University of San Francisco - School of Education

Introduction

The School of Education celebrates four decades of involved teachers, devoted leaders and caring counselors.

Our faculty and students are scholars and social justice advocates engaged within the diverse San Francisco Bay area and beyond. With over twenty masters and doctoral programs, including programs at our branch campuses and online, we welcome students who seek to make an impact and who are committed to serving those most in need.

Dean's Welcome

Greetings from the University of San Francisco School of Education

As Dean of the School, I am passionate about creating an environment where future educators, leaders and counselors can dedicate their service and research to directly impact our communities.

As a former teacher and education activist, I feel at home at the USF School of Education where faculty, students and staff are interested in creating change. I encourage you to explore our SOE community and if you have any questions or need more information about our programs, please do not hesitate to Contact Us. On behalf of the faculty and staff of the USF School of Education, I thank you for considering our programs and I hope that you will be joining this social justice focused community.

Sincerely,

Kevin K. Kumashiro, Dean

USF School of Education

This school offers programs in:
  • English

View MA » View master programs »

Programs

This school also offers:

Master

MA School Counseling

Campus Full time September 2016 USA San Francisco

Preparing School Counselors to be Social Justice Agents of Change in Urban Schools [+]

The 49 credit School Counseling program meets requirements recently issued by the California State Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC) for those seeking a career in school counseling in K-12 schools. OPTION: After their first semester at USF, students enrolled in the 49-credit School Counseling/Pupil Personnel Services (PPS) Credential Program have the option to enroll in a 60-credit Dual Concentration Program in School Counseling and Professional Clinical Counseling. Graduates of the program obtain a Master of Arts (M.A.) degree and are eligible for the Pupil Personnel Services (PPS) Credential. They may be employed: - in public or private educational settings, - in community-based agencies, - as consultants to schools, education programs, and other institutions serving the educational needs of youth. They also may choose to pursue a doctoral degree. Program Description The School Counseling program is a unique, innovative educational program for preparing counselors to address the social, emotional, and academic needs of children, adolescents, and young adults in educational settings. The program emphasizes: - multicultural youth development and counseling - problem-solving, goal-oriented, counseling - social justice orientation - ecological systems in urban contexts Students learn theories and effective, pragmatic interventions with youth in schools. The program has a social justice orientation which seeks to foster equity, respect for diversity, creativity, compassion and community empowerment. “When asked if I feel ‘ready’ to enter the field of school counseling, I always reflect on how the USF School Counseling Program has prepared me to work with the universal issues faced by adolescents as well as those specifically related to underserved youth in urban schools.” - Andrea Davis, School Counseling Psychology Alumna The curriculum is designed sequentially - The first year focuses on counseling theory and practice, legal and ethical issues, child and adolescent development, multicultural counseling, research, group counseling, and prevention and intervention in schools. - The second year focuses on problem-solving counseling strategies, learning and instruction, counseling students with exceptional needs, academic and career counseling, assessment and program evaluation, and consultation with parents, teachers, and schools. A partnership of fieldwork and classroom learning forms the core of the program. Students begin their fieldwork in the schools during a first semester practicum class and complete the fieldwork requirements during three semesters of fieldwork classes. Each semester, the fieldwork class is conducted under the supervision of an experienced PPS credentialed instructor. Entry Requirements - Completed online application with non-refundable $55 application fee. - One set of unofficial transcripts from each university/college previously attended. For U.S. applicants, the degree must be from a regionally accredited university/college. An applicant with a pending degree must provide official verification of expected degree completion from institution's Registrar or school official. An undergraduate degree is required to apply to a master's program. A master's degree is required to apply for a doctoral program. Please note: if admitted you will need to submit official transcripts prior to enrolling. - MA and Credential applicants: Minimum GPA of 2.75 - Doctoral applicants: Minimum GPA of 3.0 from a graduate program - Two current, signed letters of recommendation, noting suitability for graduate work. - Current résumé. - A Statement of Intent Visit our website directly here to learn more about the School Counseling program Financial Resources Federal financial aid, state, and university resources are available as funding to newly admitted and current USF School of Education students. In order to offset the cost of graduate education tuition, many School of Education courses are offered in the late afternoon and evening, and/or on alternating weekends. Most students find they can maintain a full time job while earning their credential, master’s or doctoral degree. However, if your program requires you to spend time in a classroom (i.e. student teaching) or to complete a fieldwork or traineeship experience, such commitments will interfere with a normal workday.     Visit our website to learn more about financial resources for this program [-]

Master in Higher Education and Student Affairs

Campus Full time 2 years August 2017 USA San Francisco

The Master of Arts in Higher Education and Student Affairs (HESA) combines a rigorous academic curriculum which includes practicum experiences in various areas of student life, arranged in collaboration with the USF Division of Student Life. [+]

Prepare for a professional career in student affairs and leadership in higher education. The Master of Arts in Higher Education and Student Affairs (HESA) combines a rigorous academic curriculum which includes practicum experiences in various areas of student life, arranged in collaboration with the USF Division of Student Life. Program Schedule Consistent with the School of Education's commitment to serve working adults, the program follows a schedule of alternate weekend classes that convene nine times a semester. Classes are typically held Thursday evenings, Friday evenings and all day Saturday. Program Cornerstones: An integrated approach to issues of equity and access in higher education. A commitment to social justice emphasized throughout coursework and co-curricular experiences. A practicum component, which places students in diverse learning environments within student affairs and promotes the development of concrete practical skills and reflective learning. An optional paid internship opportunity, which can provide a compensation package offered by the USF Division of Student Life. “The social justice education component is something that I value most about the HESA program. It adds meaning and purpose to the work I'm pursuing and allows me to see the bigger picture. Joining a program that would afford me the opportunity to merge theory and practice was essential to my decision to attend USF.” - Amiya Powell-Hodge, Higher Education & Student Affairs Alumna The HESA Program at USF seeks individuals who demonstrate an explicit commitment to social justice in higher education and student affairs. As such, we undergo a holistic admissions process in our approach to reviewing applicants, which includes consideration of prior academic and life experiences. Financial Resources Federal financial aid, state, and university resources are available as funding to newly admitted and current USF School of Education students. In order to offset the cost of graduate education tuition, many School of Education courses are offered in the late afternoon and evening, and/or on alternating weekends. Most students find they can maintain a full time job while earning their credential, master’s or doctoral degree. However, if your program requires you to spend time in a classroom (i.e. student teaching) or to complete a fieldwork or traineeship experience, such commitments will interfere with a normal workday. Please consult your intended program of study for more information. Visit our website to learn more about financial resources for this program Careers Graduates of the Higher Education Student Affairs program are educators who work in university settings. Student affairs is an exciting field that promotes the growth and development of students in higher education, in and out of the classroom. The work of student affairs practitioners centers on supporting student success, from the point of access to colleges and universities, through their educational journey, and onto achievement of educational and developmental outcomes. HESA’s program approaches student affairs as a field where ensuring equitable outcomes for all students is a primary objective of our work, a principle that is integrated throughout coursework and co-curricular experiences and better prepares HESA graduates to serve as social justice advocates within higher education settings. HESA also provides a variety of support services including workshops and mentorship in networking, interviewing and resume writing. Examples of career options include: Student Services Manager Academic Success coach Assistant Director of Student Life Program Manager Admission Assistant Program Coordinator Office of Multicultural Recruitment [-]

MA

Master Educational Technology

Campus or Online Full time September 2016 USA San Francisco

Our master's program is designed for educators who are excited about the potential technology offers for increasing student engagement and learning. Our students want to extend their skills for implementing relevant technology-enhanced activities in their own learning environments. [+]

Our master's program is designed for educators who are excited about the potential technology offers for increasing student engagement and learning. Our students want to extend their skills for implementing relevant technology-enhanced activities in their own learning environments. The hands-on quality of the Educational Technology program addresses the disparity between understanding the functionality of technology and knowing how it can be taught to students. More accurately, it’s not just why you’d use technology, but how it could be strategically implemented. Our graduates will be prepared to: Optimize the use of active learning techniques via relevant technology tools Take existing curriculum and transform it for a contemporary student audience Design and teach online, hybrid, or blended courses Serve as a peer technology coach for colleagues Program Details The Educational Technology master's program is designed for working professionals who are interested in both creative exploration and practical application of digital technologies. Our focus is always on giving students tools and strategies that they can use right away in their own learning environments. We also understand that every school has different types and amounts of resources, so we explore a wide variety of technology tools with an emphasis on low-cost or free resources. The program will be of benefit to teachers in both K-12 and post-secondary settings, educational leaders, curriculum and technology specialists, software developers, corporate trainers, and others interested in the intersection of digital technologies and education. USF's Educational Technology program gives you five powerful ways to enhance your pedagogical toolkit and increase your impact on future learners. Enter as a savvy instructor, work hard, and leave as a: Digital leader Digital storyteller Digital educator Digital designer Digital change agent Curriculum Structure The curriculum focuses on the discerning use of technological tools to increase student engagement, motivation, and active learning. Master's candidates are encouraged to leverage their learning for immediate applicability; course projects require students to apply new skills to discipline-specific content needs. The Educational Technology program helps educators: Apply technology-enhanced educational practices in and out of the classroom. Prepare to evolve with the rapidly changing educational and technological landscapes. Understand the structure and function of educational technology systems. The culminating assessment for this project-based master's degree is a portfolio website, which can serve as a platform for sharing and collaborating with other educators, as well as an electronic resume for those wishing to advance their careers. Program Delivery Classes meet on teaching weekends, an alternate weekend schedule of about two weekends a month to accommodate adult students, most of whom have full-time jobs and other obligations. The Educational Technology program is designed to be completed in five semesters (two years) including summers. To finish in this timeline, you can plan to take two courses per semester. Courses The courses are organized into five complimentary duos. Students typically will take two courses each semester for five semesters. Course Descriptions DTTL 614: Navigating the Divide: Digital Leadership – Like it or not, the rapid development of technology has created a series of divides: those with access and those without; those who are comfortable with technology and those who are not; those who enjoy integrating technology into their work and those who are happy with the tools they have always used. Navigating this divide can be both challenging and rewarding. In this course we explore how digital technologies can help solve key pedagogical problems, as well as create opportunities for new effective pedagogical practices. We start the journey of exploring what digital technologies mean for transforming academic environments. DTTL 602: Digital Leadership Lab – Digital technologies do not just open up opportunities; they also raise new problems and challenges. In this initial lab course we explore how to efficiently and ethically establish an intentional digital presence within your learning environment and the wider professional community. We also explore how to teach our students similar, age-appropriate skills. Finally, we grapple with the systemic inequities that digital technologies can reveal as well as mediate. DTTL 603: Made to Stick: Teaching with the Brain in Mind – This course explores research-based practices that hold excellent promise for capturing learner attention, improving retention, and reinforcing integration of knowledge. We explore this area though the lens of digital-learning narratives. We will use the Heath brothers’ six principles: simple, unexpected, concrete, credible, emotional, and stories as a spring board to explore the use of digital narratives in education. DTTL 604: Digital Storytelling Lab – The purpose of this course is to introduce you to the essentials of good educational storytelling in a digital format. You get your hands e-dirty with the essence of audio production: recording, editing, mixing, and sharing. We start by identifying concepts that lend themselves to audio presentations, moving on to storyboarding, and the complete creation process. The course also introduces you to the power of concept maps and visual models. You learn how to combine audio with visual models to create effective integrated learning experiences. DTTL 605: Multimedia Learning – In Multimedia Learning, we explore the reasoning behind the form and function decisions we make with instructional materials. We answer questions about why some content and presentations “work,” while others fall flat. We are guided in our examination by research-based specifics behind cognitive load theory and the principles of multimedia learning. The research behind these phenomena demonstrate the ways that making simple changes to digital products and presentations can greatly increase student learning. During the course we examine theory, apply our knowledge to analyzing existing learning resources, and finally create new materials of our own. DTTL 606: Media Lab – We explore the world of visual communication: from still images, to video, to the specialized craft of how-to screencasts. In this course you learn to more deeply apply multimedia learning principles to create effective visual learning experiences. The first part of the course focuses on effective instructional images of all kinds from infographics to the effective use of photographic images. The second part of the course explores how to effectively and efficiently develop video-based learning experiences. You leave the course well-equipped to create flipped or online learning experiences that utilize the best in visual communication techniques. DTTL 607: Learning Designs – We have all heard the maxim that “good teaching is good teaching.” But how do the precepts of pedagogy change when our classrooms no longer look the way they did twenty years ago? In Learning Designs, we explore how to adapt and apply the best practices of curriculum design to 21st century classrooms. We focus on effective techniques for increasing engagement, designing authentic assessment, sparking meaningful collaboration, and differentiating instruction for 1:1, flipped, blended, and online classes. DTTL 608: Design Lab – In Learning Designs you developed a proposed blueprint for completely redesigning one course or one in-depth unit. In Design Lab, you now transform your blueprint into a living, breathing, ready-to-deploy curriculum by following the five-step process of Design Thinking used by Stanford’s d.school. This course draws upon the skills honed in your previous lab courses, and provides the opportunity for you to deliberately match your technology repertoire with learning objectives. DTTL 609: Change the World from Here – As a graduate of the DTTL program, you are sure to face challenges that invite you to put your learning into action, and lead with purpose. In this project-based course you collaborate with a small design team on a rich, service-learning project to respond to a real-world educational need for an under-served educational institution or group. We also explore ways in which digital tools and virtual collaboration can enhance project-based and service-based learning experiences outside of the traditional classroom. DTTL 610: Capstone Lab – In this hands-on culminating course, we focus on how to synthesize all your previous work into one beautiful professional website that you can use as a foundation for your professional presence for years to come. You learn the essentials of web coding that every educator needs to develop nimble, mobile-friendly, responsive websites. Reflection on your website portfolio will help you see how portfolio-based projects can be used and facilitated within the contemporary classroom. Learning Outcomes The Educational Technology master's program has seven program outcomes. Upon completion of the MA in Educational Technology students will be able to: Demonstrate theoretical content knowledge of digital pedagogies. Curate and maintain relevant materials to share with an educational community. Create purposeful digital media drawing from research on design and the instructional use of multimedia. Reflect on practice to enhance pedagogy, to evolve as a professional, and to improve learner outcomes. Respond to systemic learning, cultural, and access inequities through digital pedagogy. Connect to various professionals and digital communities in a relevant, authentic and effective way. Contribute meaningfully to the education profession. [-]

Master in Catholic Education Leadership

Campus Part time September 2016 USA San Francisco

The master's program in Catholic Educational Leadership prepares graduates for effective leadership as administrators in Catholic elementary and secondary schools and for diocesan positions. The program consists of 30 credits, 24 of which are core credits. [+]

The master's program in Catholic Educational Leadership prepares graduates for effective leadership as administrators in Catholic elementary and secondary schools and for diocesan positions. The program consists of 30 credits, 24 of which are core credits. Program Delivery To meet the needs of working professionals, the program follows a schedule of alternate weekend classes that convene nine times a semester (Friday evenings and all day Saturdays). COURSE DETAILS CORE CURRICULUM | 24 CREDITS CEL 640 - History and Principles of Catholic Education (3) CEL 641 - Private School Law (3) CEL 642 - Moral Development (3) CEL 644 - Curriculum and Instruction Leadership in Catholic Schools (3) CEL 650 - Catholic Leadership and Educational Administration (3) CEL 651 - Business and Finance for Catholic Schools (3) CEL 653 - Personnel Leadership in Catholic Schools (3) CEL 690 - M.A. Culminating Project (3) ELECTIVES | 6 CREDITS The remaining 6 credits are earned in elective courses selected from among those in Catholic Educational Leadership or those offered by other master's degree programs in the School of Education. The program is offered during three semesters of the academic year: fall, spring, and summer. The summer CEL semester, referred to as the SummerWest program, includes a wide variety of course offerings; the summer faculty are from many parts of the country and bring expertise in theory and practice in elementary and secondary Catholic schools. MORE ABOUT SUMMERWEST The founder of the Jesuits, St. Ignatius Loyola, invested his considerable talent and energy into starting and improving educational institutions because he believed “We should be influencing those who will influence others.” SummerWest is a program of profound influence. We have been influencing Catholic educational practice, discussion, and research, both nationally and internationally, for over thirty years through our students, our faculty, our courses, our conferences, and our community. We invite you to contribute to the vision of St. Ignatius Loyola, to continue his legacy as an educator who influences those you serve, by participating in SummerWest. The three non-CEL courses (offered through the Organization and Leadership Program) that pertain to specific domains of content and competence are: Educational Governance and the Community Public School Law Information Technology in Educational Management Two remaining courses provide the field experiences that incorporate the specific domains indicated above: Field Experience I* Field Experience II *Students who have completed at least two years of service in a line administrator’s position in a school setting within the last five years may be permitted to waive Field Experience I. Permission to waive Field Experience I is granted upon recommendation of the Administrative Credential Programs Coordinator to the Dean after submission of appropriate documentation to the Program Coordinator. Learning Outcomes The Catholic Educational Leadership Program Learning Outcomes Students will become integrated leaders of Catholic education, which includes religious, spiritual, and moral competencies Students will become academically and professionally competent leaders in Catholic Education Students will engage in a lifelong learning process and are the catalysts for lifelong learning in Catholic education Students will foster in their schools the four aims of Catholic Education, namely, message, community, worship, and service Students will seek to develop the essential personal skills of Catholic educational leadership as modeled by Jesus Christ THE CATHOLIC EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP PROGRAM STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES Students will demonstrate an understanding of the vision, mission, and values of Catholic education with the ability to communicate them to the various stakeholders of their schools Students will demonstrate competency in coursework assignments and apply research skills to Catholic education and the field of education in general Students will demonstrate the knowledge and skills required within contemporary models of learning, which are characterized by transformative, reflective, and engaging modes of learning and higher order thinking Students will apply Gospel values with their school communities, demonstrate a knowledge of Catholic social teaching and the promotion of social justice, and will integrate cura personalis (care for the person) in their relationships with their stakeholders [-]

Master in Human Rights Education

Campus Full time 2 years September 2016 USA San Francisco

Grounded in the practice of critical pedagogy, this program provides a dynamic learning community where students benefit from rigorous experience both in the classroom and in the community. [+]

Grounded in the practice of critical pedagogy, this program provides a dynamic learning community where students benefit from rigorous experience both in the classroom and in the community. Program Features The only opportunity in the US to receive a master’s degree in human rights education. Rich in-class learning experiences with expert faculty blended with opportunities for practical work in schools and community organizations in the Bay Area. Pedagogy aimed at addressing inequities based on race, class, gender, sexual identity, religion, and nation. OUR STUDENTS Our students arrive at USF as educators, filmmakers, community organizers, after-school program directors, and more, eager to explore new ways of reading the world using a human rights framework. CAPSTONE PROJECTS As part of a final capstone project, students are required to create a curriculum, design a program, and produce a written project that summarizes their knowledge and experience. Want to check out past master’s projects? Human Rights Education projects are posted on USF’s scholarship repository. Program Details Human rights education is a deliberate, participatory practice aimed at empowering individuals, groups and communities through fostering knowledge, skills and attitudes consistent with internationally recognized human rights principles. Amnesty International Designed to support teachers of early childhood through college, as well as educators working in non-formal settings such as community organizations, Human Rights Education (HRE) entails understanding the promise of rights guarantees and the gap between rights and actual realities. Courses examine the right to education, schooling with dignity and rights, and curricular efforts towards social justice and comprehensive human rights. Students engage with issues in local and global contexts, with emphasis on globalization, migration, social movements, and transnationalism. Transformation is an essential element of HRE, and is done through a process of education that empowers people to make changes in their own lives, as well as in their families, communities, and institutions. Program Delivery The program follows a schedule of alternate weekend classes that convene nine times a semester (Friday evenings and all day Saturdays). See Teaching Weekend dates. A hallmark of the Masters in Human Rights Education program is its flexibility to work with diverse students. Students can complete the coursework requirements in as few as 18 months (two academic year semesters plus the summer term) and can extend the program as long as needed (up to 5 years). Most students complete the Masters program in 2 academic years with summer coursework often included. COURSE DETAILS The Master of Arts in Human Rights Education (HRE) consists of 30 credits. Requirements include 15 credits of core coursework, 9 credits of elective coursework, and 6 credits of Culminating Project. All classes are 3 credits, unless otherwise noted. HRE FOUNDATIONS COURSES | 9 CREDITS IME 618 - International Human Rights Law for Educators (3) IME 620 - Human Rights Education: Pedagogy and Praxis (3) IME 621 - Human Rights Education: History, Philosophy and Current Debates (3) HRE TOPIC COURSES | 9 CREDITS (SELECT 3 OF 4 COURSES) IME 616 - Social Movements and Human Rights (3) IME 617 - Tools for Human Rights Practice (3) IME 619 - Gender and Globalization (3) IME 640 - Immigration and Forced Displacement (3) HRE ELECTIVES | 6 CREDITS (SELECT 2 COURSES) IME 602 - Linguistic Rights and Bilingual Education (3) IME 605 - Re-conceptualizing Multicultural Education (3) IME 606 - Critical Analysis of Urban Schooling (3) IME 612 - Critical Race Theory and Praxis (3) IME 625 - Contemporary International Issues (3) IME 636 - Human Rights and Media (3) IME 637 - Critical Pedagogy (3) IME 639 - Cross-Cultural Literacy (3) CULMINATING PROJECT | 6 CREDITS GEDU 603 - Methodology of Educational Research (3) IME 649 - MA Thesis/Field Project (3) Learning Outcomes The Human Rights Education Program Learning Outcomes: The goal of the HRE program is to develop professional practitioners with expertise in the following key areas: Conceptual knowledge: including human rights education, globalization and migration, peace and conflict in education, cross-cultural competency, and global citizenship. Theoretical knowledge: including critical social theory, critical pedagogy, multicultural theory, critical race theory, feminist critical theory. Application skills: analysis, synthesis, and evaluation skills for teaching and research, program/policy development and administration, and local/global social justice/human rights activism. Methodological tools based in qualitative research such as the collection of oral histories, designing participatory research and data analysis. STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES: The HRE program is designed to enable students, upon graduation, to: Use theory as a lens for thinking critically about social inequities in local/global contexts. Critically engage with scholarly literature. Be skillful in applying research-based educational and training practices. Use a wide range of instructional materials, approaches, and methods for learners at different stages of development and from differing cultural and linguistic backgrounds. Use a wide range of assessment tools, including informal/formal, individual/group, formative/summative instruments. Design, implement, and assess K-12, post-secondary, and community-based education and training programs focused on human rights, social justice, and/or multicultural education. Careers Graduates of the Human Rights Education MA program are educators and activists who work in a variety of settings. Examples of career options include: Non-governmental organizations or schools in the U.S. or internationally Work with immigrants or refugees in the U.S. in some capacity (teacher, youth development worker, after-school educator) Work in curriculum development or program design for global education programs Work in policy settings such as state or national departments of education Work in agencies like UNICEF, Save the Children, CARE, etc. GRADUATES OF THE HUMAN RIGHTS EDUCATION PROGRAM INCLUDE: A youth development worker with a non-profit serving homeless youth A curriculum designer and trainer for an immigrant rights organization A Fulbright recipient A community organizer with low-income communities A faculty member at a community college teaching 'Peace and Human Rights' An educator of immigrant and refugee youth A study abroad coordinator for undergraduate students [-]

Master in International and Multicultural Education

Campus Part time 2 years September 2016 USA San Francisco

USF's M.A. degree in International & Multicultural Education (IME) Program is dedicated to understanding formal and informal education within its sociocultural, linguistic, and political contexts around the world. [+]

USF's M.A. degree in International & Multicultural Education (IME) Program is dedicated to understanding formal and informal education within its sociocultural, linguistic, and political contexts around the world. Based on principles of equity, social justice, and human rights, the program critically addresses the realities of education within and beyond the borders of public schooling in the United States and around the world. Distinctive Features Rich in-class learning experiences with expert faculty blended with opportunities for practical work in schools and community organizations in the Bay Area. Curriculum and pedagogy aimed at addressing inequities based on race, class, gender, sexual identity, religion, and nation. A strong sense of community composed of highly diverse faculty and students who offer personal and scholarly support Program Details The MA in International and Multicultural Education is rooted in critical social theory and the practice of critical pedagogy. This program provides a dynamic learning community where students benefit from rigorous scholarship and experience both in the classroom and in the community. We believe that our program equips students with the knowledge and strategies they need to be highly effective social justice teachers, leaders, and practitioners across various learning contexts in the U.S. and abroad. We interweave theory and practice while utilizing the following lenses to inform our curriculum equity and social justice education intersectionality of race, class, nation, language, gender and sexuality youth culture and resistance human rights and social movements globalization and migration studies community cultural wealth PROGRAM DELIVERY The program follows a schedule of alternate weekend classes that convene nine times a semester (Friday evenings and all day Saturdays). COURSE DETAILS THE MASTER OF ARTS IN INTERNATIONAL AND MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION (IME) CONSISTS OF 30 CREDITS FROM THE FOLLOWING COURSES. Course descriptions are available in the catalog. THEORETICAL FOUNDATION COURSES | 9 CREDITS Students select three of the following courses: IME 605 - Re-conceptualizing Multicultural Education (3) IME 612 - Critical Race Theory and Praxis (3) IME 169 - Gender and Globalization (3) IME 621 - Human Rights Education: History, Philosophy and Current Debates IME 639 - Cross-Cultural Literacy IME CORE COURSES | 15 CREDITS Students select five of the following courses: IME 602 - Linguistic Rights and Bilingual Education (3) IME 603 - Applied Linguistics (3) IME 604 - Global Perspectives on Education and Decolonization (3) IIME 606 - Critical Analysis of Urban Schooling (3) IME 610 - Sociology of Language (3) IME 611 - Language and Culture (3) IME 613 - Emotional Intelligence and Cultural Competency (3) IME 615 - Education for Inclusion (3) IME 616 - Social Movements and Human Rights (3) IME 617 - Tools for Human Rights Practice (3) IME 618 - International Human Rights Law for Educators (3) IME 620 - Human Rights Education: Pedagogy and Praxis (3) IME 624 - African-American Education History in the US (3) IME 625 - Contemporary International Issues (3) IME 628 - Women of Color in Higher Education (3) IME 631 - Research in 1st and 2nd Language Acquisition (3) IME 634 - Assessment/Testing of Second Language Proficiency (3) IME 635 - Latinos and Education (3) IME 636 - Human Rights and Media (3) IME 637 - Critical Pedagogy (3) IME 640 - Immigration and Forced Displacement (3) IME 647 - Technology and Diverse Learners (3) IME 650 - Asian American History and Education (3) IME 668 - Discourse, Pragmatics and Language Teaching (3) IME 676 - Teaching and Learning Through the Arts (3) IME 697 - IME Directed Study (1-3) IME 698 - IME Special Topics (1-3) MASTER'S THESIS/RESEARCH PROJECT | 3 CREDITS GEDU 603 - Methodology of Educational Research (3) IME 649 - IME MA Thesis/Research Project (3) Learning Outcomes THE INTERNATIONAL AND MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION PROGRAM LEARNING OUTCOMES The goal of each IME program is to develop professional practitioners with expertise in three key areas: Conceptual knowledge: including human rights education, urban education, language and literacy education, emotional intelligence and cultural competency. Theoretical knowledge: including critical social theory, critical pedagogy, multicultural theory, critical race theory, feminist critical theory. Application skills: analysis, synthesis, and evaluation skills for teaching and research, program/policy development and administration, and local/global social justice/human rights activism. THE INTERNATIONAL AND MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION PROGRAM STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES The IME programs are designed to enable students, upon graduation, to: Use theory as a lens for thinking critically about social inequities in local/global contexts. Critically engage with scholarship. Be skillful in applying research-based teaching practices. Work as a transformative professional in schools, universities and communities to bring about social change. Use a wide range of assessment tools for including informal/formal, individual/group, formative/summative instruments. Design, implement, and assess K-12 and post-secondary classroom/community programs focused on human rights, multicultural, and/or language/literacy education. Careers Graduates of the MA in International & Multicultural Education are educators who work in K-12 schools, higher education and in research and community organizations. Examples of Career Options Include Teachers in K-12 classrooms, as youth development workers, or as after school educators Work in non-profit and non-governmental organizations in the U.S. and internationally Curriculum development or program design for global education programs Work in policy settings such as state or national departments of education GRADUATES OF THE INTERNATIONAL & MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION MA Curriculum and School Leader, San Francisco International School, SFUSD Center Director, South of Market (SOMA) Family Resource Co-founder and Trainer, Collective Action Training Senior Program Specialist, LGBTQ Youth Child Welfare Permanency Project, National Council on Crime and Delinquency Enroll in PhD/EdD programs across the US Fullbright Scholars around the world [-]

Master in Organization and Leadership

Campus Part time 18 - 24 months September 2016 USA San Francisco

The Master of Arts in Organization and Leadership (O&L) consists of 30 credits. The program gives students the opportunity to work with a diverse and unique faculty and focus their study. [+]

Leadership is the essential resource for creating and sustaining organizations, communities, and societies. The primary goal of the O&L MA program is to bring before students a continuum of new knowledge and understanding that reflects current theories, research and innovative practices. The Organization and Leadership Master’s program is composed of a diverse and unique faculty that draws upon a common ethic to teach and live leadership through commitment, academic excellence, and innovative practice. The Master of Arts in Organization and Leadership (O&L) consists of 30 credits. The program gives students the opportunity to work with a diverse and unique faculty and focus their study. Program Delivery To meet the needs of working professionals, the program follows a schedule of alternate weekend classes that convene nine times a semester (Friday evenings and all day Saturdays). COURSE DETAILS FOUNDATIONS | 3 CREDITS (REQUIRED) O&L 614 - Introduction to Organization and Leadership (3) RESEARCH METHODOLOGY | 3 CREDITS GEDU 603 - Methodology of Educational Research (3) O&L COURSEWORK - GENERAL OR FOCUS AREA | 15 CREDITS O&L 615 - Information Systems in Educational Management (3) O&L 621 - Budget and Finance (3) O&L 622 - Education Law (3) O&L 624 - Human Resources in Educational Management (3) O&L 630 - Educational Leadership (3) O&L 635 - Anthropology of Education (3) O&L 652 - Data Based Decision Making for School Leaders (3) O&L 654 - School, Community and Society (3) O&L 658 - Culture and Work (3) O&L 661 - Organization Development and Learning (3) O&L 670 - Ethical Organization (3) ELECTIVES | 6 CREDITS Choose 2 elective courses drawn from the following based on program adviser approval: Organization & Leadership courses Special topics courses, Directed studies, Other School of Education department courses, Accepted transfer courses. MASTER'S FIELD PROJECT OR THESIS | 3 CREDITS O&L 655 - Masters Field Project (3) Course descriptions are available in the catalog. OPTIONAL FOCUS AREAS The faculty of the Organization and Leadership Program are pleased to offer the following three focus areas of study. Our programs are designed to train instructional leaders and to address the shortages of credentialed principals, superintendents, directors, and administrative personnel in San Francisco Bay Area schools. The curriculum weaves together current research with direct application to the field with a focus on creating school leaders for social justice. Contact the specific faculty member listed in each area below for additional information about that focus. K-12 INSTRUCTIONAL LEADERSHIP AND ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES CREDENTIAL PROGRAM K-12 instructional leadership focuses on the research and practice of leadership development, leadership for social justice, instructional leadership, and program development. Examples of courses include: Data-Based Decision Making for School Leaders School, Community, and Society Human Resources in Educational Management 21ST CENTURY LEADERSHIP The 21st Century Leadership focus is an opportunity to address practices and issues of concern to 21st-century leaders and their management of a diverse work force. Students will explore topics that have received attention in recent years, including different leadership styles, organizational change, work teams, global leadership, managing diversity, and ethical leadership. Examples of specific courses include: Leadership Theories Leadership in Urban Context Ethical Organization HIGHER EDUCATION LEADERSHIP Higher education leadership prepares aspiring administrators, leaders, and scholars of higher education to work in college and university settings. This emphasis exposes students to the challenges facing higher education in light of rapidly changing social, political, and demographic contexts. Common themes throughout each class are: issues of access and equity in post-secondary institutions and the experiences and problems facing under-represented groups complexities involved in transforming organizations and programs to achieve equitable outcomes for all students. Course offerings include the following: Race, Diversity, and Higher Education Campus Environments and Cultures American Institutions of Higher Education The Organization and Leadership Program Learning Outcomes: The program brings before students a continuum of new knowledge and understanding that reflects current theories, research, and innovative practices. The program equips students to apply the principles of leadership theory in a broad range of settings to effectively lead individuals and organizations to success. The program equips students to select, implement, and manage appropriate leadership methodologies to meet individual, group, and organizational needs in K-12 through higher education, for-profit, and nonprofit settings. The program equips students to utilize and conduct research to evaluate and improve organizational processes. Create leaders who are able to critically examine organizations in order to promote equitable outcomes. Foster advocacy for social justice with a consciousness around the experiences and challenges facing historically underrepresented groups. Understand and apply research to problems of practice. Develop leaders who are self-reflective of their practice and its implications for social justice and equity. THE ORGANIZATIONAL AND LEADERSHIP PROGRAM STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES: Graduates will have acquired the knowledge, understanding, tools and skills necessary to assume leadership roles in organizations at the local, state, national and international levels. Graduates will have an understanding of research methods and demonstrate competencies to engage in rigorous scholarship. Graduates will be able to relate theory to practice and demonstrate synthesis of advanced knowledge by improving organizations. Graduates will have adopted habits of personal and scholarly reflections that examine professional practice and lead to systemic renewal. Careers Graduates of the Organization and Leadership master's program are educators who work in the fields of education, business, health, government, consulting, and profit and non-profit settings in roles of leadership, management, research and all levels of teaching. Examples of career options Local, International NGO Educational Management Higher Education Administration Management Consultant Principal Assistant Principal GRADUATES OF THE ORGANIZATION & LEADERSHIP PROGRAM INCLUDE Interim Superintendent, Hayward Unified School District Assistant Superintendent, San Mateo School District President, Y Motion [-]

Master in Special Education

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years September 2016 USA San Francisco + 1 more

The Special Education Master’s and Mild/Moderate Education Specialist Credential Program is designed to prepare interns for special education careers in diverse, multicultural, urban schools. [+]

The Special Education Master’s and Mild/Moderate Education Specialist Credential Program is designed to prepare interns for special education careers in diverse, multicultural, urban schools. The program offers two pathways. One for candidates who already hold a teaching credential and one for those who are new to the profession. Both of the program pathways include working as paid intern teachers in Bay Area schools. This program can also include the Bilingual Authorization. Program Details The Special Education master's program culminates in a Master of Arts in Special Education with Mild/Moderate Education Specialist Preliminary Credential. Program Features Instruction and assignments are aligned to job demands, connecting theory and research to practice. Highly qualified instructors have extensive experience in diverse, multicultural, urban schools working with a wide range of students with disabilities. Students are members of a close-knit cohort in small, personalized classes. Students receive extensive supervision and mentoring, on the job and in class, providing the support interns need to meet job, program, and state requirements. Our intern teachers learn practical skills that they can apply the next day in their K-12 classrooms. USF helps find placement for our students in the paid internship positions. PROGRAM DELIVERY Students attend an intensive summer program, from the beginning of June through mid-July, to prepare for their first teaching assignments. Students attend class in addition to working full-time as a paid special education intern teacher. Fall and spring classes are one night per week, on Wednesdays. Intern Teaching Seminar courses meet a few Thursdays each semester in year one and continue in year two on Wednesday evenings. MA IN SPECIAL EDUCATION: ONE-YEAR PATHWAY FOR CREDENTIAL HOLDERS ONLY Candidates entering into the one-year track of the Special Education master's program may be eligible to transfer up to nine credits of coursework*. Coursework must be have been completed within the last seven years for eligibility. COURSE DETAILS | 30-39 CREDITS SUMMER | 15 CREDITS L&I 675 - Data-based Instruction (3) L&I 659 - Consultation and Collaboration (3) L&I 641 - Research in Special Education (3) Offered in the early summer, addresses research in special education and writing the thesis. L&I 665 - Development of Legal and Educational Foundations for the Learning Specialist (3) L&I 636 - Educational Practices for the Learning Specialist (3) *Transferable Courses – Up to 9 Credits TEC 604 - Multiple Subject Curriculum and Instruction: Math & Science (3) TEC 621 - Multiple Subject Curriculum and Instruction: Early Literacy (3) L&I 637 - Fieldwork Practicum: Teaching Diverse Groups (2) TEC 642 - Health Education (1) - Flexible - May be taken anytime during the two-year program on three successive Saturdays. Course may be waived for those who have a California Single or Multiple Subject credential within the last 7 years or prior qualifying health course. FALL | 7 CREDITS L&I 633 - Assessment in Special Education (3) L&I 631 - Curriculum & Instruction for Students with Mild/Moderate Disabilities (2) L&I 639 - Intern Teaching Seminar I (2) SPRING | 8 CREDITS L&I 676 - Behavior Management (3) L&I 622 - Instructional Uses of Technology for Learning Specialists (2) L&I 640 - Intern Teaching Seminar II (1) L&I 634 - Master's Thesis (2) Thesis or Project Development, is a directed study under the supervision of a full time faculty adviser and requires the development of a field project or thesis. MA IN SPECIAL EDUCATION (FOR NON-CREDENTIAL HOLDERS) COURSE DETAILS | 42 CREDITS FIRST YEAR SUMMER | 14 CREDITS TEC 604 - Multiple Subject Curriculum and Instruction: Math & Science (3) TEC 621 - Multiple Subject Curriculum and Instruction: Early Literacy (3) The courses above may be waived for those who have a California Single or Multiple Subject credential within the last 7 years. (Courses may be transferred from another institution.) L&I 637 - Fieldwork Practicum: Teaching Diverse Groups (2) L&I 636 - Educational Practices for the Learning Specialist (3) L&I 665 - Development of Legal and Educational Foundations for the Learning Specialist (3) FALL | 7 CREDITS L&I 631 - Curriculum & Instruction for Students with Mild/Moderate Disabilities (2) L&I 633 - Assessment in Special Education (3) L&I 639 - Intern Teaching Seminar I (2) SPRING | 6 CREDITS L&I 622 - Instructional Uses of Technology for Learning Specialists (2) L&I 676 - Behavior Management (3) L&I 640 - Intern Teaching Seminar II (1) TEC 642 - Health Education (1 credit) - Flexible - May be taken anytime during the two-year program on three successive Saturdays. Course may be waived for those who have a California Single or Multiple Subject credential within the last 7 years or prior qualifying health course. SECOND YEAR FALL | 4 CREDITS L&I 675 - Data-based Instruction (3) L&I 678 - Intern Teaching Seminar III (1) SPRING | 4 CREDITS L&I 659 - Consultation and Collaboration (3) L&I 679 - Intern Teaching Seminar IV (1) THE MASTER'S DEGREE REQUIRES TWO ADDITIONAL COURSES. The master's degree may be completed during the second year of the credential program or in an optional third year. | 6 credits L&I 641 - Research in Special Education (3) Offered in the early summer, addresses research in special education and writing the thesis. L&I 638 - Master's Thesis (3) Thesis or Project Development, is offered in fall or spring as a directed study under the supervision of a full time faculty adviser and requires the development of a field project or thesis. Learning Outcomes The MA in Special Education with the Mild/Moderate Education Specialist Credential Program Learning Outcomes: Using a variety of instructional strategies, resources, and technologies to meet students' diverse learning needs. Monitoring student learning and adjusting instruction while teaching. Creating a rigorous learning environment with high expectations and appropriate support for all students. Using knowledge of students' academic readiness, language proficiency, cultural background, and individual development to plan instruction. Planning instruction that incorporates appropriate strategies to meet the learning needs of all students. Applying knowledge of the purposes, characteristics, and uses of different types of assessments. THE MA IN SPECIAL EDUCATION WITH THE MILD/MODERATE EDUCATION SPECIALIST CREDENTIAL STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES: Student will be able to demonstrate advanced skill in selecting, designing, administering, and interpreting informal and formal reading assessments. Student will be able to use performance data and input from various sources to make or suggest appropriate modifications in a broad spectrum of learning environments. Student will be able to demonstrate differentiated teaching skills in his or her classrooms. Student will be able to describe a variety of instructional procedures and demonstrate the advanced ability to use appropriate instruction for students with culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds across a variety of settings. Careers Graduates of Special Education master's program are educators who work in special education settings at public and private K-12 schools. GRADUATES OF THE MA IN SPECIAL EDUCATION INCLUDE: Adjunct Professor Special Day Class Teacher Resource Specialist Teacher Program Specialist Intervention Specialist Instructional Coach Beginning Teacher Support and Assessment Coordinator Special Education Department Head Transition Specialist Adaptive Technology Specialist Technology Consultant [-]

Master in Teaching

Campus Full time 2 years September 2016 USA San Francisco

Learn to be politically informed and democratically engaged curriculum decision makers and designers who think critically about educational purposes, perspectives, and practices. [+]

Learn to be politically informed and democratically engaged curriculum decision makers and designers who think critically about educational purposes, perspectives, and practices. The Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) program focuses on curriculum. We engage in critical study of historical and current controversies that shape what is taught in classrooms today. Teachers learn to design curriculum that embodies their educational values and provides all students access to powerful learning opportunities. Teacher candidates are recommended by USF to the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (CTC) for the Preliminary Multiple Subjects (36 credits) or Single Subject (34 credits) Teaching Credential with optional bilingual authorization in Spanish. Our Faculty Our professors are experts in the field, holding degrees from prestigious institutions and leveraging a broad understanding of educational issues. They’re classroom teachers by trade and offer an intimate understanding of day-to-day classroom life and effective pedagogical strategies. MATH & SCIENCE SCHOLARS We recently added new faculty who have strengthened our program’s math and science education offerings. Program Details Your Teacher Education Experience Personalized experience in an inclusive, diverse community with small classes. Dedicated, expert faculty with backgrounds in classroom teaching and a variety of specializations. Integration of academic coursework and field experience in local schools. Vision that emphasizes humanizing relationships, democratic participation, and critical inquiry. Program Delivery Classes are offered Monday – Thursday evenings and on some Saturdays. Student teaching begins in the second semester and usually requires 2 days a week of in-class time in the second semester and 5 days a week of in-class time in the third semester. COURSE DETAILS The preliminary teaching credentials offered in conjunction with the Master of Arts in Teaching are: Preliminary Multiple Subject Credential with an optional Bilingual Authorization in Spanish | 36-40 credits. Preliminary Single Subject Credential with an optional Bilingual Authorization in Spanish | 34-38 credits. Candidates who complete all credential program requirements at USF may obtain the MAT by successfully completing the following: TED 673 - Curriculum: Currents and Controversies (3 credits) TED 674 - Curriculum Development and Design (3 credits) Our course sequence in the MAT program focuses on Curriculum. Classroom teachers constantly make crucial decisions about curriculum, instruction, and assessment. To be thoughtful decision makers, they need to gain a historical perspective on the conflicting movements — and the politics behind them — that have shaped curriculum in K-12 schools. They need to think about how their own curricular units and lessons represent different views of what students should know and be able to do. New teachers need a carefully structured experience as they learn to design units and lessons that will address the diverse needs and interests of their students. The two MAT courses provide students with knowledge about educational history, policy, and philosophy not addressed by other TED courses. They build on previous coursework related to lesson plan and unit design while delving into the larger purposes of schooling, educational controversies, and different approaches to curriculum. The courses help prepare teachers to understand and balance conflicting demands of classroom teaching. They extend teachers’ sense of themselves as intellectuals, adaptive experts, and reflective practitioners. Learning Outcomes TEACHING FOR DIVERSITY & SOCIAL JUSTICE STRAND Understand that social justice issues are always operating, affect everyone, and are manifested in relationships, curriculum, pedagogy and assessment. Problematize education practices, programs, and policies using social justice concepts, theories, frameworks. Contribute to honest and open-minded dialogue across different perspectives, cultures, experiences. Teach responsively and compassionately with a student advocacy, assets-based orientation vs. deficit perspective. Understand institutional, systemic forces of racism, classism, sexism, homophobia, and other forms of oppression and how they play out in classrooms and schools. Develop tools to recognize and confront dehumanizing speech and actions. Develop a critically reflective teacher identity with the ability to question one’s own assumptions. Develop familiarity with and motivation to apply educational principles, approaches, and resources for teaching to diversity and for social justice. LEARNING & TEACHING/DEVELOPMENT STRAND Develop awareness of classroom teaching as a complex endeavor that involves understanding of curricular knowledge, diverse learners, high leverage pedagogies, classroom community/leadership, multiple forms of assessment, and the contexts of schooling. Contemplate the different purposes of education and one’s own classroom teaching, and the implications for our role as teachers that foster our students’ growth as humane, competent, and empowered learners. Understand the connections among theories, principles, and classroom practice and critique the assumptions that underlie them. Behaviorism Constructivism Gradual release of responsibility Direct instruction Teaching for understanding Understanding by design Develop sociocultural and developmental perspectives on learners and learning that include knowledge of how cognition is related to identity, social, emotional, cultural, environmental, and physiological issues. Develop ability to closely observe classroom teaching (curriculum, pedagogy, assessment, classroom community/leadership), analyze using evidence, and apply lessons learned to one’s vision of teaching (for excellence and equity). Understand different approaches to curriculum, instruction, assessment, and classroom community/leadership; when to use them; and why. Develop habits of complex, critical thinking; inquiry; and reflection about theory and practice; challenge our own pre-conceptions of learning and teaching. Develop a vision of classroom teaching (for equity and excellence) based on big ideas from the course with the understanding that our ideals will be challenged by the realities of school and society. CURRICULUM & INSTRUCTION STRAND Teachers are critical consumers of curriculum in the schools so they adapt vs. adopt curricular/instructional materials. Teachers conduct ongoing assessment (of students’ strengths, where students are, needs) that informs planning and teaching. Teachers know how to develop lesson plans and sequences of instruction. Teachers know how to build on student assets to develop literacy and numeracy in the content areas. Teachers connect their own curriculum and pedagogy to teaching for diversity and social justice. Teachers connect theory to their practice (e.g. how children learn to read to reading instruction; how children develop number sense to math instruction). Teachers identify broad and specific curricular purposes (e.g. powerful ideas, skills and strategies). Teachers apply frameworks and tools (“nuts and bolts”) to their curriculum, pedagogy, and assessment. Careers Graduates of the Teaching MA are educators who work in a variety of settings. Most are public and private school teachers. CAREER OPTIONS USF teachers are employed by the following school districts: San Francisco Oakland Berkeley West Contra Costa Alameda Novato Hayward They are also working in private schools such as St. Ignatius, St. Joseph, Sacred Heart, San Francisco Day, The Urban School, Marin Country Day, and San Francisco Friends. [-]

Masters Program in TESOL

Campus Full time Part time 3 - 4 semesters August 2017 USA San Francisco + 1 more

The basic Master of Arts TESOL degree consists of 10 courses for a total of 30 academic credits. Full-time students can complete the program in three or four semesters [+]

The Master of Arts in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) is a practitioner-oriented degree. The basic TESOL degree consists of 10 courses for a total of 30 academic credits. Full-time students can complete the program in three or four semesters. The program combines a comprehensive coverage of linguistic theory with practical application, providing students with the knowledge and strategies they need to be highly effective ESOL teachers in schools, community colleges, and teaching abroad. The program delivery is designed for working professionals. Classes are held on one weekday–late afternoon/evening and selected Friday evenings and Saturdays (on the School of Education Teaching Weekend Schedule). The program is offered on USF’s San Francisco campus and the campus in Orange County, California Master of Arts in TESOL with Concentration in Digital Media and Learning (DTTL) The program with concentration consists of 11 courses for a total of 33 credits with specific courses in the area of educational technology. In addition, the final project must demonstrate the student's ability to combine Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages with Digital Technologies in Teaching and Learning. Master of Arts in TESOL Combined with Single or Multiple Subject Teaching Credential Students start in the preliminary teaching credential program in our Teacher Education Department (TED) and then complete 15 credits of TESOL coursework to earn the combined master's degree and credential. Visit our website to learn more about the TESOL program at USF Financial Resources Federal financial aid, state, and university resources are available as funding to newly admitted and current USF School of Education students. In order to offset the cost of graduate education tuition, many School of Education courses are offered in the late afternoon and evening, and/or on alternating weekends. Most students find they can maintain a full time job while earning their credential, master’s or doctoral degree. However, if your program requires you to spend time in a classroom (i.e. student teaching) or to complete a fieldwork or traineeship experience, such commitments will interfere with a normal workday.     Visit our website to learn more about financial resources for this program [-]

Contact

University of San Francisco

Address Fulton St 2130
San Francisco, United States
Website http://www.usfca.edu/
Phone +1 415-422-5555