University of Montana

Introduction

Nestled in the heart of western Montana’s stunning natural landscape, the University of Montana is a place where top-tier students, educators and researchers from across the country and around the globe come and thrive. UM is located in Missoula, Montana’s second-largest city with a population of 80,000 residents. The University draws a diverse population to Missoula and helps cultivate an educated, engaged and vibrant community.

Roughly 15,000 students attend UM and Missoula College, where they receive a world-class education in a broad range of subjects that include the trades, liberal arts, graduate and postdoctoral study and professional training.

The main campus spans 56 acres at the base of Mount Sentinel along the Clark Fork River and includes the park-like Oval at the center of campus, more than 60 architecturally unique buildings and a 5,200-seat football stadium. UM's 180-acre South Campus offers student housing, a golf course, soccer fields and an outdoor track facility. Missoula College occupies two sites in central and west Missoula.

Affiliated campuses

UM is an affiliation of four institutions around the state: the flagship campus in Missoula, University of Montana Western located in Dillon, Montana Tech of the University of Montana in Butte, and Helena College of the University of Montana. Each institution has its own unique emphasis, character and learning environment.

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Programs

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Master

Master of Environmental Science and Natural Resource Journalism

Campus Full time 2 years September 2017 USA Missoula

Montana’s program offers many unique features. One is the Story Lab course, which pairs students with scientists for one semester. The goal is for emerging journalists to learn how to better communicate science news; scientists also learn how to interact with the media to better tell their stories. The University of Montana is home to cutting-edge research, from Wildlife Biology to Fire Management and... [+]

Welcome to the University of Montana’s graduate program in Environmental Science and Natural Resource Journalism. Ours is a hands-on, skills based program that puts journalism students in the field reporting on issues affecting the natural world. Our masters’ candidates produce regional and international pieces for the print media, radio, television and online sites. Our faculty members have decades of professional journalism experience and are committed to guiding you along your way. Montana’s program offers many unique features. One is the Story Lab course, which pairs students with scientists for one semester. The goal is for emerging journalists to learn how to better communicate science news; scientists also learn how to interact with the media to better tell their stories. The University of Montana is home to cutting-edge research, from Wildlife Biology to Fire Management and Environmental Health. We like to call our backyard the greatest outdoor laboratory on the planet. The Master's program is an advanced program for applicants with undergraduate degrees in journalism, environmental and earth sciences, environmental studies or natural resources. We also seek applicants with professional experience in journalism, the natural resource industries and environmental non-profit organizations. Candidates without a background in the sciences or journalism may have to take foundational courses that will not count toward the degree. We offer scholarships, fellowships and teaching assistantships to assist our graduate students. Financial aid and work-study packages are also available. Take a look at our website, send us an email or call us if you have any questions. We look forward to receiving your application. Applications are accepted on a rolling basis. A new Master's class starts each fall. Graduate Curriculum A Master’s degree in Environmental Science and Natural Resource Journalism requires 36 credit hours: 18 in journalism and 12 in natural resource issues and/or environmental science. The school offers two options for the remaining six credits. Students can either use them to work on a documentary-style professional project or opt for creating a portfolio of work in multiple media. The professional project option allows students to embark on an ambitious investigation or create a comprehensive public information project. Students typically produce the project in their final semester at the university after completing the rest of the coursework. This allows them to travel outside Montana and abroad for research. They return to Montana to defend their project in front of their chosen faculty committee. The portfolio option allows students to take additional journalism electives and produce a three-part portfolio that explores a common environmental or natural resource theme. The portfolio must include work presented in at least two different mediums, ranging from writing to photography, video, audio, multimedia, maps and graphics. This track is designed for those wanting more experience with different journalistic mediums. Master's Work All students in the master’s program produce original, substantive works of journalism as part of their degree requirements. Their work is supervised and evaluated by a master’s committee, consisting of a chair and reviewer chosen from the School of Journalism faculty and a faculty member from another school or department. The graduate program director vets project, thesis or portfolio proposals before the student recruits a committee. In addition to their master’s stories, project and portfolio students produce a 1,000-word companion narrative that addresses context, story relevance, reporting and production process, sourcing, ethical considerations, media format choices and plans for publication. The master’s defense takes the form of a public presentation, where the candidate presents this narrative and shares some of her/his work. Committee members will attend this presentation and examine the candidate. In determining if the master’s work is fit for publication by a reputable news organization, they will consider accuracy, integrity, ethics, news value, depth, originality, language, style and effectiveness of technique. Technology The University of Montana’s Journalism School is housed in Don Anderson Hall, a state-of-the-art facility with abundant computer labs, wireless Internet, wired classrooms and top-notch digital video and audio capabilities. Opened in 2007, Don Anderson Hall boasts superior equipment and technology with a high-definition television studio and a robust audio facility. Students can check out any equipment necessary to complete course assignments, including still cameras, video cameras, audio recorders, microphones and tripods. Our labs are equipped with the software you’ll need to work on design, photography, web, audio and video. We have a fully-staffed Information Technology Department (JTech) available to help with technology issues. Our students produce high quality work with top tier equipment. [-]

MSc

MSc in Chemistry & Biochemistry

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Missoula

The Master of Science degree is also offered in inorganic, organic, physical chemistry and analytical/environmental chemistry. The course program consists of a broad core program plus electives approved by an advisory committee. Thesis and non-thesis options are available, although the thesis option is usually preferred. [+]

The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry offers graduate study leading to M.S. degrees. The diverse interests of the faculty allow graduate students to pursue research in any of the following areas: environmental, biochemistry, organic, organometallic, analytical or physical chemistry in addition to chemical education. Our department emphasizes close interactions with students. Faculty and staff provide a supportive and responsive environment that is not always possible in large departments. Students will also find that the department has a nationally competitive and productive research program. The Master of Science degree is also offered in inorganic, organic, physical chemistry and analytical/environmental chemistry. The course program consists of a broad core program plus electives approved by an advisory committee. Thesis and non-thesis options are available, although the thesis option is usually preferred. Financial Support The majority of graduate students in chemistry receive either a teaching assistantship (TA) or research assistantship (RA) during the academic year plus a summer stipend to support research. Job opportunities often are available for spouses of graduate students at the University or locally. These include teaching positions, government work, and work in the Missoula business community. The University also offers full-time employment information through the Office of Career Services, located in the Emma B. Lommasson Center, Room 154. Teaching Assistantships Most entering graduate students are supported initially through Teaching Assistantships. The normal teaching load is about eight contact and 15 total hours per week. TA duties may include leading a discussion or laboratory section, meeting with students in tutorials, proctoring exams and grading. These appointments also cover tuition and most fees. Research Assistantships Most students switch from teaching to research assistantship support after one or two years. RAs are available from research grants and contracts awarded by government agencies or private organizations. An RA often pays a student for the research leading to the M.S. or Ph.D. degree, greatly increasing the time a student may spend on research. RA stipends are similar to the TA stipend and cover tuition and most fees. Summer Research Assistantships Students are normally expected to work full time on research during the summer. Summer RA support is nearly always available to support students during this period. A beginning graduate student occasionally may obtain an RA the summer before he or she enters the graduate program. Such appointments are arranged between the student and individual faculty members. Fellowships and Grants The Department receives announcements of many fellowships/traineeships and grants for graduate students. These are described in the weekly departmental announcements collected by the administrative assistant. Bertha Morton fellowships are offered yearly by the University. Federal agencies (e.g., DOE, NASA, NSF, and NIH ) offer very attractive fellowship. Scholarships Many scholarships are available thanks to alumni and friends’ generous contributions to the Department’s endowment. These scholarships are awarded to our undergraduate and graduate students by selection from the faculty. Undergraduate awardees are selected based on the criteria below in addition to their academic performance and involvement in departmental research. [-]

MSc in Computer Science

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Missoula

Students who successfully complete the Master's program will have acquired the ability to think critically, communicate effectively, problem-solve, remain current in the field, and apply discipline-specific knowledge. A mixture of practical and theoretical courses is included in our program, which prepares students both for professional positions in software development and for further graduate work in Computer Science. [+]

The Department of Computer Science offers an M.S. degree in computer science. The department also collaborates with the Mathematics department to offer a computer science emphasis within the mathematics Ph.D. program. Students who successfully complete the Master's program will have acquired the ability to think critically, communicate effectively, problem-solve, remain current in the field, and apply discipline-specific knowledge. A mixture of practical and theoretical courses is included in our program, which prepares students both for professional positions in software development and for further graduate work in Computer Science. Students are exposed to a variety of computing, programming and networking environments. Students have the opportunity to work closely with a faculty member on a thesis, professional project, or portfolio. The relatively small size of the program and the department allows for a great deal of personal contact with faculty. Students with a degree in another field are welcome and prerequisite courses can often be taken simultaneously with required courses. Masters Degree Requirements Once fully admitted to the program, students have three options for the Master’s degree: thesis, project, or portfolio. The requirements of each are: Thesis Option (30 credits) Satisfactory completion of at least 24 credits of G- or UG-designated Computer Science courses, of which at least 12 credits must be five hundred level. At least 6 additional credits of CSCI 599 (Thesis/Project). Presentation and defense of a formal thesis to the student’s graduate committee. Requirements: When choosing whether to complete a thesis or a project as part of your MS degree requirements, you should carefully consider the differences between the two. Project Option (36 credits) Satisfactory completion of at least 30 credits of G- or UG-designated Computer Science courses, of which at least 18 credits must be five hundred level. At least 6 additional credits of CSCI 599 (Thesis/Project) Completion of a substantial software development project, a professional paper on that project, and presentation of a formal defense of the project to the student’s graduate committee. Requirements: When choosing whether to complete a thesis or a project as part of your MS degree requirements, you should carefully consider the differences between the two. Portfolio Option (36 credits) Satisfactory completion of at least 36 credits of G- or UG-designated Computer Science courses, of which at least 18 credits must be five hundred level. Students must create and present an e-portfolio highlighting at least five examples of their best course work. The portfolio must be presented and defended in a manner consistent with UM graduate school standards for Master’s defenses or projects (C.100-C.800). To fulfill the Masters degree requirements, you may opt to complete an e-portfolio rather than a thesis or project. The e-portfolio option assumes satisfactory completion of at least 36 credits of four or five hundred level Computer Science courses, of which at least 18 credits must be five hundred level. Additionally: All courses applied towards the degree must be marked UG or G in the catalog. As many as 6 UG or G credits for thesis, and 9 UG or G credits for project or portfolio option may be taken from other related departments if a petition for acceptance is approved by the faculty. 3 credits of independent study may be counted towards a degree without approval by faculty. More than 3 credits of independent study requires approval via petition. Students working towards a thesis or project must submit a proposed plan of research to the faculty no less than one semester before graduation. The length and scope of this proposal must be agreed upon with the student’s primary thesis or project advisor. A GPA of 3.0 or greater with no individual grade below a C must be maintained each semester. Only 6 credits may be retaken. All degree requirements for the master's degree, including the use of transfer and nondegree credits, must be completed within five years. TA and RA Eligibility The Department of Computer Science offers a number of graduate teaching assistantships and research assistantships to students admitted to the MS in Computer Science program. Teaching assistants typically teach lower level courses and/or assist in upper division classes. Research assistants assist faculty with funded research projects. In general Teaching Assistants and Research Assistants have their tuition paid and are paid a stipend. To be considered as a candidate for either type of assistantship, a student should have a strong background in computer science (a B.S. degree in computer science or have completed most of the prerequisites or their equivalents). Teaching experience is also desirable for teaching assistants. International students must either have TOEFL scores of at least 580 (paper-based exam), at least 237 (computer-based exam) or at least 92 (internet-based exam); IELTS score of at least 7.0 or the MELAB score of at least 82. In addition to their salaries, teaching assistants receive a tuition fee waiver (in-state or out-of-state). Other fees charged by the University are not included in the TA fee waiver package. Teaching and research assistants are required to register for 9 credits in Computer Science each semester. Scholarships J.R. Scholarship for Montana Computer Scientists Annual award amount: $10,000 Number of awards: 5 Application deadline: 03/31/2016 Eligibility requirements: Montana high school graduates who will major in Computer Science at the University of Montana. Recipients must demonstrate service and/or volunteerism in their community. Preference shall be given to students with a GPA of 3.0 or higher. Of the five scholarships awarded annually, the preference is for one award to be made to a graduate of a Ravalli County high school. If there are no qualified Ravalli County high school graduates then another qualifying Montana high school graduate may be selected. Mike McGinley Computer Science Scholarship Annual award amount: $1,000 Number of awards: 10 Application deadline: 03/31/2016 Eligibility requirements: Students majoring in Computer Science who have completed the UM recommended college preparatory curriculum in high school, which includes 4 years of Math, 4 years of English, and 3 years of a lab Science. Preference given to incoming freshman who are Montana residents, and to students with financial need, as determined by the Office of Financial Aid need analysis. Touch America Computer Science Scholarship Annual award amount: $2,275 Number of awards: 2 (one award given to a junior UM CS student, and one to a senior UM CS student) Application deadline: 03/31/2016 Eligibility requirements: Cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or above, with preference given to students with areas of study applicable to the telecommunications industry. Arxan Cyber Security Scholarship Arxan Technologies is a private cyber security company that provides application protection and anti-tamper solutions for a variety of defense and commercial software. They are proud to be offering a $2,000 scholarship to one student each semester who can showcase their knowledge, passion, and dedication to advancements in field of cyber security. Award Amount: $2,000 Number of Awards: 1 per semester Application Deadlines: Fall Semester: Sept. 30, 2015 Spring Semester: Jan. 31, 2016 Eligibility Requirements: Student must be enrolled in one of the following programs: Cyber Security Computer Science Information Technology Computer Software Engineering To apply, please visit arxan.com/scholarships/. [-]

MA

MA and MFA programs in Studio Art

Campus Full time September 2017 USA Missoula

The University of Montana’s graduate program in Studio Art and Art History offers an intimate graduate experience for the independent, self-directed student. The MA and MFA programs in Studio Art utilize both discipline-specific and multidisciplinary practices to develop visual language, material processes and conceptual approaches relevant to the student’s intentions and sensibilities. The curriculum encourages... [+]

The University of Montana’s graduate program in Studio Art and Art History offers an intimate graduate experience for the independent, self-directed student. The MA and MFA programs in Studio Art utilize both discipline-specific and multidisciplinary practices to develop visual language, material processes and conceptual approaches relevant to the student’s intentions and sensibilities. The curriculum encourages fluid boundaries between media, materials, and processes and supports dialogue among a diverse group of faculty and peers. Students are challenged to devise strategies of experimentation and research, as well as the ability to articulate ideas and critical responses to work, while gaining a significant understanding of both the historical framework and the contemporary discourse of art. Students and faculty across media work in close proximity to each other within this multidisciplinary curriculum. The MA in Art with a concentration in Art History offers a broad knowledge of the history of the visual arts and prepares students for advanced graduate work at the Ph.D. level and careers in art-related professions in museum studies, gallery work, and conservation. The University of Montana is a NASAD accredited program, offering an MFA and MA in studio and an MA in Art with a concentration in Art History. [-]

MA in School Psychology Educational Specialist (Ed.S.)

Campus Full time 3 years September 2017 USA Missoula

The School Psychology Educational Specialist (Ed.S.) Program follows the scientist-practitioner model in which an understanding of empirical research and theory influences the school psychologist’s best practice in service delivery. The UM School Psychology Program provides a planned sequences of courses in school psychology in addition to practica and internship experiences. The Ed.S. Program is... [+]

The School Psychology Educational Specialist (Ed.S.) Program follows the scientist-practitioner model in which an understanding of empirical research and theory influences the school psychologist’s best practice in service delivery. The UM School Psychology Program provides a planned sequences of courses in school psychology in addition to practica and internship experiences. The Ed.S. Program is approved by the National Association of School Psychologists (NASP), and the scope and sequence of the program is aligned with NASP standards. Students in the program receive the training necessary to become both a Class 6 License in School Psychology, as well as a Nationally Certified School Psychologist (NCSP) Through our strong commitment to a scientist-practitioner model, the School Psychology Educational Specialist Program provides comprehensive training through coursework and clinical training. The Ed.S. Program requires approximately 72 credit hours and entails a three-year course of study. The first two years consist of full-time coursework and school-based practica experiences. During the third year, students will complete a one-year internship in a school setting. Students must also pass a written comprehensive examination at the end of their second year on campus. Students in the School Psychology Program also have a number of opportunities to develop their clinical skills with children and their families. Practicum course seminars focus on professional and ethical issues, as well as skills and knowledge of assessment, treatment/intervention, and consultation. The program emphasizes the development of cultural competence skills to effectively work with children and families from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. Emphasis is also placed on promoting a student’s strengths and supporting all students through the problem solving model and Response to Intervention (RTI). Through both school-based and clinic-based practica, school psychology Ed.S. students have the skills and knowledge to work with children and their families, school professionals, and school systems. Coursework The Educational Specialist (Ed.S.) program requires approximately 72 credit hours and entails a three-year course of study. The first two years consist of full-time coursework and school-based practica experiences. During the third year, students will complete a one year internship in a school setting. Students must also pass a written comprehensive examination at the end of their second year on campus. Ed.S. students typically complete paid internships in public school district. NASP requires a 1,200 hour internship, with at least 600 hours completed in a school setting. The following is an example of program coursework that may be subject to change. Your program advisor will consult with you before each semester in regards to courses. EdS Clinical Training Educational Specialist students in school psychology complete practicum requirements during their first 2 years in the program. In their final year, EdS students complete a school-based internship per requirements from the National Association of School Psychologist. Students are required to complete a 1200-hour internship in the final year of the program, with at least 600 hours completed in a school setting. EdS students at the University of Montana typically complete paid internships in public schools in Montana or internships in other states. School-based Practicum Ed.S. students in the School Psychology program complete practicum and field work experiences in local K-12 settings. These experiences immerse students in the culture and operation of school, and familiarize students with the roles and functions of school staff (e.g., principal, speech therapists, teachers, social workers). Students observe in the classrooms, during intervention team meetings, interdisciplinary team meetings, parent conferences, and teacher meetings. Students also participate more directly in their school placements through activities such as conducting academic assessments and systematic observations, implementing evidence-based academic and behavior interventions, and supporting the school psychologist in cognitive abilities testing. Practicum sites are located in Missoula and surrounding areas. The program has an emphasis in working with children and families from rural and tribal communities. Doctoral students have an opportunity to learn about the provision of assessment, intervention, and consultation services to children and families from diverse socioeconomic and cultural backgrounds. Examples of practicum sites: Russell Elementary School, Missoula Lowell Elementary School, Missoula Hamilton School District, Hamilton Arlee School District, Arlee St. Ignatius Public Schools, St. Ignatius Clinton Elementary School, Clinton Frenchtown School District, Frenchtown Additional Practicum Opportunities In addition to the formalized methods of obtaining practicum experience, there are numerous other activities throughout the academic year and summer for students. Due to the lack of services in the community and state for children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), the program has established a strong relationship with the University's Department of Communicative Sciences and Disorders RiteCare Clinic. Graduate students in school psychology and speech-language pathology collaborate in conducting assessments and using evidence-based interventions for children referred to the RiteCare Clinic for ASD. Internship In their third year of the Educational Specialist Program, students are required to complete a 1200-hour school-based internship. Examples of internship placements that our Ed.S. students have attended include: In Montana: Great Falls Public Schools Gallatin-Madison Educational Co-op Glasgow School District Prickly Pear Educational Co-Op Lewistown School District Bitteroot Valley Educational Co-Op Belgrade School District Outside Montana: San Juan Colorado Co-Op, Colorado Kodiak Island Borough School District, Alaska Mat-Su Borough School District, Alaska [-]

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