University of Glasgow

Introduction

Founded in 1451, the University of Glasgow is the fourth oldest university in the English-speaking world, with Arts and Humanities being taught and researched since its inception. Today we are in the top 1% of the world's universities.

Over the last five centuries and more, we’ve constantly worked to push the boundaries of what’s possible. We’ve fostered the talents of seven Nobel laureates, one Prime Minister and Scotland’s inaugural First Minister. We’ve welcomed Albert Einstein to give a lecture on the origins of the general theory of relativity. Scotland’s first female medical graduates completed their degrees here in 1894 and in 1957, the first in Scotland to have an electronic computer.

All of this means that if you choose to study here, you will be following in the footsteps of innovators, Prime Ministers, philosophers, Emmy award winning producers, authors and leaders in the creative and cultural sector.

Our future

The University is expanding and evolving. Following the site of the Western Infirmary site in 2015, we plan to invest £1billion, transforming the university to achieve our vision of a world changing campus.

Work is nearly completed on the first phase of redevelopment of the Kelvin Hall. This iconic Glasgow building, for many years a sporting and leisure venue and home to the Transport Museum, is being given a new lease of life. A partnership has been formed involving Glasgow Museums, Glasgow Life, the Scottish Screen Archives from the National Library of Scotland and the University of Glasgow.

The Hunterian, with over 1.3 million objects in its collections, is one of the world’s finest university museums. New state of the art facilities at the Kelvin Hall will allow the College of Arts at the University of Glasgow to build on its international reputation for collection based research and teaching, allowing much greater access to collections while forging new academic and educational practice.

Facts and figures - University of Glasgow

  • is ranked 62nd in the world and is the first and only UK university to be rated as 5 Stars Plus overall. (QS World University Rankings 2015)
  • welcomes students from more than 140 countries worldwide
  • has more than 25,000 undergraduate and postgraduate students
  • has annual research income of more than £181m
  • is a member of the prestigious Russell Group of leading UK research universities
  • is ranked top in Scotland and third in the Russell Group in the National Student Survey 2015
  • is a founder member of Universitas 21, an international grouping of universities dedicated to setting worldwide standards for higher education
  • includes among its alumni, the father of economics Adam Smith, Scotland’s architect of devolution Donald Dewar and renowned physicist and engineer Lord Kelvin.
This school offers programs in:
  • English

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Programs

This school also offers:

Master

MLitt Ancient Cultures

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 24 months August 2016 United Kingdom Glasgow + 1 more

This programme offers you the opportunity to explore the ancient world from a multicultural and interdisciplinary perspective from the Near-East to North-Western Europe. It is based in Classics, with the participation of Archaeology, Egyptology, Celtic and Gaelic, and Theology and Religious Studies. [+]

This programme offers you the opportunity to explore the ancient world from a multicultural and interdisciplinary perspective from the Near-East to North-Western Europe. It is based in Classics, with the participation of Archaeology, Egyptology, Celtic and Gaelic, and Theology and Religious Studies. Why this programme The programme makes extensive use of the unique collections in the University of Glasgow's Hunterian Museum as well as collections in other Glasgow museums such as the Burrell Collection and the Glasgow Museums Resource Centre. Hands-on sessions in a range of museums and libraries can be tailor-made to suit your interests. You will have the opportunity to take up an ancient language (Greek, Latin, Egyptian, Coptic, Hebrew, early Gaelic, Welsh) from scratch, or continue it at advanced level. Entry requirements Entry requirements for postgraduate taught programmes are a 2.1 Honours degree or equivalent qualification (for example, GPA 3.0 or above) in a relevant subject unless otherwise specified. International students with academic qualifications below those required should contact our partner institution, Glasgow International College, who offer a range of pre-Masters courses. English language requirements For applicants whose first language is not English, the University sets a minimum English Language proficiency level. International English Language Testing System (IELTS) Academic module (not General Training): overall score 7.0 2 subtests not lower than 7.0 and no other sub-test lower than 6.5 or equivalent scores in another recognised qualification (see below) Common equivalent English language qualifications All stated English tests are acceptable for admission for both home/EU and international students for this programme: ibTOEFL: 92; no sub-test less than 24 CAE (Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English): 185 overall; two sub-tests no less than 185; no other sub-test less than 176 CPE (Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English): 185 overall; two sub-tests no less than 185; no other sub-test less than 176 PTE Academic (Person Test of English, Academic test): 68; no sub-test less than 60 For international students, the Home Office has confirmed that the University can choose to use these tests to make its own assessment of English language ability for visa applications to degree level programmes. The University is also able to accept an IELTS test (Academic module) from any of the 1000 IELTS test centres from around the world and we do not require a specific UKVI IELTS test for degree level programmes. We therefore still accept any of the English tests listed for admission to this programme. Alumni discount A 10% discount is available to University of Glasgow alumni applying to the MLitt. This includes graduates and those who have completed a Junior Year Abroad, Exchange programme or International Summer School at the University of Glasgow. The discount is applied at registration for students who are not in receipt of another discount or scholarship funded by the University. No additional application is required. Career prospects The programme provides excellent technical and linguistic skills for further postgraduate study in any of the subjects involved. It is also well suited for those considering a career in heritage, teaching, archives, or libraries. [-]

MLitt Comparative Literature

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 24 months August 2016 United Kingdom Glasgow + 1 more

The Masters in Comparative Literature offers interdisciplinary study across linguistic cultures as well as academic fields. Benefitting from a strong and diverse School of Modern Languages and Cultures, you will be able to take courses in the comparative study of literatures, film, visual arts, or societies of two or more language areas OR across two or more disciplines. The high degree of flexibility means that you are able to design a unique programme of study suited to your interests. [+]

The Masters in Comparative Literature offers interdisciplinary study across linguistic cultures as well as academic fields. Benefitting from a strong and diverse School of Modern Languages and Cultures, you will be able to take courses in the comparative study of literatures, film, visual arts, or societies of two or more language areas OR across two or more disciplines. The high degree of flexibility means that you are able to design a unique programme of study suited to your interests. Why this programme The School provides a wide range of languages, with a total of nine European languages from Western, Central and Eastern Europe (Catalan, Czech, French, German, Italian, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish) as well as Chinese (Mandarin). The programme is suitable whether or not you already have knowledge of one or more foreign languages; you may follow it entirely in English translation, or make use of your linguistic skills in our areas of expertise. If you wish to take up a new language, this can be part of your programme of study. You will be taught by world-leading researchers in these fields. We have courses not only in the languages, but in the literatures, films, and visual cultures of these linguistic areas, some of which are available to non-speakers of these languages. The School hosts a vibrant postgraduate community, with student-led research seminars and social activities. This Masters actively encourages you to take courses from across the College, creating a programme which is intensely interdisciplinary, and can be bespoke to your individual interests. Our MLitt is complemented within the SMLC by the MSc in Translation Studies and the MLitt in Modern Languages and Cultures. Entry requirements for entry in 2016 Candidates should normally have a good Honours degree (2.1 or better) or equivalent in a Modern Foreign Language or cognate discipline (such as English Literature or Philosophy). Recommended Fluency in one modern foreign language taught in the School and reading knowledge or better in another. English language requirements For applicants whose first language is not English, the University sets a minimum English Language proficiency level. International English Language Testing System (IELTS) Academic module (not General Training): overall score 7.0 no sub-test less than 7.0 or equivalent scores in another recognised qualification (see below) Common equivalent English language qualifications All stated English tests are acceptable for admission for both home/EU and international students for this programme: ibTOEFL: 92; no sub-test less than 22 with Speaking no less than 23 CAE (Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English): 185; no sub-test less than 185 CPE (Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English): 185; no sub-test less than 185 PTE Academic (Person Test of English, Academic test): 68; minimum 60 in writing Trinity College London Integrated Skills in English: ISEIII at Pass with Pass in all sub-tests For international students, the Home Office has confirmed that the University can choose to use these tests to make its own assessment of English language ability for visa applications to degree level programmes. The University is also able to accept an IELTS test (Academic module) from any of the 1000 IELTS test centres from around the world and we do not require a specific UKVI IELTS test for degree level programmes. We therefore still accept any of the English tests listed for admission to this programme. Alumni discount A 10% discount is available to University of Glasgow alumni applying to the MLitt. This includes graduates and those who have completed a Junior Year Abroad, Exchange programme or International Summer School at the University of Glasgow. The discount is applied at registration for students who are not in receipt of another discount or scholarship funded by the University. No additional application is required. Career prospects Employers welcome our graduates’ abilities to 'think outside the box' in relation to cultures other than their own, as well as their ability to communicate in oral and written form in a logical, coherent, articulate and creative way. Our graduates go into the workplace well-prepared to work in a global, international environment, as well as in any field requiring sophisticated communication skills. Some common careers include: publishing, editing, creative industries, and teaching. The programme also provides an excellent preparation for further study in the fields of Comparative Literature and Modern Languages and Cultures. [-]

MSc

MSc Art History: Collecting and Provenance in an International Context

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 24 months September 2016 United Kingdom Glasgow + 1 more

This Masters programme offers an interdisciplinary approach to studying the history of collecting and collections from an international perspective. In particular, it focuses on the trajectory of artefacts through time and space and their historical legacy. Subjects covered include methodological approaches and legal issues relating to provenance and restitution, illegal trafficking of cultural objects, connoisseurship, taste, the patterns of collecting and viewing both private and public and the politics of display. The programme will move the collective debate beyond the usual focus on the Western tradition. [+]

This Masters programme offers an interdisciplinary approach to studying the history of collecting and collections from an international perspective. In particular, it focuses on the trajectory of artefacts through time and space and their historical legacy. Subjects covered include methodological approaches and legal issues relating to provenance and restitution, illegal trafficking of cultural objects, connoisseurship, taste, the patterns of collecting and viewing both private and public and the politics of display. The programme will move the collective debate beyond the usual focus on the Western tradition. Why this programme This programme is unique to Scotland and the UK as it combines aspects of art history and law and places them in a broad international context. You will learn from world-leading researchers and develop expert knowledge in this specialised area of art history. Glasgow’s civic and university collections are some of the richest and most diverse in Europe and are of international standing. The University’s own Hunterian Museum and Art gallery is the oldest public museum in Scotland and has extensive holdings covering fine art, geology, anatomy and the history of medicine. The new facilities at Kelvin Hall support object-based study as a number of courses will include handling sessions of the objects in the collections. Work placement opportunities are offered within the programme on a competitive basis. In addition to Scottish institutions, work placements take place in the Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C. Our research forum provides you with a lively and stimulating introduction to methodological debates within art history. It provides a sense of art history’s own history as well as contemporary concerns and practice, examining the beliefs and values that have informed various forms of historical and visual analysis and enquiry. It is focused around a series of seminars or workshops run by members of staff and visiting academics. Programme structure The programme structure comprises of four core courses and a dissertation (these are compulsory). In addition you can choose two optional courses, either from the ones provided within the programme or from available courses across the College of Arts. The dissertation (15,000 words in length, including footnotes but excluding bibliography) will be on a topic chosen in consultation with the tutors and programme convenors. You will also have an opportunity to take part in a field trip. The learning and teaching approaches covered in the programme include: lectures (built around case studies), seminars and discussions (supported by relevant published sources), handling sessions and supervision. 12 months full-time 24 months part-time Core and optional courses Core courses Cultures of Collecting – Collecting Cultures (semester 1) Methodologies 1: Object Biography (semester 1) Objects in Motion 1: Provenance (semester 1) Objects in Motion 2: Global Illicit Trafficking (semester 2) Optional courses Objects in Motion 3: Restitution (semester 2) Archaeological Theory and Interpretation (semester 2) Approaching the Ancient World through Material Culture (semester 1) Introduction to Museology (semester 1) Art Crime (Semester 2 online) Repatriation, Recovery, Return (summer online) Independent Study (usually semester 2) Work Placement (semester 2) Entry requirements for entry in 2016 Entry requirements for postgraduate taught programmes are a 2.1 Honours degree or equivalent qualification (for example, GPA 3.0 or above) in a relevant subject, or suitable practical experience Note: A minimum 2.1 in History of Art or a related subject is required. You should also submit a writing sample of 2000-3000 words, a CV and a personal statement International students with academic qualifications below those required should contact our partner institution, Glasgow International College, who offer a range of pre-Masters courses. English language requirements For applicants whose first language is not English, the University sets a minimum English Language proficiency level. International English Language Testing System (IELTS) Academic module (not General Training): overall score 7.0 2 subtests not lower than 7.0 and no other sub-test lower than 6.5 or equivalent scores in another recognised qualification (see below) Common equivalent English language qualifications All stated English tests are acceptable for admission for both home/EU and international students for this programme: ibTOEFL: 92; no sub-test less than 24 CAE (Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English): 185 overall; two sub-tests no less than 185; no other sub-test less than 176 CPE (Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English): 185 overall; two sub-tests no less than 185; no other sub-test less than 176 PTE Academic (Person Test of English, Academic test): 68; no sub-test less than 60 For international students, the Home Office has confirmed that the University can choose to use these tests to make its own assessment of English language ability for visa applications to degree level programmes. The University is also able to accept an IELTS test (Academic module) from any of the 1000 IELTS test centres from around the world and we do not require a specific UKVI IELTS test for degree level programmes. We therefore still accept any of the English tests listed for admission to this programme. Pre-sessional courses The University of Glasgow accepts evidence of the required language level from the English for Academic Study Unit Pre-sessional courses. Career prospects This Masters programme is intended to provide you with a strong foundation from which to embark upon a career in the visual arts, the art market, museums and galleries, heritage and historic properties. Graduates have gone on to hold positions in museums and galleries (both public and private) in Scotland and elsewhere in the UK and have, more broadly, entered the commercial, cultural and heritage sectors in a number of roles. The programme also provides an excellent platform for you to move into PhD studies and an academic career. [-]

MSc Film Curation

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 24 months September 2016 United Kingdom Glasgow + 1 more

This Masters in Film Curation focuses on the history and future of the audience’s engagement with film of all kinds. It investigates the material qualities of audio-visual media and explores the history and contemporary practice of projection and exhibition, in cinemas, galleries, festivals and online. The programme includes a mandatory work placement with one of our external partners as well as opportunities for creative practice. [+]

This Masters in Film Curation focuses on the history and future of the audience’s engagement with film of all kinds. It investigates the material qualities of audio-visual media and explores the history and contemporary practice of projection and exhibition, in cinemas, galleries, festivals and online. The programme includes a mandatory work placement with one of our external partners as well as opportunities for creative practice. Why this programme The city of Glasgow is a unique hub of international cultural and creative activity offering unparalleled access to galleries, museums, cinemas, music venues and film festivals. Collaborators who will offer work placements and visiting speakers include the National Library of Scotland’s Moving Image Archive, Glasgow Film Theatre, Lux Scotland, the Gallery of Modern Art, as well as film festivals such as Africa in Motion and Document. Students will have access to the Collections Study Centre at the Kelvin Hall offering state of the art facilities and study space in close proximity to the Moving Image Archive. The programme will draw on the world leading research and teaching of staff in film and television studies at Glasgow and includes expert contributions from a variety of external cultural organisations. Programme structure Students will take: 2 core courses 1 mandatory special project/work placement course 2 optional academic courses Dissertation or creative project. Teaching methods will include lectures and seminars, visiting speakers will offer workshops and seminars, there will be field trips organised to archives and festivals, and students will be assessed through a variety of methods including practice based activities, oral presentations as well as different written assignments. Entry requirements Entry requirements for postgraduate taught programmes are a 2.1 Honours degree or equivalent qualification (for example, GPA 3.0 or above) in a relevant subject unless otherwise specified. International students with academic qualifications below those required should contact our partner institution, Glasgow International College, who offer a range of pre-Masters courses. English language requirements For applicants whose first language is not English, the University sets a minimum English Language proficiency level. Career prospects This programme is designed to provide students with a range of skills that will allow them to develop as creative and cultural entrepreneurs; as outreach officers in museums, archives or galleries; in film festivals, as programmers or curators; researchers for the film and television industries; as creative practitioners; or prepare them for future academic research. Duration : 12 months full-time 24 months part-time [-]

MSc Political Islam

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 24 months September 2016 United Kingdom Glasgow + 1 more

This Masters degree in Political Islam has been specifically designed for those who wish to comprehend the main currents of Islamic thinking during the modern period. This will involve investigating a number of radical Islamic movements as well as alternative understandings of Islam. [+]

This Masters degree in Political Islam has been specifically designed for those who wish to comprehend the main currents of Islamic thinking during the modern period. This will involve investigating a number of radical Islamic movements as well as alternative understandings of Islam. Why this programme The University of Glasgow offers a number of course options that may be taken by students, such as the courses provided within the Global Securities programme. The course is taught by experts in Theology and Religious Studies. Assistance is offered by staff who teach outside of the Islamic tradition, which will be of use for those interested, for example, in Islamic-Christian relations or forms of literature within the Islamic tradition. The programme is sufficiently flexible to enable students to concentrate on specific areas of study, or to concentrate on a more general range of issues. Linguistic ability in Arabic, Persian, Turkish (or any other non-European language) is not essential. Students are encouraged to participate in the wider seminar series offered in the subject area in order to gain a comprehensive knowledge of religion and culture in the contemporary world. (There are experts in Chinese religions, Judaism and Christianity with Theology and Religious Studies). Glasgow has a large Muslim community. There are possibilities to engage with this local community. Programme structure This MSc in Political Islam investigates a number of “radical” Islamic movements such as Salafism, the Muslim Brotherhood, and the Islamic revival in Iran post-1978. At the same time, alternative understandings of Islam will be examined including the so-called “liberal” version, Islamic feminist thinking and contemporary manifestations of Sufism (the so-called “mystical” side of Islam). As the course progresses the topics will engage with the historical Islamic tradition, so that students will appreciate the wide variety of “Islams” that have appeared in modern times. An understanding of Islam is imperative in the contemporary period, with issues such as security, identity and immigration appearing on a daily basis in the Western media. Islam is no longer a religion that is confined to the Middle East, but needs to be understood as an integral part of British society and culture. The challenges and issues that Muslims face require urgent investigation, and this course provides the framework for students to engage with the changes that affect everyone in society. The programme is designed for small groups that will discuss the topics in a seminar environment. There will be formal lectures and the occasional guest speaker. The basis of the programme will be textual, and will involve class/group discussions about the material provided. Core teaching is delivered in two semesters, followed by a dissertation. The project dissertation is an opportunity for students to identify an area of interest and to create a research project that allows in-depth critical exploration of this. Core and optional courses Core courses: Political Islam (30 credits) Modern Islamic Thought (30 credits) Students must also write a dissertation which is compulsory. Optional courses: Muhammad Religion and Violence Directed Study Students may also take one course outside of those offered within Theology and Religious Studies. Entry requirements for entry in 2016 Entry requirements for postgraduate taught programmes are a 2.1 Honours degree or equivalent qualification (for example, GPA 3.0 or above) in a relevant subject unless otherwise specified. International students with academic qualifications below those required should contact our partner institution, Glasgow International College, who offer a range of pre-Masters courses. English language requirements For applicants whose first language is not English, the University sets a minimum English Language proficiency level. International English Language Testing System (IELTS) Academic module (not General Training) overall score 6.5 no sub-test less than 6.0 or equivalent scores in another recognised qualification (see below) Common equivalent English language qualifications All stated English tests are acceptable for admission for both home/EU and international students for this programme: ibTOEFL: 92; no sub-test less than 20 CAE (Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English): 176 overall; no sub-test less than 169 CPE (Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English): 176 overall; no sub-test less than 169 PTE Academic (Person Test of English, Academic test): 60; no sub-test less than 59 Trinity College London Integrated Skills in English: ISEII at Distinction with Distinction in all sub-tests For international students, the Home Office has confirmed that the University can choose to use these tests to make its own assessment of English language ability for visa applications to degree level programmes. The University is also able to accept an IELTS test (Academic module) from any of the 1000 IELTS test centres from around the world and we do not require a specific UKVI IELTS test for degree level programmes. We therefore still accept any of the English tests listed for admission to this programme. Pre-sessional courses The University of Glasgow accepts evidence of the required language level from the English for Academic Study Unit Pre-sessional courses. Career prospects With the current interest in Islam, this degree provides essential knowledge and skills for those involved in teaching, the civil service, government, the police and the military. The degree also provides an excellent entry into a PhD related to Islamic Studies. Standard application deadlines International applications (non-EU): 22 July 2016 UK and EU applications: 26 August 2016 Duration : 12 months full-time 24 months part-time [-]

MA

MLITT Creative Writing

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 24 months September 2016 United Kingdom Glasgow + 1 more

Our commitment to excellence in writing goes back a long way and Creative Writing at Glasgow focuses on teaching writing at the postgraduate level, both taught and research-led. Our writing courses are among the most challenging and popular in Britain and have helped launch the career of a number of successful writers including Anne Donovan, Louise Welsh, Rodge Glass, Jen Hadfield, Zoe Strachan, Luke Brown, Laura Marney, Rachel Seiffert, William Letford and many others. [+]

Welcome to Creative Writing at Glasgow Our commitment to excellence in writing goes back a long way and Creative Writing at Glasgow focuses on teaching writing at the postgraduate level, both taught and research-led. Our writing courses are among the most challenging and popular in Britain and have helped launch the career of a number of successful writers including Anne Donovan, Louise Welsh, Rodge Glass, Jen Hadfield, Zoe Strachan, Luke Brown, Laura Marney, Rachel Seiffert, William Letford and many others. About us Our commitment to excellence in writing goes back a long way. This commitment was formalised in 1995 when the Masters in Creative Writing was founded by Phillip Hobsbaum and Willy Maley. Twenty years on, we focus on teaching writing at the postgraduate level, both taught and research-led. Across all our postgraduate provision students have access to the best of the new and also develop a sense of the origins and histories of the genres they practice. We are based in the Edwin Morgan Library, running writing courses that are among the most challenging and popular in Britain and have helped launch the career of a number of successful writers including Anne Donovan, Louise Welsh, Rodge Glass, Jen Hadfield, Zoe Strachan, Luke Brown, Laura Marney, Rachel Seiffert, William Letford, Karen Campbell, Kirsty Logan and many others. A Place for International Writing Lecturers and tutors on our Creative Writing programme have come from all around the world: ­ Scotland, the Caribbean, the USA, Ireland and Mexico. We speak with different accents and dialects and bring the inflections of our ears to the things we write. We have also recruited students from around the world: Hong Kong, Sweden, Iceland, Canada, Nepal, Bahamas, Japan. We see our programme as a place where World Literature is conceived and written. A Place for Scottish Writing We have deep roots in Scottish Literature. Tom Leonard, James Kelman, and Alasdair Gray have held professorships here; Scottish novelists Laura Marney and Zoe Strachan presently teach on the programme. We are housed in the Edwin Morgan Room and are right beside Scotland's only department of Scottish Literature. Our part-time programme should be especially attractive for those who already live in or near the city. A Place for New Kinds of Writing Our staff have published and won awards in a number of genres: ­ novels, poetry, essays, translations, literary history and criticism, radio dramas, librettos. We also write things which don't fit into any known category. We are willing to supervise students working in established genres but are just as keen to see students mix genres or create new forms. Creative Writing MLitt The Creative Writing programme at Glasgow has gained an excellent reputation amongst writers, agents and publishers. It is perfect for talented and aspiring writers who want to develop their craft, take risks in their work, and gain creative and critical skills; all as part of a supportive community of fellow writers. Skills gained in the study of Creative Writing may lead to career opportunities in literary and cultural fields such as editing, publishing and arts development. Why this programme Our dedicated teaching staff comprises successful and well-regarded writers who work in and encourage a variety of genres and forms. We have strong links with literary agents and publishers, and an impressive number of our graduates are published and acclaimed authors. Background ‎Among its alumni the University of Glasgow includes some notable writers, from Robert Henryson in the fifteenth century, to James Boswell, Tobias Smollett and Adam Smith in the eighteenth. It was in the twentieth century that Glasgow’s place as a centre of creativity was established. It numbers among its many writer-graduates William Boyd, James Bridie, John Buchan, A.J. Cronin, Janice Galloway, Alasdair Gray, Janice Hally, James Herriot, James Kelman, Helen MacInnes, Alistair MacLean, William McIllvanney, Edwin Morgan and Alexander Trocchi. Programme structure The MLitt in Creative Writing is directed at those who are already engaged in writing. The programme’s clear three-part structure, focused on creative, critical and practical issues, distinguishes it from others offered in the UK. The programme structure covers: Semester 1 Creative workshops and guest speakers Reading as a writer (Craft & Experimentation 1) Copyright, publishing and the culture of reception (Editing & Publication 1) Semester 2 Creative workshops and guest speakers Experimentation (Craft & Experimentation 2) Editing the twenty-first century: editorial project (Editing & Publication 2) These courses have been developed to: encourage you to experiment with a range of voices, techniques and genres alongside a consideration of major creative and editorial engagements from the modern through the contemporary period. provide a space to undertake extended portfolios of creative and editorial work. familiarise you with the writing context (audience, publishing in all its forms, the legal framework, modes of transmission); help you develop a critical understanding of diverse creative, theoretic and critical texts through consideration of major creative and editorial engagements in modern and contemporary writing. and most importantly, to help you develop the discipline of regular writing by providing a stimulating workshop and tutorial environment in which writing skills can be acquired, discussed and honed. Your portfolio, consisting of fiction, poetry, creative non-fiction, or script-writing, is at the heart of the summative assessment. Glasgow is a city known for its culture and our students are involved in festivals, events, radio and literary magazines. Entry requirements for entry in 2016 You will normally have a 2.1 Honours degree (or equivalent), though this is not a pre-requisite. The primary basis for admission is the appraisal of a portfolio of your creative work. You submit a portfolio of original work (poetry, fiction, life-writing or other prose, drama, and in some instances a portfolio of work in or of translation). A maximum of 20 pages (one side only, double spaced throughout) per submission will be considered, and the portfolio can contain prose, verse, script, or a combination of these. We also require two letters of reference. Your referees should include an academic and a creative referee where possible. Where this is not possible, you can provide referees from other areas who can vouch that you are who you say you are and that your work and achievements are your own. It is particularly helpful if these referees are familiar with your writing and can provide references on that basis. English language requirements For applicants whose first language is not English, the University sets a minimum English Language proficiency level. International English Language Testing System (IELTS) Academic module (not General Training): overall score 7.0 no sub-test less than 7.0 or equivalent scores in another recognised qualification (see below) Common equivalent English language qualifications All stated English tests are acceptable for admission for both home/EU and international students for this programme: ibTOEFL: 92; no sub-test less than 22 with Speaking no less than 23 CAE (Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English): 185; no sub-test less than 185 CPE (Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English): 185; no sub-test less than 185 PTE Academic (Person Test of English, Academic test): 68; minimum 60 in writing Trinity College London Integrated Skills in English: ISEIII at Pass with Pass in all sub-tests For international students, the Home Office has confirmed that the University can choose to use these tests to make its own assessment of English language ability for visa applications to degree level programmes. The University is also able to accept an IELTS test (Academic module) from any of the 1000 IELTS test centres from around the world and we do not require a specific UKVI IELTS test for degree level programmes. We therefore still accept any of the English tests listed for admission to this programme. Pre-sessional courses The University of Glasgow accepts evidence of the required language level from the English for Academic Study Unit Pre-sessional courses. Career prospects Graduates have gone into writing, journalism, publishing, and many other professions. Many of our students have gone on to become published authors. You can find a list of alumni on our Creative Writing subject pages. Others have been published in magazines and journals, or have had their work produced and broadcast on radio and television. A number of our graduates have won or been shortlisted for major prizes for poetry, short fiction and fiction including the Dundee Book Prize, Booker Prize, Bailey’s Women’s Prize, Orange Prize, Fish Short Story Award, Bridport Prize, McCash Scots Poetry Competition, Macallan and Canongate short story awards, Saltire Awards, Scottish Book of the Year Awards. Positions held by recent graduates include Managing Director, Freelance Writer, Editor, Programme Manager, Author, Copywriter, Author and Community Arts Worker. Application deadlines For academic year 2017 - 2018: 25 November 2016: Please apply by this date to receive a decision on your application by 16 December 2016 (if applying for funding from the University of Glasgow, this deadline must be met) 24 February 2017: Please apply by this date to receive a decision on your application by 17 March 2017 26 May 2017: Please apply by this date to receive a decision on your application by 16 June 2017 MFA The MFA is a unique and intense programme for practising writers who wish to complete an ambitious creative project in two years. In addition to the main creative project, which is supported by supervision and workshops, the MFA also includes literary and practice-based seminars and a practical pedagogy course on the teaching of creative writing, including designing and teaching syllabi to undergraduates. In the first year, you will engage in literary and practice-based study via seminars while beginning your own considerable creative work, supported by workshops and supervision. In the second year, you will continue literary and creative study and also embark upon our unique Practical pedagogy course, which is classroom based in the first semester and then provides the opportunity to design, organise and teach creative writing courses to undergraduates. You will have one-to-one supervision with writers on staff and submit a substantial and distinctive creative work at the end of the second year, which is subject to external examination. You will participate in seminars that investigate unfamiliar, formal and thematic areas, and encourage experimentation and risk-taking. These seminars entail wide reading of primary texts. Glasgow is a city known for its culture and our students get involved in festivals, events, radio and literary magazines. Core courses Practice as research Practical pedagogy We will encourage you to delve into expansive fields of literature and you will take up to four elective courses and can choose optional courses from English Literature, Scottish Literature, Comparative Literature and Translation Studies or any MLitt across the College of Arts. DFA The DFA is assessed at the end of the degree via a final thesis, which includes an ambitious creative project and a significant essay. It incorporates the MFA into the first two years. This programme privileges practice as research and builds a core of creative and critical components through enquiry-based discussions and study, targeted lectures, as well as practice-based seminars. In the MFA years, critical engagement with your creative work is undertaken via supervision and complementary workshops; you will engage with the literary, theoretic and cultural landscape of practice and writing via literary and practice-based seminars. In addition, you will attend literary and practice-based seminars and a practical pedagogy course on teaching creative writing, including designing and teaching your own syllabi to undergraduates. Exceptional students can progress to the DFA, and will be supported by standard postgraduate research supervision practices, which will lead to the submission of the final DFA Portfolio of work that includes both Creative and a Critical components. Duration : 12 months full-time 24 months part-time [-]

MLITT Creative Writing (Distance Learning)

Online Full time 12 months September 2016 United Kingdom Glasgow

Our celebrated creative writing programme is perfect for talented and aspiring writers looking to gain adventurous and needed creative and critical skills. This is an exciting and supportive online course that offers you the opportunity to develop your writing practice wherever you are in the world. [+]

Our celebrated creative writing programme is perfect for talented and aspiring writers looking to gain adventurous and needed creative and critical skills. This is an exciting and supportive online course that offers you the opportunity to develop your writing practice wherever you are in the world. Why this programme You will be taught by a number of successful and well-regarded writers and many of our graduates have gone on to be published and acclaimed authors. We have strong links with literary agents and publishers, and an impressive list of published alumni. This programme is delivered online and offers flexible study around your existing commitments. Programme structure This programme is directed at those who are already engaged in writing. Its clear three-part structure, focused on creative, critical and practical issues, distinguishes this programme from the others offered in the UK. The programme structure covers: Semester 1: Creative workshops and guest speakers Reading as a writer (CX1) Copyright, publishing and the culture of reception Semester 2: Creative workshops and guest speakers Experimentation (CX2) Editing the twenty-first century: editorial project These courses have been developed to: allow you to experiment with a range of voices, techniques and genres alongside a consideration of major creative and editorial engagements from the modern through the contemporary period. help you develop a critical understanding of diverse creative, theoretic and critical texts. provide a space to undertake extended portfolios of creative and editioral work. familiarise you with the writing context (audience, publishing in all its forms, the legal framework, modes of transmission); And most importantly, to subject you to the discipline of regular writing by providing a stimulating workshop and tutorial environment in which writing skills can be acquired, discussed and honed. Delivery Classes are taught via video conferencing and an online virtual learning platform called Moodle, where you can participate in forums, download class notes, watch related video, and submit written work for feedback. Workshops and seminars are at set times during the semester; however, these are recorded so you can watch in your own time if you can’t make the class. You are also always welcome to take part in our campus-based classes and events, if you are able. You will also have one-on-one tutorials at a time agreed between you and your tutor throughout the semester for extra support with your work. Our outgoing students have found the mixture of workshops and seminars via video conferencing and virtual learning environments to work really well in shaping their creative practice and developing their writing. Entry requirements for entry in 2016 You will normally have a 2.1 Honours degree (or equivalent), though this is not a pre-requisite. The primary basis for admission is the appraisal of a portfolio of your creative work. You submit a portfolio of original work (poetry, fiction, life-writing or other prose, drama, and in some instances a portfolio of work in or of translation). A maximum of 20 pages (one side only, double spaced throughout) per submission will be considered, and the portfolio can contain prose, verse, script, or a combination of these. We also require two letters of reference. Your referees should include an academic and a creative referee where possible. Where this is not possible, you can provide referees from other areas who can vouch that you are who you say you are and that your work and achievements are your own. It is particularly helpful if these referees are familiar with your writing and can provide references on that basis. International students with academic qualifications below those required should contact our partner institution, Glasgow International College, who offer a range of pre-Masters courses. English language requirements For applicants whose first language is not English, the University sets a minimum English Language proficiency level. International English Language Testing System (IELTS) Academic module (not General Training): overall score 7.0 no sub-test less than 7.0 or equivalent scores in another recognised qualification (see below) Common equivalent English language qualifications All stated English tests are acceptable for admission for both home/EU and international students for this programme: ibTOEFL: 92; no sub-test less than 22 with Speaking no less than 23 CAE (Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English): 185; no sub-test less than 185 CPE (Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English): 185; no sub-test less than 185 PTE Academic (Person Test of English, Academic test): 68; minimum 60 in writing Trinity College London Integrated Skills in English: ISEIII at Pass with Pass in all sub-tests For international students, the Home Office has confirmed that the University can choose to use these tests to make its own assessment of English language ability for visa applications to degree level programmes. The University is also able to accept an IELTS test (Academic module) from any of the 1000 IELTS test centres from around the world and we do not require a specific UKVI IELTS test for degree level programmes. We therefore still accept any of the English tests listed for admission to this programme. Pre-sessional courses The University of Glasgow accepts evidence of the required language level from the English for Academic Study Unit Pre-sessional courses. Career prospects Graduates have gone into writing, journalism, publishing, and many other professions. Positions held by recent graduates include Managing Director, Freelance Writer, Author, Copywriter, Author and Community Arts Work. Duration : 12 months full-time 24 months part-time [-]

Contact

University of Glasgow

Address G12 8QQ United Kingdom
Website http://www.gla.ac.uk/
Phone +44 141 330 2000