Embry Riddle Aeronautical University - Arizona

Introduction

This is Prescott

Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University's western campus is located in Prescott, AZ, north of Phoenix and a day trip away from Las Vegas, the Grand Canyon, and picturesque Sedona. Nestled in the scenic Bradshaw Mountains, the high-desert climate offers exceptional flying conditions, with nearly 300 days of sunshine a year. The Prescott Campus is located on 539 acres of scenic western terrain, with campus life for over 2,000 students centered in a one-mile area that includes academic, residential, and recreational resources.

Where Eagles Learn

Flight Line and Fleet Overview

The Embry-Riddle Prescott Flight Department has a commitment to safety, excellence, and professionalism that is second to none in the flight training community. That commitment is why the “Riddle Ramp” is home to the most technologically advanced fleet in collegiate flight training.

The ramp at the Prescott Flight Line boasts parking for more than 30 airplanes and 10 helicopters, and our instructors ensure that every student who steps into those aircraft receive the training they will need to not only meet the minimums required to gain a certificate, but become safe, professional pilots who have a truly positive impact on their industry.

Our thousands of alumni who fly some of the most advanced commercial and military aircraft today proves that Embry-Riddle is the world's leader in flight training.

Fleet Overview

  • Cessna 150
  • Cessna 172 Skyhawk
  • Cessna 182RG Skylane
  • Diamond Next Generation Diesel Twin (DA42 NG)
  • Super Decathlon (8KCAB)
  • Robinson R22
  • Robinson R44

Campus Labs

Aerospace & Mechanical Engineering Facilities - Academic Complex

The Academic Complex (AC1) contains a number of classrooms and faculty offices for the Colleges of Aviation, Arts and Sciences, and Engineering. Labs are also available in AC1 to students from a variety of disciplines, such as the Engineering Design Lab, the Airway Science Lab, and the Weather Center. In short, AC1 serves as a hub of academic activity on the Prescott Campus.

Advanced Vehicle Lab

The Advanced Vehicle Laboratory which is a fully-equipped construction facility located in the center of the campus in Building 59. The lab has been in existence for over 5 years and has an exemplary safety record. It features a milling machine, drill press, tube benders, welding and plasma cutting capability.

Aerial Robotics Laboratory

Whether they operate in the air, on the ground, or in the water, remotely piloted and autonomously operated robots are rapidly finding their ways into a growing number of civil and military applications.

Aeronautical Engineering Design Lab

Some schools create teams of students around a small design project. The college of engineering creates large design teams similar to life in the industry. At any time the college may have a propulsion team, electronics team, attitude and control team, integration team, as well as many others.

Aerospace Experimentation and Fabrication Building

The primary use of the Aerospace Experimentation and Fabrication Building (AXFAB) is to provide students with the instruction, resources, and equipment they will need to fabricate and assemble their various projects.

Air Traffic Control Lab

As airspace continues to become more crowded, so does the air traffic controller’s responsibility to keep aircraft moving in an efficient and safe manner. This is not the kind of skill a controller can learn in a classroom. The state-of-the-art Air Traffic Control (ATC) Laboratory at the Embry-Riddle Prescott Campus is a real-world environment where Air Traffic Management majors can learn and practice critical communications and aircraft-handling skills required during the approach, landing, departure, and en route phases of air traffic control.

Airway Science Lab

The Airway Science Lab serves multiple needs. Its main purpose is to support higher level application and correlation type learning for the College of Aviation degree programs.

Astronautical Fabrication Lab

The Astrodynamics Fabrication Lab is a dedicated space for students working on their senior design capstone projects. This room is dedicated to the fabrication and design of our space track design projects.

Biology Laboratory

Two brand new state-of-the-art biology laboratories provide vast opportunities for active learning and experience with professional grade equipment. Activities performed in the labs include tissue sampling and analysis of DNA evidence and blood types, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), genetic sequencing, microscopy techniques, biochemical analyses of body fluids and environmental contaminants, anatomy and physiology, as well as animal, plant and microbial identification.

Chemistry Laboratory

The Chemistry Laboratory includes 18 dedicated workstations and two fume hoods for student use. Laboratory instruments include desktop computers and printers, electronic balances, visible spectrophotometers, centrifuges, pH meters, and DC power supplies. Laboratory supplies include a full complement of burets, pipets, flasks, beakers, test tubes, Bunsen burners, and ring stands.

Communications Systems Lab

Wireless communication technology touches every aspect of our lives because of the proliferation of communication devices such as cellphones, radio, and television.

Computer Security and Forensics Laboratory

This newly built cyber lab includes 24 dedicated workstations for student use, a podium computer to control lecture material and access software and network tools. A dedicated attached server room with isolated network layers and multiple operating systems and servers supports research and instruction.

EagleSat Lab

The Eagle Sat is a research and design lab for the Eagle Sat space grant project. The first cubesat design is to create a test bed to analyze the degradation of data on the current solid state memory devices used today such as flash memory, SD cards, memory sticks, etc.

Ergonomics Laboratory

The various types of tests and equipment found in the Ergonomics Laboratory are devoted to helping students understand and evaluate the functional parameters of the human body in the workplace.

Forensic Science Laboratory

This newly renovated space offers space to learn forensic science techniques and their application to security and intelligence investigations.

GSIS Eagle Operations Center

The Eagles Operations Center, housed in the Glen A. Doherty Center for Security and Intelligence, building B17 , is a “situation room” setup where students come to run simulated conflict scenarios. As part of class exercises, students conduct practical emergency response drills using a software simulation program developed by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA).

Industrial Hygiene Laboratory

The Industrial Hygiene Laboratory is where students have the ability to gain first-hand experience using state-of-the-art equipment to evaluate a variety of hazardous environmental agents and factors.

King Engineering and Technology Center

The King Engineering and Technology Center houses faculty office space, classrooms, labs, and workspace for engineering courses and is the primary building for computer and electrical engineering.

LIGO Optics Lab

The Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory, or LIGO Lab, is used mainly by Physics majors for undergraduate research. Whether working with a professor or on a class-based project, the LIGO Lab offers students the chance to study gravitational waves and sources as well as other general relativity research.

Linear Circuits & Electronic Devices Lab Linear Circuits & Electronic Devices Lab The Linear Circuits & Electronic Devices Lab is stocked with all the standard equipment necessary for circuit implementation and analysis, including oscilloscopes, power supplies, multi-meters, function generators, etc.

Materials Science Lab

The Materials Science Lab is actually made up of a number of labs. Its primary focus is to represent the micro side of structural mechanics. The MS Lab has ovens where students can heat-treat materials, surface grinders for students to use to prepare specimens for analysis, and areas to study the fundamental makeup of key aerospace materials.

Materials Testing Lab

Focused primarily on the micro side of structural mechanics, the Materials Testing Laboratory is the central location for students to participate in the preparation and testing of physical material specimens used in aerospace platforms.

Modern Physics and Optics Lab

A lab space for majors in Space Physics, the Modern Physics and Optics Lab is utilized by students taking the Modern Physics Lab (PS 315) and Optics Laboratory (PS 380) courses. The infrastructure in this lab includes a Zeeman Effect apparatus and a variety of lenses and lasers that allow students to study refraction and diffraction systems, LIGO, and principles of quantum mechanics.

NASA Space Grant

NASA Space Grant is a NASA funded research internship that can be researched designed and tested here on campus in the Research Lab - 1. This internship is part of a national network of colleges and universities working with NASA to support and enhance science, engineering, education, research, and public outreach programs.

Observatory

The Embry-Riddle Prescott Observatory Complex is a resource for Space Physics students and the active and diverse astronomy community in Prescott. Students use the observatory for collection and analysis of astronomical data for use in research projects

Particle Physics Lab

The Particle Physics Lab is a research lab mainly for students in the astroparticle track of the space physics major. The lab allows students to research and conduct matter and anti-matter experiments as well as cosmic ray and muon observation.

Propulsion Laboratory

Housing a Spartan rocket, a rocket engine for general testing, and numerous afterburners, this lab is used mainly by aerospace and mechanical engineering students working on their senior capstone projects.

Rapid Prototyping Laboratory

The variety of equipment found in the Rapid Prototyping Laboratory is used by freshman students in EGR 101, sophomores in EGR 200, and senior students in the Capstone programs. The lab includes a number of prototyping tools, including three stereolithography printers that can make precise prototypes.

Robertson Aircraft Accident Investigation Laboratory

Embry-Riddle Prescott's Robertson Aircraft Accident Investigation Laboratory (RAAIL) is the most complete facility of its kind in the country — and the only scenario-based accident investigation facility available for use by students at any university.

Robertson Aviation Safety Center II

Opened in 2009, Embry-Riddle Prescott's Robertson Air Safety Center II is home to the Industrial Hygiene Laboratory, the Ergonomics Laboratory, and the Aviation Safety and Security Archives.

Robotics Laboratory

This lab, mainly used by mechanical engineering majors in the robotics track, offers a workspace for design courses and includes access to assembly robots, including two DENSOs and a SCARA robotic arm.

Space Systems Laboratory

The Space Systems Laboratory gives students in the Aeronautical Engineering track of Aerospace Engineering the opportunity to utilize 3-D air bearings to simulate attitude and control of various spacecraft. They will also use the lab’s vacuum chambers to test satellite systems in space-like conditions.

Structural Dynamics Lab

This is one of the most interesting and dynamic laboratories in the AXFAB facility. Its main purpose is to allow students to use the Unholtz-Dickey two-axis electromagnetic shaker table to simulate the vibrational environment of a space launch.

Structures Lab

The Structures Laboratory is designed to enable students to participate in the testing of full-scale aerospace structures to destruction. The lab has a specialized structures floor, which enables students to connect a fixture weighing several tons to the floor, while accessing instrumentation and high-pressure hydraulics from below the flooring.

UAS Simulations Lab

Meteorology students use a state-of-the-art Weather Center and computer-equipped classrooms to understand and forecast complex atmospheric phenomena ranging from severe thunderstorms and tornadoes, to cyclones, jet streams and global climate.

Wind Tunnel Laboratory

This space is both a classroom and a lab for aerodynamics courses. Both teaching and testing take place here, allowing students both a theoretical and hands-on approach to learning.

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Programs

This school also offers:

MSc

Master of Science in Safety Science

Campus Full time Open Enrollment USA Prescott

The Master of Science in Safety Science degree program qualifies students for specialized positions in a rapidly growing, highly paid and exciting field, and provides job placement assistance upon graduation. [+]

The Master of Science in Safety Science degree program qualifies students for specialized positions in a rapidly growing, highly paid and exciting field, and provides job placement assistance upon graduation. Safety is a critical part of aviation, manufacturing and industrial design. This program provides the knowledge and skills necessary to practice occupational health and safety programs in any workplace. Students can concentrate on safety in an aviation environment or a more general occupational safety. The Master of Science in Safety Science degree is housed in the Department of Behavioral & Safety Sciences of the College of Arts & Sciences. The Master of Science in Safety Science (MS-SS) degree program is designed to provide students with a practical course of study in aviation safety as well as occupational health and safety. The degree program produces safety professionals who are skilled in providing safety management expertise in a variety of industries. Graduates will be able to provide leadership, training, and guidance in safety implementation and compliance issues involving EPA, OSHA, DOD, FAA, DOE, NTSB and state health, and workplace standards, and will be prepared for service in aviation/aerospace, military, and numerous other industries. The MS-SS degree prepares graduates for professional safety positions in a variety of organizational settings, including aviation. Students will qualify for jobs such as aircraft accident investigator, aviation or general safety manager, operations safety coordinator, and safety designer. The degree offers the opportunity for students to explore both the theoretical and pragmatic discipline that occupational health and safety has become. Particularly in light of extensive interest by the private sector and by government entities, this degree offers occupational health and safety professionals the advanced education and credentials necessary to succeed in the practice of safety. The MS-SS is a 36 credit hour program of study composed of a General Core (15 credit hours), a Research Core (9 to 12 credit hours), and electives (9 to 12 credit hours). Elective coursework must be selected from the elective list below. All elective courses may not be offered every year. Check with an advisor for a schedule of course offerings. Preference will be given to applicants with an undergraduate background that includes college-level mathematics, social, behavioral and physical sciences, aviation, engineering or other related disciplines. Opportunities for Graduate Students Graduate Assistantships Graduate assistantships are academic appointments that are reserved for qualified graduate students. Graduate assistants are involved in research activities under the direction of a faculty member. To be eligible for a graduate assistantship, a student must have full graduate status in a degree program, must have maintained a CGPA of 3.00 out of a possible 4.00 or above through the end of the semester (graduate or undergraduate) preceding the appointment, and must demonstrate adequate communication and technical skills. Each department has the responsibility to post the availability of its graduate assistantships. Current students submit an application form, resume, and a 500-word essay directly to the Department of Behavioral and Safety Sciences. Newly admitted students submit their application materials via the Graduate Admissions Office. Please note that any student who is eligible to receive VA benefits under the Post-9/11 GI Bill Yellow Ribbon Program is not eligible to apply for a graduate assistantship. Graduate assistantships carry a stipend set by the University and a partial tuition waiver; in addition, limited hourly graduate employment opportunities within a department may be available. Graduate assistants with such appointments are expected to devote up to 20 hours each week to effectively carry out their assignments. Under some circumstances, partial assistantships providing either tuition or a stipend may be granted. Expected time to be devoted is set by the assigning department. Graduate assistants are permitted to accept other University employment; however, University policies limit all students to a total of 25 hours of work per week, including the graduate assistantship. All graduate research assistantships, both full and partial, require that the recipient be registered for at least three graduate credits at Embry-Riddle for any semester of their appointment. Graduate Internships Graduate internships are temporary professional or industrial work opportunities available to graduate students. There are two types of internships: resident and nonresident. Resident internships are professional work activities supported by a partnership between the University and industry and conducted on campus under the supervision of a faculty/staff sponsor. Nonresident internships are professional work activities conducted off campus at the supporting organization facility. Full-time employees of the offering organization are not eligible for an internship appointment and cannot receive elective credit for their professional work service. Graduate students who have full graduate status, are in good standing, with a minimum of six completed graduate credit hours, and who earn a cumulative GPA of 3.00 on a 4.00 basis, are eligible to apply for graduate internships. Students must demonstrate adequate communication and technical skills. Students selected for an internship must register for the approved number of credit hours in the departmental internship course and pay all fees. Graduate academic credit is awarded at a rate of one credit hour for every 200 clock hours of work completed, up to a maximum of three credit hours in one semester. Three internship credit hours may be applied as an elective toward degree requirements. Students are advised to consult with the Safety Science internship coordinator for approval to use internship credits toward their degree program. Guidelines for Graduate Capstone Projects and Theses The graduate program in the Department of Behavioral & Safety Sciences offers the degree of Master of Science in Safety Science (MS-SS), which is a 36 credit-hour program. In addition to course work, this degree requires the completion of a research project, either a three-hour Graduate Capstone, with 33 hours of course work, or a six-hour Master’s Thesis (with 30 hours of course work). Those students who are planning to do a Capstone should have registered for a total of three hours of MSF 691 before graduation. Those planning to do a thesis should register for six hours of MSF 700 before graduation. The detailed information in this section is intended to assist graduate students in the completion of this research requirement. The Difference between a Capstone and a Thesis If the student has any aspirations to later pursue a doctorate, a thesis is strongly recommended, since this is good preparation for writing a dissertation. A thesis is a project that requires the collection and analysis of data in an original fashion. This work should be suitable for submission to a peer-reviewed journal for publication, and takes multiple semesters to complete successfully. In contrast, a capstone project may consist of a selection from a number of possible options: for example, documenting results of an internship in which the student designed a safety program or conducted hazard analyses, or replicating previously-published research to validate findings. The capstone project is completed over the course of one semester and provides students an opportunity to create and document significant evidence of mastery of the safety science core body of knowledge, and provides the student evidence of experience to show to current and prospective employers. [-]

Master of Science in Security & Intelligence Studies

Campus Full time Open Enrollment USA Prescott

The Master of Science in Security and Intelligence Studies degree program provides the knowledge and skills professionals need to excel in intelligence analysis, operations, military-political studies, law enforcement, corporate security and cyber-intelligence and security. [+]

The Master of Science in Security and Intelligence Studies degree program provides the knowledge and skills professionals need to excel in intelligence analysis, operations, military-political studies, law enforcement, corporate security and cyber-intelligence and security. The program combines science and high technology with advanced intelligence and security courses. Students receive advanced instruction in the research skills and analytical methods required by the security and intelligence fields along with the ability to communicate their findings clearly. The Master of Science in Security and Intelligence Studies is housed in the College of Security and Intelligence. The Master of Science in Security and Intelligence Studies (MSSIS) degree program is offered by the College of Security and Intelligence. It is designed to produce competitive graduates for professional service in the intelligence, aviation, military, homeland defense, and corporate security communities. The MSSIS degree will enhance the career prospects both for entry-level professionals and mid-level leaders, managers, operators and analysts. For many security and intelligence professionals currently working in these communities, the Master’s degree will be seen as one qualification for promotion in the middle and even upper levels of management or military command. The degree program provides graduate students and security and intelligence professionals with an opportunity to explore both theoretical and practical knowledge across the disciplines that compose the field that security and intelligence studies has become. These include strategic concepts; the integration of science and technology in the security and intelligence realms; the principles, processes, and presentation of products; the importance of cultural understanding in key regions of the world; the evolution, nature, and roles of states and non-state actors; and the forms of international conflict and cooperation that constitute the playing field of the intelligence and policy communities. The elective course offerings in the MSSIS provide the student with the opportunity to specialize to a degree in one of the areas of security and intelligence studies. In this way, the program enables the student to structure his or her own elective program within the schedule of courses offered each semester. The MSSIS is a 36 credit hour program, composed of a General Core (18 credit hours), and Electives (18 credit hours). Normally, elective course work will be selected from the list of courses below, although occasional experimental courses may also be considered. Not all elective courses are offered every year. Check with an adviser for a schedule of current course offerings. Summer registration is not required, but is encouraged. A course for which the student receives a grade of less than a B cannot be counted as having met a requirement for the MSSIS degree. The MSSIS program will consider applicants with an undergraduate background in college-level history, political science, international relations, geography, foreign language, psychology, computer science and applications, and any of the physical and natural sciences. The prerequisite knowledge for any graduate course must be satisfied before enrollment in the course is permitted. Graduate Assistantships Graduate assistantships are academic appointments that are reserved for qualified graduate students. Graduate assistants may be involved in research activities under the direction of a faculty member or may assist with administrative duties. In the case of research, a graduate assistant should be paired with a faculty member such that the graduate student is involved in research that will enhance his or her own topical interests and progress toward the Experimental Research Project or Master’s Thesis. To be eligible for a graduate assistantship, a student must have been accepted to full graduate status in the MSSIS Program. Current students submit an application form, resume, and a 500-word essay directly to the College of Security and Intelligence Office. Newly admitted students submit their application materials via the Graduate Admissions Office. After the first semester of working as a graduate assistant, in order to retain the assistantship, the student must have maintained a CGPA of 3.50 out of a possible 4.00 or above. Please note that any student who is eligible to receive VA benefits under the Post-9/11 GI Bill Yellow Ribbon Program is not eligible to apply for a graduate assistantship. Graduate assistantships carry a stipend set by the University and recipients are expected to devote up to 20 hours each week. Students are permitted to accept other University employment; however, University policies limit all students to a total of 25 hours of work per week, including the graduate assistantship. All graduate research and administrative assistantships require that the recipient be registered for at least six graduate credits at Embry-Riddle for any semester of their appointment. Guidelines for Graduate Research Projects, Theses and Comprehensive Examinations The MSSIS Program requires the completion of an Experimental Research Project, a Master’s Thesis, or a Comprehensive Examination each of which carries six-hours of course credit. Those students planning to do a Research Project should register for SIS 690, those planning to complete the Master’s Thesis should register for SIS 700 and those planning to take the Comprehensive Examination should register for SIS 698 Graduate Reading and Review. The Comprehensive Exam is designed to intensively test the student’s acquisition of the knowledge and skills provided by the MS SIS curriculum and is tailored for each student. Comprehensive Examination procedure: The Instructor for each of the courses taken by the student will contribute questions to the student’s Comprehensive Examination. The examination will be in two parts: Part I and Part II. The time allotted for the completion of the examination will be in two three hour segments, with an hour break for lunch. The student will be given Part I in the first segment and Part II in the second segment. If a student fails a portion of his/her exam, they will be issued an incomplete (I) grade must retake the entire exam again; students will not be allowed to retake exams during the same semester as the initial attempt. Students retaking the exam must wait until the following semester to do so. If his/her second effort proves unsuccessful, they will be issued an F and fail out of the program. The Experimental Research Project provides the student with an opportunity to conduct security and intelligence-related research in an area of the physical or behavioral sciences. The Master’s Thesis is a more traditional approach and normally requires library or archival or survey research. The general requirements for both SIS 690 and SIS 700 are the same in three areas. First, the project or thesis must present an original approach to its topic, whether in the collection or analysis of data, and in its conclusions. Second, the graduate student will be required to present and defend his or her thesis in a public presentation open to faculty, students and the interested public. Third, the work should be suitable for submission to a peer-reviewed journal for publication. Steps in the Completion of the Research Requirement TOPIC: Generate ideas for research in consultation with the graduate faculty. This will allow the student to arrive at a research and/or thesis topic that is consistent with the curriculum and objectives of the MSSIS Program and is of genuine interest for the student. It would also be useful if the research project or thesis would be consistent with the student’s professional interests. COMMITTEE SELECTION: Choose a committee of three people. This committee must consist of two faculty members of the College of Security and Intelligence, one of whom must be chair of the committee. The third member may be anyone from the faculty or from outside the University who can contribute to the project. Note that a faculty member may remove him or herself from the committee at this (or any) stage of the process. If this happens, the student must then choose an alternate member. PROPOSAL: Write a proposal of from 3-5 pages. The proposal must consist of: an introduction, a clear problem statement normally (but not always) in the form of a hypothesis, an outline of the methods to be used, and a preliminary list of sources. The format for the proposal and all other documentation should conform to the APA Guide. A copy of the proposal signed by the entire committee should be placed on file with the Administrative Assistant to the College. HUMAN SUBJECTS: For all projects that require the use of human subjects, the student must submit an approval from through the University’s Institutional Review Board (IRB). Forms for this process are available through the Sponsored Programs Pre-Award Office at Daytona Beach. RESEARCH: The research should be conducted in close consultation with the committee. If the committee is not consulted on a regular basis through this process, the chance of approval of the final product diminishes. DOCUMENT PREPARATION: Writing the Research Project results or the Thesis should not be started until the student’s committee has given approval. The process of writing should begin as early as possible, but no later than the beginning of the semester of anticipated graduation. As the committee approves each section, the student may move on to the next section. The student will be allowed to finish when and only when the committee has signed the “approval to defend” sheet. Note that summers are allocated for completing the research and and starting the writing process. FINAL DEFENSE: Once the penultimate document is prepared and approved for defense, the oral defense will be scheduled by the College and invitations to the campus faculty and student body will be issued. The final defense of the Research Project or Thesis will require a formal presentation using PowerPoint or other presentation software. This presentation will be limited to 30 minutes, with another 15 minutes for questions from the committee and the audience. After the defense, the student’s committee will advise the student whether he or she has passed and what revisions are necessary for the final document. At this point, the committee will decide whether to sign the signatory page. COMPLETION: Finally, the student must complete all necessary paperwork for graduation (assuming that all coursework has been completed as well). Both the final report of a Research Project and the final version of the Thesis must be bound and two copies presented, one to the Library and one to the College’s Administrative Assistant. ENROLLMENT: Once a student has enrolled in SIS 690 or SIS 700, he or she must enroll in a subsequent semester for 1 credit while he or she is working on either the Research Project or Thesis. Additional enrollments must be approved by the Dean or CAO. Deadlines for Research Project and Thesis Preparation Each semester the College establishes and posts the deadlines for committee organization, proposal submission, completion the first three chapters of the Research Project or Thesis, the defense confirmation, delivery of the penultimate document to the committee, final defense, and delivery of the bound copies. [-]