University of Kent, School of English

Introduction

Ranked a top 15 English department in the Guardian University Guide 2014-17, 10th for research intensity in the recent Research Excellence Framework exercise, and achieving 95% student satisfaction in the most recent National Student Survey, the School of English at Kent offers an exciting and welcoming environment for study. You will be taught by leading international researchers and award-winning creative writers in a location steeped in literary history. Our programmes – English and American Literature, Creative Writing, Contemporary Literature and Postcolonial Literature – cover all periods from Chaucer to the Contemporary and at every step of the way students choose their own pathway through the subject. All our undergraduate degrees are available with a year abroad or a year in industry and our postgraduate programmes are taught at centres in Paris and London as well as in Canterbury. We are committed to research-led teaching and an international understanding of literature and through these dynamic approaches we ensure that our students are ready for the challenges of work and further study.

This school offers programs in:
  • English

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Programs

This school also offers:

Master

BA English, American and Postcolonial Literature with an Approved Year Abroad (Hons)

Campus Full time 4 years September 2017 United Kingdom Canterbury

English at Kent is challenging, flexible, and wide-ranging. It covers both traditional areas (such as Shakespeare or Dickens) and newer fields such as American literature, creative writing and recent developments in literary theory. In this degree programme (alongside a selection of literature modules) students [+]

English at Kent is challenging, flexible, and wide-ranging. It covers both traditional areas (such as Shakespeare or Dickens) and newer fields such as American literature, creative writing and recent developments in literary theory. In this degree programme (alongside a selection of literature modules) students will take modules that address the phenomenon of empire and its contemporary consequences: for example, nationhood, diaspora and migration. The material studied includes literary texts and theoretical texts as well as life-writing. Students are encouraged to consider how these texts reflect on the colonial experience and the construction of a narrative of its aftermath. You also offer you the opportunity to spend up to a year studying abroad in either America, Canada, Europe or Hong Kong. Staff in the School of English are internationally recognised for academic research which links closely with undergraduate teaching, and the School regularly hosts visits by a variety of international writers and critics. There are several published authors and poets in the School, and our students publish a magazine of creative writing, poetry and prose. A number of our students also write for InQuire, the student union newspaper. Entry requirements Home/EU students The University will consider applications from students offering a wide range of qualifications, typical requirements are listed below, students offering alternative qualifications should contact the Admissions Office for further advice. It is not possible to offer places to all students who meet this typical offer/minimum requirement. - A level: AAB including English Literature or English Language and Literature grade B - Access to HE Diploma: The University of Kent will not necessarily make conditional offers to all access candidates but will continue to assess them on an individual basis. If an offer is made candidates will be required to obtain/pass the overall Access to Higher Education Diploma and may also be required to obtain a proportion of the total level 3 credits and/or credits in particular subjects at merit grade or above. - BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma (formerly BTEC National Diploma): The university will consider applicants holding BTEC National Diploma and Extended National Diploma Qualifications (QCF; NQF;OCR) on a case by case basis please contact us via the enquiries tab for further advice on your individual circumstances. - International Baccalaureate: 34 overall or 17 at HL, including HL English A1/A2/B at 5/6/6 OR English Literature A/English Language and Literature A (or Literature A/Language and Literature A of another country) at HL 5 or SL 6. International students The University receives applications from over 140 different nationalities and consequently will consider applications from prospective students offering a wide range of international qualifications. Our International Development Office will be happy to advise prospective students on entry requirements. Please note that if you need to increase your level of qualification ready for undergraduate study, we offer a number of International Foundation Programmes through Kent International Pathways. If you are required to meet an English language condition, we offer a number of pre-sessional courses in English for Academic Purposes through Kent International Pathways. [-]

BA English and American Literature and Creative Writing with an Approved Year Abroad (Hons)

Campus Full time 4 years September 2017 United Kingdom Canterbury

English and Creative Writing at Kent is challenging, flexible, and wide-ranging. Literature modules cover both traditional areas (such as Shakespeare or Dickens) and newer fields such as American literature, postcolonial [+]

English and Creative Writing at Kent is challenging, flexible, and wide-ranging. Literature modules cover both traditional areas (such as Shakespeare or Dickens) and newer fields such as American literature, postcolonial literature and recent developments in literary theory. Creative Writing options allow you to choose from a range of poetry and prose modules and develop your own voice and style. The classes will teach you about writing and give you the chance to practise, through writing exercises, workshops and assignments, your own writing. There is also the opportunity to spend up to a year studying abroad in either America, Canada, Europe or Hong Kong. Staff in the School of English are internationally recognised for academic research which links closely with undergraduate teaching, and the School regularly hosts visits by a variety of international writers and critics both on campus and in the city of Canterbury. There is a weekly reading series during term time that plays host to a wide range of leading authors reading from their work, as well as publishing industry professionals. Our staff are all published writers and continue to write. Students publish a magazine of creative writing, poetry and prose. A number of our students also write for InQuire, the student union newspaper. Entry requirements Home/EU students The University will consider applications from students offering a wide range of qualifications, typical requirements are listed below, students offering alternative qualifications should contact the Admissions Office for further advice. It is not possible to offer places to all students who meet this typical offer/minimum requirement. - A level: ABB including English Literature or English Language and Literature grade B - Access to HE Diploma: The University of Kent will not necessarily make conditional offers to all access candidates but will continue to assess them on an individual basis. If an offer is made candidates will be required to obtain/pass the overall Access to Higher Education Diploma and may also be required to obtain a proportion of the total level 3 credits and/or credits in particular subjects at merit grade or above. - BTEC Level 3 Extended Diploma (formerly BTEC National Diploma): The university will consider applicants holding BTEC National Diploma and Extended National Diploma Qualifications (QCF; NQF;OCR) on a case by case basis. - International Baccalaureate: 34 overall or 17 at HL, including HL English A1/A2/B at 5/6/6 OR English Literature A/English Language and Literature A (or Literature A/Language and Literature A of another country) at HL 5 or SL 6 International students The University receives applications from over 140 different nationalities and consequently will consider applications from prospective students offering a wide range of international qualifications. Our International Development Office will be happy to advise prospective students on entry requirements. Please note that if you need to increase your level of qualification ready for undergraduate study, we offer a number of International Foundation Programmes through Kent International Pathways. If you are required to meet an English language condition, we offer a number of pre-sessional courses in English for Academic Purposes through Kent International Pathways. [-]

MA

MA Creative Writing

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years September 2017 United Kingdom Canterbury + 1 more

The MA in Creative Writing at Kent offers you the opportunity to study fiction and poetry (exclusively or together) along with optional modules in translation, and writing and the environment. [+]

MA Creative Writing Overview The School of English has a strong international reputation and global perspective, apparent both in the background of its staff and in the diversity of our teaching and research interests. Our expertise ranges from the medieval to the postmodern, including British, American and Irish literature, postcolonial writing, 18th-century studies, Shakespeare, early modern literature and culture, Victorian studies, modern poetry, critical theory and cultural history. The international standing of the School ensures that we have a lively, confident research culture, sustained by a vibrant, ambitious intellectual community. We also count a number of distinguished creative writers among our staff, and we actively explore crossovers between critical and creative writing in all our areas of teaching and research. Our reputation for research excellence was confirmed in the most recent Research Assessment Exercise (2008) in which our research was recognised to be world-leading. The University of Kent is a research-led institution, which means that the research that the academics are engaged in continues to inform their teaching, and that you, as a student in the department, are at the centre of a dynamic and thriving academic environment. Course structure The MA in Creative Writing at Kent offers you the opportunity to study fiction and poetry (exclusively or together) along with optional modules in translation, and writing and the environment. Designed with serious, ambitious writers in mind, our programme uses seminars, tutorials, workshops, and precise editing to enable you to take control of your own work and write exciting, contemporary material. You are taught exclusively by members of the permanent creative writing team, all of whom are practising, award-winning writers: Patricia Debney, David Flusfeder, David Herd, Nancy Gaffield, Dragan Todorovic, Alex Preston, Amy Sackville, Simon Smith and Scarlett Thomas. Assessment You take a total of four modules, for which you will produce approximately 8,000 words each (or an equivalent number of poems or translations). In addition, you write a creative dissertation of about 15,000 words. Learning outcomes Programme aims This programme aims to: provide you with the opportunity to obtain a postgraduate qualification (MA) in one year, and to allow you, if required, a smooth transition to doctoral studies extend and deepen your understanding of your own writing practice through coursework and research enable you to develop an historical awareness of literary and creative writing traditions develop your independent critical thinking and judgement develop your independent creative thinking and practice develop your understanding and critical appreciation of the expressive resources of language enable you to make connections across your various modules and transfer knowledge between modules provide you with teaching, workshops and other learning opportunities that are informed by current research and practice and that require you to engage with aspects of work and practice at the frontiers of knowledge. Knowledge and understanding You will gain knowledge and understanding of: key texts from contemporary British, American, postcolonial and world literatures the main aspects of literary techniques and theory in either fiction or poetry, including point of view, form, style, voice, characterisation, structure and theme key literary traditions and movements, both contemporary and historical terminology used in literary criticism terminology used in creative practice the cultural and historical contexts in which literature is written, published and read critical theory and its applications to both reading and writing the study and creation of the ‘text’ and how this is influenced by cultural factors inter- and multidisciplinary approaches to the advanced practice of creative and critical writing research methods. Intellectual skills You develop intellectual skills in: the application of the skills needed for advanced academic study and enquiry the evaluation of your research findings the ability to synthesise information from a number of sources in order to gain a coherent understanding of theory and/or practice the ability to make discriminations and selections of relevant information from a wide source and large body of knowledge exercise of problem-solving skills communication of complex ideas in prose, poetry or both Subject-specific skills You gain subject-specific skills in: advanced creative writing skills in prose, poetry or both. the ability to produce work with ambition, depth, intellectual structure, sophistication, scope, independence and importance the ability to sustain a piece of creative work and make choices about form, content and style understanding of a ‘whole’ in creative practice (whether this is a novel, a collection of poems or short stories or some other advanced project) the ability to present creative writing professionally, both orally and in writing, demonstrating an awareness and understanding of current practice an advanced understanding of literary themes enhanced skills in the close critical analysis of literary and other texts informed critical understanding of the variety of critical and theoretical approaches to the study of texts and source materials an ability to articulate knowledge and understanding of texts, concepts and theories relating to advanced English or cultural studies well-developed linguistic skills, including a grasp of standard critical terminology appropriate scholarly practice in the presentation of formal written work an understanding of how cultural norms and assumptions influence questions of judgement Transferable skills You will gain the following transferable skills: advanced skills in communication, in speech and writing the ability to offer and receive constructive criticism the capacity to argue a point of view, orally and in written form, with clarity, organisation and cogency enhanced confidence in the efficient presentation of ideas the ability to assimilate, organise and work with substantial quantities of complex information competence in the planning and execution of coursework the capacity for independent thought, reasoned judgement, and self-criticism enhanced skills in collaborative intellectual and creative work the ability to understand, interrogate and apply a variety of theoretical and/or creative positions and weigh the importance of alternative approaches research skills, including scholarly information retrieval skills IT: word-processing, the ability to access electronic data and the ability to work efficiently and effectively in an online learning environment Entry requirements A first or second class honours degree in a relevant subject (or equivalent), or substantial creative writing experience. You are required to submit a sample of your creative writing, and this will be the most significant factor in admissions decisions. Writing Sample A piece or portfolio of creative work should be uploaded on the ‘Declaration’ page of the online application form. If fiction, this should be around 1,500–2,000 words; if poetry, approximately 4 pages. On the ‘Course Details’ page, you should submit a description of around 300 words of your creative writing plans. Please tell us whether you intend to work in fiction, poetry, or narrative non-fiction, and what experience you have working in this form. Please also give some indication of the concerns, style, ideas and/or themes that you are interested in exploring in your work. Request for Consideration on the Grounds of Equivalent Professional Status Candidates who hold no first degree, or a first degree in a non literary/creative subject-area should include in their applications a summary of any information that might allow us to support the application on the grounds of ‘equivalent professional status’. This could include previous writing publication credits or other successes and/or relevant professional achievements. General entry requirements Please also see our general entry requirements. English language entry requirements For detailed information see our English language requirements web pages. Please note that if you are required to meet an English language condition, we offer a number of pre-sessional courses in English for Academic Purposes through Kent International Pathways. Research areas Research in the School of English comes roughly under the following areas. However, there is often a degree of overlap between groups, and individual staff have interests that range more widely. Eighteenth Century The particular interests of the Centre for Studies in the Long Eighteenth Century converge around gender, class, nation, travel and empire, and the relationship between print and material culture. Staff in the Centre pursue cutting-edge approaches to the field and share a commitment to interdisciplinary methodologies. The Centre regularly hosts visiting speakers as part of the School of English research seminar programme, and hosts day symposia, workshops and international conferences. Nineteenth Century The 19th-century research group is organised around the successful MA in Dickens and Victorian Culture and the editorship of The Dickensian, the official publication outlet for new Dickens letters. Other staff research interests include literature and gender, journalism, representations of time and history, sublimity and Victorian Poetry. American Literature Research in north American literature is conducted partly through the Faculty-based Centre for American Studies, which also facilitates co-operation with modern US historians. Staff research interests include 20th-century American literature, especially poetry, Native American writing, modernism, and cultural history. Creative Writing The Centre for Creative Writing is the focus for most practice-based research in the School. Staff organise a thriving events series and run a research seminar for postgraduate students and staff to share ideas about fiction-writing. Established writers regularly come to read and discuss their work. Medieval and Early Modern The Faculty-based Canterbury Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies has a distinctive brand of interdisciplinarity, strong links with local archives and archaeological trusts, and provides a vibrant forum for investigating the relationships between literary and non-literary modes of writing in its weekly research seminar. Modern Poetry The Centre for Modern Poetry is a leading centre for research and publication in its field, and participates in both critical and creative research. Staff regularly host visiting speakers and writers, participate in national and international research networks, and organise graduate research seminars and public poetry readings. Postcolonial Established in 1994, the Centre for Colonial and Postcolonial Research has acquired an international reputation for excellence in research. It has an outstanding track record in publication, organises frequent international conferences, and regularly hosts leading postcolonial writers and critics. It also hosts a visiting writer from India every year in association with the Charles Wallace Trust. Key facts School: School of English Subject area: English Award: MA Course type: Taught Location: Canterbury Mode of study: Full-time or part-time Attendance mode: Campus Duration: One year full-time, two years part-time Start: September Total Kent credits: 180 Total ECTS credits: 90 [-]

MA Critical Theory

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years September 2017 United Kingdom Canterbury + 1 more

This programme offers you the chance to study a range of theories in depth. It engages with modern literary theory, psychoanalytical theory, political theory and theories of visual and aesthetic experience. [+]

MA Critical Theory Overview Our expertise ranges from the medieval to the postmodern, including British, American and Irish literature, postcolonial writing, 18th-century studies, Shakespeare, early modern literature and culture, Victorian studies, modern poetry, critical theory and cultural history. The international standing of the School ensures that we have a lively, confident research culture, sustained by a vibrant, ambitious intellectual community. We also count a number of distinguished creative writers among our staff, and we actively explore crossovers between critical and creative writing in all our areas of teaching and research. Course structure This programme offers you the chance to study a range of theories in depth. It engages with modern literary theory, psychoanalytical theory, political theory and theories of visual and aesthetic experience. You reflect on these areas of thinking in themselves and as they relate to particular literary texts, to post-enlightenment philosophy and to other relevant areas of culture and experience. Assessment The course is assessed by coursework for each module and by the dissertation which accounts for a third of the final grade. Learning outcomes Programme aims This programme aims to: extend and deepen through coursework and research your understanding of modern literary and critical theory study the reading-practices, analytic tools and vocabularies of modern critical thought develop your independent critical thinking and judgement introduce you to the research methods that facilitate advanced theoretical study of literature provide a basis in knowledge and skills if you intend to teach critical theory, especially in higher education develop your understanding and critical awareness of the expressive and analytical resources of language offer scope for the study of critical theory within an interdisciplinary context, notably that provided by philosophy develop your ability to argue a point of view with clarity and cogency, both orally and in written form examine this writing in the wider context of literature, culture and philosophy provide teaching which is informed by current research and scholarship and which requires you to engage with aspects of work at the frontiers of knowledge develop your research skills to the point where you are ready to undertake a research degree, should you so wish. Knowledge and understanding You will gain knowledge and understanding of: modern literary and critical theory the relations between literary and critical theory and particular literary texts, genres and movements the relations between literary and critical theory and philosophy the relations between literary and critical theory and other relevant areas of culture and experience psychoanalytic theory theories of the visual and aesthetic experience. Intellectual skills You develop intellectual skills in: the application of the skills needed for academic study and enquiry at graduate level evaluation of research findings the ability to synthesise information from a range of primary and secondary sources in order to gain a coherent understanding of theory and practice the ability to make discriminations and selections of relevant information from a wide range of sources in a large body of knowledge the ability to think conceptually and to criticise analytically. Subject-specific skills You gain subject-specific skills in: advanced skills in the close critical analysis and discussion of theoretical, literary and other writing a developed and critical understanding of the variety of critical and theoretical approaches to the study of literature and other cultural forms an ability to articulate your knowledge and understanding of texts, concepts and theories relating to critical theory well-developed linguistic resourcefulness, including a grasp of standard critical terminology articulate responsiveness to critical and theoretical language developed scholarly practice in the presentation of formal written work, of bibliographic and annotational practices, and of structuring and developing an argument over an extended piece of written work a nuanced understanding of how norms and assumptions influence questions of judgement. Transferable skills You will gain the following transferable skills: developed powers of communication and the capacity to argue a point of view, in extended oral and written form, with clarity, organisation, cogency and sophistication the ability to think independently, analytically, critically and self-critically the ability to assimilate and organise substantial quantities of complex information of diverse kinds an advanced level of competence in the formulation, planning and execution of extended written projects an advanced level of competence in the formulation, planning and formal oral presentation of research papers the experience of collaborative intellectual work the ability to understand, interrogate and apply a variety of theoretical positions and weigh the importance of alternative perspectives trained research skills, including scholarly information retrieval skills IT skills: word-processing, email communication, the ability to access electronic data. Entry requirements A first or second class honours degree in a relevant subject (or equivalent). In certain circumstances, the School will consider candidates who have not followed a conventional education path.These cases are assessed individually by the Director of Graduate Studies. General entry requirements Please also see our general entry requirements. English language entry requirements For detailed information see our English language requirements web pages. Please note that if you are required to meet an English language condition, we offer a number of pre-sessional courses in English for Academic Purposes through Kent International Pathways. Research areas Research in the School of English comes roughly under the following areas. However, there is often a degree of overlap between groups, and individual staff have interests that range more widely. Eighteenth Century The particular interests of the Centre for Studies in the Long Eighteenth Century converge around gender, class, nation, travel and empire, and the relationship between print and material culture. Staff in the Centre pursue cutting-edge approaches to the field and share a commitment to interdisciplinary methodologies. The Centre regularly hosts visiting speakers as part of the School of English research seminar programme, and hosts day symposia, workshops and international conferences. Nineteenth Century The 19th-century research group is organised around the successful MA in Dickens and Victorian Culture and the editorship of The Dickensian, the official publication outlet for new Dickens letters. Other staff research interests include literature and gender, journalism, representations of time and history, sublimity and Victorian Poetry. American Literature Research in north American literature is conducted partly through the Faculty-based Centre for American Studies, which also facilitates co-operation with modern US historians. Staff research interests include 20th-century American literature, especially poetry, Native American writing, modernism, and cultural history. Creative Writing The Centre for Creative Writing is the focus for most practice-based research in the School. Staff organise a thriving events series and run a research seminar for postgraduate students and staff to share ideas about fiction-writing. Established writers regularly come to read and discuss their work. Medieval and Early Modern The Faculty-based Canterbury Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies has a distinctive brand of interdisciplinarity, strong links with local archives and archaeological trusts, and provides a vibrant forum for investigating the relationships between literary and non-literary modes of writing in its weekly research seminar. Modern Poetry The Centre for Modern Poetry is a leading centre for research and publication in its field, and participates in both critical and creative research. Staff regularly host visiting speakers and writers, participate in national and international research networks, and organise graduate research seminars and public poetry readings. Postcolonial Established in 1994, the Centre for Colonial and Postcolonial Research has acquired an international reputation for excellence in research. It has an outstanding track record in publication, organises frequent international conferences, and regularly hosts leading postcolonial writers and critics. It also hosts a visiting writer from India every year in association with the Charles Wallace Trust. Key facts Schools: School of English, School of European Culture and Languages Subject areas: English, Comparative Literature Award: MA Course type: Taught Location: Canterbury Mode of study: Full-time or part-time Attendance mode: Campus Duration: One year full-time, two years part-time Start: September Total Kent credits: 180 Total ECTS credits: 90 [-]

MA Dickens and Victorian Culture

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years September 2017 United Kingdom Canterbury + 1 more

This programme studies the author in a place that perhaps offers more Dickensian associations than anywhere else in the world. [+]

MA Dickens and Victorian Culture Overview The School of English has a strong international reputation and global perspective, apparent both in the background of its staff and in the diversity of our teaching and research interests. Our expertise ranges from the medieval to the postmodern, including British, American and Irish literature, postcolonial writing, 18th-century studies, Shakespeare, early modern literature and culture, Victorian studies, modern poetry, critical theory and cultural history. The international standing of the School ensures that we have a lively, confident research culture, sustained by a vibrant, ambitious intellectual community. We also count a number of distinguished creative writers among our staff, and we actively explore crossovers between critical and creative writing in all our areas of teaching and research. Our reputation for research excellence was confirmed in the most recent Research Assessment Exercise (2008) in which our research was recognised to be world-leading. The University of Kent is a research-led institution, which means that the research that the academics are engaged in continues to inform their teaching, and that you, as a student in the department, are at the centre of a dynamic and thriving academic environment. Course structure As the only named Master’s programme within the UK devoted to Charles Dickens, this programme studies the author in a place that perhaps offers more Dickensian associations than anywhere else in the world. It combines a focus on both the local and the global author through compulsory modules contextualising the variety of ways in which Dickens engaged with the social, cultural and political issues of his age. Interdisciplinary approaches are employed, using Dickens as a focus, to consider the relationships between19th-century fiction and journalism, the Victorians’ engagement with material culture, and their fascination with the body and its metaphors. Assessment Assessment is by a 5-6,000-word essay for each module and a 12-15,000-word dissertation. Learning outcomes Programme aims This programme aims to: provide excellent postgraduate-level study that deepens and extends your understanding of work in the field of Dickens and Victorian culture develop your understanding of, and engagement with, the critical and methodological paradigms that inform the field of studies in Dickens and Victorian culture develop your independent critical thinking and judgement develop your research skills in the relevant field so as to provide a pathway for you to undertake PhD work in the area of Dickens and Victorian culture build upon and extend an already-established reputation at Kent for distinction in the learning and teaching of Dickens and Victorian culture. Knowledge and understanding You will gain knowledge and understanding of: primary sources and recent scholarship concerning Dickens as a major figure in Victorian print culture and English literature more generally the relationship of Dickens to his age in terms of relevant contexts such as the newspaper and periodical market, the theatre, politics, economics, imperialism, the law, religion, science, education, gender, class, and visual culture the part played by Victorian literature in addressing contemporary social problems the theoretical and methodological challenges presented by researching a past historical moment. Intellectual skills You develop intellectual skills in: the acquisition of advanced skills in the use of bibliographic and other research methods essential to the pursuit of original research at graduate level the demonstration of competence in critically evaluating research tools and findings the ability to conceptualise and formulate a substantial research project the ability to synthesise information from a range of primary and secondary sources in order to gain a coherent understanding of theory and practice the ability to criticise analytically. Subject-specific skills You gain subject-specific skills in: the research, analysis and evaluation of Victorian texts, including both primary and secondary sources a developed, critical understanding of a variety of scholarly approaches to the study of literature and other cultural forms in this period an ability to articulate knowledge and understanding of various kinds of text and their political, cultural and historical contexts a developed scholarly practice in the presentation of formal written work, of bibliographic practices, and of structuring and developing an argument over an extended piece of written work. Transferable skills You will gain the following transferable skills: advanced oral and written communication skills, including the capacity to argue for a point of view with clarity, organisation, cogency and sophistication a capacity for independent research and learning, including the ability to think independently, analytically, critically and self-critically the ability to assimilate and organise substantial quantities of complex information of diverse kinds IT skills: word-processing, email communication, the ability to access electronic data and evaluate online resources. Entry requirements A first or second class honours degree in a relevant subject (or equivalent). General entry requirements Please also see our general entry requirements. English language entry requirements For detailed information see our English language requirements web pages. Please note that if you are required to meet an English language condition, we offer a number of pre-sessional courses in English for Academic Purposes through Kent International Pathways. Research areas Research in the School of English comes roughly under the following areas. However, there is often a degree of overlap between groups, and individual staff have interests that range more widely. Eighteenth Century The particular interests of the Centre for Studies in the Long Eighteenth Century converge around gender, class, nation, travel and empire, and the relationship between print and material culture. Staff in the Centre pursue cutting-edge approaches to the field and share a commitment to interdisciplinary methodologies. The Centre regularly hosts visiting speakers as part of the School of English research seminar programme, and hosts day symposia, workshops and international conferences. Nineteenth Century The 19th-century research group is organised around the successful MA in Dickens and Victorian Culture and the editorship of The Dickensian, the official publication outlet for new Dickens letters. Other staff research interests include literature and gender, journalism, representations of time and history, sublimity and Victorian Poetry. American Literature Research in north American literature is conducted partly through the Faculty-based Centre for American Studies, which also facilitates co-operation with modern US historians. Staff research interests include 20th-century American literature, especially poetry, Native American writing, modernism, and cultural history. Creative Writing The Centre for Creative Writing is the focus for most practice-based research in the School. Staff organise a thriving events series and run a research seminar for postgraduate students and staff to share ideas about fiction-writing. Established writers regularly come to read and discuss their work. Medieval and Early Modern The Faculty-based Canterbury Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies has a distinctive brand of interdisciplinarity, strong links with local archives and archaeological trusts, and provides a vibrant forum for investigating the relationships between literary and non-literary modes of writing in its weekly research seminar. Modern Poetry The Centre for Modern Poetry is a leading centre for research and publication in its field, and participates in both critical and creative research. Staff regularly host visiting speakers and writers, participate in national and international research networks, and organise graduate research seminars and public poetry readings. Postcolonial Established in 1994, the Centre for Colonial and Postcolonial Research has acquired an international reputation for excellence in research. It has an outstanding track record in publication, organises frequent international conferences, and regularly hosts leading postcolonial writers and critics. It also hosts a visiting writer from India every year in association with the Charles Wallace Trust. Key facts School: School of English Subject area: English Award: MA Course type: Taught Location: Canterbury Mode of study: Full-time or part-time Attendance mode: Campus Duration: One year full-time, two years part-time Start: September Total Kent credits: 180 Total ECTS credits: 90 [-]

MA Eighteenth-Century Studies

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years September 2017 United Kingdom Canterbury + 1 more

This is an interdisciplinary MA programme that builds upon the expertise and common research interests of 18th-century researchers and teachers across the Faculty of Humanities. [+]

MA Eighteenth-Century Studies Overview The School of English has a strong international reputation and global perspective, apparent both in the background of its staff and in the diversity of our teaching and research interests. Our expertise ranges from the medieval to the postmodern, including British, American and Irish literature, postcolonial writing, 18th-century studies, Shakespeare, early modern literature and culture, Victorian studies, modern poetry, critical theory and cultural history. The international standing of the School ensures that we have a lively, confident research culture, sustained by a vibrant, ambitious intellectual community. We also count a number of distinguished creative writers among our staff, and we actively explore crossovers between critical and creative writing in all our areas of teaching and research. Our reputation for research excellence was confirmed in the most recent Research Assessment Exercise (2008) in which our research was recognised to be world-leading. The University of Kent is a research-led institution, which means that the research that the academics are engaged in continues to inform their teaching, and that you, as a student in the department, are at the centre of a dynamic and thriving academic environment. Course structure This MA offers an intellectually dynamic introduction to one of the most exciting eras in literary history. Grounded in and administered from the Centre for Studies in the Long Eighteenth Century, this is an interdisciplinary MA programme that builds upon the expertise and common research interests of 18th-century researchers and teachers across the Faculty of Humanities. The Centre provides an excellent research context for the MA programme and any further postgraduate work that will arise from it. Among the teachers involved in this MA are Jennie Batchelor (English), Jonathan Friday (History and Philosophy of Art), Donna Landry (English), Paddy Bullard (English) and Ben Thomas (History & Philosophy of Art). Assessment Assessment is by a 5-6,000-word essay for each module and a 12-15,000-word dissertation. Learning outcomes Programme aims This programme aims to: extend and deepen through coursework and research your understanding of eighteenth-century literary, visual and material culture and its political and cultural contexts develop your understanding of, and engagement with, the critical and methodological paradigms that inform the field of eighteenth-century studies today develop your independent critical thinking and judgement. introduce you to the research methods that facilitate advanced study in the field provide a basis in knowledge and skills for those intending to teach eighteenth-century studies, especially in higher education provide an interdisciplinary context for the study of eighteenth-century literary, visual and material culture. develop your ability to argue a point of view with clarity and cogency, both orally and in written form provide teaching which is informed by current research and scholarship and which requires you to engage with aspects of work at the frontiers of knowledge develop your research skills to the point where you are ready to undertake a research degree. Knowledge and understanding You will gain knowledge and understanding of: primary sources and recent scholarship concerning literary, visual, material, and political culture in the period how the ‘new’ eighteenth century differs from the ‘old’, and how the canon of works to be studied changes and is constructed grasp of intellectual categories and debates relevant to this period (eg Enlightenment, public sphere, global eighteenth century, taste, the polite, the sublime, revolution, sensibility, political economy) within and across disciplinary boundaries theoretical challenges presented by researching a past historical moment, spectre of ‘presentism’ versus more discontinuist approaches archival procedures, available resources, theoretical questions, approaches to popular and public interest in the period. Intellectual skills You develop intellectual skills in: the application of the skills needed for academic study and enquiry at graduate level the evaluation of research findings the ability to synthesise information from a range of primary and secondary sources in order to gain a coherent understanding of theory and practice the ability to make discriminations and selections of relevant information from a wide range of sources in a large body of knowledge the ability to think conceptually and to criticise analytically. Subject-specific skills You gain subject-specific skills in: advanced skills in the close critical analysis and discussion of eighteenth-century literary, visual and material culture a developed, critical understanding of a variety of scholarly approaches to the study of literature and other cultural forms in this period an ability to articulate knowledge and understanding of various kinds of text and their political, cultural and historical contexts a developed scholarly practice in the presentation of formal written work, of bibliographic and annotational practices, and of structuring and developing an argument over an extended piece of written work. Transferable skills You will gain the following transferable skills: developed powers of communication and the capacity to argue a point of view in extended oral and written form, with clarity, organisation, cogency and sophistication the ability to think independently, analytically, critically and self-critically the ability to assimilate and organise substantial quantities of complex information of diverse kinds an advanced level of competence in the formulation, planning and execution of extended written projects an advanced level of competence in the formulation, planning and formal oral presentation of research papers the experience of collaborative intellectual work the ability to understand, interrogate and apply a variety of theoretical positions and weigh the importance of alternative perspectives trained research skills, including scholarly information retrieval skills IT skills: word-processing, email communication, the ability to access electronic data and evaluate online resources. Entry requirements A first or second class honours degree in a relevant subject (or equivalent). General entry requirements Please also see our general entry requirements. English language entry requirements For detailed information see our English language requirements web pages. Please note that if you are required to meet an English language condition, we offer a number of pre-sessional courses in English for Academic Purposes through Kent International Pathways. Research areas Research in the School of English comes roughly under the following areas. However, there is often a degree of overlap between groups, and individual staff have interests that range more widely. Eighteenth Century The particular interests of the Centre for Studies in the Long Eighteenth Century converge around gender, class, nation, travel and empire, and the relationship between print and material culture. Staff in the Centre pursue cutting-edge approaches to the field and share a commitment to interdisciplinary methodologies. The Centre regularly hosts visiting speakers as part of the School of English research seminar programme, and hosts day symposia, workshops and international conferences. Nineteenth Century The 19th-century research group is organised around the successful MA in Dickens and Victorian Culture and the editorship of The Dickensian, the official publication outlet for new Dickens letters. Other staff research interests include literature and gender, journalism, representations of time and history, sublimity and Victorian Poetry. American Literature Research in north American literature is conducted partly through the Faculty-based Centre for American Studies, which also facilitates co-operation with modern US historians. Staff research interests include 20th-century American literature, especially poetry, Native American writing, modernism, and cultural history. Creative Writing The Centre for Creative Writing is the focus for most practice-based research in the School. Staff organise a thriving events series and run a research seminar for postgraduate students and staff to share ideas about fiction-writing. Established writers regularly come to read and discuss their work. Medieval and Early Modern The Faculty-based Canterbury Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies has a distinctive brand of interdisciplinarity, strong links with local archives and archaeological trusts, and provides a vibrant forum for investigating the relationships between literary and non-literary modes of writing in its weekly research seminar. Modern Poetry The Centre for Modern Poetry is a leading centre for research and publication in its field, and participates in both critical and creative research. Staff regularly host visiting speakers and writers, participate in national and international research networks, and organise graduate research seminars and public poetry readings. Postcolonial Established in 1994, the Centre for Colonial and Postcolonial Research has acquired an international reputation for excellence in research. It has an outstanding track record in publication, organises frequent international conferences, and regularly hosts leading postcolonial writers and critics. It also hosts a visiting writer from India every year in association with the Charles Wallace Trust. Key facts Schools: School of English, School of European Culture and Languages Subject area: English Award: MA Course type: Taught Location: Canterbury Mode of study: Full-time or part-time Attendance mode: Campus Duration: One year full-time, two years part-time Start: September Total Kent credits: 180 Total ECTS credits: 90 [-]

MA English and American Literature

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years September 2017 United Kingdom Canterbury + 1 more

The School of English has a strong international reputation and global perspective, apparent both in the background of its staff and in the diversity of our teaching and research interests. [+]

MA English and American Literature Overview The School of English has a strong international reputation and global perspective, apparent both in the background of its staff and in the diversity of our teaching and research interests. Our reputation for research excellence was confirmed in the most recent Research Assessment Exercise (2008) in which our research was recognised to be world-leading. The University of Kent is a research-led institution, which means that the research that the academics are engaged in continues to inform their teaching, and that you, as a student in the department, are at the centre of a dynamic and thriving academic environment. Course structure This programme allows you to choose from the full range of our MA literature modules. The list of what’s on offer is regularly added to by academics keen to explore new areas of thinking with students and to draw you in to our established areas of research strength, such as postcolonial studies; 18th-century studies; modern poetry and fiction; or Victorian studies. The modules draw on many different critical approaches and focus on a wide range of historical periods, ideas and places from modern India to post-war New York to literary London in the 18th century. Within this programme you may also choose to take pathways, so as to concentrate on studies in certain specific areas (especially if you intend to continue to a research degree in a particular field). Assessment Assessment is by a 5-6,000-word essay for each module and a 12-15,000-word dissertation. Learning outcomes Programme aims This programme aims to: extend and deepen through coursework and research your understanding of a body of literatures in English, with special emphasis on modern and postcolonial literatures, and on literary and critical theory enable you to develop an historical awareness of literary traditions develop your independent critical thinking and judgement introduce you to bibliographic method and scholarship and to foster in you the research methods that facilitate advanced literary study provide a basis in knowledge and skills if you intend to teach English and American literature, especially in higher education develop your understanding and critical appreciation of the expressive resources of language offer opportunities for you to develop your potential for creative writing (where such a module is taken) offer scope for the study of literature within an interdisciplinary context, notably that provided by history develop your ability to argue a point of view with clarity and cogency, both orally and in written form. Knowledge and understanding You will gain knowledge and understanding of: authors and texts from British, American and postcolonial literatures the principal literary genres, fiction, poetry drama and of other kinds of writing and communication literatures in English from countries outside Britain and America traditions in literary criticism the challenges of creative writing (where such a module is taken) terminology used in literary criticism the cultural and historical contexts in which literature is written, published and read critical theory and its applications literary criticism as a practice subject to considerable variation of approach inter- and multidisciplinary approaches to the advanced study of literature research methods. Intellectual skills You develop intellectual skills in: the application of the skills needed for advanced academic study and enquiry the evaluation of research findings the ability to synthesise information from a number of sources in order to gain a coherent understanding of theory and practice the ability to make discriminations and selections of relevant information from a wide source and large body of knowledge the exercise of problem-solving skills. Subject-specific skills You gain subject-specific skills in: enhanced skills in the close critical analysis of literary texts informed critical understanding of the variety of critical and theoretical approaches to the study of literature the ability to articulate knowledge and understanding of texts, concepts and theories relating to advanced English studies sensitivity to generic conventions in the study of literature well-developed linguistic resourcefulness, including a grasp of standard critical terminology articulate responsiveness to literary language appropriate scholarly practice in the presentation of formal written work, in particular in bibliographic and annotational practices an understanding of how cultural norms and assumptions influence questions of judgement. Transferable skills You will gain the following transferable skills: developed powers of communication and the capacity to argue a point of view orally and written form, with clarity, organisation and cogency enhanced confidence in the efficient presentation of ideas designed to stimulate critical debate developed critical acumen the ability to assimilate and organise substantial quantities of complex information competence in the planning and execution of essays and project-work enhanced skills in creative writing (where the relevant module has been taken) the capacity for independent thought, reasoned judgement, and self-criticism enhanced skills in collaborative intellectual work the ability to understand, interrogate and apply a variety of theoretical positions and weigh the importance of alternative perspectives research skills, including scholarly information retrieval skills IT skills: word-processing, the ability to access electronic data. Entry requirements A first or second class honours degree in a relevant subject (or equivalent). General entry requirements Please also see our general entry requirements. English language entry requirements For detailed information see our English language requirements web pages. Please note that if you are required to meet an English language condition, we offer a number of pre-sessional courses in English for Academic Purposes through Kent International Pathways. Research areas Research in the School of English comes roughly under the following areas. However, there is often a degree of overlap between groups, and individual staff have interests that range more widely. Eighteenth Century The particular interests of the Centre for Studies in the Long Eighteenth Century converge around gender, class, nation, travel and empire, and the relationship between print and material culture. Staff in the Centre pursue cutting-edge approaches to the field and share a commitment to interdisciplinary methodologies. The Centre regularly hosts visiting speakers as part of the School of English research seminar programme, and hosts day symposia, workshops and international conferences. Nineteenth Century The 19th-century research group is organised around the successful MA in Dickens and Victorian Culture and the editorship of The Dickensian, the official publication outlet for new Dickens letters. Other staff research interests include literature and gender, journalism, representations of time and history, sublimity and Victorian Poetry. American Literature Research in north American literature is conducted partly through the Faculty-based Centre for American Studies, which also facilitates co-operation with modern US historians. Staff research interests include 20th-century American literature, especially poetry, Native American writing, modernism, and cultural history. Creative Writing The Centre for Creative Writing is the focus for most practice-based research in the School. Staff organise a thriving events series and run a research seminar for postgraduate students and staff to share ideas about fiction-writing. Established writers regularly come to read and discuss their work. Medieval and Early Modern The Faculty-based Canterbury Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies has a distinctive brand of interdisciplinarity, strong links with local archives and archaeological trusts, and provides a vibrant forum for investigating the relationships between literary and non-literary modes of writing in its weekly research seminar. Modern Poetry The Centre for Modern Poetry is a leading centre for research and publication in its field, and participates in both critical and creative research. Staff regularly host visiting speakers and writers, participate in national and international research networks, and organise graduate research seminars and public poetry readings. Postcolonial Established in 1994, the Centre for Colonial and Postcolonial Research has acquired an international reputation for excellence in research. It has an outstanding track record in publication, organises frequent international conferences, and regularly hosts leading postcolonial writers and critics. It also hosts a visiting writer from India every year in association with the Charles Wallace Trust. Key facts School: School of English Subject area: English Award: MA Course type: Taught Location: Canterbury Mode of study: Full-time or part-time Attendance mode: Campus Duration: One year full-time, two years part-time Start: September Total Kent credits: 180 Total ECTS credits: 90 [-]

MA in The Contemporary

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years September 2017 United Kingdom Canterbury + 1 more

This is an interdisciplinary programme in the field of contemporary culture. The programme also allows you to enrich your academic knowledge with a practical internship at the ICA. [+]

MA in The Contemporary Overview The School of English has a strong international reputation and global perspective, apparent both in the background of its staff and in the diversity of our teaching and research interests. Our expertise ranges from the medieval to the postmodern, including British, American and Irish literature, postcolonial writing, 18th-century studies, Shakespeare, early modern literature and culture, Victorian studies, modern poetry, critical theory and cultural history. The international standing of the School ensures that we have a lively, confident research culture, sustained by a vibrant, ambitious intellectual community. We also count a number of distinguished creative writers among our staff, and we actively explore crossovers between critical and creative writing in all our areas of teaching and research. Our reputation for research excellence was confirmed in the most recent Research Assessment Exercise (2008) in which our research was recognised to be world-leading. The University of Kent is a research-led institution, which means that the research that the academics are engaged in continues to inform their teaching, and that you, as a student in the department, are at the centre of a dynamic and thriving academic environment. Course structure This is an interdisciplinary programme in the field of contemporary culture. It is a unique collaboration between the University of Kent and the Institute of Contemporary Arts (ICA) in London which allows you to choose from a range of modules, each focusing on different aspects of contemporary culture. The programme also allows you to enrich your academic knowledge with a practical internship at the ICA. The programme provides you with a deep understanding of the relationship between disciplines in the arts and an appreciation of the way in which interdisciplinary thinking makes it possible to grasp and respond to key issues in contemporary culture. The MA equips you with the skills, knowledge and professional experience to progress into areas such as artistic practice, related higher postgraduate research, arts management and policy, and a variety of other careers within the arts. You choose from a wide variety of modules in the areas of contemporary literature, creative writing, film, drama, and history and philosophy of art. You are invited to attend an induction at the ICA at the start of your studies to introduce you to the facilities and are encouraged to make use of the ICA’s programme of seminars and events. Internship You are invited to undertake an internship at the ICA (for a maximum of two days a week over a month) between February and June. Each group of students work in the ICA studio, supervised by the Associate Curator of Education, and have access to the ICA programme and ICA archive where necessary. The experiences and research undertaken feed into your final project while gaining vocational experience at the ICA. Assessment Assessment is by a 5-6,000-word essay for each module and a 12-15,000-word dissertation based in part on your internship at the ICA. Learning outcomes Programme aims This programme aims to: provide an excellent quality of postgraduate level education in the field of contemporary culture provide a cross-disciplinary, inspiring learning environment informed by high-level research and practice provide a pioneering educational opportunity within the UK context through which MA students will progress into careers in the fields of arts management and policy, or on to related postgraduate opportunities develop the following range of aptitudes and skills: high-level written communication, the capacity to present information and argument in public, information literacy, research methods, work-based teamwork skills, project planning promote engagement with a range of disciplines and thereby enable you to pursue careers in a range of complex organisational settings within the field of the arts promote an understanding of the relations between disciplines and an appreciation of the ways in which cross-disciplinary thinking within the arts makes it possible to grasp and respond to salient issues in contemporary culture provide a vocational training within an academic framework through internships provided by the Institute of Contemporary Arts. Knowledge and understanding You will gain knowledge and understanding of: principles and application of underlying modes of inquiry within different academic disciplines and contexts across the field of the arts issues shaping contemporary theory and philosophy the relation between artistic practice and theoretical inquiry in the contemporary period the varying ways in which different disciplines and practices across the arts conceptualise the contemporary how to use the resources of contemporary art practice to think through current issues and future challenges in modern culture the ways in which contemporary art practice addresses its publics, and the institutions through which it influences thought and opinion. how to discuss, conceptualise and mediate current work in the fields of fine art, film and literature a selected topic within a given discipline and the application of appropriate research methods. Intellectual skills You develop intellectual skills in: research skills: how to formulate research questions and hypotheses to address problems across a range of disciplines within the Arts analytical skills: how to interpret arguments, marshal information from published sources, interpret materials from archives, critically evaluate your own research and that of others information technology literacy: the use of appropriate technology to retrieve, analyse and present information presentation skills: the use of public forum to develop ability to present arguments persuasively. Subject-specific skills You gain subject-specific skills in: reasoning: how to construct arguments within different intellectual contexts and disciplines across the Arts, how to formulate and address research questions and problems communication: how to communicate within and across Arts disciplines, how to mediate key ideas between disciplines and towards the non-academic public, how to speak and write persuasively in discursive contexts presentation of research: how to write essays and a dissertation in an appropriate style, in keeping with the conventions of different subject areas project organisation: how to conceive and execute a dissertation-length project under the guidance of academic and practice-based supervision employment-oriented practice: how to integrate with a gallery-based team, how to shape arts programming, how to mediate contemporary arts practices to the general public. careers: a recognition of career opportunities for postgraduates in the fields of contemporary arts. Transferable skills You will gain the following transferable skills: communication: the ability to organise information clearly, present information in oral and written form, adapt presentation for different audiences reflection: make use of constructive informal feedback from staff and peers and assess your own progress to enhance performance and personal skills self-motivation and independence: time and workload management in order to meet personal targets and imposed deadlines. teamwork: the ability to work both independently and as part of a research group using peer support, diplomacy and collective responsibility. Entry requirements A first or second class honours degree in a relevant subject (or equivalent). General entry requirements Please also see our general entry requirements. English language entry requirements For detailed information see our English language requirements web pages. Please note that if you are required to meet an English language condition, we offer a number of pre-sessional courses in English for Academic Purposes through Kent International Pathways. Research areas Research in the School of English comes roughly under the following areas. However, there is often a degree of overlap between groups, and individual staff have interests that range more widely. Eighteenth Century The particular interests of the Centre for Studies in the Long Eighteenth Century converge around gender, class, nation, travel and empire, and the relationship between print and material culture. Staff in the Centre pursue cutting-edge approaches to the field and share a commitment to interdisciplinary methodologies. The Centre regularly hosts visiting speakers as part of the School of English research seminar programme, and hosts day symposia, workshops and international conferences. Nineteenth Century The 19th-century research group is organised around the successful MA in Dickens and Victorian Culture and the editorship of The Dickensian, the official publication outlet for new Dickens letters. Other staff research interests include literature and gender, journalism, representations of time and history, sublimity and Victorian Poetry. American Literature Research in north American literature is conducted partly through the Faculty-based Centre for American Studies, which also facilitates co-operation with modern US historians. Staff research interests include 20th-century American literature, especially poetry, Native American writing, modernism, and cultural history. Creative Writing The Centre for Creative Writing is the focus for most practice-based research in the School. Staff organise a thriving events series and run a research seminar for postgraduate students and staff to share ideas about fiction-writing. Established writers regularly come to read and discuss their work. Medieval and Early Modern The Faculty-based Canterbury Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies has a distinctive brand of interdisciplinarity, strong links with local archives and archaeological trusts, and provides a vibrant forum for investigating the relationships between literary and non-literary modes of writing in its weekly research seminar. Modern Poetry The Centre for Modern Poetry is a leading centre for research and publication in its field, and participates in both critical and creative research. Staff regularly host visiting speakers and writers, participate in national and international research networks, and organise graduate research seminars and public poetry readings. Postcolonial Established in 1994, the Centre for Colonial and Postcolonial Research has acquired an international reputation for excellence in research. It has an outstanding track record in publication, organises frequent international conferences, and regularly hosts leading postcolonial writers and critics. It also hosts a visiting writer from India every year in association with the Charles Wallace Trust. Key facts School: School of English Subject area: English Award: MA Course type: Taught Location: Canterbury Mode of study: Full-time or part-time Attendance mode: Campus Duration: One year full-time, two years part-time Start: September Total Kent credits: 180 Total ECTS credits: 90 [-]

MA Postcolonial Studies

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years September 2017 United Kingdom Canterbury + 1 more

The MA in Postcolonial Studies develops your understanding of the politics of culture in relation to both the imperialist world’s interpretation of the colonial, and postcolonial assertions of autonomy. [+]

MA Postcolonial Studies Overview The School of English has a strong international reputation and global perspective, apparent both in the background of its staff and in the diversity of our teaching and research interests. Our expertise ranges from the medieval to the postmodern, including British, American and Irish literature, postcolonial writing, 18th-century studies, Shakespeare, early modern literature and culture, Victorian studies, modern poetry, critical theory and cultural history. The international standing of the School ensures that we have a lively, confident research culture, sustained by a vibrant, ambitious intellectual community. We also count a number of distinguished creative writers among our staff, and we actively explore crossovers between critical and creative writing in all our areas of teaching and research. Our reputation for research excellence was confirmed in the most recent Research Assessment Exercise (2008) in which our research was recognised to be world-leading. The University of Kent is a research-led institution, which means that the research that the academics are engaged in continues to inform their teaching, and that you, as a student in the department, are at the centre of a dynamic and thriving academic environment. Course structure The MA in Postcolonial Studies develops your understanding of the politics of culture in relation to both the imperialist world’s interpretation of the colonial, and postcolonial assertions of autonomy. In this context, while ‘postcolonial’ refers primarily to societies of the so-called ‘Third World’, it also includes questions relevant to cultures such as those of Ireland and Australia. The University of Kent was one of the first universities to establish postcolonial literary studies in Britain and has continued to play a significant part in the development of the field. Among the teachers involved in the programme are Abdulrazak Gurnah, Caroline Rooney, Alex Padamsee and Donna Landry (see staff research interests for further details). Assessment Assessment is by a 5-6,000-word essay for each module and a 12-15,000-word dissertation. Learning outcomes Programme aims This programme aims to: explore a wide range of writing resulting from the encounter between imperialist and colonised countries and cultures examine this writing in the wider context of colonial and postcolonial history study how this writing and its history have been theorised develop your research skills to the point where you are ready to undertake a research degree develop your oral skills to the point where you are able to present a conference-type paper to your peers. Knowledge and understanding You will gain knowledge and understanding of: a wide range of colonial and postcolonial texts, primarily but not exclusively in English the interaction between colonial and postcolonial texts, in terms of the imperialist world’s rendering of the colonial and postcolonial assertions of autonomy the relation between critical theory in general, and various kinds of postcolonial theory the concepts, terminology and modes of thought specific to postcolonial theory and criticism the cultural conditions of production of contemporary postcolonial literatures the wider intellectual and academic context from which postcolonial studies has developed. Intellectual skills You develop intellectual skills in: the application of the skills needed for academic study and enquiry at graduate level. the evaluation of research findings the ability to synthesise information from a range of primary and secondary sources in order to gain a coherent understanding of theory and practice the ability to make discriminations and selections of relevant information from a wide source and large body of knowledge the ability to think conceptually and to criticise analytically. Subject-specific skills You gain subject-specific skills in: advanced skills in the close critical analysis of colonial and postcolonial writing developed and critical understanding of the variety of critical and theoretical approaches to the study of postcolonial literatures developed scholarly practice in the presentation of formal written work, of bibliographic and annotational practices, and of structuring and developing an argument over an extended piece of written work a nuanced understanding of how cultural norms and assumptions influence questions of judgement. Transferable skills You will gain the following transferable skills: developed powers of communication and the capacity to argue a point of view, in extended oral and written form, with clarity, organisation, cogency and sophistication the ability to think independently, analytically, critically and self-critically the ability to assimilate and organise substantial quantities of complex information of diverse kinds an advanced level of competence in the formulation, planning and execution of extended written projects an advanced level of competence in the formulation, planning and formal oral presentation of research papers the experience of collaborative intellectual work the ability to understand, interrogate and apply a variety of theoretical positions and weigh the importance of alternative perspectives trained research skills, including scholarly information retrieval skills IT skills: word-processing, email communication, the ability to access electronic data. Entry requirements A first or second class honours degree in a relevant subject (or equivalent). General entry requirements Please also see our general entry requirements. English language entry requirements For detailed information see our English language requirements web pages. Please note that if you are required to meet an English language condition, we offer a number of pre-sessional courses in English for Academic Purposes through Kent International Pathways. Key facts School: School of English Subject area: English Award: MA Course type: Taught Location: Canterbury Mode of study: Full-time or part-time Attendance mode: Campus Duration: One year full-time, two years part-time Start: September Total Kent credits: 180 Total ECTS credits: 90 [-]

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MA in the Contemporary

MA in 18th Century Studies

MA - Postcolonial Studies

MA - Creative Writing

MA in English & American Literature

Contact

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