy across many different sectors – here is an example of how a few former Stirling Media Management students have advanced in their careers: Marketing Manager Vice President of Programming, Creative & Content Content & Produce Development Manager PR Executive Project Manager Communications Consultant Account Executive Communication Manager in Public Relations Department Creative Partner Financial Control/Analysis Manager Account Associate Managing Director Head of Regulatory Affairs Head of Customer Base Management Project Manager Business Development & Operations Director Business Development Director Director, Global Digital Marketing Press Officer Marketing Director Accounts Director Head of Corporate Relations Employability Skills you can develop through this course As you progress through your Media Management degree, you will have the opportunity to develop the following practical skills and attributes that are much sought after by prospective employers: Media industry awareness – through case study analysis, guest lectures and site visits to media organisations, you will develop an understanding of what is going on in the media sector and rapid developments in other digitally related industries Written and oral communication – media management involves communication both internally and externally with various stakeholders. The course develops your abilities to communicate through various essays, reports, presentations and online activities Teamworking – groupwork is an essential part of your Media Management degree, both during management and communications modules simulate real-life scenarios in business and marketing communications Research and analysis – critical learning is a key aspect of any Master's course in media and communications and you will be given the opportunity to develop your own research skills to carry out both small-scale and larger research projects including the Master's dissertation Time management – you will learn how to manage your time more effectively through your active involvement in group projects, as well as by successfully juggling your weekly workload in order to meet your (sometimes conflicting) deadlines for coursework Self-confidence – the media industry needs confident, self-starters and your active participation in the degree programme and the wider postgraduate community will build your personal confidence and professional prospects Graduating with a degree in Media Management does not necessarily mean that you have to progress into a career in that field. A Media Management degree is a solid foundation upon which to base a career in a variety of different fields, as is shown by some of the potentially less obvious roles that our Media Management graduates are currently working as: Area Manager Regional Sales Director In-house Lawyer Head of Finance Industry connections The Division of Communications, Media and Culture actively supports and encourages its staff and students to engage with a wider non-HEI audience for its research evidenced through contributions to policy fora, funded research for government agencies, collaborative work with NGO’s, engagement with the trade associations, unions and institutes of communications, media and culture professionals, active dialogue and contributions to media organisations across the spectrum of broadcasting, the press, film and the Internet, professional contributions to charities and pressure groups in relation to public media issues and policies, and a range of cultural heritage activities at national and international film festivals and exhibitions. Students will meet media professionals through talks and site visits, and will have the opportunity to focus aspects of their assessment on the needs of media organisations. Staff maintain good relationships with former graduates now working in the media, including organisations such as the BBC, Channel 4, MTV, China Radio HIT FM, Vodafone Greece and Radio One India (A Midday/BBC Joint Venture). [-]

MSc in Perception and Action

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 24 months September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

The course will explore methods by which it is possible to measure perception with varied content, depending on the specific interests of the student. Lectures from academic staff will form a course introducing the main methods of measuring perception, considering the strengths and weaknesses. [+]

(MSc, Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma) As we make our way around the world we are continually making decisions and performing actions that are driven by our sense organs. Our perception of the world is not just sensory information, but instead an interpretation based on what our brain expects as well as what it is being told by sense organs. Understanding and measuring perception distinct from sensation is a complex task. The course will explore methods by which it is possible to measure perception with varied content, depending on the specific interests of the student. Lectures from academic staff will form a course introducing the main methods of measuring perception, considering the strengths and weaknesses. Course objectives In addition to broad training in psychological methods, this course ensures that students acquire an understanding of how to measure perceptual experience in a bias-free manner, including the basic framework for understanding such measurements. Students also acquire practical experience in making measurements of perceptual experience through a research project and opportunity to conduct a placement in a laboratory context. What makes us different? ... [-]

MSc in Performance Coaching

Online Part time 2 years September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling

Performance Coaching is an innovative online learning degree; the first of its kind in Scotland. It is for experienced performance coaches who wish to extend their expertise adjacent to their sport- specific qualifications. [+]

Performance Coaching is an innovative online learning degree; the first of its kind in Scotland. It is for experienced performance coaches who wish to extend their expertise adjacent to their sport- specific qualifications. The course has been developed to articulate with the UKCC Level 4 certification process. The programme is endorsed with Sports Coach UK for UKCC Level 4. It will develop skills of critical analysis and reflective practice, enhance problem-solving capacity and promote innovative solutions to performance coaching problems. Your work will be grounded in performance coaching practice, considering case studies and experiential learning from peers and leading coaching practitioners. Course objectives This online learning course is for experienced performance coaches who wish to extend their expertise alongside their sport-specific qualifications. The course aligns with the UK Coaching Certificate (UKCC) Level 4 certification process. It will develop skills of critical analysis and reflective practice, enhance problem-solving capacity and promote innovative solutions to performance coaching problems. In addition to the sports-specific coaching skills, you will have developed in your practice, we develop coaches who: reflect continuously and challenge personal assumptions and beliefs to improve future performance critically reflect on decisions in complex and unpredictable situations recognise and resolve problematic coaching issues through the generation of innovative strategies and solutions design and implement an optimal learning environment to impact on athletes’ performance needs design and implement a planned and strategic approach to performance improvement develop and manage appropriate support structures to facilitate improved performance What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. Five years' relevant/appropriate work experience is required. Please note: If you are a student from overseas and applying with a Tier 4 student visa, we unfortunately can not accept your application for this course as it falls into the category of being part-time, delivered online or a distance learning course. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.5 with 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 17 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Structure and content You must successfully complete six taught modules (120 credits) and an applied research project (60 credits) for the award of the MSc. For the award of the Postgraduate Diploma students must successfully complete all the taught modules. For the Postgraduate Certificate students must successfully complete 60 credits worth of taught modules. Students will study a number of modules, including: The Coaching Process: Providing an opportunity to examine conceptual models of the coaching process and examining the cognitive expertise required to affect the process Coaching Concepts: Examining key conceptual topics in your coaching practice and asking you to reflect on how you have developed your expertise Performance Analysis and Planning: Coaches are provided with an opportunity to develop their capacity to use and critically appraise the application of technology in analysing sports performance Coaching as Learning: Coaches discover how to apply integrated approaches to learning in generating, managing, and directing coaching practice. While encouraging coaches to become self-reflective practitioners Independent Study: Allowing coaches to identify an area of personalised, context-specific study, they develop an agreed learning programme accordingly Understanding Performance: This module consists of two segments: physiology and psychology. The physiology half of the module provides an understanding of the appropriate application of exercise physiology to the measurement and assessment of human exercise capacity. In the psychology half of the module students examine theories, models, and factors conducive to the understanding of behaviour of individuals and groups in sport and exercise settings. Applied Coaching Project: This module will enhance coaches’ capacity for autonomous, professional judgement and practice. It should contribute to the development of the student as a coach who is capable of sustaining enquiry into aspects of his/her professional context In addition to the sports-specific coaching skills, you will have developed in your practice, we develop coaches who: reflect continuously and challenge personal assumptions and beliefs to improve future performance critically reflect on decisions in complex and unpredictable situations recognise and resolve problematic coaching issues through the generation of innovative strategies and solutions design and implement an optimal learning environment to impact on athletes’ performance needs design and implement a planned and strategic approach to performance improvement develop and manage appropriate support structures to facilitate improved performance Delivery and assessment A flexible approach to learning and assessment will characterise this degree. Knowledge and understanding are acquired and enhanced through online lectures and seminars, guided independent study, professional practice experiences and through the University’s virtual learning environment – Succeed. Individual staff/student tutorials, eg via Skype are available for providing feedback and for supervision of coursework and the Applied Coaching Project. Students receive a Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport Postgraduate Handbook describing the course outline, module details, procedures and assessment criteria. In addition, module outlines include details of specific content and assessments. All assessment procedures are in line with institutional policies and will be conducted in such a way as to adhere to adult learning principles. This means that content and learning demonstrate relevance, problem solving, learning by doing and a strong element of self-direction and ownership. Modules Applied Coaching Project (SPSP037) Coaching Concepts (SPSP050) The Coaching Process (SPSP052) Coaching as Learning (SPSP054) Independent Study (SPSP056) Understanding Performance (SPSP057) Performance Analysis and Planning (SPSP062) Strengths As Scotland’s University for Sporting Excellence we are closely aligned with many sports organisations and have formal links with a growing number of organisations with regard to facilitating student research projects, work experience and guest lectures. Academic strengths This course is delivered by a team of highly qualified academics with experience and research interests that complement and support teaching activities. The quality of research and publications produced by the Faculty of Health Sciences and Sport is clearly evident in the most recent RAE ranking which placed the University of Stirling in the top five in the UK, with 85 percent of publications classed as ‘International level’ and 15 percent as ‘World-leading’. Career opportunities It is anticipated that coaches who apply for this course will already be in employment in performance sport. The establishment of the UKCC across four levels and different coaching contexts has provided an opportunity to modernise existing coach qualification and learning courses. The course aligns with UKCC Level 4 and is endorsed by Sports Coach UK. It will create a shaped learning platform between performance sport and the University in the delivery of a practice-based performance coaching course. Graduates are anticipated to fulfil roles in the ‘top tier’ of employment opportunities for coaches in their sport. [-]

MSc in Psychological Research Methods

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

The Psychological Research Methods (PRM) course provides broad training in the fundamentals of psychological science - the modern approach to studying mind and behaviour. [+]

The Psychological Research Methods (PRM) course provides broad training in the fundamentals of psychological science - the modern approach to studying mind and behaviour. PRM combines training in psychological theory with practical skills development, preparing our students for a future career in psychology. Individual modules provide a thorough introduction to quantitative and qualitative research, the analysis and interpretation of data, and a critical skeptical approach to psychological science. Opportunities for practical hands-on skills development are built in, ranging from low-tech observational assessment to high-tech eye-tracking, and including training on giving oral presentations. A self-reflective approach to personal development is encouraged, and students on this course are an integral part of Stirling Psychology's research community, housed within a dedicated MSc office. The course will appeal to students wishing to develop a career in psychological research, either working towards a PhD in Psychology, or working in the wider public, private or third sector. Course objectives The primary aim of the course is to provide advanced training as a preparation for a research career in Psychology. The course develops the theoretical understanding and practical and interpersonal skills required for carrying out research. Postgraduates are an integral part of our research community. Students are based in a dedicated MSc office, or within an appropriate research group, and allocated a peer mentor. Students have an academic supervisor in Psychology who supports and guides their development - including the research dissertation project. Our aim is to encourage students to make the complex transition to become a fully independent research scientist. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Scholarships & funding There are typically five £1,000 bursaries to contribute towards fees or maintenance costs for students beginning a taught MSc course. All students, including international students, formally accepted onto the MSc course are eligible to apply for these awards. Awards will be decided on both previous experience and academic record but preference will be given to applicants intending to stay at Stirling to pursue a PhD following the MSc course. Structure and content The course consists of different modules designed to provide training in the fundamentals of Psychological Research Methods. We aim to be flexible in meeting personal training needs and students may select some alternative modules from other taught MSc courses at the discretion of the Course Coordinator. This course includes the following modules: Psychological Research Methods I and II: These modules cover a wide range of techniques used in research and demonstrate these techniques in relation to topics in a range of areas, including social, cognitive, comparative and developmental work Research Methods in Cognition and Neuropsychology: A series of seminars and practical classes covering the range of methods that are used to study issues in cognition, including the use of eye-tracking, neuropsychological case studies of brain-injured patients and the application of neuroimaging methods. Advanced Statistics: The teaching is aimed at introducing the packages available to psychologists, at advanced methods such as multivariate statistics and at the rationale of using statistical methods Qualitative Research Methods: This module provides a broad but solid grounding in qualitative research methodology Key Skills for Psychology Researchers: This module focuses on the research process, including ethical conduct and disseminating research to both academic peers and non-specialist audiences. Research Placement: This month-long placement is carried out in January/February, allowing students to broaden their practical research experience. The placement may be external to the department and can be in a non-academic research environment. The different modules emphasise different types of skills, from explicit hands-on demonstrations of tools, to discussion of different approaches to research. All our postgraduates are also expected to attend regular research seminars and relevant research group meetings. Students are also encouraged to attend ‘Scottish Postgraduates in Psychology Research Training’ events in participating universities across Scotland. Finally, for those who go onto the MSc: Research dissertation: Approximately half of your time is devoted to a research project, leading to a 12,000-word dissertation. Delivery and assessment Teaching is delivered using a variety of methods including tutorials, demonstrations and practical classes, but the majority is seminar-based. Students are typically taught in small groups in specialist classes, with first-year PhD students or other postgraduate students (for example, in modules from other MSc courses). The individual module components provide 60 percent of the MSc grade, with the research dissertation contributing the remaining 40 percent. Strengths Psychology at Stirling is one of the leading psychology departments in the UK. It ranked in the top 20 in the recent research assessment (REF 2014) and is one of only seven non-Russell group universities to do so (Birkbeck, Royal Holloway, Sussex, Essex, St Andrews and Bangor; source Times Higher Education magazine). Its quality of research publications ranked third in Scotland after Aberdeen and Glasgow. Furthermore, the relevance of its research activity to society received the highest possible rating which only four other psychology departments in the UK achieved (REF 2014 results). Psychology at Stirling University is small enough to fully involve MSc students in our lively and collegial community of research excellence. Your three month full-time dissertation is supervised by leading UK academics. Career opportunities The Psychological Research Methods (PRM) course is designed as a springboard for a career in psychological research and is ideal for students wishing to pursue a PhD in psychology. The course incorporates training in a wide range of skills that are required to conduct high-quality research in psychology, and students are encouraged to develop applications for PhD funding through the course. One essential part of the course is the requirement to carry out a Placement (typically in an external company, charity or third sector organisation). This provides a fantastic opportunity to develop relevant work-based employment skills, and to develop a network of contacts relevant to future career goals. Students benefit hugely from the Placement experience, combining skills and experience with personal and professional development. PRM graduates are well placed for careers in clinical and health psychology, educational psychology and teaching, human resources management and personnel, etc. The skills gained are also readily transferable to other careers: PRM positions students for the growing expectation that graduates have a good understanding of human behaviour, are able to interpret and analyse complex forms of data, and to communicate ideas clearly to others. [-]

MSc in Psychology (accredited conversion course)

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 27 months September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

This is an intensive one year (12 month) or 27 month part-time course. You already have a degree in another subject but want to ‘convert’ to Psychology. This may be because you have noticed in work that a scientific psychology degree would help you, or because you are seeking a career change or a new intellectual challenge potentially progressing to PhD or MPhil studies. The course is accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS) and gives you BPS Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership which is of interest both to national and international students wanting to practise as a psychologist or health professional. [+]

This is an intensive one year (12 month) or 27 month part-time course. You already have a degree in another subject but want to ‘convert’ to Psychology. This may be because you have noticed in work that a scientific psychology degree would help you, or because you are seeking a career change or a new intellectual challenge potentially progressing to PhD or MPhil studies. The course is accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS) and gives you BPS Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership which is of interest both to national and international students wanting to practise as a psychologist or health professional. Accreditation This course is accredited as conferring eligibility for Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership with the British Psychological Society. This is the first step towards becoming a Chartered Psychologist. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in another subject. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Scholarships & funding There are typically five £1,000 bursaries to contribute towards fees or maintenance costs for students beginning a taught MSc course. All students, including international students, formally accepted onto the MSc course are eligible to apply for these awards. Awards will be decided on both previous experience and academic record but preference will be given to applicants intending to stay at Stirling to pursue a PhD following the MSc course. Structure and content This course will cover the basics of psychology in an in-depth and accelerated fashion. You will take the lectures and read the textbooks that undergraduates also take, but you will get through these quicker and you will critically evaluate concepts, knowledge, and research evidence at a level in keeping with postgraduate study. This way of learning is possible because you have already completed another degree. While you acquire the key concepts and core knowledge of psychology in its broadest sense (e.g. social psychology, cognition, development, individual differences, biological bases of mind and behaviour) you also take research methods modules specially designed for postgraduate students. You will further do a practical placement. This intensive learning experience culminates in a three month (or six month part-time) independent empirical research project supervised one-to-one by an academic specialist. Psychology at Stirling has a vibrant research ‘culture’ and our taught postgraduate students are fully integrated in the research community, meeting up for weekly research seminars and informal specialist discussion groups with staff and students. The facilities are excellent and psychology masters students enjoy a dedicated suite of study rooms. Delivery and assessment Teaching is delivered using a variety of methods including lectures, tutorials, demonstrations and practical classes, practical placement, and one-to-one research supervision. Lectures are typically taken together with honours students, while small group specialist classes are generally taken with first-year PhD students or other postgraduate students (for example, in modules from other MSc courses). Both taught and research postgraduates are integral to our research community and are expected to participate in our regular research discussion meetings and seminars. All students are provided with appropriate office space and equipment. In addition, each student is associated with an academic from Psychology. The individual modules contribute towards 60 percent of the MSc grade, with the research dissertation contributing the remaining 40 percent. Study abroad opportunities As an intensive 12 month course it is not advisable to study abroad as part of this MSc although some students do their dissertation research in another country. Strengths Psychology at Stirling is one of the leading psychology departments in the UK. It ranked in the top 20 in the recent research assessment (REF 2014) and is one of only seven non-Russell group universities to do so (Birkbeck, Royal Holloway, Sussex, Essex, St Andrews and Bangor; source Times Higher Education magazine). Its quality of research publications ranked third in Scotland after Aberdeen and Glasgow. Furthermore, the relevance of its research activity to society received the highest possible rating which only four other psychology departments in the UK achieved (REF 2014 results). Psychology at Stirling University is small enough to fully involve MSc students in our lively and collegial community of research excellence. Your three month full-time dissertation is supervised by leading UK academics. Career opportunities Graduates of this course are well placed for careers in clinical and health psychology, educational psychology and teaching, human resources management and personnel etc. The skills gained are also readily transferable to other careers: this course positions students for the growing expectation that graduates have a good understanding of human behaviour, are able to interpret and analyse complex forms of data, and to communicate ideas clearly to others. Completion of this course gives Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership of the British Psychological Society (BPS). [-]

MSc in Psychology of Faces

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

The University has a long history of face research. Our internationally renowned team of experts study almost all aspects of face perception, including low level visual processing, adaptation, gaze perception, social perception such as mate preference and attractiveness, mechanisms of recognition and forensic aspects such as unfamiliar face matching and eye witness recovery of memories for faces. This research has led to EvoFIT, a unique system for constructing facial composites of offenders by witnesses and victims of crime, which has a suspect identification rate ten times higher than traditional methods used by police. You will become part of this vibrant research community as you study the key research methods related to face research and will put your learning into practice during a month-long placement. [+]

The University has a long history of face research. Our internationally renowned team of experts study almost all aspects of face perception, including low level visual processing, adaptation, gaze perception, social perception such as mate preference and attractiveness, mechanisms of recognition and forensic aspects such as unfamiliar face matching and eye witness recovery of memories for faces. This research has led to EvoFIT, a unique system for constructing facial composites of offenders by witnesses and victims of crime, which has a suspect identification rate ten times higher than traditional methods used by police. You will become part of this vibrant research community as you study the key research methods related to face research and will put your learning into practice during a month-long placement. Course objectives This course facilitates understanding of this diverse subject whilst allowing students to focus the majority of their efforts in face research, an area for which Psychology at Stirling has long been internationally renowned. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View our range of pre-sessional courses. Scholarships & funding There are typically five £1,000 bursaries to contribute towards fees or maintenance costs for students beginning a taught MSc course. All students, including international students, formally accepted onto the MSc course are eligible to apply for these awards. Awards will be decided on both previous experience and academic record but preference will be given to applicants intending to stay at Stirling to pursue a PhD following the MSc course. Structure and content The course consists of a number of different modules designed to provide training in the fundamentals of research methods. They emphasise different types of skills, from explicit hand-on demonstrations of tools, to discussion of different approaches to research. An important part of the course is training in the skills needed to generate stimuli for research, from controlled photography to morphing and editing, in both 2 and 3D. Students may select some alternative modules from the other taught MSc courses at the discretion of the Course Coordinator. This course includes the following modules: Psychology of Faces: A series of seminars will address both theoretical and practical issues relating to the study of the face, including face perception, face recognition and the role of emotional expressions and gaze in face processing. Students will also be expected to participate in regular research group meetings, in which they will hear about the current work of staff and other graduate students. Psychological Research Methods I and II: These modules cover a wide range of techniques used in psychological research and to demonstrate these techniques in relation to topics in a range of areas. Advanced Statistics: This module assumes a reasonable knowledge of statistics, although an additional introductory module is available for those who wish. The main statistics teaching is aimed at introducing advanced methods such as multivariate statistics and at the rationale of using statistical methods. Key Skills for Psychology Researchers: This module focuses on the research process, including ethical reviews, professional conduct and disseminating research. Qualitative Research Methods: This module provides a broad but solid grounding in qualitative research methodology. Research Placement: This month-long placement is carried out in January/February, allowing students to broaden their practical research experience. The placement may be external to Psychology and can be in a non-academic environment. Dissertation For those who go onto the MSc, approximately half of your time is devoted to a research project, leading to a 12,000-word dissertation. Delivery and assessment Teaching is delivered using a variety of methods including tutorials, demonstrations and practical classes, but the majority is seminar-based. Students are typically taught within small groups in specialist classes, with first-year PhD students or other postgraduate students (for example, in modules from other MSc courses). Both taught and research postgraduates are integral to our research group and expected to participate in our regular meetings. All students allocated a peer mentor are provided with appropriate office space and equipment. In addition, each student is associated with an academic from Psychology. Part-time students take the same modules spread over two years. Strengths Psychology at Stirling is one of the leading psychology departments in the UK. It ranked in the top 20 in the recent research assessment (REF 2014) and is one of only seven non-Russell group universities to do so (Birkbeck, Royal Holloway, Sussex, Essex, St Andrews and Bangor; source Times Higher Education magazine). Its quality of research publications ranked third in Scotland after Aberdeen and Glasgow. Furthermore, the relevance of its research activity to society received the highest possible rating which only four other psychology departments in the UK achieved (REF 2014 results). Psychology at Stirling University is small enough to fully involve MSc students in our lively and collegial community of research excellence. Your three month full-time dissertation is supervised by leading UK academics. Career opportunities The course provides advanced training for a career involving face research. It is intended primarily for students who already have a degree in Psychology or an allied discipline who intend to proceed to a PhD in this field. [-]

MSc in Psychology of Sport (Accredited)

Campus Full time Part time 9 - 24 months September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

Taught by staff with consultancy and research experience, this MSc reflects the current industry trends and employer needs. The course has a broad focus and develops a critical understanding of contemporary theory, research and practice in sport psychology, with a focus on developing graduates who are able to integrate and translate theory and research into practice. [+]

Taught by staff with consultancy and research experience, this MSc reflects the current industry trends and employer needs. The course has a broad focus and develops a critical understanding of contemporary theory, research and practice in sport psychology, with a focus on developing graduates who are able to integrate and translate theory and research into practice. Your studies will include: theory and application of psychological skills, exploration of social processes, understanding of individual differences, learning applied research methods and developing knowledge of career transition management. In addition to these core skills, the course places a great emphasis on professional practice and development through a work-based learning experience, alongside developing your own specific interests through a research dissertation. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. INTO University of Stirling offers a Graduate Diploma for those students who do not meet the required criteria for this course. If you successfully complete the Graduate Diploma in Business, Finance and Sport and meet the required progression grades, you will be guaranteed entry onto this Master's degree. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.5 with 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 17 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View our range of pre-sessional courses. Structure and content Taught by staff with consultancy and research experience, the course reflects the current industry trends and employer needs. Staff comprise Chartered Psychologists, registered Sport and Exercise Psychologists with the Health & Care Professions Council, and BASES accredited practitioners, supervisors and reviewers. You can study either full-time or part-time to Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma or MSc levels. To be awarded an MSc in Psychology of Sport, you must attain 180 SCQF points. You will achieve this by successfully completing the following modules: Applications of Sport Psychology (40 credits) Social Psychology of Sport (20 credits) Research Methods for Sport (20 credits) Key Readings in Sport Psychology (20 credits) Public Engagement in Sport and Exercise Psychology (20 credits) Dissertation (60 credits) On successful completion of the above modules, you will be able to: demonstrate knowledge and understanding of key theories in sport psychology, including a broad knowledge base of psychological skills, strategies and techniques to facilitate performance enhancement within individuals and teams apply a variety of assessment methods in order to develop comprehensive profiles for performance enhancement work identify areas of practice that could benefit from research, and design, conduct and evaluate an appropriate investigation develop and utilise quantitative and qualitative research skills Delivery and assessment Knowledge and understanding are acquired and enhanced through lectures, seminars, group work, presentations, staff/student tutorials, guided independent study, professional practice experiences and through the University’s virtual learning environment – Succeed. Individual staff/student tutorials are available for providing feedback and for supervision of the Research Project. Students receive a Faculty handbook describing the course outline, module details, procedures and assessment criteria. In addition, module handbooks include details of timetable, content, and assessments. The assessment procedures are in line with institutional policies and will be conducted in such a way as to adhere to adult learning principles. This means that content and learning demonstrate relevance, problem solving, learning by doing and a strong element of self-direction and ownership. Assessment involves a mixture of coursework, presentations and written examinations, and will vary according to the context of each module. Modules Application of Sport and Exercise Psychology (SPSP040) (40 credits) Social Psychology of Sport and Exercise (SPSP042) (20 credits) Research Methods for Sport (SPSP039) (20 credits) Key Readings in Sport and Exercise Psychology (SPSP043) (20 credits) Public Engagement in Sport and Exercise Psychology (SPSP061) (20 credits) Dissertation (SPSP010) (60 credits) Strengths As Scotland’s University for Sporting Excellence we are closely aligned with many sports organisations and have formal links with a growing number of organisations with regard to facilitating student research projects, work experience and guest lectures. Academic strengths This course is delivered by a team of highly qualified academics with experience and research interests that complement and support teaching activities. Career opportunities This course is a major foundation for a profession in psychology. It is geared towards the field of sport and exercise psychology, but we anticipate graduates acquiring the skills to move into a broad range of career opportunities, including a number of sport and health professions, posts within a number of fields in the science industry, to careers within the civil service and government. Industry connections There are a number of opportunities within the University for students to develop their knowledge and experience working with elite athletes at our Golf and Tennis Centres. [-]

MSc in Social Enterprise

Campus Full time 5 semesters January 2017 United Kingdom Stirling

The MSc focuses on things that matter to social enterprises: delivering excellent services and high social value, building and maintaining stakeholder support, securing investment, and measuring and communicating success. These are set in the wider context in which social enterprises operate, including political, market and community contexts. [+]

A formal qualification in Social Enterprise will help to further your career, your work and your organisation’s contribution to society. The MSc focuses on things that matter to social enterprises: delivering excellent services and high social value, building and maintaining stakeholder support, securing investment, and measuring and communicating success. These are set in the wider context in which social enterprises operate, including political, market and community contexts. The MSc in Social Enterprise is a new and exciting course aimed at professionals working within social enterprises, advisors, officials, development officers and sector representatives and those wishing to develop a career or an interest in social enterprise. The goal of the course is to support the vitality of the sector, provide advanced expertise and equip the sector to meet the challenges of innovation and sustainability. The course offers opportunities to gain specialised expertise in key sectors such as health, social care, housing, education, sport, culture and the environment, or in key functional areas such as finance, HRM, marketing, public relations or operational management. The in-built flexibility of the course means that these aspects can be tailored to the needs of each individual student. Prior learning and experience will be fully assessed and accredited. The course culminates with a supported project to conduct research and development within the social enterprise sector. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 56 in each component IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Scholarships & funding The Faculty of Social Sciences is committed to investing in academically talented students, enabling them to further their education with a reputable qualification from one of the many degree courses on offer at the University of Stirling. There are various categories of funding available to support the cost of your studies at the University of Stirling. Structure and content At the heart of the course are four core modules, each taught over three full days. It provides content on important themes as social innovation, social value, social responsibility, social capital, social networks, legal identities, finance/investment, entrepreneurship, marketing, communications and social media, leadership, strategic management, governance and stakeholder participation. One day on each core module is a ‘Masterclass’ for the social enterprise sector in Scotland. Students work with detailed case studies and input from industry representatives to provide a high-quality learning experience. This is further enhanced with a range of web-based resources to support and reinforce learning on the course. This MSc offers opportunities to gain specialised expertise in key sectors such as health, social care, housing, education, sport, culture and the environment, or in key functional areas such as finance, HRM, marketing, public relations or operational management. The in-built flexibility of the programme means that these aspects can be tailored to the needs of each individual student. Full recognition of prior experience and learning will be given, subject to application and approval. A key feature of these Advanced courses will be the ‘Social Enterprise Project’, through which we will seek to improve the knowledge base for social enterprise in Scotland and beyond. The course will be part of a Social Enterprise Research Laboratory at the University of Stirling, in which research and development from both inside and outside the University will be presented and disseminated. Delivery and assessment Delivery will be a mix of full day teaching and online resource support. Teaching days will be spread at regular intervals throughout each semester. One day per core module is a ‘Masterclass’ for the Social Enterprise Sector in Scotland. Students work with detailed case studies and input from industry representatives to provide a high-quality learning experience. This is further enhanced with a range of web-based resources to support and reinforce learning on the course. Assessment will be through a mix of coursework, presentations, online participation and an important social enterprise research project. The project will contribute to the Social Enterprise Laboratory at Stirling. Career opportunities The University contributes to the development of a healthy system for social enterprise in Scotland and beyond, upskilling the workforce and providing a base for the presentation and dissemination of research evidence. These courses provide an opportunity for talented professionals within the social enterprise sector to gain formal qualifications that reflect their contribution to social life. Social entrepreneurs often need to be able to compete for contracts and commissions with other agencies. A goal of this high quality course is to provide the ability for individual social enterprises to compete effectively and match the credentials of their private sector competitors. The content of these courses is aimed at improving the functionality of social enterprises to deliver excellent services and high social value, build and maintain stakeholder support, secure investment, and measure and communicate their success. This MSc allows social entrepreneurs to understand more clearly how added value can be driven by integrating these tasks more effectively. This is particularly important where social entrepreneurs may have to fulfil more than one strategic role in their organisation. For students setting out on the path to a career in social enterprise, this course provides an important grounding in the skills, knowledge and expertise needed to succeed in the sector. Linked to the practical understanding of cuting-edge new developments in the sector through participation in Masterclasses and the Social Enterprise Laboratory, they will be fully prepared for the road ahead. Industry connections The School and University maintain contacts and networks with social enterprise bodies (e.g. SENScot, Scottish Social Enterprise Coalition, Social Firms Scotland, Supporters Direct, Co-operatives UK, SCVO, SAOS, Social Enterprise Academy). There has been contact with some of these organisations to discuss the needs of their members in relation to potential TPG provision. This has provided some useful market information and helped to plan for better integration of the University’s provision with the social enterprise community. Flexibility Choice Tailored content High quality input Mix of learning styles Flexible content Access to specialists in in key sectors such as health, social care, housing, education, sport, culture and the environment, or in key functional areas such as finance, Human Resource Management, marketing, public relations or operational management. Recognition of prior learning and experience by portfolio Master classes with detailed case studies and industry input Social Enterprise research project to investigate key research and development issues in the sector Opportunity to participate in the Social Enterprise Laboratory [-]

MSc in Social Work Studies

Campus Full time 2 years January 2017 United Kingdom Stirling

At Stirling University social work education is committed to progressive social change through teaching, research and an active involvement with practice. We believe in a social work profession defined not only by its function but also by its values and integrity. [+]

Do you want a career that is stimulating, rewarding and makes a positive contribution to society? If so a postgraduate diploma/MSc in social work could be for you. At Stirling University social work education is committed to progressive social change through teaching, research and an active involvement with practice. We believe in a social work profession defined not only by its function but also by its values and integrity. We promote an understanding of social work which is informed by social justice and human rights, a profession that acknowledges the links between 'public issues' and 'private troubles' and seeks to address both. We value social work practice that has prevention at its heart and recognises the importance of collective approaches, actively engaging with and learning from user movements. On the Postgraduate Diploma/MSc Social Work course at the University of Stirling you will be taught by a team of qualified social workers including world leaders in their research field and academics who continue to work in practice alongside their University role. You will enjoy the benefits of smaller class sizes (23-55) with creative approaches to teaching and assessment as well as detailed feedback on your progress. You will experience contributions to teaching by people who have used social work services and carers and on your practice placements, will be supported and assessed by accredited Practice Teachers and Educators. We will help you qualify as a social worker who is knowledgeable, skilled, analytical and ethical in your approach to working with individuals, families, groups and communities. Accreditation Successful completion of this course will mean students are then eligible to be registered, by the Scottish Social Services Council, as a qualified social worker. Course objectives This course provides you with an integrated academic and professional course which develops the intellectual and practice skills necessary for professional practice as a social worker. Recent dissertation titles are: End of life assistance from a social work perspective; The use of communication tools when working with people with dementia: a practitioner perspective; Foster carers' experiences of support; Does employment have an impact upon the social inclusion of people with learning disabilities? What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Practical experience in a social care setting is essential. Registration with the Scottish Social Services Council (SSSC) is a requirement for commencing and remaining on the programme (further information on how to apply will be provided to successful applicants who accept a place on the course). Enrolled students must also be a member of the Protection of Vulnerable Groups Scheme. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 56 in each component IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View our range of pre-sessional courses. If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Scholarships & funding Currently, bursaries are available from the SSSC for Postgraduate Social Work students; applicants who are offered and accept a place will be given information about applying for a bursary. Please note that the University is not responsible for allocating these. Further information about this funding can be found here www.sssc.uk.com. Please note that the current bursary covers most of the fee for the course, however there is a shortfall for which you will be responsible. Structure and content The taught course consists of nine modules which include two periods of assessed practice. All students have a personal tutor during the course. Year 1 You will study three modules during Semester 1 on: Human Development and Family Contexts (SWKPDE): Development across the life cycle. Dominant themes and challenges associated with developmental stages; complexity of family life Theory and Practice of Social Work (SWKPPT): Introduction to core knowledge, skills and values for social work practice; professional identity, communicating, listening, interviewing, assessing, planning, intervening, reviewing and evaluating, reflective practice, anti-discriminatory practice Research Methods (SWKPOR): This online module introduces students to the role of research in social work practice and equips them with the key knowledge and skills to undertake their own research. Students will also undertake directed study into Social Work Law and Policy: Introduction to legal systems and processes, law regarding children, adults and families, community care and criminal justice During Semester 2 you will undertake a placement in full-time supervised practice (75 days) in a statutory or independent agency: Practice Learning 1 (SWKPP1). Year 2 You will study four modules during Semester 3 on: Critical Approaches to Theory & Practice – Children, Families and Society (SWKPCF): social work assessment and intervention in relation to children and families. Exploration of different areas of practice. Creative responses to the assessment and management of risk Theory & Practice – Crime, Welfare and Justice (SWKPCJ): What is crime and who defines crime? Responses to offending behaviour. Theoretical explanations of offending behaviour ‘causes’ of crime. Assessing and ‘managing’ the risk of crime, its extent and nature. Exploration of different areas of practice. Effective social work practice and what it means. Theory & Practice – Health, Illness and Disability (SWKPHD): the impact of illness and disability on the social and emotional functioning of individuals, families and specific service user groups, for example, people with mental health problems, people with drug/alcohol problems. Social and medical models of illness, disability and learning difficulties. The meaning of risk – risk taking and risk minimisation approaches. The influence of social and structural factors. Social work skills and methods in promoting the health of people who use social work services The second supervised practice placement runs through the summer period and during semester four (95 days) Practice Learning 2 (SWKPP2). You then take one module: Dissertation (SWKPDD). The award of Postgraduate Diploma is made at this point, following satisfactory completion of all assessed work. The dissertation period, during which empirical research is undertaken and written up, is three months (full-time) or six months (part-time). There is an additional fee for the dissertation component of the programme. This covers supervision, support and assessment. At present, this fee is £500 Delivery and assessment The course is delivered through lectures incorporating small group discussion, student-led project work, micro-skills teaching workshops. Practice Placements are in a wide range of statutory and voluntary agencies across a sixty-mile radius and provide the opportunity for classroom-based teaching to be applied in practice. Every student has a qualified practice teacher to supervise and assess their practice. The course is run in partnership with statutory and non-statutory agencies in Stirling, Falkirk, Clackmannanshire, Fife, Perth and Kinross, Edinburgh City, Midlothian, West Lothian, East Lothian and the Scottish Borders. Your learning is greatly assisted by the contribution (to teaching and practice learning) of staff from local voluntary and statutory agencies. You will also benefit from contributions by service users and carers and from the range of research and teaching interests within the Faculty of Social Sciences, in which Social Work is located. Particular strengths include community care, criminal justice, children and families, skills teaching, values and comparative approaches. A wide range of assessment methods is used: essays, analytical accounts of practice, filmed assessment of practice skills, class presentations, an oral examination on social work practice and assessment of the two practice learning opportunities. Staff are all qualified social workers with a strong commitment to the profession in terms of teaching and research. This is demonstrated by membership of a range of international and national social work organisations within the staff group. Additionally, we have partnerships with local agencies in terms of exchange of knowledge between academia and practice. As a result we have strong representation of practitioners and other agency staff on our assessment boards and in teaching. Career opportunities Successful completion of the Postgraduate Diploma or the MSc provides the ‘licence to practise’ as a qualified social worker registered with the regulatory council of the country in which they work. The qualification is recognised throughout the UK and for work in community-based teams, hospitals, day and residential centres and voluntary agency projects. In Scotland and Northern Ireland it is also the qualification for social work in prisons and criminal justice teams. The nature of the work is extremely varied and there is the capacity to move between different work settings throughout your career. Currently, over 80 percent of students find social work jobs within six months of graduating. The nature of the work is extremely varied and there is the capacity to move between different work settings throughout your career. Currently, over 80 percent of students find social work jobs within six months of graduating. Employability The MSc/PG Dip in Social Work Studies is a professional course which requires students to undertake along with their academic modules, two practice placements. It is in these placements that our students gain experience in direct work with service users and learn essential transferrable skills for their future employment within the social work profession. During the course they also gain experience of presentation skills, research methodology, as well as being taught specific and relevant skills to prepare them for employment in a variety of social work settings. Industry connections We are fortunate to have strong connections with our partner agencies within a 60-mile radius of the University, who contribute to the teaching on the course and who also provide a range of placements across both statutory and voluntary social work services. Examples of these are: the local authorities in Forth Valley, Fife, and Perth & Kinross, and voluntary agencies such as Barnardos and Multi-Cultural Family Base. [-]

MSc in Software Engineering

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 27 months September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

The MSc in Software Engineering offers in-depth knowledge on advanced topics in Software Engineering and Computing Science to existing graduates in Computing or a closely-related discipline. This course has been designed to equip students with the necessary skills to find employment as a software developer or system architect in the IT/Computing industry. [+]

The MSc in Software Engineering offers in-depth knowledge on advanced topics in Software Engineering and Computing Science to existing graduates in Computing or a closely-related discipline. This course has been designed to equip students with the necessary skills to find employment as a software developer or system architect in the IT/Computing industry. Computing Science at Stirling has strong links with industry. Students can get a first hand industrial experience through placements and internships with local enterprises and organisations. More specifically, we offer company-based MSc projects to our students where our students can work with an employer to gain valuable commercial experience. We usually place more than 50% of our students with a company for the MSc project duration. We also regularly invite industry experts to share their expertise with students through seminars and talks. The course is designed to complement and extend a student’s previous education and experience. As such the course offers a high degree of flexibility. You will also get prepared for finding and securing a great job after completing this course through an integrated structured personal and professional development programme. This course covers crucial topics such as self-image, body language, interview techniques, assessment centre strategies, conflict resolution as well as CV preparation and job targeting techniques. Course objectives This course has been designed to provide up-to-date and in-depth expertise in specialist areas of computing, such as: Industry strength Software Engineering approaches Mobile Phone Applications Enterprise Database Systems including NoSQL systems Concurrent and Distributed systems programming including Condor This course will equip you with the necessary knowledge and expertise to embark on a successful career in the IT and software development industry. Our company sponsored MSc projects will provide an ideal pathway into the industry. What makes us different? ... [-]

MSc in Sport Management (with internship)

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 24 months September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

Sport Management is an exciting degree that will help you develop your career in the sport industry. It has been designed to meet the industry’s need for well-qualified managers who can combine management and financial skills with specialist knowledge of sport. The course will help you acquire the necessary knowledge, understanding and skills to enable reflective management practice in a range of sport settings. [+]

Sport Management is an exciting degree that will help you develop your career in the sport industry. It has been designed to meet the industry’s need for well-qualified managers who can combine management and financial skills with specialist knowledge of sport. The course will help you acquire the necessary knowledge, understanding and skills to enable reflective management practice in a range of sport settings. Course objectives The course will help you acquire the necessary knowledge, understanding and skills to enable reflective management practice in a range of sport settings. Throughout the course you will be challenged to evaluate the dynamic environment in which sport organisations in the public, commercial and voluntary sectors strive to flourish, and to apply your developing knowledge and management skills to meet the inherent sport management challenges. Taught by staff with consultancy and research experience, this MSc reflects the current industry trends and employer needs. Your studies will include: strategic management, finance, research methods, professional practice and integrated sport management studies. You will also have the opportunity to widen or deepen your knowledge through selection of two option modules. On successful completion you will be able to: identify and evaluate recent changes in sport participation and policies, and their implications for sport management practices. apply management theory to the context of managing sport organisations. conduct research into sport issues relevant to managing and developing sport organisations and events. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. INTO University of Stirling offers a Graduate Diploma for those students who do not meet the required criteria for this course. If you successfully complete the Graduate Diploma in Business, Finance and Sport and meet the required progression grades, you will be guaranteed entry onto this Master's degree. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.5 with 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 17 Structure and content You can study either full-time or part-time to Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma or MSc levels. You must attain 180 SCQF points to be awarded an MSc in Sport Management. You will achieve this by successfully completing the following modules: Principles of Management in Sport (20 credits) Sports Finance (20 credits) Professional Practice (20 credits) Research Methods for Sport (20 credits) Sport Event Management (20 credits) Sport Management Challenges (10 credits) Sport Marketing (10 credits) Dissertation (60 credits) You will have the chance to work on case studies, learn from people in the business and to develop specific interests through a research dissertation. On successful completion you will be able to: identify and evaluate recent changes in sport participation and policies, and their implications for sport management practices. apply management theory to the context of managing sport organisations. conduct research into sport issues relevant to managing and developing sport organisations and events. If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Delivery and assessment Management concepts and theories will be delivered through traditional lecturing methods. Theory will be applied to practice through case study analysis, discussion with sport management practitioners, seminars and research. You will acquire ‘softer’ management skills such as problem-solving, team-working, leadership, analysis, evaluation and presentation through a range of learning activities, and which are essential if you are to become an effective manager. The modules are assessed by coursework only and designed to encourage students to link theory to professional practice. Strengths A particular strength of this course is the focus on real practice enabled by the knowledge and industry experience of module tutors. Amongst the course tutors are trustees of National Governing Bodies of Sport, those who have employment experience in sport management and a team who, in combination, has provided consultancy support to a wide range of national and international sport organisations. This offers students a unique insight into real life practice and opportunity to access a substantial network of industry contacts. As Scotland’s University for Sporting Excellence we are closely aligned with many sports organisations and have formal links with a growing number of organisations with regard to facilitating student research projects, work experience and guest lectures by industry practitioners. We are also pleased to have a close association with the Chartered Institute for the Management of Sport and Physical Activity. Academic Strengths This course is delivered by a team of highly qualified academics with experience and research interests that complement and support teaching activities. Of particular note is that fact that tutors of what may be regarded as generic management disciplines have a publications record which evidences their specific interest in applying generic theory to the sporting context. Career opportunities Gaining this degree will prepare you for sport management jobs with a local authority, a commercial organisation or with a voluntary sport organisation such as a governing body of sport. A key benefit of this course is the opportunity to gain expert management knowledge that can be applied to a wider range of industrial sectors than just sport. Employability You will have the opportunity to work with a sport organisation during a 30-hour internship as well as organising and marketing a local sport event with Active Stirling. That experience will increase your employability for the job you aim for in the sport sector. Industry connections The University has strong partnerships with a number of organisations including: PGA Scotland, Scottish Professional Football League, Senscot, Scottish Sport Federations, Forth Valley Football Academy and Active Stirling. [-]

MSc in Sports Coaching

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 24 months September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

The Sports Coaching course is for coaches who wish to extend their capacity by engaging in learning experiences which promote analysis and critical reflection of their coaching practice. It will develop skills of analysis, critical reflection, problem-solving and managing the coaching process. Your work will be grounded in coaching practice and research, considering case studies and learning from peers and leading coaching practitioners. You will be expected to be actively involved in coaching during the course. [+]

The Sports Coaching course is for coaches who wish to extend their capacity by engaging in learning experiences which promote analysis and critical reflection of their coaching practice. It will develop skills of analysis, critical reflection, problem-solving and managing the coaching process. Your work will be grounded in coaching practice and research, considering case studies and learning from peers and leading coaching practitioners. You will be expected to be actively involved in coaching during the course. Course objectives In addition to the sports-specific coaching skills, you will be developing in your practice, we develop coaches who: can analyse and reflect on their coaching practice. evaluate and adjust their coaching process. amend their coaching practice to take account of each individual. understand the socio-ethical context of their coaching practice. develop the capacity to make decisions under pressure. have clear personal development goals. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. Applicants must have a minimum of three years’ experience lead coaching including responsibility for planning, implementing, analysing and revising annual coaching programmes and be able to demonstrate their responsibility for preparation, delivery and review of coaching sessions. Evidence of successful completion of sport-specific coaching qualifications is expected (e.g. UKCC Level 2 or equivalent). Successful applicants are expected to be actively engaged in coaching during their studies on the MSc Sports Coaching. INTO University of Stirling offers a Graduate Diploma for those students who do not meet the required criteria for this course. If you successfully complete the Graduate Diploma in Business, Finance and Sport and meet the required progression grades, you will be guaranteed entry onto this Master's degree. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.5 with 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 17 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View our range of pre-sessional courses. Structure and content You can study either full-time or part-time to Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma or MSc levels. You must successfully complete six taught modules (120 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits) for the award of the MSc. For the award of the Postgraduate Diploma students must successfully complete all the taught modules. For the Postgraduate Certificate students must successfully complete 60 credits worth of taught modules. The Coaching Process Coaching Concepts Coaching as Learning Research Methods Professional Practice Dissertation Performance Analysis and Planning or Understanding Performance In addition to the sports-specific coaching skills you will be developing in your practice, we develop coaches who: Critically analyse and reflect on their coaching practice. Continuously evaluate and adjust their coaching process. Foster optimal learning environments taking into account each individual. Understand the socio-ethical context of their coaching practice. Have the capacity to make decisions in complex situations and solve problems in innovative ways. Identify areas of practice that could benefit from research, and design, conduct and evaluate an appropriate investigation. Delivery and assessment A flexible approach to learning and assessment will characterise this degree. Knowledge and understanding are acquired and enhanced through lectures, seminars, group work, presentations, staff/student tutorials, guided independent study, professional practice experiences and through the University’s virtual learning environment – Succeed. Accessibility of the curriculum is in line with institutional policies and it is anticipated coaches with disabilities, as well as coaches of athletes with disabilities, will form part of the cohort on a regular basis. Students receive a faculty handbook describing the course outline, module details, procedures and assessment criteria. In addition, module outlines include details of timetable, content, and assessments. The assessment procedures are in line with institutional policies and will be conducted in such a way as to adhere to adult learning principles. This means that content and learning demonstrate relevance, problem solving, learning by doing and a strong element of self-direction and ownership. Assessment involves a mixture of coursework, presentations and written examinations, and will vary according to the context of each module. Strengths A particular strength of this course is the focus on real practice enabled by the knowledge and coaching experience of module tutors. Amongst the course tutors are those who have considerable coaching experience, links with National Governing Bodies of Sport and have provided consultancy support to a wide range of sport organisations. This offers students a unique insight into real life practice and opportunities to access a network of industry contacts. As Scotland’s University for Sporting Excellence we are closely aligned with many sports organisations and have formal links with a growing number of organisations with regard to facilitating student research projects, work experience and guest lectures. Academic strengths This course is delivered by a team of highly qualified academics with coaching experience and research interests that complement and support teaching activities. Career opportunities The climate for developing sport and coaching in Scotland and the UK has never been more positive. With major international events being hosted here, coach education and development have become a major focus for policy and funding decisions by the UK Government. The establishment of the UKCC across four levels and different coaching contexts has provided an opportunity to modernise existing coach qualification and learning programmes. Graduates fulfil roles in a wide range of sport and non-sport related organisations. For example: Sport Governing Bodies Programme Manager Coaching Manager Swimming coach Strength and Conditioning coach Local Authorities Sports Development Officer Active Schools Co-ordinator Education Physical education teacher High school coach University lecturer University coach development officer Director of Sport Researcher Other Self-employed business Full- or part-time coach [-]

MSc in Strategic Communication & Public Relations (Joint Degree)

Campus Full time 1 year September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling Spain Barcelona + 2 more

The MSc Strategic Communication & Public Relations is an interdisciplinary, advanced level course taught by established academics and practitioners. It offers a hands-on approach while at the same time providing you with the theoretical foundations necessary to practise public relations at a managerial level. [+]

This variant of our established MSc Strategic Public Relations & Communication Management course is delivered jointly with our partner Pompeu Fabra University in Barcelona, Spain. This course provides students with a solid international perspective on strategic communication and provides an opportunity to study in both Stirling, UK, and Barcelona, Spain. The MSc Strategic Communication & Public Relations is an interdisciplinary, advanced level course taught by established academics and practitioners. It offers a hands-on approach while at the same time providing you with the theoretical foundations necessary to practise public relations at a managerial level. You will be offered the opportunity to attend a Public Affairs and Lobbying seminar series in Brussels, which includes visits to the European Parliament, the European Commission as well as specialist industry seminars with leading public affairs and public relations experts in Brussels. This course is taught completely in English and students will obtain a joint MSc degree from the University of Stirling and Pompeu Fabra University. Students spend the Semester 1 at the University of Stirling and then move to Pompeu Fabra University for Semester 2. Students then decide if they would like to have their dissertation supervised by Stirling or Pompeu Fabra. MSc Strategic Communication and Public Relations at Pompeu Fabra University Top Reasons To Study With Us You will benefit from valuable international experience, gained not only by studying international public relations and communication, but actually experiencing them first-hand in different cultures. The course offers an excellent balance between theory and practice. As well as educating students on how to perform certain tasks in practice, we also give them theoretical knowledge. You will experience university life in both Stirling and Barcelona – two of the most beautiful campuses in Europe. One of the major strengths of the course is the emphasis on employability and encouraging students to develop their own networks by visiting different institutions. The course is taught by a lecturing team with both practical and international experience, and who are all research-active What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 56 in each component IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Structure and content Students spend Semester 1 at the University of Stirling and then go to Pompeu Fabra University for Semester 2. Students then can decide to have their dissertation supervision at the University of Stirling or Pompeu Fabra University. The course covers a range of modules including public relations and communication management theory, strategic public relations planning, public diplomacy and strategic communication, media relations, digital media, public affairs and advocacy, and research methods. Delivery and assessment Delivery methods include lecture, workshops and seminars. Methods of assessment include case studies, timed assignments, essays, presentations and reports. Students also complete a 12,000-word dissertation. Strengths Academic strengths This course provides a unique multicultural and intercultural experience for students as well as an innovative and challenging curriculum that is regularly updated. Students will develop a solid theoretical foundation as well as learn practical skills necessary for working within the public relations industry. Students benefit from the experience and expertise of the academic research active team at Stirling and Pompeu Fabra; students are able to study in both northern and southern Europe (Scotland and Spain) and will develop an international outlook. Students are able to attend a two-day Public Affairs and Lobbying seminar series delivered in Brussels (additional cost). Career opportunities This course prepares students for careers in public relations and related areas in consultancies and private sector companies, (in-house positions, such as communications officer/manager, public relations officer/manager, press officer, internal communications officer/manager) NGOS, international organisations (such as the EU, UN etc.). [-]

MSc in Strategic Public Relations & Communication Management

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

The MSc in Strategic Public Relations and Communication Management equips students with the necessary practical and analytical skills for a professional career and it examines how to design, implement and evaluate public relations (PR) and programmes. [+]

The MSc in Strategic Public Relations and Communication Management equips students with the necessary practical and analytical skills for a professional career and it examines how to design, implement and evaluate public relations (PR) and programmes. Accreditation The MSc in Strategic Public Relations & Communication Management is recognised by the UK Chartered Institute of Public Relations (CIPR). Top Reasons To Study With Us The programme’s emphasis on how theory can help inform practice is a very useful tool for those seeking to progress their careers and gain management positions within the public relations industry. We are approved by the Chartered Institute of Public Relations, which provides important networking opportunities and boosts the chances of gaining employment. We keep up to date with new advances, including how digital media is used in public relations. The programme at the University of Stirling is one of the longest established public relations Masters programmes in Europe. Our industry links are second to none. We have an excellent guest speaker programme and we provide students with the opportunity to work for real clients as part of the course. Course objectives Public relations courses at the University of Stirling are designed for students from a variety of degree backgrounds to develop the appropriate intellectual skills at Master's level for a management-level career in Public Relations, Communication Management, Corporate Affairs or Public Affairs. The course helps students develop a critical appreciation of the role of public relations in society and to develop key analytical and professional skills. Our approach is founded on the following principles: Public relations contributes to the effectiveness of organisations by improving organisational relationships and facilitating public conversations and debate. Public relations has a remit for corporate social responsibility through its issues management function and responsibility for reputation, which necessarily means that it has to help organisations change to meet new agendas of sustainability. Teaching strategic public relations can facilitate better public understanding of the occupation, and thus mitigate contemporary cultural stereotypes and prejudice (much fostered by journalists who have an interest in purveying negative images), as well as diffusing core concepts that can benefit Scotland’s private and public sector enterprises: small, medium and large. Improved understanding of this organisational function can aid government and NGOs in political and policy communications. In understanding public relations practitioners as being, in some aspects, ‘discourse workers’ it becomes easier to see that the functional role has the potential to contribute to a more enlightened and better-informed society. Public relations takes place at points of change and moments of transformation in complex contemporary societies. Typically, public relations activity clusters around (i) public policy formation (ii) organisational change and development (iii) public issues such as the environment (iv) major global shifts such as conflict, unstable international environments, globalisation, natural disasters or human disasters such as war or global financial collapse. Bearing all this in mind, public relations education is necessarily embedded in the contemporary issues of the day in a very wide range of environments (political, economic, technological, socio-cultural, regulatory/legal) and contexts (sports, health, religion, tourism, development, regeneration). Our courses are regularly restructured to improve their effectiveness and efficiency in meeting both academic and professional requirements. Modules relate to the Public Relations Education and Training Matrix developed with, and endorsed by, the Chartered Institute of Public Relations and the Public Relations Consultants Association. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. INTO University of Stirling offers a Graduate Diploma for those students who do not meet the required criteria for this course. If you successfully complete the Graduate Diploma in Media, Humanities and Social Sciences and meet the required progression grades, you will be guaranteed entry onto year one of this Master's degree. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 56 in each component IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View our range of pre-sessional courses. Scholarships & funding The University of Stirling is offering any UK or European Union student with a First Class Honours degree (or equivalent) a £2,000 scholarship to study full-time on any taught Master's course or £1,000 for part-time study. Structure and content The course includes six modules, comprising 3 compulsory and 3 optional modules, and a dissertation. The taught elements of the course are in two semesters which run from September until December and from January until the end of May. Master's students are then expected to spend the summer carrying out a Research Project and to submit a 12,000-word Dissertation in August. Delivery and assessment Lectures, seminars and workshops. Methods of assessment include exams, essays, case studies, presentations and practical reports. For some of the more practical modules students are required to produce a portfolio of work which they can present to potential employers at job interviews. Study abroad opportunities No formal study abroad opportunities at present. Strengths Teaching staff on the course have been nominated for a number of RATE (Recognising Achievement in Teaching Excellence) awards since they were launched at Stirling. Career opportunities The degrees offer necessary conceptual skills for managerial careers in public relations, organisational communication, corporate communications and communication management and related posts in a variety of contexts and sectors. Graduates of our Master's level courses in public relations have successfully established careers in the public relations field working for a wide range of organisations all round the world. Recent examples include Nike, the UK Government, Office Depot, Police Scotland and the National Museum of Wales. Many of our graduates work in public relations consultancy, including some of the big names in the PR world, and some have even gone on to start their own businesses. Others stay in academia, going on to gain PhDs and then work as lecturers, teaching and researching public relations in universities all over the world. Skills you can develop through this course By studying this course you will gain a solid understanding of the theory behind public relations and you will have many opportunities to put this theory into practice. You will gain practical skills in campaign planning and the production of public relations materials such as news releases, feature articles and blog postings. This material can make up the basis of a portfolio of work which can be shown to potential employers. Chances to expand your horizons Guest lectures from public relations practitioners provide networking opportunities and expose students to current practice in the industry. The course is recognised by the Chartered Institute of Public Relations and students can attend CIPR Scotland events, allowing them to meet practitioners working in the field and to extend their network of contacts. Where are our graduates now? Graduates of our Master's level courses in public relations have successfully established careers in the public relations field working for a wide range of organisations all round the world. Recent examples include Pfizer, Nike, the UK Government, Office Depot, Police Scotland and the National Museum of Wales. Many of our graduates work in public relations consultancy, including some of the big names in the PR world, and some have even gone on to start their own business. Others stay in academia, going on to gain PhDs and then on to work as lecturers, teaching and researching public relations in universities all over the world. [-]

MSc in Strategic Public Relations (Online)

Online Part time 30 months October 2017 United Kingdom Stirling

This online learning public relations course was specially created to provide access to those whose work or domestic commitments prevent them from attending a full-time course. In recognition of the special requirements of online learning, support networks have been set up in the form of a student network, academic tutors and residential schools. [+]

This online learning public relations course was specially created to provide access to those whose work or domestic commitments prevent them from attending a full-time course. In recognition of the special requirements of online learning, support networks have been set up in the form of a student network, academic tutors and residential schools. Course objectives The course develops a critical appreciation of the role of public relations in contemporary society as well as key analytical, management and communication skills. The course marries vocational skills, tested through practical exercises, and theoretical knowledge. By the end of the course you should have mastered the skills needed to work at a managerial level in the public relations industry. You should be able to: Analyse environments, issues, organisational cultures and relationships relevant to an organisation’s reputation Set objectives, design and implement public relations programmes Carry out research and evaluation including opinion polls and be able to commission market research Apply mass communication, media and psychological theories in a variety of contexts Analyse and make full use of digital media What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. Please note: If you are a student from overseas and applying with a Tier 4 student visa, we unfortunately can not accept your application for this course as it falls into the category of being part-time, delivered online or a distance learning course. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 56 in each component IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View our range of pre-sessional courses. Structure and content The course includes six compulsory modules, two optional modules and a dissertation. The taught elements of the course run over two academic years. Master's students are then expected to carry out a Research Project, starting in October and ending in May, and to submit a 12,000-word Dissertation. Delivery and assessment Course materials will be delivered in a number of formats. The primary teaching materials are the original course contents presented in each of the modules. Each module is divided into a number of topics. This material will be available via Succeed, the University of Stirling's chosen online learning environment. All the topics for a module will usually be available at the start of each module. This content is originally-produced material, written by the course team especially for this course. As well as core materials, module contents include reading lists of additional sources of information students can use to supplement their studying. Assessments include essays, project work, and reports. Study abroad opportunities No formal study abroad opportunities at present. Strengths Teaching staff on the course have been nominated for a number of RATE awards since they were launched at Stirling. Career opportunities The degree offers the necessary conceptual skills for managerial careers in public relations, organisational communication, corporate communications and communication management and related posts in a variety of contexts and sectors. Graduates of our online public relations course have successfully advanced their careers in the public relations field, working for a wide range of organisations all round the world. Many of our graduates work in public relations consultancy, including some of the big names in the PR world, and some have even gone on to start their own business. Others stay in academia, going on to gain PhDs and then work as lecturers, teaching and researching public relations in universities. [-]

MSc in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

A Masters in TESOL at the University of Stirling offers a thorough understanding of the principles and practice of Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) at a level appropriate to graduates who already have a sound academic training. The course is taught by experienced TESOL Education staff within the Faculty of Social Sciences [+]

Gain a TESOL Masters from the University of Stirling, ranked 1st in Scotland for Education The TESOL Masters (MSc) A Masters in TESOL at the University of Stirling offers a thorough understanding of the principles and practice of Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) at a level appropriate to graduates who already have a sound academic training. The course is taught by experienced TESOL Education staff within the Faculty of Social Sciences. Top Reasons To Study With Us You will gain a Master’s level TESOL qualification in teaching from an Education centre for excellence that is ranked 1st in Scotland and 9th in the UK in the Guardian's University League Tables 2017. We specialise in training both novice and experienced teachers. The TESOL course offers an excellent balance between theory and practise using a range of innovative teaching methods that facilitate engagement with new and complex ideas. You will have the opportunity to join a class with TESOL students from across the world. You will be taught by TESOL professionals who have combined experience of living and teaching in all continents of the world TESOL Masters (MSc) Pathways Registering students will have the opportunity to specialise in the following areas which will be confirmed on your award certificate at the point of graduation: MSc TESOL (Applied Linguistics) MSc TESOL (Computer Assisted Language Learning) Course objectives The TESOL Masters at the University of Stirling provides an advanced training and professional qualification for people presently engaged in any area of the teaching of English as a foreign or second language. It also offers professional development to people new to TESOL who are seeking a career change. On completion, you should possess the knowledge and practical classroom skills to be a confident, critically reflective and enterprising teacher. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements Normally, a minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. INTO University of Stirling offers a Graduate Diploma for those students who do not meet the required criteria for this course. If you successfully complete the Graduate Diploma in Media, Humanities and Social Sciences and meet the required progression grades, you will be guaranteed entry onto year one of this Master's degree. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.5 with at least 6.0 in speaking and listening and 6.5 in reading and writing Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade B Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with a minimum of 60 in reading and writing and 56 in speaking and listening IBT TOEFL: 90 with minimum 23 in reading and writing and minimum 20 in speaking and listening If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View our range of pre-sessional courses. Scholarships & funding TESOL Quarter Scholarships - new from 2016/17 We are offering four “Quarter Scholarships” to overseas applicants for any TESOL degree for the academic year 2016-17. These are 25% tuition fee reductions – a saving of almost £3,500! All students paying overseas tuition fees and not in receipt of other funding are eligible. Postgraduate Tuition Fee Loan This course is currently approved for PTFL (Postgraduate Tuition Fee Loan) funding from SAAS. Delivery and assessment Delivery of modules is carried out mainly through seminars, workshops and video tutorials. Practical teaching skills are developed through classroom observation and videoed peer teaching sessions. Learning and professional development is facilitated by regular guided group work tasks. Progress is assessed by coursework assignments and, for the MSc, the dissertation. The Postgraduate Certificate in TESOL is awarded on the successful completion of 60 coursework modules worth 60 credits. The Postgraduate Diploma in TESOL is awarded on successful completion of coursework modules worth 120 credits. The Masters (MSc) TESOL is awarded upon successful completion of coursework modules worth 120 credits plus a dissertation of 15,000 words. Study abroad opportunities As a student on our MSc TESOL programme you have the fantastic opportunity to gain valuable work experience teaching English to non-English speakers in 33 European countries through the Erasmus+ traineeships, or through our partnership with the São Paulo State University (UNESP) in Brazil! See the Overseas Placements page for more details and how to apply. Strengths MSc in TESOL and Applied Linguistics graduate, Ben Dickson, made the national news in November 2015 when his dissertation examined the use of national identity in sports reporting by analysing UK press reports on Andy Murray’s Wimbledon matches from 2005 – 2014. His studying debunked the long-held belief that Murray is referred to Scottish only when defeated, and British when victorious. Career opportunities English is regarded as the most widely spoken language in the world and a qualification in TESOL can open up the opportunity of an English language teaching career or, in the case of experienced teachers, can provide access to promoted posts and management positions within English language teaching. On completion of the MSc in TESOL, overseas graduates will be well prepared to sit all three modules of the University of Cambridge ESOL Examinations TKT. Recent graduates have taken up posts overseas or in the field of ESOL in the UK. For more experienced teachers, the qualification has provided access to positions with the British Council or in the tertiary sector. Employability The course provides students with a ‘career change’ opportunity enabling them, on successful completion, to confidently seek employment as a TESOL tutor. For experienced practitioners, it enhances their professional knowledge and understanding of the TESOL sector which enables them to adopt greater responsibility and leadership in their own or future work environment. There are many opportunities for TESOL graduates to seek jobs throughout the world. Many dedicated TESOL jobs websites are in existence that showcase the wealth of opportunities that await those graduating with a TESOL Masters degree. Industry connections The course draws on practitioners and best practice from across the TESOL sector, focusing on the development of advanced professional capabilities and knowledge in language learning and teaching. [-]

MSc in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) (online)

Online Part time 30 months September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling

Delivered completely online, but with the option of attending modules on-campus if you so wish, this newly drafted and improved programme will satisfy the needs of those who seek to gain a masters qualification whilst continuing to teach. [+]

Delivered completely online, but with the option of attending modules on-campus if you so wish, this newly drafted and improved programme will satisfy the needs of those who seek to gain a masters qualification whilst continuing to teach. TESOL (online) at the University of Stirling will enhance your teaching skills and open up new opportunities for you to advance your career in a wide range of language teaching positions in the UK and overseas. Top Reasons To Study With Us You will gain a Master’s level qualification in teaching from an Education centre for excellence that is ranked 9th in the UK, The Times Good University Guide, 2016. We specialise in training experienced teachers. The course offers an excellent balance between theory and practise using a range of innovative teaching methods that facilitate engagement with new and complex ideas. This online qualification is designed for those who wish to gain a Master’s in TESOL that will fit around their professional and personal lifestyle You will be taught by professionals who have combined experience of living and teaching in all continents of the world Course objectives TESOL (online) at the University of Stirling provides an advanced training and professional qualification for people presently engaged in any area of the teaching of English as a foreign or second language. On completion, you should possess the knowledge and practical classroom skills to be a confident, critically reflective and enterprising teacher. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements Normally, a minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants are expected to have at least two years full-time English language teaching experience. Applicants who hold a DELTA or equivalent awarded within the last 5 years will normally be given credit for prior learning. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.5 with at least 6.0 in speaking and listening and 6.5 in reading and writing Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade B Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with a minimum of 60 in reading and writing and 56 in speaking and listening IBT TOEFL: 90 with minimum 23 in reading and writing and minimum 20 in speaking and listening If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View our range of pre-sessional courses. Structure and content You must complete six modules to gain the MSc. Those entering the course with a recent Cambridge DELTA will get exemption from TESPD01 'Methodology' in year 1 and TESPD06 'Grammar for TESOL' in year 2. Students who take the CALL module (TESPD04) and complete the CALL Portfolio (TESP051) will graduate with the named award - MSc TESOL (Computer Assisted Language Learning) Students who take the Corpora module (TESPD05) and complete a corpus-based dissertation (TESP050) will graduate with the named award - MSc TESOL (Corpus Linguistics) Students who want MSc TESOL as their named degree can take either the CALL or the Corpus module but can choose to write their dissertation on anything TESOL related, not specifically CALL or Corpus. Delivery and assessment Delivery of modules is carried out online. Although not essential, should you wish to attend modules on-campus, this can be arranged. Learning and professional development is facilitated by regular guided group work tasks online. Progress is assessed by coursework assignments for each module and, for the MSc, the dissertation. Strengths MSc in TESOL and Applied Linguistics graduate, Ben Dickson, made the national news in November 2015 when his dissertation examined the use of national identity in sports reporting by analysing UK press reports on Andy Murray’s Wimbledon matches from 2005 – 2014. His studying debunked the long-held belief that Murray is referred to Scottish only when defeated, and British when victorious. Career opportunities English is regarded as the most widely spoken language in the world and a qualification in TESOL can provide access to promoted posts and management positions within English language teaching. On completion of the MSc in TESOL, overseas graduates will be well prepared to sit all three modules of the University of Cambridge ESOL Examinations TKT. For experienced teachers, the qualification has provided access to positions with the British Council or in the tertiary sector. Employability The course allows experienced practitioners to enhance their professional knowledge and understanding of the TESOL sector which enables them to adopt greater responsibility and leadership in their own or future work environment. Industry connections The course draws on practitioners and best practice from across the TESOL sector, focusing on the development of advanced professional capabilities and knowledge in language learning and teaching. [-]

MSc in Translation Studies with TESOL

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

A postgraduate degree in Translation Studies with TESOL is of the highest value. Not only will it equip you with professional level translation skills in international dialogues, enabling you to play your part in developing a global community, it will also give you an entry-level teaching qualification with which you can embark on a career in English Language Teaching. [+]

Available in six languages pairings, one of which must be your native language: English and one of - French, German, Mandarin, Polish, Russian and Spanish. A postgraduate degree in Translation Studies with TESOL is of the highest value. Not only will it equip you with professional level translation skills in international dialogues, enabling you to play your part in developing a global community, it will also give you an entry-level teaching qualification with which you can embark on a career in English Language Teaching. Here in the UK, recent research has shown that the fall in the number of language learners over the past decade has come at a big cost to the economy. Accreditation We are proud members of the Institute of Translation and Interpreting (ITI). The ITI is the UK's only dedicated association for practising translation and interpreting professionals. Our membership of the ITI allows us to help you to keep abreast of the full range of exciting developments and opportunities in the languages services industry. Course objectives The objectives of the MSc in Translation Studies with TESOL are twofold. On the one hand, the course has a strong focus on practical translation and on specific situations in which people communicate with another across cultures. We offer the following language pairings: English and French, Spanish, German, Chinese, Polish and Russian. On the other hand, you will benefit from a sustained focus on contemporary theory and practice in the field of TESOL, with teaching provided by staff who have extensive personal experience of TESOL teaching. In the Translation part of the course, you will undertake extensive practical translation work and you will have considerable flexibility in choosing what areas of translation you wish to specialise in, as you build up a portfolio of translations under the guidance of your tutor. Students on the course also examine some major debates surrounding the opportunities and problems that arise when people from different cultures communicate and translate, through seminars led by experts in the field of intercultural communication. And there will also be some opportunity for work-based study and exercises, including a work-based dissertation, as well as a chance to develop your skills using translation software packages. You may also choose to undertake extended translation as part of your final dissertation and will be given an opportunity to examine some of the key topics in contemporary Translation Studies throughout the course. The TESOL segment of the course comprises a module in TESOL methodologies and another in Applied Linguistics, These, in turn, will underpin the development of your own teaching practice through the third TESOL module, which is devoted to classroom observation and peer assessment of your lesson planning and teaching. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. Language competence requirement; a native speaker of or holding a degree in French, German, Spanish, Chinese, Polish or Russian. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.5 with at least 6.0 in speaking and listening and 6.5 in reading and writing Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade B Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with a minimum of 60 in reading and writing and 56 in speaking and listening IBT TOEFL: 90 with minimum 23 in reading and writing and minimum 20 in speaking and listening If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Scholarships & funding University of Stirling Postgraduate Merit Scholarship The University of Stirling is offering any UK or European Union student with a First Class Honours degree (or equivalent) a £2,000 scholarship to study full-time on any taught Master's course or £1,000 for part-time study. Financial information Find out more about funding your studies and meeting your living costs while working towards another degree. Structure and content The teaching year follows the two semesters, which run from mid-September to late December, and from January to the end of May. During the summer, students complete a dissertation. Portfolio of Translation: This module develops critical ability and autonomy in applying theories and approaches to different types of translation texts. This module will also introduce students to the core translation theories, research methods and approaches in Translation Studies. After that, the students will develop, with their tutor, their own portfolio of practical translation exercises, relating to their own interests. The portfolio will consist of four pieces of translation, each approx. 500 words in length. Students will also discuss and comment on the issues arising in translating your portfolio in a commentary of around 1,250 words. Cultural Translation and Transfer: You will engage in seminar discussions with experts in the area of cultural translation and transfer, analysing the opportunities and problems that arise when information is communicated across cultures. You will be assessed by means of essays reflecting on a major topic of debate, as well as reports based on a site visit to one of our partner institutions engaged in cultural translation. Terminology and Translation Project Management: This module focuses on introducing students to the theoretical framework of the disciplines of terminology and project management, familiarising them with the practice of terminological research and glossary compilation - both essential adjuncts to the work of a professional translator - and developing the students’ career awareness and enterprise skills. TESOL Methodology: You will develop an in-depth awareness of the most up-to-date theory and practice in the teaching of listening, speaking, reading and writing, as well as in the teaching of grammar, vocabulary and pronunciation. Classroom Observation and Microteaching: You will develop your critical awareness of contemporary TESOL teaching practice through the observation of highly-experience TESOL practitioners. In Semester 2, you will get the opportunity to put what you have learned into practice by planning, teaching and reflecting on lessons taught to your peers. A Variety of TESOL Optional Modules Delivery and assessment You will attend seminars and workshop sessions which will focus on translation theories, cultural translation and transfer, but also on the practical activity of translation. Each semester will also include a site visit to one of our partner institutions which engages in cultural translation, broadly construed. Assessment will include essays, reports (which may take the form of written documents, websites or PowerPoint presentations), and the portfolio of translation. Strengths The MSc in Translation Studies with TESOL combines training in two key areas for linguists. Gaining expertise in both will open the door to a wide range of possible career routes and will stand you in good stead when embarking on your chosen career path. This MSc degree is accredited by the Institute of Translation and Interpreting (ITI), meaning it is professionally recognised throughout the world. You are taught by staff with a strong background in the teaching of language and in translation, while tuition on the TESOL modules is delivered by staff with a great deal of expertise and experience as TESOL teachers. Career opportunities Our MSc in Translation Studies with TESOL opens up a range of opportunities across diverse sectors where linguistic fluency and language teaching are key. It offers a fantastic gateway into a career in Translation, whether you want to work freelance or in-house, specialising in business or tourism or literary translation, and there’s much more that you could end up doing with a qualification in Translation. In a world of globalisation, criss-crossing travel and trade routes, and multi-lingual, multi-platform media, your high-level Translation skills, your close attention to detail and your ability to work to client deadlines will set you apart from the crowd. Whether you’re interested in developing a career in Europe, or working for one of the many international companies with offices in Scotland and the UK, this is the course for you. At the same time, the course prepares you for a dynamic career teaching English to speakers of other languages, in the UK or beyond. You will be fully-equipped with an in-depth understanding of the challenges of the language classroom, and will be able to build on your own combined experience as a student of languages and of language teaching to provide a supportive and productive language learning environment for your own students. In short, our course will enable you to play an active role in the development of a global community, putting your language skills to excellent use in fostering international dialogue, exchange and cooperation. Industry connections Our translation course has developed industry links with the translation profession through ITI, Chartered Institute of Linguists, National Network for Translation National Network for Interpreting Professional Language University Group [-]

MA

MA in Atlantic Studies

Campus Full time 1 year August 2017 United Kingdom Stirling

The MA in Atlantic Studies enables you to investigate the link among the many peoples, cultures and environments of the Atlantic world. [+]

Please note: This course will not be accepting applications for 2017 entry. The MA in Atlantic Studies enables you to investigate the link among the many peoples, cultures and environments of the Atlantic world. Core seminars explore the transatlantic movements of people, commodities and ideas, and the circular transmission of language, ideologies, and disease. Elective modules facilitate independent study and fieldwork, and allow students to conduct selective comparisons of the histories, literatures, and ecologies of the regions connected by the Atlantic Ocean: Europe, Africa, and the Americas. Study trips to various cities of the Atlantic facilitate experiential learning and networking for future internships/placement and employment. Top Reasons To Study With Us The Stirling course is distinctive in its combination of core modules taught across subject areas in the Faculty of Arts & Humanities (which call on different teaching styles and paradigms) with options modules and independent learning. Once you have completed this course you will understand how, when, and why the Atlantic world played a seminal role in the development of modernity, and to what extent Atlantic cultural and political connections remain significant in modern life. You will study the subject through a number of different but complementary disciplines in the Arts and Humanities and advanced your appreciation of the political geography of less familiar places (the Americas, Africa, or for international students, Europe). You will also have the opportunity to develop skills in languages (English, French, and Spanish). Further, you will develop a keen awareness of theoretical underpinnings about race, religion, and multiculturalism. You will gain experience in research, visit new places, and been given the opportunity to develop your own independent interests in a supportive and scholarly environment. The course builds in sufficient flexibility to ensure that the development is personalised; by the time you complete it, you will be adequately equipped to pursue more advanced research if you choose. Equally, you can take critical tools into the marketplace: experience in working with multiple languages and with an appreciation of international history and cultural heritage, close reading of texts, the capacity to work up reports and presentations from single page abstracts to dissertations, and working across disciplines. You will take onwards an awareness of the plethora of Atlantic cultures, peoples, and goods that came into contact and conflict, an understanding of the Age of Revolutions in the Americas and their precepts, and a sound grasp of the major theories and scholars of Atlantic Studies in relation to its origins and development. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Structure and content You will take two core modules on Atlantic history and cultures. These are team taught in weekly seminars; two other core modules address training requirements, while for the fifth, you will write a dissertation. In addition, you take two elective modules wherein you can study subjects in more depth. Subject skills: Understanding of the origins and development of the Atlantic world Appreciation of the range of ecologies, cultures, literatures and peoples around the Atlantic basin Comparative awareness of the organisation and evolution of European colonialism and post-colonialism The origins and outcomes of the Age of Revolutions in the Americas Familiarity with a selection of relevant contemporary sources and literature Capacity to evaluate conflicting interpretations across different disciplines in Arts & Humanities Writing a dissertation Developing foreign language proficiency Generic skills: You take two core training modules in spring and autumn, Training for Masters in the Arts and Humanities, which plan a pathway of activities in four benchmark areas: (i) generic skills (which can be applied to many different subjects and kinds of work) (ii) employability skills (to strengthen your appeal in the jobs market) (ii) breadth of knowledge (demonstrating awareness of intellectual debate beyond particular specialisms) (iv) subject-specific skills (that concern academic specialisms) You can attend training events organised by the Faculty of Arts and Humanities, the University of Stirling Graduate School and by external bodies. Delivery and assessment The core modules and elective options are taught largely by weekly seminars of two hours. The training modules require due performance in workshops and the submission of reflective journals A week-long study visit will take place to Nantes (France), where you will take classes and visit heritage and cultural centres Assessment is continuous and by coursework rather than by examination. Every student will be expected to write reflective journals give presentations (including online) Engage in peer review complete essays according to the guidelines and practices of different disciplines (including history and literature) Undertake a substantial piece of writing in the dissertation The course is to be team taught across subject areas in the Faculty of Arts & Humanities, meaning that the teaching and assessment load is divided between colleagues, and you have the opportunity to sample new and perhaps unfamiliar subject matter and theoretical foundations. You will, therefore, be assessed across a wide range of indicators and have the opportunity to express your skills throughout the year, albeit within a robust and established set of parameters. Study abroad opportunities This course will include several study visits to European "cities of the Atlantic", which have been particularly involved in Atlantic historical and cultural exchanges. The first semester will feature a trip to "Glasgow, City of the Trans/Atlantic," where students will learn about Scotland's role in the making and shaping of the Atlantic World. Week-long study visits will take place after the first semester, when students will have improved their language skills and taken classes which have discussed some of the sites. Study visits will involve one or more of the following activities: seminar classes in-situ visits to museums and heritage institutions engagement with other students guest lectures There are also opportunities to undertake language development and research methods training, and to undertake dissertation research and writing overseas at partner universities in Europe and North America. Strengths This innovative course draws on Stirling’s impressive array of scholars who are working on subjects that intersect with Atlantic Studies, and on Stirling’s many international connections. They draw on interests and experience in History, Literature, Religion, Languages, Media, Politics, amongst other disciplines. Whether coming from the UK, Europe, or further afield, the course will allow you to work with expert dissertation supervisors to travel and to borrow and exchange concepts and activities from different disciplines as they tackle significant research questions and develop their own unique projects. The Faculty provides a supportive and welcoming environment, and Atlantic Studies students will be at the forefront of linking together people and places. The strengths of the course lie in its particular integration of subjects and disciplines, and its flexibility to allow you to develop your own momentum, connections, and projects. Atlantic Studies offers a great balance of the personal and the communal. It combines the shared experience of the core modules, where you work with the same peer-group over the course of the year, and participate in the unique study visit to Europe, with the personalised experience of independent study in the dissertation, based on extensive one-to-one tuition by an expert advisor. Academic strengths The Faculty of Arts and Humanities offers you an excellent environment in which you will be encouraged to explore, question, innovate and create. You can choose what to study from an exciting range of stimulating subjects: English History Politics Law and Philosophy Modern Languages Cultures and Religions Communications, Media and Culture You will be taught by experienced and committed staff whose work is well represented in national and international journals, at academic conferences and in the media. You will also quickly become an important part of the Faculty's vibrant intellectual community, which is constantly enriched and renewed by the contributions of visiting scholars and practitioners. Furthermore, your teaching will be innovative, challenging and highly enjoyable and will be delivered within the Faculty's research-led and highly interdisciplinary environment. Employability The course improves graduates' employment portfolios through: inculcating intellectual engagement that emphasises intercultural understanding skills training that stresses employability skills for enhancing cross-cultural capability transitional personal development for a research-based or teaching career experiential learning, which synthesizes academic knowledge with embodied experience and skills acquisition Graduates in Atlantic Studies will have developed advanced presentation skills, the capacity for completing a range of independent research projects, mastered different approaches to scholarship in different disciplines, and enhanced their language skills and appreciation of international history and cultural relations. In short, they will be equipped to both think about and engage with the resources, agents, flows and markets of the Atlantic realm and its heritage, as well as its current issues. [-]

Contact
Location address
University of Stirling,
Stirling, Scotland, FK9 4LA GB
Location address
University of Stirling,
Highland Campus,
Centre for Health Science,
Old Perth Road

Inverness, Scotland, IV2 3JH GB
Location address
University of Stirling,
Western Isles Hospital,
MacAulay Road

Stornoway, Scotland, HS1 2AF GB