University of Westminster

Introduction

The University of Westminster is a dynamic international education institution with a distinguished 175-year history. With three campuses in central London (Cavendish, Marylebone and Regent) and one in Harrow, it is home to over 20,000 students from over 150 nations.

Committed to educating for professional life, Westminster offers a vibrant and supportive learning environment where innovative, creative and dedicated students can gain the skills and experience needed to succeed in an increasingly international workplace. Our programmes are both challenging and rewarding. Westminster students have access to state of the art facilities and are taught within a truly cosmopolitan learning environment.

The University of Westminster has been named one of the top 100 international universities in the world, and among the top 10 in London, following the release of the Times Higher Education's global university rankings.

Academic Excellence

Our academic excellence and diversity is supported by over 950 teaching staff and more than 700 visiting subject specialists. Our research quality is confirmed by our top position in the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF). QS Worldwide University Rankings, ranked us as one of the top five universities in the UK for Media, Journalism and Communications, and our Architecture Department was ranked joint second in the UK by practicing architects, according to the influential Architects Journal. Westminster Law School was awarded the highest possible rating from the Solicitors Regulation Authority for our Legal Practice Course.

Employability

Employability is at the centre of the University’s vision for the future. Along with alliances with professional organisations (such as AMBA and RIBA), our global network of academic partnerships and 150,000 alumni connect us to leading figures and institutions worldwide.

We ensure our courses are professionally relevant. Our Career Development Centre team can help you to develop your employability and offer advice on post-graduation opportunities.

Accommodation and Facilities

We offer a range of student accommodation for undergraduate students across Halls of Residence, based in central London and Harrow. Our accommodations provide excellent facilities, 24/7 security and high speed broadband services.

We have invested more than £125 million in refurbishing our campuses. From laboratories and libraries to studios and computer suites, you will be able to take advantage of the latest cutting-edge technology and resources.

Undergraduate and Postgraduate courses

The University of Westminster offers a wide range of undergraduate and postgraduate courses from six faculties: Architecture and the Built Environment; Westminster Business School; Westminster Law School; Westminster School of Media, Art and Design; Science and Technology and Social Sciences and Humanities. Many of our courses start both in January and September, providing greater flexibility for entry.

Support for International students

Our support for International students includes visits of our staff to your country, Pre-departure counselling, Airport Meet and Greet and the International Students Welcome Programmes. We also have 65 worldwide education representatives providing customised support.

Once here, you can access a range of study, personal and employment guidance. Our services include Career Development Centre, Counselling, English language support and the Students’ Union.

Fees & Scholarships

We have one of UK’s largest scholarship schemes, having been recognised by Times Higher Education magazine for Outstanding Support for Overseas Students. Information about our tuition fees and payment method can be found on the individual pages for undergraduate and postgraduate courses.

Open Days

One of the best ways to get a taste of life as a Westminster student is to join us for an Undergraduate Open Days or a Postgraduate Information Evening, where you can explore our campuses and meet our lecturers and students

Virtual Open Day

If you are unable to visit us in person, why not take a virtual tour of the campus and sign up for the Virtual Open day? You can also get a snapshot of our International students’ life through our blogs and social media.

This school offers programs in:
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Programs

This school also offers:

MSc

MSc Applied Biotechnology

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years September 2016 United Kingdom London + 1 more

Our established programme in Biotechnology, which has been extensively updated, includes a wide range of modern molecular biology techniques and how biotechnology can be used by today's society. [+]

Our established programme in Biotechnology, which has been extensively updated, includes a wide range of modern molecular biology techniques and how biotechnology can be used by today's society. You will complement your theoretical studies with hands on experience of fully controlled fermenters that are up to pilot-plant scale, and are linked to modern monitoring and control systems. You will study a range of subjects in considerable depth, including bioactive compounds, industrial bioprocesses, microbial physiology and fermentation technology, microbial production of novel metabolites, monitoring and control of fermentation, topics in biotechnology, and types of bioreactors. Core modules APPLIED MOLECULAR BIOLOGY This module is designed to provide you with insight into current research topics in biochemistry and molecular biology. Since these areas are evolving rapidly, the most recent relevant topics are selected year-to-year. Examples of topics might include: molecular biology of cancer, personalised medicine, transgenic plants, epigenetics, metabolomics, proteomics, gene therapy and stem cell research. FERMENTATION TECHNOLOGY This module aims to examine and discuss the essential, qualitative and quantitative principles in growth of cultures and subsequent bioproducts to provide the needed expertise for the bio-industries. You will gain an understanding of fermentation processes, as well as smalland large-scale production of fermentation products, microbial strain/culture selection and development, and microbial culture. INDUSTRIAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL BIOTECHNOLOGY This module will explore applications of bacterial, fungal, and mammalian culture to the production of bio-products (eg enzymes, biopharmaceuticals) and examine ways in which micro-organisms are applied in the solution of environmental problems. The latest trends in the improvement of plant yield, tolerance to water/drought stress and pests, as well as the use of plants as bio-reactors will also be covered. POSTGRADUATE RESEARCH METHODS You will be able to develop your skills in information retrieval, critical analysis and presentation relevant to your research topic, and form a clear plan for your project. POSTGRADUATE PROJECT This module aims to enhance your skills of self-management, experimental design, critical analysis and interpretation of data, enabling you to present and justify your research. SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY AND COMMERCIALISATION You will gain an insight into the scope of commercial biotechnology, starting and financing a company, the role of intellectual property protection, writing a business plan, assessing projects, managing a company, managing company finances, and coping with industrial safety legislation. Course-specific entry requirements You must have a good (at least a lower second class) BSc Honours in Biological Sciences or a related discipline, a professional qualification of equivalent status and associated work experience or an equivalent qualification deemed suitable by the course team. If you are applying for part-time study, you will normally be working in a relevant area and will require written support from your employer including confirmation that facilities will be available in your workplace for you to carry out your research project. If your first language is not English you should have an IELTS score of at least 6.5, with 6.0 in each element. During the induction stage of the course, if you do not have English as your first language, you will need to complete Academic English screening and any resulting recommended Academic English support activity. Associated careers The course is aimed at those aspiring to be researchers and managers in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries or other biosectors. [-]

MSc Architecture and Environmental Design

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years August 2016 United Kingdom London + 1 more

This interdisciplinary and international course will provide you with skills that can be applied to diverse building typologies and global climatic, environmental and contextual issues. On completion of this course you will have a thorough understanding of the principles and methodology of environmental design and will develop critical thinking skills to challenge established practices. [+]

The global environmental and energy challenge facing current and future generations of architects and building professionals calls for a deeper understanding of the principles of environmental design, and their effective application into architectural practice worldwide. Over the last decades Environmental Design as a subject area has developed, responding to new research and experimentation, both in academia and in practice. However, buildings claiming to be environmentally conscious do not perform to the expected standards, still heavily contributing to global CO2 emissions and often providing unsatisfactory comfort conditions to occupants. The same can be said for the existing built environment which is largely outdated and underperforming, requiring urgent implementation of effective retrofit strategies. This is due to a lack of comprehensive performance prediction and feedback protocols, which are still not common practice in architectural design. Course content Students on this course will take a fresh critical look at this subject. Here you will gain the knowledge and tools to make informed design decisions based on post-occupancy feedback and performance analysis, towards a new paradigm of environmental architecture, which is environmentally and energy conscious, yet sensitive to the contextual and socio-cultural landscape we live in. You will learn environmental design methods which relate to the various stages of architectural design. You will be able to evaluate existing buildings and design new ones following a combined bioclimatic and building occupant focused approach. In the core design modules you will follow an evidence based design approach where the acquisition of specialised software and analytical tools will be directly applied to an evaluation or design project. This interdisciplinary and international course will provide you with skills that can be applied to diverse building typologies and global climatic, environmental and contextual issues. On completion of this course you will have a thorough understanding of the principles and methodology of environmental design and will develop critical thinking skills to challenge established practices. You will hold the knowledge and the practical tools to better understand existing buildings for retrofit and to design new ones – positively driving change in this field and moving towards a truly environmentally conscious architecture. The course covers both the wider contextual and sustainable approach to environmental design, and the more technical aspects of environmentally and energy conscious building design and performance. As well as taught modules, you will take design-based modules where you will apply quantitative and qualitative analysis to the study of existing built environments and to new design projects. For more information on how this course is taught and assessment methods, please refer to full course document Images from top to bottom: Image 1: Global Ecology Research Centre, Stanford, CA. Image 2: Sun path diagram projection on site map. Image 3: Natural ventilation strategy of hypothetical building in South of Italy. Image 4: Computational Fluid Dynamic simulation showing temperature stratifications in hypothetical building in Singapore Core modules Evaluation of Built Environments You will be involved in practical workshops on the use of tools and on the development of analytical methods, which will be directly applied to a design studio project on the evaluation of case studies. In this module you will learn about climate and microclimate analysis and fieldwork methods for the measurement of environmental and energy parameters, thermal comfort surveys and post-occupancy evaluations. Principles of Environmental Design You will look at the principles of passive solar design and strategies for bioclimatic architecture (eg enhanced thermal performance of building envelope, solar control, natural ventilation, day-lighting, passive solar heating and cooling etc). The module will provide, through practical experimentation and laboratory exercises, fundamentals of building physics, energy and environmental foundations, including heat exchange and energy balance of buildings, and thermal and visual comfort. Theory and History of Environmental Design You will look at ethical and environmental drivers of environmental design; climate change, energy conservation and economy; standards and regulations; history of environmental design; and its various past and present definitions. Environmental and Energy Modelling You will undertake software workshops and design application of dynamic thermal modelling, Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) modelling and day-lighting. The software used will be tailored to the various stages of the design process and will range from climate data analysis to daylighting and thermal modelling. These will be directly applied to a design studio project running in parallel to the workshops. Thesis Project You will explore advanced topics and contexts of research applicability. The topic chosen can depend on your individual interests and aspirations, ranging from analytical projects to design proposals. The module will provide you with the background on research methods and advanced technical skills appropriate to your topic of choice. Dissertations can be formulated as a written thesis or as a hybrid written and design-project thesis. Course-specific entry requirements Generally, a good undergraduate degree (i.e. First or Upper-Second Class Honours) in Architecture or a related subject within the context of the construction industry and built environment disciplines. Applicants with qualifications in other subject areas which may be relevant to the award are encouraged to apply, each case being considered on merit. You will need a portfolio of work, or comprehensive, and a personal statement which clearly articulates why you wish to study for the award. You will need fluent written and spoken English to study at postgraduate level. If your first language is not English, you will need an IELTS score of at least 6.5 (or equivalent). The University offers pre-sessional summer programmes if you need to improve your English before starting your course. Associated careers This course will give you skills which can be used both in architectural practice and in environmental design consultancy. The research issues explored in your final thesis project could also lead to further research and an academic career through the path of a PhD degree in a number of related fields. [-]

MSc Computer Networks

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3 years September 2016 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The programming techniques and technological requirements of this rapidly developing field are new territory, not only for those who have worked in this sector for some time, but also to many recent computer science graduates. [+]

The unprecedented growth in commercial and information management uses of the internet and World Wide Web is only the visible tip of the vast scientific, computing, technical and engineering developments that are occurring in the field. As a result of this growth, new computer science and engineering disciplines must emerge. The programming techniques and technological requirements of this rapidly developing field are new territory, not only for those who have worked in this sector for some time, but also to many recent computer science graduates. There is now a long-term and growing market for professionals possessing a clear overview of current information and communication networks capabilities, standards and trends, along with a firm grasp of specifics in areas ranging from data network protocols to network security issues. Whatever developments occur, there will always be a need for the designer and engineer who has knowledge and experience of both the engineering and implementation of a distributed or network system, and the ability to work at the higher levels of abstraction and programming of networked and distributed computing. As a graduate of this course, you will have the knowledge and skills to meet those needs. Course content The computer Network MSc focuses on computer communications form the data link layer upwards. It covers the architectures, protocols and service in both local-area and wide-area networks. The provision of end-to-end services and internet service are covered together with the design of secure networks. It is distinguish from the Mobile, Wireless and Broadband Communication MSc in its focus on the higher layers in the communication reference model, with a greater emphasis on networks software and computer-to computer communication. The final project counts for one third of the course and involves undertaking a substantial research or product development. In addition to the project, the course consist of the following modules. Core modules COMMUNICATION AND COMPUTER NETWORKS This module provides both theoretical and practical insight into fixed broadband telecommunication networks and their latest technologies, and an in-depth understanding of networks architectures and protocols. NETWORK CONFIGURATION AND OPERATION This module provides an insight into the design and development of the real-world networks, and gives you practical hand-on-hand experience of network configuration and problem diagnosis. NETWORK PROGRAMMING The module introduces the tailoring of a modern programming language (Java) to the design and implementing of socket-level network programs. Course-specific entry requirements You should have qualifications equivalent to a good Honours degree from a UK university in computer engineering, computer science with a knowledge of computer hardware, or in electronic engineering with some programming experience. Relevant work experience will be taken into account. An IELTS score of 6.5 or equivalent will normally be required from applicants whose first language is not English, or who have not studied their secondary and bachelor’s degree education in English. [-]

MSc Cyber Security and Forensics

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years September 2016 United Kingdom London + 1 more

Students taking the course will gain an understanding of the nature of the security threats that face computer systems and the type of information that is stored on digital devices (and how it can be extracted from them). [+]

Computers are central to all aspects of our daily lives; as industries ranging from communications to banking have come to rely on them, the need for improved computer security has never been greater. This course focusses on two aspects of Cyber Security: analysis and assessment of risk plus how to minimise it, and, how to extract and use digital information from a wide range of systems and devices. The course is structured so that all students cover the same introductory material, but then choose to specialise in either Cyber Security or Digital Forensics. Students taking the course will gain an understanding of the nature of the security threats that face computer systems and the type of information that is stored on digital devices (and how it can be extracted from them). They will benefit from a broad and varied array of state-of-the-art technologies, including: EnCase, FTK and open-source forensic tools, and a dedicated forensics computer laboratory Specialist input from guest lecturers Over 20 university computing laboratories providing access to Unix, Novell and NT servers, all supported by high-bandwidth networks Specialist technicians to ensure you can get the most out of these technologies. Course content All students will take the core modules which are designed to give a comprehensive introduction to this specialist field. They will cover basic digital forensics and network security, and also cover computer system tools and the UNIX operating system. Dealing with digital evidence in a professional manner (that includes adhering to appropriate legal guidelines) is also covered. You will then follow either the Cyber Security or Digital Forensics pathway within the course (though each lead to the same named degree: the pathways are simply opportunities to specialise within the field). In addition, all students will take a Research Methods module and complete a project module. The course offers the opportunity to examine a variety of tools available on the open market, and the use of forensic tools to retrieve data from electronic sources. It will also consider the analysis of professional and ethical issues relating to computer security and forensics, and the development of professional competencies, such as report writing and presenting evidence in court. Teaching methods include lab-based sessions, student-led tutorials and lectures by internal staff and guest speakers from industry. Our courses are offered by friendly, highly experienced staff, and benefit from the diverse specialist knowledge and skills within the departments of the Faculty. Assessments will be carried out mostly through practical or research-based course work. Core modules COMPUTER FORENSICS FUNDAMENTALS This module gives you an introduction to some of the general concepts of computer forensics, as well as helping you to develop the skills that will be needed on other modules. You will cover in detail the layout of volumes on storage devices, and file systems within volumes, with particular emphasis on the FAT file system. You will learn to look at raw devices using low-level tools like hex editors, and consider how security considerations should affect software design and implementation. COMPUTER SYSTEM TOOLS This module commences by giving you a hands-on introduction to the UNIX operating system. You will look at a range of tools that might be used by a forensic examiner: this will include high-level tools like EnCase, FTK and Autopsy, although your main focus will be on low-level tools such as dd and the Sleuthkit tools, as these help to develop your understanding of what (and how) the higher level tools are actually doing. You will also learn to use basic system tools such as grep. In addition you will learn a scripting language so that you can develop your own forensic tools. EVIDENCE AND PROCEDURE You will examine the legal obligations of computer forensics, gaining an understanding of the relevant statutes and industry guidelines, and of proving the authenticity of evidence via a chain of custody from collecting evidence through to presenting findings in a professional manner. The module also aims to provide you with a broad understanding of the professional factors that influence the work of professional practitioners, particularly in the context of the 'Expert Witness'. NETWORK SECURITY The module will cover the basics of how networks work, what the specific threats to networks are, and how they might be ameliorated. POSTGRADUATE PROJECT MODULE This module is the culmination of the course. It is an opportunity for you to put into practise many of the skills learned elsewhere on the course. It is a major piece of work on a topic chosen by you (normally, this topic will be chosen as part of the Research Methods module). You will undertake this work individually, and will be assigned a project supervisor to assist with and guide the development of the project. RESEARCH METHODS This module is shared with other MSc courses run by the Department. Its main focus is on introducing you to research, and developing the skills you need to read and evaluate original research literature. This in turn leads into the Project, and a major outcome of the module should be a Project Proposal. In addition, the module addresses certain aspects of Personal Development Planning (PDP). Course-specific entry requirements You are usually expected to have a good Honours degree (generally an upper second class) in a computing-related discipline form a UK university or overseas equivalent. If your first degree does not have a strong computing. Your work experience and other qualification may also be taken in to account. You must submit a statement of purpose with your application in which you should present your key interest and career aspiration. How you believe the course can help you to achieve these, and what relevant qualities and experience you will bring to the course. You may invited by the admissions tutor an informal interview. If your first language is not English you will need an IELTS score of 6.5 or equivalent. Associated careers Depending on their chosen pathway graduates of the course are expected to find employment as information security/senior security officers and related cyber security roles or more technical roles investigating threats and safeguarding digital assets their life-cycle. Such roles will range from supporting industry, the public sector in general and the police and law enforcement agencies specifically, while some may focus more on researching new security threats and countermeasures. Additional also arrive for a supportive alumni community, including graduates with work experience who use their new skills and qualification to progress their career to more senior posts. [-]

MSc Logistics and Supply Chain Management

Campus Full time 1 year September 2016 United Kingdom London

Developed in partnership with Arnhem Business School (HAN University, Netherlands), this international MSc course will develop your ability to initiate and carry out advanced analysis, research and problem solving in the field of logistics and supply chain management. [+]

Developed in partnership with Arnhem Business School (HAN University, Netherlands), this international MSc course will develop your ability to initiate and carry out advanced analysis, research and problem solving in the field of logistics and supply chain management. If you study this MSc, you will study the first semester at the University of Westminster, and then have the choice either to continue studying in London (Westminster route) or to spend the second semester at our partner institution in the Netherlands (Arnhem route). You will not only benefit from the wider range of module choices, but also from the opportunity to study in two countries. During the third semester you will work on a research-based dissertation. It is expected that you will spend the equivalent of three to four months' full-time work on this research. The MSc course is accredited by the Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport (CILT), and graduates are exempt from the Institute's exams. For more information on how this course is taught and assessment methods, please refer to full course document. If you are unable to study for a full Masters course, we also offer a Logistics and Supply Chain Management Postgraduate Diploma and a Logistics and Supply Chain Management Postgraduate Certificate. Please scroll to the bottom of this page for information on these courses. Alternatively, you can also study individual modules from this Logistics and Supply Chain Management MSc course as stand alone short courses. Core modules (All students) Logistics and the External Environment (20 credits) This module is designed to make you aware of the external influences that companies must take into account in the design and operation of their logistics systems. Supply chains do not exist in a vacuum, and there are many issues that companies need to consider to ensure that they operate legally and responsibly in addition to meeting their own internal company objectives. Logistics Management and Planning (20 credits) This module provides you with the foundation for studying logistics, ensuring that you are aware of the components of the logistics system and how they interact with each other to influence the design and operation of supply chains. You will focus on the aspects of logistics operations that tend to be directly within the control of companies. Research Dissertation (40 credits) Your dissertation will draw on techniques and background material introduced during the Masters course, and will incorporate original analysis. This module provides you with an opportunity for an in-depth, extended study of a specific topic within the logistics and/or transport sector. You are encouraged to undertake original research, and write a critical analysis and draw rational conclusions. Statistics and Operational Research for Logistics (20 credits) This module aims to equip you with the statistical and operational research concepts and techniques necessary for logistics, and give you some grounding in the practical application of these methods. You will develop your ability to suggest and apply suitable probability and statistical models to the analysis of logistics and transport data. You will also learn to analyse a time series and produce forecasts for future values, analyse a stock control system, analyse a transport scheduling problem, and analyse a route network. Sustainability and Freight Transport (20 credits) In this module you will focus on the study of sustainability and green logistics, with a particular emphasis on freight transport. The first part of the module provides the context for sustainable supply chains, examining the business and public policy reasons for attempting to address sustainability issues, and examining how sustainability impacts are measured, monitored and reported. In the second part of the module you will focus on the freight transport element of supply chain management, looking at the strategic, operational and public policy perspectives. Core modules (Arnhem route) Commercial Distribution of Fast Moving Goods (20 credits) The distribution of fast moving goods has seen a tremendous change during the last decade. Fashion, electronic devices etc have to be developed, produced and distributed in a very short timeframe. This requires quick and fast response of all concerned with the supply value chain. By studying analytical models and using them in case studies, the student will be provided with knowledge and skills in order to organise supply value chains effectively in an ever-changing, international environment. Distributing for the Future (20 credits) The world of transportation and the world within which transportation takes place are changing rapidly. The course material will be discussed in two parts of three weeks. The first part teaches you the different aspects of the supply chain, such as the set up and management of the logistics network, the management of strategic suppliers and the development of partnerships with logistic service providers. The second part teaches you how to apply scenario planning models to discover how logistic service providers should adapt in future to counter possible situations. The course ends with a summary overview and tips for implementation. Finance and Management (20 credits) With the increase of the volume of goods shipped all over the world, logistics needs more and more to consider the financial implications of these international flows. This module provides a framework necessary for the analysis and solutions of financial and accounting problems which are relevant to firms trading and investing on an international basis. For example, what are the impacts of interest rates and exchange rates risk on stock values and international distribution channels, and how should a logistician evaluate the financial impact on international shipments and commercial distribution? Core modules (Westminster route) Freight Transport and Logistics Services (20 credits) In this module you will examine the changing market for freight transport and logistics services in a European and increasingly global context. You will evaluate economic principles in terms of costs and revenues, and assess the changing demands for new services. Fleet operations and warehouse management are investigated in relation to technology and market requirements, and you will also explore strategic options for service providers. Retail Supply Chain Management (20 credits) You will examine retail markets by country and sector, and investigate developments in control of the supply chain between retailers and manufacturers. You will explore cost structures in the retail supply chain, and new patterns of retailing and their implication for logistics; international comparisons are also made. Course-specific entry requirements You should normally have the equivalent of a good Honours degree and demonstrate strong motivation in the subject area. Alternative qualifications with relevant professional experience will also be considered. The programme has been devised to appeal to graduates who wish to develop their career in an international environment concerned with logistics. Directly relevant degree disciplines include economics, business studies, management, geography and operations research. However, students with qualifications in other disciplines such as languages and the humanities, engineering, and environmental sciences are also encouraged to apply. If English is not your first language, you will need an IELTS score of 6.5, with a minimum of 6.0 in each component. Professional accreditation This MSc course is accredited by the Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport (CILT) and graduates are exempt from the Institute's exams. Associated careers Previous graduates have gained employment with third party logistics providers, the airline industry, manufacturing companies, retailers, shipping lines, etc. Examples of companies that have recruited graduates in recent years are Kuehne + Nagel, DHL, TNT, Norbert Dentressangle, Maersk Logistics, GIST, Volvo Logistics, Honda, GlaxoSmithKlein, Procter and Gamble and IKEA. You will also be equipped for further research (eg Doctoral studies) should you wish to continue in an academic environment. [-]

MSc Multimedia

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3 years September 2016 United Kingdom London + 1 more

This course has been designed to produce hands on professionals with a broad range of career possibilities in the digital economy, either working as designers, developers, managers or starting an enterprise. [+]

This course has been designed to produce hands on professionals with a broad range of career possibilities in the digital economy, either working as designers, developers, managers or starting an enterprise. This sector is expanding rapidly in all areas, with major social media companies now trading on the stock exchange with revenues of billions of dollars and applications like WhatsApp selling for $19 billion. Companies are spending billions on their online and digital strategies, on mobile optimised websites, applications and content like videos, the demand for skilled professionals who can deliver these strategies continues to grow. The course has been designed to address the needs of these emerging areas, and ensure graduates can adapt to the changing needs of the sector. We have excellent links within the multimedia industry, and many companies and experts have visited the Faculty in previous years to give presentations, including MPC, Sky, Apple and Adobe as well as companies looking to recruit students after finishing the Masters. The Multimedia MSc hosts multimediatrainingvideos.com, a comprehensive repository of freely accessible multimedia training videos to which the teaching team have been significant contributors to the site over the last few years. This site has become one of the biggest Open Educational Resources (OER) sites for multimedia on the internet and was funded by JISC. Course content The course emphasises the key multimedia principles, theories and concepts, as well as exposing you to the industry standard languages and tools including scripting languages, HTML, AJAX, and Xcode. You will examine a number of areas, including human computer interaction and the user experience, project management, web development, scripting for interactivity, and analytics. The course will enable you to develop the knowledge and skills required in a number of careers as well as preparation to continue to a PhD. Core modules MULTIMEDIA MANAGEMENT This module gives you a broad understanding of the planning and organisation that goes into developing a product. You will work with a real client, taking the process right through from an initial pitch to the execution of a prototype, providing you with practice in many of the key tools and concepts used in project management. MULTIMEDIA SCRIPTING FOR INTERACTIVITY You will develop and implement an interactive application, using an industry standard development environment and object-oriented scripting language. You will organise and plan the production of the prototype, with an emphasis on the approach taken to coding. PROJECT The project is an extended piece of supervised independent work relevant to the field. This can be either undertaken as a work-based project or on a topic proposed by the student or faculty. RESEARCH METHODS AND PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE You will strengthen your skills for the research and industry needs of the course, the final project, and for your future career and study. The module guides your personal development plan towards the professional requirements of the discipline, and covers methods of critical evaluation, gathering and analysing information, and preparing and defending a project proposal. USER-CENTRED INTERFACE DESIGN The module will explore the foundations of user-centred interface design and the user experience through applied theory. You will be introduced to the importance of the Human Computer Interaction discipline, and the need to consider both the cognitive and interaction perspective. Building from this you will explore related issues such as design, interaction, globalisation, accessibility and navigation. Course-specific entry requirements The course is open to computer literate graduates with a good first degree (minimum Second Class Honours) or equivalent in a related discipline such as graphic design, computer science, digital imaging or journalism. Alternatively you may have in-depth work experience in a related field, or already be employed in the sector and are undertaking the programme to further enhance your career plans. The relevance of your first degree or industrial experience and suitability for the course will be usually determined by interview and, where relevant, portfolio. If English is not your first language, you will need an IELTS score of 6.5. [-]

MSc Software Engineering

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 5 years September 2016 United Kingdom London + 1 more

Software engineering is the area of computing that is concerned with applying engineering-style methods to the production of computer software. It is a dynamic and expanding field that continues to play a central role in the UK's future economic growth. [+]

Software engineering is the area of computing that is concerned with applying engineering-style methods to the production of computer software. It is a dynamic and expanding field that continues to play a central role in the UK's future economic growth. The continuing shortage of qualified software engineers means that graduates have been very successful in gaining software-related jobs by integrating their existing and newly acquired skills. The course is aimed at software developers and programmers. The course's main theme is software development using the object-oriented paradigm. If you do not have a formal computing background, this course will give you greater skills and understanding of the development of software applications, from initial requirements through to implementation, with an emphasis on programming. Alternatively, if you do have a significant background in software engineering, the course will enable you to build on your existing knowledge. You will benefit from a broad and varied array of state-of-the-art technologies, including: Sunray servers connected to a 1GB fibre optic network with links to both the Super-Janet 4 network and the London Metropolitan Network, connecting the Greater London education and research community a Uni-Backbone network that supports IP Multicasts to deliver a constant stream of interactive, multimedia-rich content over 20 laboratories providing access MACS (OSX), PCs (Windows 7) and Sunrays (Ubuntu/Linux) specialist technicians to ensure you can get the most out of these technologies. Course content The core modules focus on the stages of the object-oriented software life cycle, from requirements analysis and capture to software design, software implementation of a design, software testing techniques, software system integration, and ending with software maintenance. The option modules offer you the opportunity to apply and extend these core skills in a variety of software application areas, including mobile devices, databases, enterprise development and system administration. You will complete a software development project that requires the application of the knowledge and skills taught on the course, as well as providing an opportunity to acquire new skills and knowledge not taught on the course. You will also gain extensive experience of many of the software tools and environments used in the software development industry. A variety of teaching methods are used, ranging from formal lectures, problem-solving tutorials and programming laboratory sessions, to student presentations, student-led seminars and group work activities. By the end of the course, you will have the knowledge and skills required to be a professional practitioner in object-oriented software development and software engineering, and hence, to become a successful member of the IT industry. Core modules ALGORITHMICS This module will give you the skills and theoretical knowledge to design and analyse algorithms in terms of their computational complexity. You will cover the general techniques of algorithm design, with illustrations from system and end-user application areas, and an emphasis on the design and analysis of alternative algorithmic solutions to practical problems. Other topics you will cover include types of algorithm, time and space complexity, and the use of standard libraries. OBJECT-ORIENTED PROGRAMMING This module introduces you to the features of an object-oriented programming language (C++), and then uses this to demonstrate program development using the objectoriented paradigm. The topics covered include core language features, problem solving, object-oriented paradigm and the development of libraries. RESEARCH METHODS The module aims to develop your knowledge and competence of the research process, and the application of research methods in the area of software engineering. The topics you will cover include research methods, strategies and paradigms, as well as supporting skills and professional issues relating to a career in software engineering. You will undertake a literature review, critical reading of research papers and the writing and presentation of a research proposal. SOFTWARE DESIGN You will examine the techniques and methods appropriate for the development of objectoriented software. You will explore the conceptual foundations of the object-oriented approach, and acquire practical skills in objectoriented design, and in the implementation of such designs. The main topics you will cover include unified modelling language (UML), data modelling, behavioural modelling, design and implementation. SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT (PROJECT) You will undertake an extended, individual piece of work on an approved topic, which unifies and extends your theoretical and practical knowledge of software engineering by applying them to develop a software application. A supervisor will provide you with guidance on planning, researching, designing, development, documentation and demonstration. SOFTWARE ENGINEERING CONTEXT You will examine the nature of software engineering and important external factors that influence the work of a practising software engineer. In particular you will explore software engineering life cycles, requirements engineering, user-interface design, software quality assurance, testing, and selected professional issues. Course-specific entry requirements You will normally have a good first degree (at least a Lower Second). This may contain a significant amount of computing or software engineering, and you may wish to reinforce and build on your existing knowledge. Alternatively, this may be in a subject not containing a significant amount of computing or software engineering, in which case you will be expected to demonstrate prior interest in, or aptitude for, programming and working with computers. Under exceptional circumstances, if you do not have a degree, you may be considered if you have extensive professional experience of programming and software engineering. If your first language is not English you will need an IELTS score of 6.5 or equivalent. If you satisfy the basic academic entry requirements you are invited to one of the University’s open evenings, where you can meet the course leader and discuss any issues regarding the course. Associated careers Graduates are employed in a wide variety of roles related to software development, including internet programmer, programmer, software designer, systems administrator and web application programmer. The common theme of these roles is the need to understand and apply techniques related to the stages of the software life cycle process. Some graduates also go on to undertake a research degree related to the object-oriented paradigm. Professional recognition The course is accredited by the British Computer Society (BCS). [-]

MSc Transport Planning and Management

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3 years September 2016 United Kingdom London + 1 more

This course develops your ability to initiate and implement advanced analysis and research in transport policy, planning and management. You will learn the techniques and methodologies you need to take decisions, or to provide the necessary information for others to take policy decisions. [+]

This course develops your ability to initiate and implement advanced analysis and research in transport policy, planning and management. You will learn the techniques and methodologies you need to take decisions, or to provide the necessary information for others to take policy decisions. The MSc course has been running successfully for many years, and is offered by the Department of Planning and Transport. It will give you full exemption from the examination requirements for Membership of the Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport (MCILT), and also forms part of the pathway to the Transport Planning Professional (TPP) qualification. For more information on how this course is taught and assessment methods, please refer to full course document. If you are unable to study for a full Masters course, we also offer a Transport Planning and Management Postgraduate Diploma and a Transport Planning and Management Postgraduate Certificate. Please scroll to the bottom of this page for information on these courses. Alternatively you can also study some of the individual modules from the Transport Planning and Management MSc course as stand alone short courses. Course content The MSc course balances theoretical and practical applications in the three separate components: core modules, option modules and a research dissertation. Core modules Research Dissertation (60 credits) Your dissertation will draw on techniques and background material introduced on the Masters course, and incorporate original analysis. Lectures are provided on research methods in Semester One, interlinked with the Statistics and Survey Methods for Transport module which provides a background in relevant techniques. Work is undertaken in Semester Two of the full-time course, or in the case of part-time students in Semester Two of Year 2 or Year 3. Final submission is in early September, and part-time MSc students may register to complete the dissertation in Year 3, rather than completing in Year 2. Statistics and Survey Methods for Transport (20 credits) This module is designed to equip transport planners and managers with the basic concepts used in statistics and market research methods, and their application in the transport context, illustrated by suitable examples. You will explore topics including survey design and analysis, statistical modelling (including probability distributions and regressions), sampling methodology and qualitative research design. Students are introduced to specialist software including SPSS, Qualtrics and NVivo. Transport Economics (20 credits) Through this module you will examine the application of relevant economic theory and principles to transport operations, in relation to a range of transport modes. Topics you will explore include transport markets and market structures, deregulated transport markets and contestability, transport operator costs, transport pricing, operator investment, and economic evaluation and appraisal. Transport Policy and Politics (20 credits) This module introduces you to debates within transport policy and politics past, present and future. It draws on material from different disciplines in placing a range of relevant controversies, ideas and issues within their theoretical, policy and political contexts. You will cover specific levels of decision-making for different topics, and learn about non-governmental organisations, including lobby groups, that influence transport policy making. Course-specific entry requirements You should have at least a good Second Class Honours degree in a relevant subject area, and any relevant transport experience would further enhance your application. Part-time students should normally be employed within a relevant sector of transport for the duration of the course. If your first language is not English you will need an IELTS score of 6.5. [-]

MA

MA Art and Visual Culture

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years September 2016 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The course introduces you to a range of historical and contemporary debates that inform the theories and practice of visual culture, and enables you to develop a conceptual framework within which to evaluate the role of the visual arts, and other forms of visual production, in contemporary society and culture. [+]

This multidisciplinary, visual theory-based course is established around the belief that visual literacy and the impact of visual forms of thinking and working now play significant roles in society. The course introduces you to a range of historical and contemporary debates that inform the theories and practice of visual culture, and enables you to develop a conceptual framework within which to evaluate the role of the visual arts, and other forms of visual production, in contemporary society and culture. You will acquire creative and professional research skills, such as the ability to work from exhibitions, art works and institutional archives, to be able to operate within different artistic and conceptual frameworks. Course content This Masters balances historical and theoretical debates in the field of visual culture studies with a rigorous interrogation of cultural practices across a range of topics, including: activism and popular politics; contemporary visual arts, capitalism and culture; globalisation and new media technologies; institutions and their archives; and the material culture of the city. The course also draws upon the cultural institutions and intellectual resources of central London, and has established contacts with other galleries and organisations for work placements. Core modules DISSERTATION This extended piece of research work is an opportunity for you to pursue a topic of individual interest, and is conducted through individual study and directed supervision. The module also includes preparation of a detailed research proposal. RESEARCH METHODS: KNOWLEDGE, CULTURAL MEMORY, ARCHIVES AND RESEARCH This introduction to research methods engages with the critical implications of knowledge in the humanities, through interdisciplinary approaches to literature, visual, material, and spatial cultures, as they are understood, interpreted, and mobilised. Highlighting questions raised by discourse on epistemology, memory, archives, and research itself, the module concentrates on the complex links between: organic and technical forms of memory; public and private cultural institutions of knowledge, memory and identity; and information-gathering, retrieval, and analysis. THEORETICAL AND CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES This module introduces you to the theoretical debates that have contributed to the field of visual culture studies, including consideration of the politics of representation, the reproduction of images, audience reception, the male and female gaze, and the discourse of the 'other'. You will also focus on an examination of the ways that theories and objects constitute each other. VISUAL CULTURE: PRODUCTION DISPLAY AND DISCOURSE This module provides an introduction to the history and theory of visual culture. Philosophical and theoretical perspectives are used to explore vision as a social and cultural process, investigating the ways in which the meanings of the 'seen' are explored, constructed and contested in construction, display and discourse. Course-specific entry requirements You should have a good first degree in a relevant area, such as history of art, cultural studies, fine art or design, English, history, media and communications, architecture and business studies. You may be invited for interview, or to submit previous written work. If your first language is not English, you will need an IELTS score of 6.5 with 7.0 in writing (or Equivalent), and will be asked to provide exampled of previous written work. The University offers pre-sessional summer programmes if you need to improve your English before starting your course. Associated careers Graduates will be equipped for roles in the creative industries, including museum and gallery work, education, arts administration and marketing, or could pursue further study to PhD level. The course is also suitable for practising artists wishing to further their research. Because the MA provides students with sophisticated critical skills and a widely applicable knowledge base that can be adapted to numerous settings, graduates go on to establish a broad range of careers in museums, galleries, and cultural organisations as curators, programmers, cultural consultants, events and communications managers, and media arts project managers. They have also gone on the begin PhDs in the UK, mainland Europe, and internationally. [-]

MA Communication

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years September 2016 United Kingdom London + 1 more

This highly regarded course offers a rigorous analysis of the political, economic, cultural and sociological factors which shape the practices and outcomes of mass media. It will give you the opportunity to study and research the main ways in which social scientists have analysed the role of the mass media and communication, and how to develop, evaluate and apply research to evaluate those theories. [+]

This highly regarded course offers a rigorous analysis of the political, economic, cultural and sociological factors which shape the practices and outcomes of mass media. It will give you the opportunity to study and research the main ways in which social scientists have analysed the role of the mass media and communication, and how to develop, evaluate and apply research to evaluate those theories. The MA ensures that you will receive a relevant, well-grounded, high-quality education and skill base, and a clear and comprehensive understanding of communication and the mass media. It is designed both for those who already work in or want to work in the media, and for those who want to go on to pursue further academic research in media and communication. Based on continuous assessment, the course is taught in lectures and seminars by the team from Westminster’s top-rated Communication and Media Research Institute (CAMRI). You will be part of a bustling, multicultural academic department which boasts a strong research culture. You will be able to attend the regular talks by outside speakers (academics and practitioners) on a variety of communication and mass media issues. Course content Core modules DISSERTATION MODULE A taught module and group workshops in the first semester will guide you in conducting a major piece of independent research. This module will be supplemented by individual supervisions beginning from the second semester. The aim is to give you a guided framework within which you can demonstrate your ability to carry out advanced independent study and write it up in the form of a dissertation. The dissertation is a 15,000-word piece of original research on a topic agreed with your supervisor and related to the political, economic, cultural and/or sociological factors which shape the practices and outcomes of mass media, including media texts and the audience reception of them. THEORIES OF COMMUNICATION The module is intentionally eclectic. You will cover (in a loosely historical way) the arguments, advantages and problems of the main sociological, cultural and psychological theories about the media. It aims to provide a comprehensive introduction to the most important ways of approaching the fundamental issues posed by the relationships between the media of communication and social and economic life. It will also enable you to understand the problems posed by different intellectual traditions, and to place those theories in their proper contexts. APPROACHES TO MEDIA AND COMMUNICATION RESEARCH This module will introduce you to the main methods of communication research. We shall look at how to undertake selective quantitative and qualitative methods, understanding and exploring the different stages of the social science research process from a definition of a research hypothesis, to data collection and analysis. We shall also look at the theoretical reasoning behind different methodological approaches to media and society, in particular the politics of social research. Note: The University is constantly improving its offer to students. It is intended that some changes, such as practice options under new course titles, may be approved between printing this brochure and enrolment for this course. You are therefore advised to look at the website for updated details. Associated careers Graduates have found jobs in middle and upper management in the media industries, as well as in the broader private sector (eg consulting and advertising firms), the public sector (eg government ministries, regulatory authorities), international organisations and NGOs. Work experience Students are encouraged to seek work experience in the industry and opportunities are regularly communicated by members of staff. This has often led to full-time employment once graduating from the course. In addition, the MA course takes advantage of the vibrancy of the media environment in London. For instance, students are encouraged to benefit from events taking place in London, e.g. at Frontline Club. Equally, there are a number of activities within the Department that give plenty of opportunities to students for networking which increases their employability. An example here is the University’s Communication And Media Research Institute (CAMRI) seminars every fortnight where leading researchers present their work. This extracurricular activity promotes networking among MA students and gives them an opportunity to meet PhD students, other research staff and visiting speakers. Further networking opportunities are offered by the regular workshops and conferences which the various research centres within CAMRI organize and which our students can attend for free. These workshops and conferences bring together academic researchers, industry representatives as well as regulators and policy makers. Graduate employment The MA course is well established and has a strong (inter)national reputation. Our students are very successful in gaining employment status, in many cases straight from graduating the course. Graduates have found jobs in middle- and upper management in media industries, as well as the broader private (e.g. consulting and advertising firms) and public sector (e.g. government ministries, regulatory authorities), international organisations and NGOs. Some graduates also continue to do PhD research. Success in their Masters degree has allowed many who have been in media jobs before joining the course to move into more senior roles within their companies or organisations and totransfer to new sectors of the media. Graduates from the MA Communication have found roles in a wide variety of media and communications organisations including: CCTV, Xinhua News Agency, BBC World Service, KBS (South Korea). [-]

MA English Language and Creative Writing

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years September 2016 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The English Language and Creative Writing MA allows you to explore the interconnections between your knowledge of how language is used and produced, and your literary compositions. [+]

The English Language and Creative Writing MA allows you to explore the interconnections between your knowledge of how language is used and produced, and your literary compositions. It will provide you with a thorough understanding of the linguistic features of English from a wide range of perspectives (theoretical and applied, synchronic and diachronic), as well as leading you to explore the writing process across genres and to take the city of London as one of your main sources of inspiration. The MA will equip you with the intellectual perspectives and the scholarly skills that will prepare you to conduct independent research, and will offer you many opportunities to network with other writers, agents, TV producers and performance poets. Course content The English Language and Creative Writing MA is suitable for students who have taken English language, literature and/or creative writing modules at undergraduate level, and others with experience in these fields. It is of particular interest to those wishing to pursue further study, and those aiming to apply their knowledge of language and the writing process in their careers. If pursuing the degree full-time, you will study 180 credits in one academic year; if part-time, you will normally complete 180 credits in two academic years. You will study three or four core modules (including a 60-credit dissertation on a topic of English language or a creative writing project), as well as two modules from the list of options. The core module English Language in Use will help you acquire the scholarly tools necessary for the stylistic interpretation of literary and non-literary texts, while the modules Tales of the City and Conflict and the City invite you to explore the writing process in connection with prose and dramatic texts. The teaching is mainly through weekly two- or three-hour sessions for each module, which include tutorials, seminars, practical sessions and workshops. There is also independent self-directed study, and you will be prepared for the Dissertation via structured sessions in research methodology. Assessment methods include submitted coursework such as essays, reviews and exercises; there are no formal examinations. Core modules DISSERTATION The Dissertation gives you the opportunity to conduct autonomous work with supervisory support on a topic you feel passionate about. At the beginning of the module you will have a series of practical seminars on the different issues involved in the process of writing a dissertation, such as finding a topic, the role of the supervisor, research methodology and the conventions of academic writing. ENGLISH LANGUAGE IN USE: TIME, TEXTS AND CONTEXTS In this module you will study English historical linguistics and stylistics, literary linguistics and cognitive poetics. Thus, you will gain a good knowledge of the ways in which the language has changed overtime and the stylistic effects of particular linguistic choices, as well as an in-depth understanding of the theoretical frameworks that can be used to describe the interaction between language and literature. TALES OF THE CITY (PROSE WRITING)(SEPTEMBER STARTERS) This module focuses on developing skills at writing prose fiction inspired by the city through a combination of exercises, close reading of established authors and critiques of your own work, as you are challenged to raise your own prose writing to a professional level. As it establishes your understanding of prose fiction and treating the city as a primary source or background presence, the module will nurture your potential to be an innovative and independent writer. You will also examine approaches to writing short and longer prose fiction that either overtly takes the city as its theme or employs it as a significant presence. LANGUAGE AND THE IMAGINATION You will develop your use of poetic language through a combination of short exercises, close reading of poetry, and critiques of your own work. You will gain a sophisticated understanding of poetic language and its applications to a range of other genres, and enhance your ability to identify imaginative uses of language as a writer and reader of poetry on the city of London. The module will allow you to develop an advanced understanding of formal poetic structures and of the publishing and performance opportunities for poetry in London. TALES OF THE CITY This module focuses on developing skills at writing prose fiction inspired by the city of London through a combination of exercises, close reading of established authors and critiques of your own work, as you are challenged to raise your own prose writing to a professional level. As it establishes your understanding of prose fiction and treating the city as a primary source or background presence, the module will nurture your potential to be an innovative and independent writer. You will also examine approaches to writing short and longer prose fiction that either overtly takes the city as its theme or employs it as a significant presence. CONFLICT AND THE CITY (WRITING DRAMA)(SEPTEMBER STARTERS) This module focuses on the craft of playwriting, with a particular emphasis on drama that exploits the possibilities of the urban environment. You will draft a dramatic work of 60-90 minutes, critique the work of experienced dramatists and develop a shared vocabulary of 'technical' terminology. It will also introduce you to major new writing opportunities in London and beyond. While contextualising new playwriting within the wider parameters of 20th and early 21st-century drama, the module will encourage you to reflect in depth on your own writing and develop an advanced understanding of the elements of a dramatic text, including characterisation, structure, conflict, dramatic irony and subtext. PORTFOLIO (JANUARY STARTERS) This module will develop your creative writing skills using a variety of exercises and techniques. It will allow you to put together a portfolio of creative writing inspired by the city through a combination of practical workshops and close reading of established authors. You will also learn to critique your own work, while being challenged to raise your own writing to professional level. Course-specific entry requirements Applicants are normally required to have a good first degree (2.1 or above) or equivalent experience in a relevant subject (eg English language, linguistics , or TESOL). Students whose first language is not English must have an IELTS certificate with an overall score of 6.5, with a minimum of 6.0 in each component, or be able to demonstrate an equivalent level of proficiency. Applicants will be required to submit two academic references, and a 10,000-word portfolio of creative writing; they may be invited to an interview (either face to face or via Skype). Applications from candidates without a first degree in a relevant subject are also welcomed. These applicants can submit professional or academic references. Teaching and assessment Teaching is conducted mainly through weekly two or three hour sessions for each module, which include tutorials, seminars, practical sessions and workshops. Teaching will also include visits to selected London institutions to support certain aspects of writing, and you will be encouraged to use various archives, galleries, etc. There is also independent self-directed study, and you will receive one-to-one advice for your dissertation or writing project. Assessment methods include submitted coursework such as essays, projects, reports or reflective logs. There are no timed written examinations. Research The Department of English, Linguistics and Cultural Studies at the University of Westminster boasts a long established research culture in literature and linguistics. Its commitment to the study of language and its interaction with literature, both from a theoretical and an applied perspective, has led to its more recent expansion of the English language and creative writing areas and the appointment of internationally renowned experts in these fields. Associated careers The course will enable you to develop sophisticated critical and creative skills and a widely applicable knowledge base that can be adapted to various fields of language use and study, creative practice and writing business. This course is intended to move you to a new level in your career as a writer by developing your skills as a sophisticated critical practitioner, and your knowledge of literature about the city as well as the writing business. You will be encouraged to network with other writers and identify useful opportunities for career development, partly through the wide range of extra-curricular activities, including writers' events and talks, and partly through the workshops organised by the departmental employability coordinator. The critical and practical skills you will acquire by the end of the course will make you a strong candidate in many areas, including arts management, copy editing, education, freelance writing, journalism, media, publishing, research and academia. [-]

MA English Language and Linguistics

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years September 2016 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The English Language and Linguistics MA aims to provide you with a thorough understanding of the linguistic features of English from a wide range of perspectives: theoretical and applied, synchronic and diachronic. [+]

The English Language and Linguistics MA aims to provide you with a thorough understanding of the linguistic features of English from a wide range of perspectives: theoretical and applied, synchronic and diachronic. It will enable you to understand and evaluate critically a wide spectrum of ideas put forward in the study of the English language (particularly in connection with linguistic variation in terms of space, time, communicative context and linguistic contact) and will equip you with the intellectual perspectives and the scholarly skills that will prepare you to conduct independent research. Course content The English Language and Linguistics MA is suitable for students who have taken English language and/or linguistics modules at undergraduate level, and others who have taken allied disciplines such as psychology, philosophy or TESOL. It is of particular interest to those wishing to pursue further study and those teaching English who wish to gain a further qualification and investigate recent and current developments in the field. If pursuing the degree full-time, you will study 180 credits in one academic year; if part-time, you will normally complete 180 credits in two academic years. You will study three core modules (including a 60-credit dissertation on a topic of English language and/or linguistics), as well as two modules from the list of options. The core modules English Language in Use and English Worldwide examine linguistic variation from a wide range of perspectives and many of the options complement this approach. You can explore TESOL issues as part of your options. The teaching is mainly through weekly two- or three-hour sessions for each module, which include tutorials, seminars, practical sessions and workshops. There is also independent self-directed study, and you will be prepared for the Dissertation via structured sessions in research methodology. Assessment methods include submitted coursework such as essays, reviews and exercises; there are no formal examinations. Core modules DISSERTATION The Dissertation gives you the opportunity to conduct autonomous work with supervisory support on a topic you feel passionate about. At the beginning of the module you will have a series of practical seminars on the different issues involved in the process of writing a dissertation, such as finding a topic, the role of the supervisor, research methodology and the conventions of academic writing. ENGLISH LANGUAGE IN USE: TIME, TEXTS AND CONTEXTS In this module you will study English historical linguistics and stylistics, literary linguistics and cognitive poetics. Thus, you will gain a good knowledge of the ways in which the language has changed overtime and the stylistic effects of particular linguistic choices, as well as an in-depth understanding of the theoretical frameworks that can be used to describe the interaction between language and literature. ENGLISH WORLDWIDE This module explores the interaction between the English language and other languages throughout the world, examining such varied but closely interrelated topics as world varieties of English, creole linguistics, multilingualism, intercultural pragmatics, and London English. Course-specific entry requirements Applicants are normally required to have a good first degree (2. 1 or above) or equivalent experience in a relevant subject (eg English language, linguistics or TESOL). Students whose first language is not English must have an IELTS certificate with an overall score of 6.5, with a minimum of 6.0 in each component, or be able to demonstrate an equivalent level of proficiency. Applicants will also be required to submit two academic references and they may be invited to an interview (either face to face or via Skype). Applications from candidates without a first degree in a relevant subject are also welcomed. These applicants can submit professional or academic references. Teaching and assessment Assessment methods include submitted coursework such as essays, projects or reports. There are no timed written examinations. Research The Department of English, Linguistics and Cultural Studies at the University of Westminster boasts a long established research culture in linguistics, with international reputation in the fields of creole linguistics, phonetics and syntax. More recently, the Department has also developed the English language and creative writing areas, appointing internationally renowned experts in these fields. Work on the English language focuses broadly on its history, its presence worldwide, multilingualism, stylistics, discourse analysis, semantics, translation and TESOL. Associated careers The English Language and Linguistics MA will provide you with sophisticated analytical skills and a widely applicable knowledge base, which will enable you to study at MPhil or PhD levels with a view to pursuing an academic career. The course is also particularly relevant to teaching English as a first or foreign language, and to a range of professions involving language and communication. While studying the MA, you will also benefit from the careers workshops organised by the departmental employability coordinator. [-]

MA Global Media

Campus Full time 1 year September 2016 United Kingdom London

From Al Jazeera to Hollywood, News Corporation to China Central TV, the media increasingly operate in a global context. This course offers a comprehensive interdisciplinary approach to global media, and is designed for those who work in, or want to work in, the media industries. [+]

From Al Jazeera to Hollywood, News Corporation to China Central TV, the media increasingly operate in a global context. This course offers a comprehensive interdisciplinary approach to global media, and is designed for those who work in, or want to work in, the media industries. You will examine key developments in the media and communications industries associated with the logic of globalisation, and explore the complex nature of the globalisation process in the media. You will gain a relevant, well-grounded, high-quality education and skill base, enabling you to develop a clear and comprehensive understanding of communication and the mass media. Based on continuous assessment, the course is taught in lectures and seminars by the team from Westminster's top-rated Communication and Media Research Institute (CAMRI ). You will be part of a bustling multicultural academic department which boasts a strong research culture, and you will be able to attend the regular talks by outside speakers (academics and practitioners) on a variety of communication and mass media issues. Course content Core modules DISSERTATION A taught module and group workshops in the first semester will guide you in conducting a major piece of independent research. This module will be supplemented by individual supervisions beginning from the second semester. The aim is to give you a guided framework within which you can demonstrate your ability to carry out advanced independent study and write it up in the form of a dissertation. The dissertation is a 15,000-word piece of original research on a topic agreed with your supervisor and related to developments, processes and outcomes in transnational media and communications, ranging from the sub-national to the supra-national, and/or their impact on cultures worldwide. GLOBAL MEDIA This module examines key developments in the media and communications industries associated with the logic of globalisation. You will explore the complex nature of the globalisation process, focusing on the emergence of both supra-national and sub-national developments and explore the relationship between new contexts of production and questions of collective culture and identity. APPROACHES TO MEDIA AND COMMUNICATION RESEARCH This module will introduce you to the main methods of communication research. We shall look at how to undertake selective quantitative and qualitative methods, understanding and exploring the different stages of the social science research process, from a definition of a research hypothesis, to data collection and analysis. We shall also look at the theoretical reasoning behind different methodological approaches to media and society, in particular the politics of social research. Associated careers Graduates have found jobs in middle and upper management in media industries, as well as the broader private sector (eg consulting and advertising firms) and public sectors (eg government ministries, regulatory authorities), international organisations and non-governmental organisations. Work experience Students are encouraged to seek work experience in the industry and opportunities are regularly communicated by members of staff. This has often led to full-time employment once graduating from the course. In addition, the MA course takes advantage of the vibrancy of the media environment in London. For instance, students are encouraged to benefit from events taking place in London, e.g. at Frontline Club. Equally, there are a number of activities within the Department that give plenty of opportunities to students for networking which increases their employability. An example here is the University’s Communication And Media Research Institute (CAMRI) seminars every fortnight where leading researchers present their work. This extracurricular activity promotes networking among MA students and gives them an opportunity to meet PhD students, other research staff and visiting speakers. Further networking opportunities are offered by the regular workshops and conferences which the various research centres within CAMRI organize and which our students can attend for free. These workshops and conferences bring together academic researchers, industry representatives as well as regulators and policy makers. Graduate employment The MA course is well established and has a strong (inter)national reputation. Our students are very successful in gaining employment status, in many cases straight from graduating the course. Graduates have found jobs in middle- and upper management in media industries, as well as the broader private (e.g. consulting and advertising firms) and public sector (e.g. government ministries, regulatory authorities), international organisations and NGOs. Some graduates also continue to do PhD research. Success in their Masters degree has allowed many who have been in media jobs before joining the course to move into more senior roles within their companies or organisations and to transfer to new sectors of the media. Graduates from the MA Global Media have found roles in a wide variety of media and communications organisations including Al Jazeera, CCTV, and many other organisations around the world. [-]

MA International Media Business

Campus Full time 1 year September 2016 United Kingdom London

This course is designed for recent graduates seeking a career in traditional and new media organisations. It provides a combination of business and media skills designed to quip you to take up an entry-level position I today's media organisation. [+]

This course is designed for recent graduates seeking a career in traditional and new media organisations. It provides a combination of business and media skills designed to quip you to take up an entry-level position I today's media organisation. You will learn how media organisation are engaging with the challenges resulting from the emergence of digital media technologies and platforms. The course introduces you to the processes by which media organisations develop their corporate strategies, business plans, marketing and production operation as they respond to radical change on the commercial. The course is designed to enable you to find and take up work placements and internships at media organisations in London during the course of their studies. Our graduates have successfully completed internships at TV production, web, multimedia, advertising, and news organisations in London. Whether you are planning a career in a large media organisation or seeking to create your own initiatives and businesses, the International Media Business MA aims to provide the analytical insight, operational knowledge and planning skills you will need to prosper. The course is taught jointly Westminster's highly successful Media Management MA. Core modules MEDIA BUSINESS DISSERTATION A taught module and group workshops in the first semester guides you in conducting a major piece of independent research which could be either practical or academic in focus. In the second semester you will receive individual tuition in how to develop your research questions, collect and analyse data. The dissertation is a 15,000-word piece of original research on a topic agreed with your supervisor and related to the business, economic, political or cultural factors shaping the performance and practices of media businesses. MEDIA BUSINESS STRATEGY This module integrates Business Strategy and Planning. You will conduct case study analysis of a media company facing major environmental changes, you will learn how to produce a competitive analysis of a media organisation and present strategy recommendations to faculty. In teams, you will learn how to develop a new media business idea, write a business and financial plan and present this to a panel of industry experts and media investors. MEDIA MARKETS This module introduces the economics of the media and content industries, including broadcasting, print, film, recorded music and interactive media. You will learn how to research and produce a market report examining the revenue and cost structures of these industries, and the economics of key processes of production, distribution and consumption. You will also learn to use tools enabling decision-making based on quantitative market data. MEDIA PRODUCTION SKILLS This module enables you to develop your practical and critical understanding of how media content is created and distributed. You will develop and improve your their newswriting techniques for different media platforms; learn how to develop research and write your own professional blog; design a website in teams using individual and team working skills; acquire a knowledge of ethical considerations faced by journalists. MEDIA WORK EXPERIENCE As London is the media capital of Europe, there is a great opportunity for you to take work experience as a part of the course. This could be in long established companies or start-ups. While the course team and work experience unit will advise you on placements it is you responsibility to actively pursue work placement opportunities. Our students have secured work placements at media companies including: the BBC, Universal Music, Blue Rubicon PR, Kameleon Brand Engagement and Paul Smith Fashion. Associated careers Most graduates of the course find work in the media industries soon after graduation, some start at an entry level while others have used their knowledge and work experience to rise quickly to a more senior level. A smaller number of graduates have started their own media businesses or worked in non-media businesses. [-]

MA International Planning and Sustainable Development

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years September 2016 United Kingdom London + 1 more

This course is aimed at built environment professionals and others with a relevant background who wish to gain an in-depth understanding of planning and sustainable development, whether to improve career prospects in their country or enter international practice. [+]

This course is aimed at built environment professionals and others with a relevant background who wish to gain an in-depth understanding of planning and sustainable development, whether to improve career prospects in their country or enter international practice. Through the course you will examine the growing problems of sustainable development facing cities, regions and communities in a rapidly urbanising world, subject to growing climate change and other environmental, economic and social pressures and risks. Based in London, you will have access to internationally recognised experience of spatial planning for sustainable development, and explore contemporary theories, public policy thinking and good practice in planning in both the developed and developing worlds. The University of Westminster is the UK's first Habitat Partner University. We work with UN-HABITAT and like-minded institutions to promote the socially and environmentally sustainable development of towns, cities and regions, in accordance with the UN Millennium Development Goals. The course is primarily for full-time international, UK and EU students, but it is also open to part-time UK-based students who want to explore an international pathway for their career development. The MA course is fully accredited by the Royal Town Planning Institute (RTPI) as a "combined planning programme". Those offered a place are eligible for postgraduate scholarships offered by the University. For information on scholarships visit westminster.ac.uk/scholarships For more information on how this course is taught and assessment methods, please refer to full course document. If you are unable to study for a full Masters, we also offer an International Planning and Sustainable Development Postgraduate Diploma and an International Planning and Sustainable Development Postgraduate Certificate. Please scroll to the bottom of this page to find out about these courses. Alternatively, you can study a single module(s) from the International Planning and Sustainable Development MA course as a stand alone short course. Course content This course addresses the growing problems of sustainable development facing cities and communities in a rapidly urbanising world. It explores contemporary theories, public policy thinking and good practice in planning that spans both developed and developing world contexts, and offers you the opportunity to explore one area of specialism in a related field in some depth. Course pathways There are two RTPI-accredited pathways through the course. The Spatial Planning Pathway has a strong urban design component and an emphasis on the development planning process. The Urban Resilience Pathway provides a sustainable development-focused route with a core emphasis on climate change mitigation and adaptation planning. Both pathways cover all these aspects to some degree. Core modules (Both pathways) Dissertation or Major Project (40 credits) This module offers you the opportunity to research in depth a spatial planning or related topic through primary or desk-based research. The Dissertation is 12-15,000 words in length. You may undertake a Major Project on a similar topic, producing a written report of a similar length, or a report combining planning or design proposals, or data presented in other formats, with a written analytical report of 5-10,000 words. International Spatial Planning Practice (20 credits) Through the exploration of theoretical models of sustainable urban form and practical exercises, you will explore the principles, methods and techniques of land use, transport and infrastructure planning for new and existing towns and cities and their regions. The module examines strategic spatial planning policy and managing development in the context of rapid urbanisation and the challenge of urban governance in the developing world. Planning in a Globalising World (20 credits) This module explores urban issues such as impacts of economic globalisation and sustainability in a range of development contexts (developed and developing worlds, and high, middle and low-income countries) using a comparative planning systems approach. You will analyse key urban policy concerns, debates, dynamics of urban change and planning responses comparatively and internationally, across different regional and historical contexts. Research Methods and the Built Environment (10 credits) This module introduces you to research methods and methodologies specific to urban and spatial research, design and planning. You will explore the theory and practice of developing a research framework, with a particular emphasis upon methods, methodologies and frameworks used within the built environment professions. The module will allow you to begin developing your own research proposal for the Dissertation. Skills for Planning Practice (10 credits) This module introduces you to a range of planning skills not covered elsewhere in core modules. You will cover core planning skills, appraisal techniques and technical skills including project management and communications. The module introduces assessments of need and capacity (for example retail, housing, leisure, transport) and tools and techniques to assist with these assessments, such as impact assessment, GIS, effective project management and engagement techniques. Sustainable Cities and Neighbourhoods (20 credits) In this module you will explore 'next generation' cities, investigating critical issues relating to climate change and other large-scale environmental threats and challenges. The module adopts a cross-disciplinary perspective, at a range of scales from the global to the local. Using a UK-based case study and hands-on sustainability appraisal, planning and urban design exercises, you will develop a critical understanding of the concept of sustainability, encompassing notions of resource conservation, environmental, social and economic impact, and quality of life. Sustainable Neighbourhood Development and Management (20 credits) In this module you will address the range of social sustainability concerns including housing and livelihoods. As well as introducing you to techniques such as participatory planning and community asset management, this module is concerned with local neighbourhood planning and introducing conceptual frameworks for understanding localised social and governance structures. Core module (Spatial Planning Pathway) Urban Design and Planning Skills (20 credits) In this module you will examine place-making in the context of the UK development process. Based on practical design projects supported by lectures and workshops, it enables students to gain an insight into the relationship between urban design theory and practice. The module is built around a site-based design project with a series of specific tasks relating to various stages of project development including area appraisal, strategic framework and design brief. Core modules (Urban Resilience Pathway) Planning for Urban Risk and Resilience (20 credits) You will explore spatial planning for risk management, including reducing vulnerability and building urban resilience as it relates to the built environment, urban governance and long-term climate change and development needs. The module integrates sustainable development and climate change mitigation and adaptation planning concerns with disaster and hazard risk management in an international urban context. Course-specific entry requirements You should have a good first degree (normally Second Class Honours or above) in a relevant built environment or land planning related discipline (such as urban or transport planning, architecture, landscape design, surveying, civil engineering, or land management) from a higher education institute in the UK or EU, or a comparable qualification from another country. Alternatively, you may have a good first degree (normally Second Class Honours or above) in a relevant human geography, social or environmental science subject from a higher education institute in the UK or EU (or a comparable qualification from another country), and relevant practical experience of working in a built environment discipline. If your first language is not English you will need an IELTS score of 6.5. Professional accreditation The MA course is fully accredited by the royal town planning institute (RTPI) as a 'combined planning programme'. Associated careers Students on the course are most likely to be working in a relevant built environment or sustainable development-related profession. Overseas students may be receiving a government bursary. Graduates from the course may secure promotion within their existing or a new related area of work, or move onto more responsible positions within 18 months of completing their studies. This may include management posts or the responsibility for project or policy development. It is expected that graduates will enhance their potential to be considered for development positions outside their home country. Graduates from this course can expect to find employment as planners or urban designers, urban regeneration or environmental management specialists in private consultancy, local and national government, and non-governmental sectors in their own country or internationally, including international development agencies. [-]

MA International Relations

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years September 2016 United Kingdom London + 1 more

This course offers you an innovative, disciplined and intellectually challenging framework for studying issues and perspectives within international relations. You will consider various aspects of international order and politics, including the dynamics of international social and political power relationships and conflicts, and state building. [+]

This course offers you an innovative, disciplined and intellectually challenging framework for studying issues and perspectives within international relations. You will consider various aspects of international order and politics, including the dynamics of international social and political power relationships and conflicts, and state building. These topics are studied comparatively in relation to governmental, political and social processes, and in the contexts of various historical continuities, discontinuities and contrasts. Core modules Dissertation and Research Methods You will receive supervised guidance and research methods training (through a series of research method workshops, the dissertation induction and colloquium seminars, and individual dissertation supervision sessions) to prepare you for your Masters dissertation on an agreed research topic. You will begin identifying your dissertation interests at the start of your studies, when you will be able to discuss your ideas with different tutors who may direct you towards taking appropriate option modules that support your future research studies. This module must be taken either following the completion of all other modules, or concurrently with modules in your second semester. International Relations: Beyond International Relations? This module analyses the theory and the practice involved in giving international content to universal values and aspirations today. Part I analyses how two central tenets of realism have come under question: national interest and sovereignty. Part II considers the rights of the individual in the international sphere, focusing on humanitarian assistance and human rights. Part III traces the impact of new international practices to extend democracy, and Part IV analyses the recent developments in international justice and law. Part V considers whether a new global political actor is emerging – global civil society – which can overcome the international/domestic divide. International Relations: Theoretical Perspectives This module charts the development of International Relations (IR) as an academic discipline, locating the dominant theoretical perspectives within their historical and political contexts. The central theme is the analysis of how a broad range of theories reflect changes in the subject of IR theory – the sovereign state. It looks at the role of theory in IR, the historical development of the discipline, and focuses on competing theories. The course aims to familiarise you with the rich debate within the discipline and allow you to make up your own mind about your choice of theories. Course-specific entry requirements You should have a First Class or Upper Second Class Honours degree or equivalent in Social Sciences or Humanities; equivalent qualifications from overseas are welcome. Your application must be supported by a reference written on institutional notepaper by an academic familiar with your abilities. Applications from mature candidates are welcomed. If your first language is not English, you will need an IELTS score of 6.5 or equivalent. The University offers pre-sessional summer programmes if you need to improve your English before starting your course. Associated careers This course will provide you with numerous key skills and knowledge that will prepare you for your future career in a variety of different fields. Our graduates hold posts within various international and national government departments and organisations. Many have also gone on to study for Doctorates within the Department and at other universities around the world. [-]

MA International Relations and Security

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years September 2016 United Kingdom London + 1 more

This course provides you with a detailed understanding of the nature of the contemporary security agenda, its origins, theoretical foundations and future trajectory. You will examine the theories of international security and those key security issues that have dominated security discourse in the post-Cold War era. [+]

The question of security now dominates contemporary international politics. Issues such as the 'War on Terror', pre-emptive self-defence and humanitarian intervention constitute seminal international concerns that have implications for all states and all peoples. This course provides you with a detailed understanding of the nature of the contemporary security agenda, its origins, theoretical foundations and future trajectory. You will examine the theories of international security and those key security issues that have dominated security discourse in the post-Cold War era. You will also develop your analytical skills in order to facilitate understanding of the seminal contemporary security issues in a broader theoretical and historical framework. Core modules Contemporary Controversies in International Security: Intervention Terrorism and Self-Defence he end of the Cold War fundamentally altered the nature of international security, heralding the emergence of new issues and threats. In the contemporary era the locus and nature of the paramount threats have altered, with intra-state conflicts and non-state actors characterising sources of insecurity. This module will provide you with a comprehensive overview of security discourse and practice since the end of the Cold War relating key issues such as humanitarian intervention, self-defence and terrorism to broader trends such as the evolving role of the UN, the challenges to international law and the new concern with intra-state crises. Dissertation and Research Methods You will receive supervised guidance and research methods training (through a series of research method workshops, the dissertation induction and colloquium seminars, and individual dissertation supervision sessions) to prepare you for your Masters dissertation on an agreed research topic. You will begin identifying your dissertation interests at the start of your studies, when you will be able to discuss your ideas with different tutors who may direct you towards taking appropriate option modules that support your future research studies. This module must be taken either following the completion of all other modules, or concurrently with modules in your second semester. Theories of International Security This module examines the contemporary discourse and debates surrounding the meaning of international security. The end of the Cold War fundamentally altered the structure of the international system and precipitated the emergence of a new security agenda. The new systemic dynamics and reconfigured security agenda led many to question the dominant theoretical frameworks previously applied to international security, and new security discourses – such as human security and critical security studies – have emerged to challenge established security theory. This module will examine the key tenets of the new theoretical frameworks and critically analyse their contribution to our understanding of 'security'. Course-specific entry requirements You should have a First Class or Upper Second Class Honours degree or equivalent in Social Sciences or Humanities; equivalent qualifications from overseas are welcome. Your application must be supported by a reference written on institutional notepaper by an academic familiar with your abilities. Applications from mature candidates are welcomed. If your first language is not English, you will need an IELTS score of 6.5 or equivalent. The University offers pre-sessional summer programmes if you need to improve your English before starting your course. Associated careers This course will provide you with numerous key skills and knowledge that will prepare you for your future career in a variety of different fields. Our graduates hold posts within various international and national government departments and organisations. Many have also gone on to study for Doctorates within the Department and at other universities around the world. [-]

MA Media, Campaigning and Social Change

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years September 2016 United Kingdom London + 1 more

This new Masters degree from the world ranking Department of Journalism and Mass Communications aims to equip students with the skills, knowledge and strategic approach to develop and analyse social change campaigns, with a particular focus on the role of communications and the media. [+]

This new Masters degree from the world ranking Department of Journalism and Mass Communications aims to equip students with the skills, knowledge and strategic approach to develop and analyse social change campaigns, with a particular focus on the role of communications and the media. This innovative course builds on our close links with leading campaigners and communicators in London's vibrant social change sector. An advisory panel, with representatives from Amnesty UK, Campaign Bootcamp, FairSay, Friends of the Earth, NCVO, RIBA, WaterAid and Scouts among others, will ensure we always reflect the skill sets in demand and deliver an exciting learning experience. A limited number of work placements and internships will be available. The course is aimed at those with some experience or interest in social change, the media, and communications or campaigns within not for profit organisations. The course will help you improve your practical skills, develop a deep understanding of the theories and frameworks that underpin and shape campaign communications, and enjoy the space to reflect critically on current and past practice. It is designed to help you start, or progress, a career in charity, pressure group or public sector campaign communications. It may also be of interest to those working in corporate social responsibility. The course team has extensive experience both in developing social change campaigns and in academic research into the connections between media and social change. The course is jointly led by Michaela O’Brien and Dr. Anastasia Kavada with additional teaching by practitioners and members of CAMRI. The course offers a number of delivery modes to suit the different needs of students and can be taken as either part-time or full-time. There are three core modules. The first develops practical planning and campaign communications skills; the second considers media and activism theories; and the third combines theory with practice, reflecting on applying concepts like power and ethics within the setting of campaign communications. Each module has assessments – e.g. essays, campaign plans, reflective blogs, debates and presentations - rather than exams. These three core modules make up the Postgraduate Certificate. Students can take another three modules - chosen from a very wide range of options including practical media and content production skills; diversity issues; development and policy; social media; theories of communication and more - to complete a Postgraduate Diploma. Students wanting to take the Masters course also complete either a 15,000-word research dissertation, or a professional practice project (which can be work-based). Details of the individual modules are given below: Course content Core modules - Semester One CRITICAL ISSUES IN CAMPAIGNING In this module, students will consider the factors that influence social change in the context of current campaigns around the world, and the historical development of campaign techniques and practices. They will apply a critical analysis of concepts such as power, theories of change, ethics, innovation, media representation, narrative and framing to practical scenarios and topical campaigns. This module requires students to monitor and critically evaluate practice in the UK and / or internationally. Core modules - Semester Two PLANNING CAMPAIGN COMMUNICATIONS In this module students will learn how to research and plan a campaign for social change based on the theories of social change examined in semester 1. They will produce communication material such as news releases, e-alerts, tweets, infographics and / or videos to support the campaign strategy. Where possible, students work to live briefs. This is a practical, hands-on module taught through a series of workshops, visits to campaign communication teams in London-based campaigning organisations, and guest talks by leading campaigners and social change communicators. MEDIA, ACTIVISM AND POLITICS The module critically investigates the relationship between media, activism and politics. It offers a critical assessment of the role of media in political mobilization, social movements, dissent, wars, conflicts, elections, and political and social crises. The module looks at the impact of the internet and new means of transparency and communications on journalism and activism in a range of circumstances from secure democracies through different kinds of political systems. The module is unique in its combination of traditional academic lectures and seminars with attendance of topical events and visits to relevant exhibitions and institutions. Associated careers This course is particularly relevant if you want to start, or to progress, a career in communications and campaigning for social change, whether in a charity or non-governmental organisation; in a public sector body; in a political party or election campaigning setting; or even in a corporate social responsibility role. It could also be a stepping-stone towards a PhD and an academic career in this growing field of study. [-]

MA Media and Development

Campus Full time 1 year September 2016 United Kingdom London

The Media and Development MA is an interdisciplinary course that teaches main theories, concepts, case studies and practical media skills around the theme of media and development and its implications for less developed countries. [+]

The Media and Development MA is an interdisciplinary course that teaches main theories, concepts, case studies and practical media skills around the theme of media and development and its implications for less developed countries. The course will provide you with a unique blend of theory and practice teaching, aimed at deepening your knowledge of the history of communications within the development process of emerging economies. It will critically evaluate the impact of international and regional institutions from a critical political economic perspective. Teaching by academic staff, guest lecturers and other carefully selected staff from development organisations will provide you with an overview of the policies, actions and impact of state and non-state institutions within the area of communication media and development. A distinctive feature is its emphasis on the practical role of communication media in development. You will participate in media production workshops and take part in our internship programme, offered in partnership with media and development organisations in London. As part of the work experience module, students participate in an extensive NGOs and media seminar series featuring experts and panel discussions. The work placement programme is in line with the University of Westminster’s strategy of nurturing of the critical practitioner. The course team is led by Dr Winston Mano and includes Professor Daya Thussu, Professor Christian Fuchs, Professor David Gauntlett, Professor Naomi Sakr, Dr Anthony McNicholas, Dr Xin Xin, Dr Anastasia Kavada, Dr Maria Michalis, Dr Roza Tsagarousianou, Dr Tarik Sabry, Paul Majendie, Geoffrey Davies and Michaela O’Brien. Visiting Lecturers include Jackie Davies, founder and Director of the Communication and Development Network (C4D) (www.c4d.org), a community of professionals working in communication for development. As a peer network the C4D Network is aimed at communication for development practitioners plus allied development workers, donors, academics and communication experts from the BBC, UN and major development organisations. The joining criterion is an engagement in communication for development - either professionally or through academia. Students on the Media and Development MA have the option to join the C4D network and each can do a fellowship/internship with the network during the course. Core modules THEORIES OF COMMUNICATION The module is intentionally eclectic.You will cover (in a loosely historical way) the arguments, advantages and problems of the main sociological, cultural and psychological theories about the media. It aims to provide a comprehensive introduction to the most important ways of approaching the fundamental issues posed by the relationships between the media of communication and social and economic life. It will also enable you to understand the problems posed by different intellectual traditions, and to place those theories in their proper contexts. THEORIES OF DEVELOPMENT This module focuses on different theories and approaches to development. It considers key development theories and approaches such as modernization, dependency and Neo- Liberalism and will provide you with an opportunity to critically assess their relevance to specific contexts in developing countries. DISSERTATION A taught module and group workshops in the first semester will guide you in conducting a major piece of independent research. This module will be supplemented by individual supervisions beginning from the second semester. The aim is to give you a guided framework within which you can demonstrate your ability to carry out advanced independent study and write it up in the form of a dissertation. The dissertation is a 15,000-word piece of original research on a topic agreed with your supervisor and related to the political, economic, cultural and/or sociological factors which shape the practices and outcomes of mass media, including media texts and the audience reception of them. DEVELOPMENT AND COMMUNICATIONS POLICY The aims of this module are to provide you with a theoretical overview of the concept of ‘development’, and the opportunity to consider how it relates to empirical experience in communications in small and developing countries. You will be able to analyse the role of multilateral and bilateral agencies, NGOs, public service broadcasting and to compare the experiences of a range of countries in attempting to retain cultural autonomy, in developing their own communications technologies and policies, in democratisation, and in exporting mass media content. This module also critically discusses Chinese intervention in communication and development in Africa. MEDIA WORK EXPERIENCE Students will be encouraged to take work experience during the course. With the number of charities and NGOs dealing with development in London, we expect students will get a placement with an organisation and we envisage them working in a communications role. Students on the Media and Development MA have the option to join the C4D Network and each can do a fellowship/internship with the network during the course. Associated Careers The Media and Development MA is suitable for you if you would value an opportunity to be able to reflect critically on the role of media in the process of development and learn practical skills. The course will be of interest to you if you have a background in working for governmental, intergovernmental and nongovernmental organisations, and a range of international business organisations, while at the same time providing appropriate preparation for those seeking employment in such fields or, indeed, wanting to prepare for further studies for higher a higher degree, including a PhD. While the majority of our graduates will return to more senior posts with improved skills, knowledge and qualifications gained from their year with us, we would expect them to apply for jobs at development organisations such as Internews, BBC Media Action, Oxfam, Save the Children, Red Cross, ActionAid, Panos, DfiD, Intermedia, Institute of War and Peace, Christian Aid, WACC, OneWorld and War on Want. Work experience Students on the MA in Media and Development will mainly get work experience opportunities in London. The course equips students with skills, strategies and practical knowledge of work in the media for development sector. Students participate in media production workshops and take part in our internship programme offered in partnership with media and development organisations in London. The inclusion of an internship/work placement programme on this MA is in line with the University’s strategy of nurturing of the critical practitioner. The Media Work Experience module requires all students to source, secure and complete one or more (depending on the length) work placements in a media and development environment. They will produce a full Personal Development Plan (PDP) to identify their core skills and match them with work placement opportunities. They will develop the PDP as they approach media and development organisations, obtain work placements and as they maintain a diary to reflect on the development of their skills and experience. The module extends across the summer term to allow students to gain the maximum value from their work experience. In 2011-2012 industry speakers included Sophie Chalk, from OneWorld, who is a highly experienced television producer/director. Using her knowledge of filming in more than 25 countries around the world, Sophie held a day long workshop to explore representation, practicalities of working in a developing country and how to make programming appealing to the widest possible audience. Graduate employment Graduates of the first year (2012) are applying for posts in development organisations based in London such as OneWorld, Oxfam, Save the Children, Red Cross, ActionAid, Panos, DfiD, Intermedia, BBC, Institute of War and Peace, Christian Aid and War on Want. Some students were able to build on knowledge, skills and their background in working for governmental, intergovernmental and non-governmental organisations (in Romania, Pakistan and India) and a range of international business organisations, including the BBC. The course also prepares students for further studies and for a higher degree, e.g., a PhD. Some students applied for PhD Scholarships advertised by the Faculty of Media, Arts and Design and they were all encouraged to join the Communication for Development Network (C4D) which meets once a month in London. We are aware that the range of skills needed is exceptionally diffuse, and that students on the course hope to develop careers in a variety of fields in many different countries. We are also aware that we are preparing you for careers in a rapidly changing job market and the structure of the course allows you take advantage of change, and not to be its victim. It, therefore, would be misleading and unhelpful to place too much emphasis on acquiring a precise set of skills drawn from one part of the media and development sector. Finally, with a view to your professional development planning, the course is designed to give you a wide-ranging and critical knowledge of the development industry that you plan to enter. [-]

MA Museums, Galleries and Contemporary Culture

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years September 2016 United Kingdom London + 1 more

This course looks at the way that museums, galleries and other cultural institutions are changing to meet the needs of the 21st century. The MA has been designed for students who wish to work as curators, arts organisers, museum professional and other cultural managers and who want to know in particular how these institutions face contemporary issues. [+]

This course looks at the way that museums, galleries and other cultural institutions are changing to meet the needs of the 21st century. The MA has been designed for students who wish to work as curators, arts organisers, museum professional and other cultural managers and who want to know in particular how these institutions face contemporary issues. It looks at the changing role of cultural provision and how agencies, festivals and flexible organisations shape, house, fund, and disseminate culture today. The course also gives you the opportunity to immerse yourself in the contemporary debates about working practices in cultural institutions, and the changing context in which organisations operate. The course concentrates on professional practice and you will work closely with institutions such as Tate Britain and the Museum of London, and conduct case studies into creative projects run by organisations as diverse as the Victoria and Albert Museum, smaller independent galleries and London-based festivals and arts organisations. Classes are taught off-site at other institutions, and involve professionals from the sector as much as possible to give you an understanding of vocational issues and a close involvement in the workplace. Course content You will examine key issues and themes in the museums and gallery sector, and explore how these are dealt with not just in theory, but also on a day-to-day basis by leading institutions. You will learn about the challenges faced by museums and galleries, how they confront them and how they are developing innovative practices in relation to their collections, exhibitions and audiences. For example, sessions address how institutions use internet resources for learning and to promote their collections, new approaches to understanding arts audiences, and collaborations between creative arts organisations and museums. Gaining professional knowledge is an important part of the course and you will be encouraged to have a close involvement with institutions through internships, work placements and projects. The course is also designed to facilitate students who are currently in professional employment in cultural institutions, and flexible timetables can be constructed so that you can integrate your studies with you own work. The course is taught alongside the Visual Culture MA and shares modules with this and with other MAs taught in the Department, offering you a broad theoretic context that can cover wider aspects of the arts. The teaching team are curators, museum and gallery professionals, as well as scholars and fine artists. Teaching methods include seminars, tutorials, practical sessions and workshops, together with independent, student-directed study. The course has a strong emphasis on vocational learning, and you are encouraged to undertake professional placements and internships. Assessment methods include coursework (essays, oral presentations and professional project reports) as well as the final 10-12,000-word dissertation. There are no formal examinations. Core modules ART MUSEUMS AND CONTEMPORARY CULTURE This module takes a case-study approach to the position of Tate Britain and leading international art museums and asks how they define their roles and priorities within the contemporary art world. Specific themes include: how contemporary research interests are developed by scholarship within the collection and through exhibitions; how different approaches to collecting art have evolved and reflect institutions' different priorities, material interests and ideologies; and the relationship of institutions to the commercial art world, festivals and art fairs. You will also explore the changing relationship of signature buildings to an institution's identity, and how major institutions are presented as a 'brand'. CURRENT ISSUES IN MUSEUM AND GALLERY STUDIES This module introduces students to the current issues being discussed by professionals and the pressing issues that are facing their institutions. They range from the changing role of organisations as public bodies and what their responsibilities are, to working in a post-recession economy where public funding is diminishing, to the ethics of sponsorship from the private sector. It will address topical issues such as the inclusivity and accessibility of organisations to audiences with disabilities and how museums deal with claims for the repatriation of artefacts to other countries. The module is structured around talks from museum and gallery professionals with additional reading groups where students will tackle the way issues are discussed in professional journals. This is a core module that all students will take as it covers essential knowledge for the MA. DISSERTATION This extended piece of research work is an opportunity for you to pursue a topic of individual interest, and is conducted through individual study and directed supervision. The module also includes preparation of a detailed research proposal. It consists of preliminary workshops focused on relevant research skills, followed by individual tutorials with your supervisor. Course-specific entry requirements You will normally be required to have a good first degree or equivalent. Applications from mature candidates with demonstrable relevant work experience and relevant professional qualifications are welcomed. In these cases, you may be required to undertake a written entrance test in the form of a short 1,500-word essay, and may also be required to assemble a work experience portfolio (consisting of testimonials, job descriptions etc). Where English is not your first language, you will need an IELTS score of 6.5 overall and 7.0 in writing (or equivalent). Associated careers Graduates will have the skills to work in a variety of positions in the cultural sector, including in the post of curator, consultant, arts and media strategists and advisers, funding officers or education and interpretation officers. [-]

MA Public Relations

Campus Full time 1 year September 2016 United Kingdom London

This course is designed to produce the future leaders of the Public Relations Industry. You will not only learn the practical skills required to embark on a career in PR but also the research and analysis skills that will help you get ahead. [+]

This course is designed to produce the future leaders of the Public Relations Industry. You will not only learn the practical skills required to embark on a career in PR but also the research and analysis skills that will help you get ahead. You will create campaigns, pitch to clients, stage a press conference and create videos and blogs, as well as write research reports, essays and a dissertation. You will also explore issues affecting the industry, such as professional ethics and the impact of digital media. The course has close links to the London-based PR industry, and is one of a select few chosen by the professional body PRCA for its University partnership initiative. These connections with leading PR practitioners help you gain the practical knowledge and understanding you need to work in PR. Course content You will take five core and two optional modules. All teaching takes place in the first and second semesters - September to April. In the third semester you will complete your dissertation. Core modules PUBLIC RELATIONS AND THE MEDIA The module equips students with the professional practice skills to conduct media relations including writing press releases, conducting media interviews and preparing media events. It also looks at the increasing role of digital media including Twitter feeds, blogs and online newsrooms. PLANNING A PUBLIC RELATIONS CAMPAIGN This module gives you an opportunity to develop and enhance your campaign management skills. You will plan, design and present a creative public relations campaign and explore the relationship between PR agencies and their clients. UNDERSTANDING PUBLIC RELATIONS This module provides a critical evaluation of the public relations industry and the context in which it operates. You will look at the role of the practitioner and explore whether perceptions of the industry are valid. You will also consider the professional aspirations of PR, ethics and how the industry is changing in the context of digital media. CONTEMPORARY THEORY AND ISSUES IN PR This module explores a range of perspectives on PR. We look at the social, cultural and management approaches to PR, and examine the tension between these theoretical models and their practical application. DISSERTATION RESEARCH SKILLS This module provides guidance on how to plan and conduct a piece of independent research into the PR industry. You will learn how to apply the theories, research methods and scholarly practice learned in your other modules to produce an original 15,000 word dissertation. Associated careers This course is particularly relevant if you want to start, or to progress, a career in public relations or one that involves communications with either internal or external stakeholders. Most graduates of the course are working in PR or related communications roles within a year of graduating. Of our several hundred alumni, many now operate at the most senior level and some have won awards, such as Reuven Proenca, who won Young Communicator of the Year in 2009 at the inaugural Middle East PR Association Awards in Dubai. Some alumni work in PR agencies including Hill and Knowlton, Burson-Marsteller and Edelman, while others work in-house at organisations as diverse as the Premier League and the United Nations. [-]

MA Social Media, Culture and Society

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 5 years September 2016 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The MA in Social Media, Culture and Society offers a flexible interdisciplinary exploration of key contemporary developments in the networked digital media environment. [+]

The MA in Social Media, Culture and Society offers a flexible interdisciplinary exploration of key contemporary developments in the networked digital media environment. It will benefit those seeking to develop their understanding of contemporary communication and its societal, political, regulatory, industrial and cultural contexts. The MA in Social Media, Culture and Society provides students with the opportunity to focus at postgraduate level on: Studying the ways in which social media and the Internet shape and are shaped by social, economic, political, technological and cultural factors, in order to equip students to become critical research-oriented social media experts. Developing reflective and critical insights into how social media and the internet are used in multiple contexts in society, and into which roles social media can play in various forms of organisations that are situated in these societal contexts. The aim is that students are equipped to become reflective and critical social media practitioners. Gaining in-depth knowledge and understanding of the major debates about the social and cultural roles of social media and the Internet. Acquiring advanced knowledge and understanding of the key categories, theories, approaches and models of social media's and the Internet's roles in and impacts on society and human practices. Obtaining advanced insights into practical activity and practice-based work that relate to how social media and the Internet work and which implications they have for social and cultural practices. Course content Core modules SOCIAL MEDIA: CREATIVITY, SHARING, VISIBILITY This module provides students with a theoretical understanding of the development, significance and contemporary uses of social media. It fosters both critical analysis and reflective practice in the networked digital media environment. Students will critically engage with key ideas of creativity, sharing and visibility in social media, and will participate in creative and reflective practice using leading social media tools and platforms. DISSERTATION MODULE A taught module and group workshops in the first semester will guide you in conducting a major piece of independent research or create a theoretically inspired social media artefact. This module will be supplemented by individual supervisions beginning from the second semester. The aim is to give you a guided framework within which you can demonstrate your ability to carry out advanced independent study and write it up in the form of a dissertation. The dissertation is a 15,000-word piece of original research on a topic agreed with your supervisor and related to the political, economic, cultural and/or sociological factors which shape the practices and outcomes of social media OR a social media artefact accompanied by a written report of approximately 7,000 words, in which the student critically reflects on their social media project, and grounds it in relevant theory. CRITICAL THEORY OF SOCIAL MEDIA AND THE INTERNET This module provides an overview of the critical and theoretical analysis of how the Internet and social media (Facebook, Twitter, Wikipedia, WikiLeaks, file sharing, blogs etc) shape and impact on society, the economy and politics and how power structures in society shape the Internet and social media. Associated careers Students obtain skills to work as social media experts, either as social media and Internet researchers or as social media professionals in various types of organisations. Work experience Students are encouraged to seek work experience in the industry and opportunities are regularly communicated by members of staff. This has often led to full-time employment once graduating from the course.In addition, the course takes advantage of the vibrancy of the media environment in London. For instance, students are encouraged to benefit from events taking place in London, eg at Frontline Club. Equally, there are a number of activities within the Department that give plenty of opportunities to students for networking which increases their employability. An example here is the University's Communication And Media Research Institute (CAMRI) seminars every fortnight where leading researchers present their work. This extracurricular activity promotes networking among MA students and gives them an opportunity to meet PhD students, other research staff and visiting speakers. Further networking opportunities are offered by the regular workshops and conferences which the various research centres within CAMRI organize and which our students can attend for free. These workshops and conferences bring together academic researchers, industry representatives as well as regulators and policy makers. Graduate employment Graduates who have studied media and communication at the University of Westminster have found jobs in middle and upper management in media industries, as well as the broader private (e.g. consulting and advertising firms) and public sector (eg government ministries, regulatory authorities), international organisations and NGOs. Some graduates also continue to do PhD research. Success in their Masters degree has allowed many who have been in media jobs before joining the course to move into more senior roles within their companies or organisations and to transfer to new sectors of the media. [-]

MA Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years September 2016 United Kingdom London + 1 more

This course provides you with a specialist combination of theoretical academic study and robust practical application and skills development in English language teaching. It provides advanced training for TESOL professionals, and examines the latest developments in TESOL methodology and related issues. [+]

This course provides you with a specialist combination of theoretical academic study and robust practical application and skills development in English language teaching. It provides advanced training for TESOL professionals, and examines the latest developments in TESOL methodology and related issues. You will develop the practical and professional skills involved in TESOL, along with the ability to analyse and apply theoretical perspectives to practical situations. The course enables you to develop your skills in argument, synthesis and critical expression of TESOL issues, and apply them in different teaching contexts. You will also enhance your advanced skills of research, presentation and analysis in TESOL contexts. Nurturing ongoing professional development and skills in pursuing further independent research is an important aspect of the course, enabling you to make a full contribution to professional development in your specialist area. Course content The course consists of three core modules and a range of option modules. The Language and Learning: Description and Analysis core module introduces in-depth exploration of the core concepts in the description and analysis of language and language learning, with specific reference to English language teaching and second language acquisition. The Current Developments in Language Teaching core module examines a wide range of current practice and developments, including communicative competence in language learning and teaching, language teaching methodology, and discrete and integrated skills. The Dissertation is the third core module. Core modules CURRENT DEVELOPMENTS IN LANGUAGE TEACHING You will examine current practice and developments in language teaching, including communicative competence in language learning. During this module you will cover a range of topical issues in language learning and teaching, including: content and language integrated learning; individual differences in language learning; language for specific purposes; learner autonomy and strategy training; methodology; neurolinguistic processing and multiple intelligences; skills lessons and real language; and teacher language and national curriculum. DISSERTATION This initial research-skills module will cover a range of topics, including: investigating and assessing the relevance of potential research sources; issues in research design, including identifying the field of study; planning, conducting and recording of research; the responsibility of the researcher and role of the supervisor; and writing up. The subsequent work you undertake will be conducted autonomously with supervisory support. LANGUAGE AND LEARNING: DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS This module introduces and encourages in-depth exploration of core concepts in the description and analysis of language, with specific reference to English language teaching. The module also introduces and encourages in-depth exploration of core concepts in language learning, with specific reference to second language acquisition and the implications of these concepts for the language teacher. The module is divided into two units, the first on language description and analysis, and the second on language learning. Course-specific entry requirements You are normally required to have a good first degree or equivalent, although mature candidates with demonstrated relevant work experience and relevant qualifications (eg CELTA, DELTA) are welcomed. If you did not receive your first degree in English, you will need an IELTS average score of 6.5 (or equivalent). Associated careers The course enables you to make substantial progress as advanced English Language Teaching practitioners and managers in a variety of national, regional and cultural educational systems. You will have the training and preparation to make significant contributions as instructors, managers and researchers. [-]

MA Urban Design

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years September 2016 United Kingdom London + 1 more

Our Urban Design programme is one of the largest and longest established in the UK. It enjoys an excellent reputation and our graduates are highly respected in the profession. Our students are from a variety of professions and backgrounds, including architecture, landscape architecture and planning, from the UK, Europe, and across the globe. [+]

In an increasingly urbanised world, there is growing international demand for urban design graduates. These courses will equip you with the knowledge and skills you need to participate in this rapidly expanding profession. Urban design involves shaping the physical setting for life in cities. The pace of urban change, and the challenge of making cities efficient, sustainable and meaningful, demands creative solutions to design and management. The Urban Design courses at Westminster provide a coherent approach to issues that face our cities, combining structured academic study with live design projects, allowing you to develop practical skills, a theoretical understanding and an informed approach to sustainable urban development. Our Urban Design programme is one of the largest and longest established in the UK. It enjoys an excellent reputation and our graduates are highly respected in the profession. Our students are from a variety of professions and backgrounds, including architecture, landscape architecture and planning, from the UK, Europe, and across the globe. They range from recent graduates seeking to expand their skill base before commencing their career or those considering a shift from an allied profession, to established professionals seeking to specialise or develop a more informed critical approach. Our central London location allows you to interact with a huge variety of practitioners and organisations, as well as drawing on the city's huge range of resources; you will be at the heart of the debate over the future of cities. For more information on how this course is taught and assessment methods, please refer to full course document. Course content The course places a strong emphasis on design, practical outputs and a multidisciplinary approach. While focusing on UK examples, the lessons from the courses are applicable to a wide range of international and economic contexts. This flexible and student-centred approach is highly valued by former graduates and their employers. The course is delivered by staff with many years' experience in practice, education, training, research, and consultancy in the UK and overseas. Outputs from the course combine into a portfolio demonstrating your ability to deal with the complexities of urban design in a practical and informed manner. Core modules Sustainable Cities In this module you will explore the concept of sustainability in urban development in depth. You will examine the role of urban form and land use planning, energy planning, and social and transport infrastructure in developing sustainable cities. You will be introduced to techniques of and undertake a sustainability appraisal. An important aspect of the module is interdisciplinary working and you will examine how different disciplines can contribute to the sustainable development of cities and neighbourhoods. Urban Design Field Trip The field trip forms an integral part of the taught course as a whole. It involves a residential field trip normally undertaken over five or six days in a European city. The city has urban forms from a variety of periods and is undergoing growth, enabling the analysis of historic form as well as the investigation of new models. Student feedback over many years has demonstrated that it is a highly valued part of the course. Urban Design and Development Planning Skills This is a foundation double module for all postgraduate Urban Design pathways, enabling you to develop the essential skills required in practice. It is built around a site-based exercise with a series of specific tasks relating to various stages of project development. These include area appraisal, strategic framework, design brief, development appraisal and design statement. The module covers urban form, activity and movement, design in the public realm, site planning, development economics and legislative context. Based on practical design projects supported by lectures and workshops, it enables you to gain an insight into the relationship between urban design theory and practice. Urbanism and Design In this module you will address the issue of how and why cities look as they do. You will investigate urban form through history, and the module will encourage you to understand how and why particular patterns of development have come into being and why other visionary insights have not. Particular attention is paid to design traditions, philosophies and intentions, past and present. You will be required to critically engage with the topics and to distinguish between the physical manifestations of different types of urbanism. Dissertation/Major Project This module offers you the opportunity to research in-depth topics or issues related to urban design based on primary or desk-based research. The written dissertation is 12-15,000 words in length. Alternatively, you may undertake a major design project that explores a particular issue and is informed by research, including a written report of 5-6,000 words. Reflective Practice In this module you will draw on both formal and informal learning experiences and relate these to practice and professional development. The module complements the research methods module that examines the production of knowledge by looking at the application of knowledge and the role of the expert. The module involves a combination of taught sessions, individual tutorials and group seminars. Sessions will cover: integrating academic study and workplace experience; professional practice and ethical behaviour in the built environment; the concept of reflective practice; thinking critically in workplace situations; and roles, relationships and responsibilities of interdisciplinary teams. Research Methods and the Built Environment This module introduces you to research methods and methodologies specific to urban and spatial research, design and planning. You will explore the theory and practice of developing a research framework, with a particular emphasis upon methods, methodologies, and frameworks used within the built environment professions. The module will allow you to begin developing your own research proposal for the Dissertation. Course-specific entry requirements Applications are invited from graduates with a good Honours degree in architecture, landscape architecture, town planning or another related discipline, together with practical or professional experience in their own field or in urban design. If your first language is not English, you will need an IELTS score of 6.5. Associated careers Graduates of this course typically find employment as urban designers in private consultancy or local authorities. Many find the course useful when developing careers in architecture, planning or landscape architecture. [-]

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