Goddard College

Introduction

Goddard is a one-of-a-kind institution of higher education with a history of creativity and chaos, invention and experimentation, of growth, decline and reemergence. It is an institution that has survived with integrity and adherence to its founding values for nearly 150 years, with the fortitude of a pioneering spirit and the unpredictability that such a spirit can bring.

The Goddard of today took shape in earnest in 1938, when a group of educators led by Royce “Tim” Pitkin proposed a Vermont “College for Living” to be located on a Plainfield sheep farm purchased from the Martin family. This new college would provide the environment for students and faculty together to build a democratic community featuring plenty of the “plain living and hard thinking” espoused in Goddard’s early mission. The aims were far-reaching, radical. These aims still influence and, with some change in nomenclature and practice, aptly describe Goddard to this day. The original, 1938 Goddard College catalog described them this way:

  • Education for real living, through the actual facing of real life problems as an essential part of the educational program.
  • The study of vocation as part of living rather than as something different and an end in itself.
  • The integration of the life of the College with the life of the community, and the consequential breaking down of the barriers that separate school from real life.
  • The use of the community as a laboratory.
  • The participation of students in policy making and in the performance of work essential to maintenance and operation as part of the educational program.
  • The development of a religious attitude that is free from sectarianism recognizing that any activity which is pursued on behalf of an ideal end of universal worth is religious.
  • The provision of educational opportunities for adults.

The new college, while small in scale (starting with 50 students and a truckload of old furniture and books moved to the Martin family’s farm), was rich in inspiration, drawing on the experiences of Bennington, Sarah Lawrence, Reed, the new Antioch, Black Mountain, St. John’s, and the educational innovations of the University of Chicago. Most people in the Goddard community now associate “Kilpatrick” with the main dormitory on the Greatwood Campus in Plainfield. However, it was Dr. William Kilpatrick, an influence on founding president Tim Pitkin and in whose honor the building is named, who stated three principles key to the Goddard practice:

  • The most fundamental fact of life is change.
  • People learn only what they inwardly accept.
  • Education is a moral concern.

Mission

To advance cultures of rigorous inquiry, collaboration, and lifelong learning, where individuals take imaginative and responsible action in the world.

This school offers programs in:
  • English

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Programs

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MA

MA in Education

Campus Full time Part time September 2017 USA Seattle Plainfield + 1 more

In Goddard’s Master of Arts in Education, you choose your topic of inquiry and design a program of study based on how you learn best and what your study can contribute most to you and your community. Goddard invites you to think about your topic by drawing in other pertinent fields of study, which in turn allows you to see a wider view of the practices and theories inherent in your topic of study. Such a... [+]

MA in Education In Goddard’s Master of Arts in Education, you choose your topic of inquiry and design a program of study based on how you learn best and what your study can contribute most to you and your community. Goddard invites you to think about your topic by drawing in other pertinent fields of study, which in turn allows you to see a wider view of the practices and theories inherent in your topic of study. Such a view enables you to create a more holistic thesis project, and enables you to learn more in the process about your life, your challenges and your gifts. The Master of Arts in Education offers study options in these areas: Teacher Licensure Self-Designed Degree Community Education Dual-Language/Early Childhood Education School Counseling Endorsement Graduate Studies for non-degree-seeking students Students may apply to transfer up to 12 graduate credits Locations Students can enroll in the MA in Education Program in two locations: The Plainfield, VT Campus, offering the following MA Degree Options: Individual Focus in Education (Non-Licensure) Community Education Concentration Dual Language/Early Childhood Education Concentration Licensure: Teacher or School Counseling The Seattle, WA Site offers the following MA Degree Option: Individual Focus in Education (Non-Licensure) Community Education Concentration Dual Language/Early Childhood Education Concentration Full-time Goddard’s traditional 12-credit semester full-time study format includes attending an eight-day residency at the beginning of each semester, which occurs in January and July. Full-time study requires a commitment of 26 hours or more a week after the residency. Three-quarter-time Goddard’s three-quarter-time study option translates to nine credits each semester. It provides a study opportunity for students who are not able to attend a residency in January. As part of the three-quarter-time option, students attend a five-day summer institute immediately following the required eight-day residency in July. Students living internationally, or who are working for a school district that does not grant five release days from work for professional development, are excellent candidates for the three-quarter-time program. The nine-semester credit option also benefits students who can commit 19 hours a week to their academic work, but find the 26 hours required of the full-time option too challenging. The nine-semester credit option extends the time necessary to earn the degree by one semester. The cost per individual semester is reduced. Degree Criteria The MA in Education degree criteria are the goals toward which your individualized graduate studies are aimed. Throughout your course of study, you are expected to deeply engage with the criteria, working toward a full and sustained demonstration of them by graduation. Students graduating with an MA in Education will have successfully accomplished the following: Articulated a powerful autobiographical understanding of their relationship to society, culture, and education Understood and actualized the essential concepts of progressive education, namely inquiry-based learning, reflection and critical thinking, and a student-focused curriculum Prepared themselves to work toward the creation of a more just, humane, democratic, and sustainable world Acquired the professional knowledge base to perform a leadership role in the field of education Developed the capacities to critically analyze, interpret, organize, communicate, and apply knowledge relevant to education Developed a clear sense of the relationship between theory and practice, and learned to apply progressive education principles and practices to real-world issues Produced a masters’ thesis that includes the formulation of significant questions, application of methods of inquiry, identification and utilization of learning resources, analysis, crit​ical thinking, and the integration and application of theory into practice Work of the Program At the center of the Goddard MA in Education program is the concept that the most effective education occurs when it is shaped around you, the student. There is an emphasis on individual needs and interests rather than predetermined curriculum. Goddard education programs hold a central commitment to social justice, diversity, anti oppression, and anti bias education. These values are especially important today for educators working in a complex and pluralistic society. As a student, you engage with the program faculty who allow you to begin your studies where you are, and help you discover your interests and goals. From there, your study plan evolves. Educational resources vary from independent study to field experience. Many studies focus on a particular issue or problem. Creative engagement and the integration of theory and practice are emphasized. Within an individualized education focus, work may include studies in anti-racist education, alternative schooling, integrative arts, mediation, bilingual education, spirituality, and environmental sustainability, to name a few. At the end of each semester, in lieu of grades, you and your advising faculty write narrative evaluations that describe your work in a practice of authentic assessment. [-]

MA in Psychology

Campus Full time Part time September 2017 USA Plainfield

The Master of Arts in Psychology is designed to prepare graduates to enter into their area of psychology with the professional skills necessary to advance their career goals, their personal development, and to make a positive impact on the communities in which they live and work. We have the goal of meeting each student where they are in their development as scholar, psychologist, and advocate for social justice... [+]

MA in Psychology The Master of Arts in Psychology is designed to prepare graduates to enter into their area of psychology with the professional skills necessary to advance their career goals, their personal development, and to make a positive impact on the communities in which they live and work. We have the goal of meeting each student where they are in their development as scholar, psychologist, and advocate for social justice. We will work with students to provide them with appropriate opportunities to overcome whatever challenges they face in their development in these areas, as our resources permit, and to identify those for whom our program is not appropriate as soon as we are reasonably able to do so. We also work with students to create expectations for their work that reflect not only their passions and interests, but also the demands for proper training that the ethical principles of our profession demand of us as faculty members. In our work together, we will create a learning experience that meets students’ unique needs, within the limitations under which the field and we, as practitioners and teachers, exist. Curriculum Students must complete a minimum of 48 credits (and to 60 credits) to earn the MA in Psychology. Students making satisfactory progress toward the Master of Arts in Psychology will, in the course of their studies, complete eight required courses, an internship for credit, elective courses, and either capstone or thesis (called a final product). The number of elective courses is determined by the number of semesters required to fulfill requirements for a concentration or the specific licensure criteria in a student’s intended state/province of employment. Core Course Requirements for MA in Psychology The following 24 credits are required of all students pursuing the MA in Psychology. PSY 510 Ethics and Professional Orientation PSY 600 Human Lifespan Development PSY 610 Social and Cultural Foundations PSY 621 Cognition and Learning PSY 630 Biological Bases of Behavior PSY 700 Psychopathology PSY 720 Assessment and Evaluation PSY 730 Research Methods Electives Because students seek licensure throughout the U.S. and in Canadian provinces, they may use elective credits to design courses that meet the credentialing requirements in their home state or provinces. In addition to the courses listed below, students may also use their elective credits to pursue the Sexual Orientation Concentration or Expressive Arts Therapy Emphasis . Students generally complete a minimum of 12 elective credits. PSY 800-809 Student-Initiated Elective PSY 810-812 Supervised Internship for Credit Thesis or Capstone (12 credits) In addition to successfully completing the required course work and an internship, all students complete a culminating project. Students have two options: Thesis: A culmination of a student’s studies that documents both their ability to do work within the field and communicate it in an appropriate format and style. Capstone Process: During the final semester, students may work with their academic advisor on two designated courses (6 credits). There are 12 credit hours devoted to the final product, the equivalent of one semester. Students who complete the Capstone Process generally require two additional elective credits, most often Student-Initiated Elective courses or Supervised Internship for Credit. PSY 852 Thesis I PSY 853 Thesis II PSY 807 Capstone Personal Process Course PSY 808 Capstone Professional Process Course [-]

MA in Social Innovation & Sustainability

Campus Full time Part time September 2017 USA Plainfield

he Master of Arts in Social Innovation and Sustainability is a 48-credit degree intended for students who seek low-residency, interdisciplinary and self-designed graduate studies, focusing on social innovation and sustainability at the community level, as well as those looking to transform non-profit, for-profit and public sector organizations, enterprises, and processes... [+]

MA in Social Innovation & Sustainability The Master of Arts in Social Innovation and Sustainability is a 48-credit degree intended for students who seek low-residency, interdisciplinary and self-designed graduate studies, focusing on social innovation and sustainability at the community level, as well as those looking to transform non-profit, for-profit and public sector organizations, enterprises, and processes. Students pursuing the Master of Arts in Social Innovation and Sustainability will acquire the practical knowledge needed to advance in their current careers or to start a new vocational path, and will gain the theoretical foundation and skills to generate innovative and sustainable methods of solving vexing social, environmental and economic challenges. The Faculty The faculty in the Goddard Graduate Institute have longstanding presence in the college and bring to their work a host of professional skills and disciplinary areas. Fields of expertise include consciousness studies, expressive arts therapy, ecopsychology, cultural studies, gender studies, poetry, literature, psychology, natural history, organizational and community development, neuroscience, medical anthropology, religious studies, theater, and Ayurvedic medicine, among other areas. Much of the work and interests of the faculty is in keeping with the college’s activist and social justice mission. The Faculty also have a range of international experience both in terms of work and research conducted in other areas of the world and in terms of their own lived experiences. Social Innovation Students may focus on social innovation, acquiring skills and knowledge to engage diverse constituents and stakeholder groups—from marginalized individuals and communities to socially responsible investors—in generating social value that fundamentally improves quality of life for the most vulnerable and for society as a whole. Students will immerse themselves in this emerging field and will be encouraged to contribute by applying participatory research and data collection methods and interdisciplinary and innovative approaches to problem solving at local, community, organizational and regional levels. Sustainability Students who focus on sustainability will combine whole system and place-based approaches to develop sustainable communities, organizations and local economies. Students will be encouraged to identify meaningful geographic, cultural, ecological and economic frameworks for understanding place and facilitating equity, access and appropriate scale and practice. Drawing broadly from sustainability discourse, students will design new approaches to development challenges and will demonstrate their relevance to larger global issues. They may explore alternative organizational and business structures, models of community planning and organizing and ways of engaging, motivating and empowering diverse community stakeholders. Combined Study Students may choose to combine Sustainability and Social Innovation by applying theory and practice from both fields to explore innovations that specifically contribute to promoting and advancing more sustainable and viable ways of living. All students, regardless of their focus area, will be required to acquire a working knowledge of both Social Innovation and Sustainability theory and practice by exploring their relevance to their particular area of inquiry. Degree Criteria The MA in Social Innovation and Sustainability requires students to consider social justice and empowerment theories in order to design inclusive, equitable and accessible practices and models that embrace diverse communities and perspectives and facilitate the participation of those excluded from policy and decision-making arenas. Students are expected to: Acquire a working knowledge of issues, trends, forecasts and public policy debates relevant to the social challenges they are addressing. Diagnose issues and challenges from diverse cultural frameworks and organizational and theoretical perspectives. Develop and apply theory of change tools and participatory development models. Employ interdisciplinary methods and processes. Guided studies, applied learning and reflection will emphasize: Cultivating self awareness and a sense of purpose. Applying systems thinking. Thinking in terms of having local and global impact. Developing the capacity to build relationships, coalitions and systems to support and sustain transformational change. Understanding applicable trends in nonprofit and for-profit finance. Students are required to: Demonstrate research skills, including the ability to locate and utilize information from diverse sources. Demonstrate fluency in the theories, practices, trends and on-going dialogue that informs their areas of study within this graduate program. Demonstrate analytical skills, such as critical reading, thinking and writing through documented exploration and analysis of a primary research question. Demonstrate engagement in experiential learning and reflection on that learning Demonstrate engagement with activities that encourage self-reflection and mindful attention to the learning process. Admission Criteria Goddard offers students the ability to chart their own paths and develop, or further develop, the habits and skills of life-long learning. An application for admission to a graduate program may be questioned or rejected because of: Curricular Limits: The proposed study appears to require expertise not available at Goddard. Critical Inquiry: The proposed study appears to consist in research or other activities designed to proselytize for a theory or point of view important to the applicant, rather than a scholarly study of that and other theories or points of view. Readiness: The student has not earned a baccalaureate degree or its international equivalent or application materials otherwise indicate the student is not ready for a graduate-level, writing-intensive independent program of study. [-]

Contact
Location address
Goddard College,
123 Pitkin Road

Plainfield, Vermont, 05667 US
Location address
Goddard College - Instructional Site,
200 Battery Way,
Building 298

Port Townsend, Washington, 98368 US
Location address
Goddard College - Instructional Site,
Martin Luther King Community Center,
3201 East Republican Street

Seattle, Washington, 98112 US