University of Kent, School of Anthropology & Conservation

Introduction

Anthropology Reaffirms its Top 10 Position in the Guardian University Guide

The School of Anthropology and Conservation has reaffirmed its position as one of the top Anthropology departments in the UK earning 6th place in the Guardian University Guide 2015, maintaining our competitive position.

What Our Students Say

Our students are an inspiring group of people from home and abroad. We are delighted that we have a supportive and collaborative culture within the School which enhances the student experience and encourages everyone to excel.

Developing our students employability skills is a high priority. We offer students the opportunties to develop these skills through taught lectures, practical experience and also by hearing from SAC graduates.

10 reasons why you should study with us

These are some of the reasons why our students love it here ...

Research Led Teaching

Our academic staff are all research active scholars who bring their specialist knowledge and passion into the teaching context ensuring learning is relevant and stimulating. Students receive quality teaching (as student feedback and the National Student Survey attests) and all lectures are given by our experienced academic staff.

Good Employment Prospects

The percentage of our graduates who enter employment or further study continues to increase; recent statistics show 85%. This is above the national average and is directly influenced by our dedication to integrate skills sought by employers into the teaching of our programmes. Many of our graduates go on to really interesting work related to their degree, including James Wong who has his own TV series, Grow your Own Drugs, or have become leaders in their fields such as Edwin Matokwani (DICE MSc in Conservation Biology) who has recently been appointed as Director General of the Zambian Wildlife Authority or Sarah Pink who is a renowned academic innovator in the field of Visual Anthropology.

International Opportunities

Due to the reputation for excellence the school has internationally, it attracts students from 73 countries. It also provides opportunities for students to undertake elements of their study abroad. A number of our programmes include Years Abroad in Japan, Spain, the USA, Italy, Finland, Germany, the Netherlands and Denmark. Other programmes include project work, field trips, and research oversees: MSc Ethnobotany students spend two weeks in Barcelona; BSc Wildlife Conservation students conduct 6-week research projects abroad (current destinations include Amazonian Peru and Southern Africa) and have the opportunity to join a tropical fieldcourse to Borneo; and MA Social Anthropology, Visual Anthropology, and Anthropology of Ethnicity, Nationalism, and Identity carry out Master's thesis fieldwork in sites as far afield as Columbia, West Bank Palestine, Cyprus, and India.

World Leading Research

In the 2001 and 2008 Research Assessment Exercises over 50% of our research was rated as 'internationally excellent' and some work identified as being 'world leading'. Staff publish their research regularly, often in leading academic journals including Science and Nature.

Specialist Facilities, Equipment & Resources

Students benefit from access to a state-of-the-art visual anthropology lab, ecology field trials area and laboratory, research laboratories for ethnobotany, biological anthropology and conservation genetics as well as a student computer suite. The school has close links to a number of external organisations which benefit our students including the Powell-Cotton Museum, the Royal Botanical Gardens at Kew, the Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust, the International Union for Conservation of Nature, and the Royal Anthropological Institute. The School also utilises contacts from around the world, bringing students together with renown practitioners, policy makers, and leading researchers through seminar and lecture series.

Focus on Excellent Student Experience

Seeing students flourish as a result of a supportive, challenging and inspiring experience is high on the agenda of the School. The school provide all students with subject specific tutors to support them with their academic progress. Students have regular meetings with their programme convenor which cultivates strong group dynamics and provides opportunities for difficulties to be discussed and resolved. Student representatives also sit on many of our committees to ensure student matters are raised and discussed. In response to student feedback this year we have increased the amount of free printer credit, implemented electronic submission of coursework, completely changed feedback documentation, and supported a new cross disciplinary student-led seminar series. Our research students receive quality dedicated supervision which far exceeds our competitors.

Unique Synergies between Anthropology and Conservation

We recognise that humans and the natural world are interconnected, and this is reflected in the wide range and integration of our intellectual interests. Students have opportunities to study across disciplines through flexible module choices and to relate socially through our multidisciplinary seminar series.

Dynamic School Community

Our students often comment on the strong sense of community in our school. Undergraduate and postgraduate students regularly work together through supported seminars, project consultations, and research groups. There are weekly seminars and social activities where staff and students gather for collaboration and fun!

Location

The Canterbury campus is beautiful! The self-contained campus overlooks the city of Canterbury and has excellent transport links to London and Europe. The campus includes accommodation, shops, theatre, cinema, library, sports centre, a nightclub, LOTS of eateries, and many other facilities.

Experienced Administrative Support

Students benefit from being serviced by a very experienced administrative team. The friendly team is available every day to support students and forms an essential part of our secure learning environment.

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Programs

This school also offers:

Master

MA/MSc in Environmental Anthropology

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years August 2016 United Kingdom Canterbury + 1 more

Interdisciplinary study into how societies are influenced by the environment & how they manage natural resources and hazards. [+]

Interdisciplinary study into how societies are influenced by the environment & how they manage natural resources and hazards. The Masters programme in Environmental Anthropology aims to offer you the opportunity to acquire advanced knowledge of how different societies are influenced by the environment and manage natural resources and hazards, in relation to issues in human ecology, biodiversity management, sustainable development, environmental change and the practical applications of such knowledge. The aims include ensuring that as a graduate you will have a range of both practical and evaluative skills, and experience of conducting empirical or other applied research, to allow you to pursue work as a researcher or to inform whatever position you take up in the future. It is expected that such work might be undertaken in conjunction with a range of organisations including national or international environmental bodies, governmental departments, and non-governmental organisations. Our Anthropology research degree allows you to specialise in Environmental Anthropology. Doctoral degrees usually require three to four years of preparation, fieldwork and writing. Research students often forge independent linkages with overseas institutions, while many work with the numerous research fellows and staff in several research centres in the department, particularly the new Centre for Biocultural Diversity, and with our various partners, such as the Institute for Ecology in Bandung, Indonesia, the Centre for International Forestry Research in Indonesia, the Global Diversity Foundation. Course Structure The programme is taken over one year full-time, two years part-time. In each academic year there are three terms. Teaching for coursework takes place in the first and second terms. During the third term and the summer period students prepare their dissertation on a topic that reflects their own individual interests and experience. (Please note: All module offerings are subject to change and availability is not guaranteed) Features of the programme We follow an experiential and interactive learning method. We continue to experiment with ways of lecturing, running seminars and workshops, writing exams, designing assignments, supervising students, and evaluating essays and theses, to ensure that students learn by doing and so internalise substantive knowledge as well as the methods used by environmental anthropologists. A typical student will take assessed modules in Environmental Anthropology, Ethnobiological Knowledge Systems, Contemporary Ethnography, Social Anthropology and Research Methods. These modules involve a combination of lectures, seminar discussions and practical laboratories. Additionally students may opt to audit modules taught in DICE (the Durrell Institute of Conservation and Ecology) on conservation biology, nature and tourism and the international wildlife trade. There are also informal workshop series in Practical Methods in Conservation Social Science (jointly held with DICE), cultural domain analysis, research design, and computer applications. There are also field trips to various gardens, zoos and museums in the Kent area, such as the Powell-Cotton Museum, Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew, the Eden Project, the Brogdale National Fruit collection and the Aviary at Leeds Castle. Often taking time throughout the whole course to prepare for and carry out, the dissertation project is the culmination of the programme. Students often apply for funding from outside bodies and receive support from the department for overseas studies. They prepare proposals, practice methods, arrange for permits and letters of consent, and often take language classes to prepare for roughly 8 weeks of research between April and July 1st. They then write a 15,000 word dissertation that goes beyond a simple research report to argue a theoretical point and discuss research findings in much wider contexts. Increasingly, students are going on to publish edited versions of these projects, and are making substantive contributions to the research, development or conservation projects they work with. [-]

MSc

Anthropology & Ethnobiology Research Degrees

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 4 years August 2016 United Kingdom Canterbury + 1 more

We welcome students with the appropriate background for research. You register for a PhD and we expect you to complete your doctoral thesis before the end of the fourth year. You take part in coursework, especially methods modules, as part of your training in the first year. [+]

PhD, MA & MSc by research give you access to research methods training & supervision by internationally recognised researchers. We welcome students with the appropriate background for research. You register for a PhD and we expect you to complete your doctoral thesis before the end of the fourth year. You take part in coursework, especially methods modules, as part of your training in the first year. You may also register initially for an MA or MSc by Research, and these degrees may also be upgraded (MA or MSc in Anthropology; MSc in Ethnobiology). We can offer supervision in both socio-cultural and biological anthropology. We are currently strong in environmental anthropology, ethnobiology, ethnicity and nationalism, kinship, methodology, and the anthropology of language use.. In general, you work closely with one supervisor throughout your research, although your work will be overseen by a committee of three members of staff. If you want to do research in the area of Applied Computing in Social Anthropology you have two supervisors: one in the Computing Laboratory as well as an anthropologist. Supervision It is essential that prospective research students identify and contact a potential supervisor (by email) prior to making a formal application. We are unable to process any application without such prior contact. MSc in Anthropology by Research We have a newly developed and vibrant research group whose interests stretch across the range of biological and evolutionary anthropology. We can provide extensive and modern data-analysis facilities as well as a newly refurbished research lab dedicated to biological and evolutionary anthropology. We are actively recruiting new research students, and if you have an idea or topic you want to pursue, then we will help you develop your project. [-]

MSc in Conservation & International Wildlife Trade

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years August 2016 United Kingdom Canterbury + 1 more

The MSc in Conservation and International Wildlife Trade provides students with the knowledge base to address trade regulation and management at both the national and international levels. [+]

Addressing trade regulation and management at both the national and international levels. The MSc in Conservation and International Wildlife Trade provides students with the knowledge base to address trade regulation and management at both the national and international levels. The programme will provide information on the workings of The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) and how this complements other multi-lateral environment agreements. This programme is a modular degree comprising six months of coursework, followed by a six-month research project. It will provide students with knowledge to: - Minimise the negative effects of trade on species. - Increase the effectiveness of regulatory and market measures to promote conservation of species in trade and use. - Ensure that local communities dependant on wildlife products are respected and have their interests taken into account when managing species for use and conservation. - Integrate the planning and management of international trade and biodiversity conservation. The programme is relevant to the work of national management and scientific authorities, international and national NGOs, consultancy firms and contractors, international agencies and donors. [-]

MSc in Conservation & Primate Behaviour

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years August 2016 United Kingdom Canterbury + 1 more

At its core, the <strong>MSc in Primate Conservation and Behaviour</strong> will provide you with a forum for understanding not only the behaviour of NHPs but also the current issues and hot topics in NHPs conservation and management. [+]

The high extinction rates of wild non-human primates, their increased occurrence in sanctuaries around the world and their characteristic behavioural flexibility, which enables some species to thrive alongside their human relatives, render today their conservation a top priority. The relationship between humans and non-human primates is often one characterized by intense resource competition over space, food and water, yielding serious conflict concerns and challenges to their conservation. How can we in essence help prevent and/or mitigate current trends and threats to non-human primates? At its core, the MSc in Primate Conservation and Behaviour will provide you with a forum for understanding not only the behaviour of NHPs but also the current issues and hot topics in NHPs conservation and management. You will also become familiar with a range of methodologies employed in the study of the behavioural ecology of NHPs and in the survey and monitoring of NHP populations. An additional suite of modules offered within DICE, including topics concerned with social science approaches to conservation, GIS skills, protected areas' management, will further equip you with a rich and diverse toolkit and theory-base to pursue future research and/or a career in primate conservation. This program offers collaborations with international NGOs around the world from the neotropics to Africa and South-East Asia, with zoological institutions across Europe (e.g. Howletts and Port Lympne Animal Parks, Kent) and primate sanctuaries across Africa. The Primate Behaviour and Conservation programme will encourage students to: - acquire a thorough understanding of the current status of and threats to non-human primates in the wild. - critically engage with the practical and multidisciplinary challenges, approaches and dimensions of conserving non-human primates in and outside protected areas. - demonstrate familiarity with a range of techniques and methodologies aimed at evaluating, monitoring and addressing relevant conservation issues concerning non-human primates. - understand current debates and challenges to primate conservation, rehabilitation and reintroduction. - demonstrate an ability to study, evaluate and improve the social and environmental welfare and management of non-human primates in captivity. - critically appraise the ecosystem service potential and value of wild non-human primates. The programme is relevant to the work of research institutions, international and national NGOs, consultancy firms and/or contractors, international agencies and donors. [-]

MSc in Conservation & Rural Development

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years August 2016 United Kingdom Canterbury + 1 more

This programme explores the issues underlying the conservation-rural development debate and offers practical and methodological tools for working at the interface between conservation and rural development. [+]

Offering practical and methodological tools for working at the interface between conservation and rural development. This programme explores the issues underlying the conservation-rural development debate and offers practical and methodological tools for working at the interface between conservation and rural development. It complements DICE's existing Masters programmes in Conservation Biology and Conservation and Tourism, and has a special emphasis on developing country issues. The Conservation and Rural Development programme will provide students with the information to: - Build on areas of common interest between conservation and rural development - Implement a rights-based approach to conservation,/ - Inform on-the-ground planning and management of conservation and rural development through applied research - Utilise a range of basic social science techniques, including questionnaire surveys, qualitative interviews, focus groups and community workshops The programme is relevant to the work of national management and scientific authorities, international and national NGOs, consultancy firms and contractors, international agencies and donors. [-]

MSc in Conservation & Tourism

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years August 2016 United Kingdom Canterbury + 1 more

This programme addresses the issues implicit in the tourism industry, and the biodiversity conservation concerns arising from it. This requires a broad interdisciplinary approach which we are ideally situated to provide. [+]

Addressing the issues implicit in the tourism industry, and the biodiversity conservation concerns arising from it. Tourism is the world's largest industry and nature and wildlife tourism is the fastest growing sector of the industry. Therefore, there is a need to ensure that nature tourism follows the principles of sustainability, by minimising impacts on natural environments, contributing to protected area management and also benefiting local people. This programme addresses the issues implicit in the tourism industry, and the biodiversity conservation concerns arising from it. This requires a broad interdisciplinary approach which we are ideally situated to provide. All students undertake a relevant research project, over five months. Students will have the opportunity to develop their own ideas for the research project, or alternatively, participate in an international conservation project run by DICE or one of its partners. The project is written up in the form of a research paper for publication rather than a lengthy thesis-style report. DICE is active in encouraging its mission in the selection of research topics so that the programme remains truly international in outlook and interdisciplinary in focus. The programme is relevant to the work of NGOs, consultancy firms and contractors, tour operators, conservation managers, international agencies, and donors. Equally, it is important to note what this programme is not. The programme specifically does not aim to cover aspects of tourism hospitality and marketing, or of cultural tourism, although many of these aspects are covered by the Kent Business School's MSc in Tourism Management. Therefore, the programme remains firmly embedded in the DICE mission, aiming to address biodiversity and local community concerns arising from the unparalleled growth in nature and wildlife tourism. [-]

MSc in Conservation Biology

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years August 2016 United Kingdom Canterbury + 1 more

The Conservation Biology programme provides students with a knowledge base and the practical experience to address issues relating to biodiversity conservation and biodiversity management. [+]

Enhance your knowledge and the practical experience to address issues relating to biodiversity conservation & management. The Conservation Biology programme provides students with a knowledge base and the practical experience to address issues relating to biodiversity conservation and biodiversity management. In particular, it will provide students with information and knowledge to: - Minimise the negative effects of development on species, habitats and ecosystems. - Increase awareness of the issues surrounding biodiversity conservation nationally and globally. - Ensure that local communities living around areas of conservation importance are respected and have their interests taken into account when developing management plans for protected areas. - Integrate the planning and management of biodiversity conservation with education, applied scientific research, and sustainable development. The programme is relevant to the work of conservation biologists and managers, NGOs, consultancy firms and contractors, international agencies, and donors. In particular, it is designed for conservation professionals who wish to gain formal scientific training and students with prior academic qualifications who wish to re-train for a new career in biodiversity conservation. The majority of graduates have resumed conservation work in their own countries, secured employment or are carrying out further research [-]

MSc in Conservation Project Management

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years August 2016 United Kingdom Canterbury + 1 more

This new MSc programme draws upon the extensive conservation project management experience of Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust, and aims to equip practitioners with the skills and tools they need to manage conservation projects effectively. [+]

Equipping practioners with the skills and tools they need to manage conservation projects effectively. The management of species, habitats and ecosystems is increasingly drawing upon principles and practices from other disciplines, such as business, marketing and human resources. This new MSc programme draws upon the extensive conservation project management experience of Durrell Wildlife Conservation Trust, and aims to equip practitioners with the skills and tools they need to manage conservation projects effectively. The programme is suitable for managers of conservation projects that wish to build on their existing skills, or conservation practitioners who wish to move into a project management role. Core Modules The core modules for all DICE MSc Programmes are: - DI884 Research methods for natural sciences - DI876 Research methods for social sciences - DI998 Dissertation project - Conservation Plus for Conservation Project Management: - DI889 Leadership skills for conservation management [-]

MSc in Ethnobotany

Campus Full time 1 year August 2016 United Kingdom Canterbury

Ethnobotany is the study of the interrelationship between people and plants, particularly the way in which plants impact on human culture and practices, and how humans have used and modified plants, and how they represent them in their systems of knowledge. [+]

Fundamentally interdisciplinary: connecting anthropology, botany, natural resource management and environmental history. Ethnobotany is the study of the interrelationship between people and plants, particularly the way in which plants impact on human culture and practices, and how humans have used and modified plants, and how they represent them in their systems of knowledge. It is fundamentally interdisciplinary: connecting anthropology, botany, natural resource management and environmental history, to mention only the most central of the contributing subjects. The Kent MSc is an intensive 12 month programme. Students take 6 coursework modules over the first 6 months, and then undertake a project and write a dissertation in the second 6 months. The course will be supplemented with practical work, field visits to local sites of ethnobotanical interest (Blean woodland, national fruit collection at Brogdale, Canterbury Cathedral Library, phytomedical suppliers and practitioners), and through guest speakers involved in research in various parts of the world. Ethnobotany at Kent - Established since 1998, with over 100 graduates - First and only graduate course of its kind in the UK - Situated in a combined School of Anthropology and Conservation - Largest research group for ethnobotany in Europe - Excellent career outcomes - Wide geographical expertise of staff - Integrates field methods with theoretical perspectives - Jointly taught with the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew Careers Since 1998 we have trained nearly 100 students through our MSc Programme. Most of these have moved on to undertake research degrees in some area of ethnobotany (e.g. Oxford, Kent, Vienna, Florida, McGill), or have taken-up positions which utilize their training and knowledge, for example in NGOs such as the Global Diversity Foundation, at the Harvard Museum of Economic Botany, conservation education (e.g. Dublin Botanic Gardens and the Eden Project) and in the pharmaceutical industry. [-]

MSc in Evolution & Human Behaviour

Campus Full time August 2016 United Kingdom Canterbury

Taught by expert researchers, this unique and innovative MSc combines evolutionary anthropology, focusing on the behaviour of human and non-human primates, with evolutionary, social, and cognitive psychology. [+]

Interdisciplinary approach combining both evolutionary anthropology with evolutionary, social and cognitive psychology. Taught by expert researchers, this unique and innovative MSc combines evolutionary anthropology, focusing on the behaviour of human and non-human primates, with evolutionary, social, and cognitive psychology. You gain an interdisciplinary understanding of the origins and functions of human behaviour and can select from a range of advanced topics such as Evolutionary Anthropology, Primatology, Human Behaviour, Cognitive Psychology, and Intergroup Relationships. The programme places a strong emphasis on critical thinking and understanding of both the broad field and the specialisms within. Core to the programme is the development of research methods, culminating in a piece of original research, written up in the form of a publication ready journal article. The MSc in Evolution and Human Behaviour is a perfect foundation for PhD research: it provides theoretical background, discipline specific knowledge and advanced research methods. [-]

MA

MA in Anthropology and Conservation

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years August 2016 United Kingdom Canterbury + 1 more

This challenging and innovative MA programme provides a distinctive combination of knowledge and training in Social Anthropology and Environmental Conservation. It qualifies students to pursue careers and doctoral studies in either of the two disciplines—Anthropology or Conservation. [+]

This challenging and innovative MA programme provides a distinctive combination of knowledge and training in Social Anthropology and Environmental Conservation. It qualifies students to pursue careers and doctoral studies in either of the two disciplines—Anthropology or Conservation. The course is offered in an academic environment that formally embraces both social anthropology and conservation science, the School of Anthropology and Conservation, which is, in its constellation of specialisations, unique in the world. The integration of theoretical perspectives and methodologies from Anthropology and Conservation presents a distinctive set of skills that enable the practice and design of anthropologically informed conservation, the resolution of environmental conflict, and the study and revaluation of indigenous/local environmental knowledge. The course encourages a critical perspective on the practice and epistemology of conservation and anthropology, paving the way for the integration of the two disciplines methodologically and theoretically. It pays particular attention to the interrelationships between local/indigenous populations and environmental groups, policy makers, legislators, and institutions concerned with the protection of the environment (e.g. Natural Protected Areas, green development projects). During the course of studies the students explore themes such as human-animal conflicts, environmental politics, debates over fragile environments, attitudes toward conservation among indigenous groups (and vice versa), and institutional and indigenous environmental knowledge and practices. The MA programme in Anthropology and Conservation at the University of Kent builds on the unique co-existence of the disciplines of Anthropology and Conservation within the same School. Drawing upon the specialist skills of individual members of staff in the two disciplines, the programme offers a distinctive and exciting mix of anthropological and conservation sub-topics and skills, but also, and more importantly, the opportunity to integrate the two disciplines at the MA level of study. This combination is achieved, for the very first time at the University of Kent, and reflects the specialization and research synergies realised in the School of Anthropology and Conservation. Course Structure In each academic year there are three terms. Teaching for coursework takes place in the first and second terms. During the third term and the summer period students prepare their dissertation on a topic that reflects their own individual interests and experience. Students minimally enroll in three required or suggested modules in both the first and second terms term and have the option of also taking additional modules (non-assessed). From the start of the third term the students focus on their dissertation, which counts towards one third of the overall degree. [-]

MA in Anthropology of Ethnicity, Nationalism & Identity

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years August 2016 United Kingdom Canterbury + 1 more

This MA examines how anthropology and associated disciplines contribute to understanding and resolving issues arising from the formation and negotiation of collective identities. It examines topics such as the politics of place and identity, the logics and practices of intercommunal struggles, nationalist movements, the impact of globalisation, the relations of diasporic and 'home' communities, issues of heritage and 'authenticity', the formation of new ‘hybrid’, ‘multicultural’ or cosmopolitan identities. [+]

The current world scene is shaped by identity politics generating struggles between groups constituted around ethnic, religious, national and other claims. This MA examines how anthropology and associated disciplines contribute to understanding and resolving issues arising from the formation and negotiation of collective identities. It examines topics such as the politics of place and identity, the logics and practices of intercommunal struggles, nationalist movements, the impact of globalisation, the relations of diasporic and 'home' communities, issues of heritage and 'authenticity', the formation of new ‘hybrid’, ‘multicultural’ or cosmopolitan identities. Kent's unique programme, which integrates anthropological theory and fieldwork methodology (including visual techniques) into specialised programme content, makes for a powerful and practical approach to this contemporary topic. ‘Identity’ seems self-evident, but the implications of how we define and operationalise it range from self-realisation through multi-cultural politics to explosions of ethnic and religious warfare. This MA explores the implications of identity and the various politics which it engenders, using contemporary social and philosophical theory as well as School members’ diverse experience of ethnicity, nationalism and identity politics across the world. Distinctive Features - Wide ranging theoretical overview matched with appropriate -- and exciting -- ethnographic case studies - Taught by scholars with field experience ranging from studies of ethnic identity and its expression in food and dress to studies of ethnic mobilisation in nationalist conflicts - Incorporates modules dealing with classic and contemporary anthropological theory as well as fieldwork methods such as participatory observations, interviewing, visual anthropology etc. - Culminating thesis on a topic of students’ own choices, with one-on-one guidance by an appropriate academic supervisor Entry Requirements A good honours or joint honours degree. This programme is open to applicants from all disciplines. Candidates with academic backgrounds will normally be expected to have at least a 2.1 or equivalent in their first degree. Applicants with work experience (in for instance NGOs) around peace, conflict studies, migration, and other topics related to ethnicity, nationalism and/or identity are encouraged. Applications are made online. [-]

MA in Social Anthropology

Campus Full time 1 year August 2016 United Kingdom Canterbury

This programme is designed as an advanced course in social and cultural anthropology for students who have either already studied anthropology or are looking for a sophisticated 'conversion' course. [+]

Our School is highly inter-disciplinary and our postgraduate students can benefit from a wide variety of expertise not only in the traditional fields of social anthropology but also in areas such as environmental anthropology, ethnobotany, conservation biology, biodiversity management, environmental law and, in particular, computing applications for anthropology. This programme is designed as an advanced course in social and cultural anthropology for students who have either already studied anthropology or are looking for a sophisticated 'conversion' course. Kent's unique programme, providing in-depth generalist training in anthropological theory and fieldwork methodology while allowing access to specialised work in topics such as Visual Anthropology, the Anthropology of Ethnicity, Nationalism and Identity, Anthropology and Conservation and area specialisms, is an excellent preparation for those embarking on research degrees in anthropology or intending to enter professional fields in which anthropological training is advantageous. The Postgraduate Diploma and the taught MA consist of two core modules on Current Problems in Anthropology and Anthropological Research Methods. In addition students do a further module from a range offered within the School which they choose following consultation with their supervisor. Each student is assigned a supervisor at the beginning of the year whom they are expected to meet regularly. These meetings offer students the opportunity to discuss the assignments which they are required to undertake for evaluation of their progress. Postgraduate students are required to write seven essays for evaluation. MA students write a 10,000 word dissertation in addition to their essays. (Note: Students registered for the Diploma attend the same courses as the MA students. If, on completion of their assignments, they have achieved a sufficiently high overall mark, they are given the option of proceeding to the writing of a dissertation.) The following Master's programmes are recognised by the ESRC as having research training status, so successful completion of these courses is sufficient preparation for research in the various fields of social anthropology. Many of our students do, in fact, go on to do MPhil and PhD research. Others use their Master's qualification in employment ranging from research in government departments to teaching to consultancy work overseas. [-]

MA in Social Anthropology & Computing

Campus Full time 1 year August 2016 United Kingdom Canterbury

The aim of the MA in Social Anthropology with Computing is to prepare you to apply appropriate computer-based methods to anthropological research at a relatively advanced and creative level. [+]

Our School is highly inter-disciplinary and our postgraduate students can benefit from a wide variety of expertise not only in the traditional fields of social anthropology but also in areas such as environmental anthropology, ethnobotany, conservation biology, biodiversity management, environmental law and, in particular, computing applications for anthropology. The School also houses the Centre for Social Anthropology and Computing (CSAC) under its Director, Dr. Michael Fischer. Thanks to the Centre the School is one of the world's leading institutions in the field of the application of computing techniques to anthropology. The aim of the MA in Social Anthropology with Computing is to prepare you to apply appropriate computer-based methods to anthropological research at a relatively advanced and creative level. You will develop a research perspective in social anthropology - the design, planning, implementation and analysis of anthropological research - and apply specialised computing methods to anthropological research and analysis. The following Master's programmes are recognised by the ESRC as having research training status, so successful completion of these courses is sufficient preparation for research in the various fields of social anthropology. Many of our students do, in fact, go on to do MPhil and PhD research. Others use their Master's qualification in employment ranging from research in government departments to teaching to consultancy work overseas. Postgraduate Diploma students may study the same course content as MA and MSc students on the respective programmes, but diploma programmes run for nine months full-time and are assessed by essays and course participation alone. Diploma students who successfully complete the coursework may, on application, be accepted onto the research and dissertation module which leads to the award of MA or MSc. Course Structure - Design and Implementation of Computer Applications in Anthropology (20 credits) Pascal Programming I and II (20 credits) - Two modules drawn from the School of Computing (40 credits) - Two modules (40 credits) drawn from Social Anthropology, usually Research Methods and one other module relating to your interests. Students with a strong computing background can exchange one module between computing and social anthropology, and/or take more advanced modules in computing than those ordinarily offered. - Computing application and short dissertation (Please note that students with no background in Java programming must take a special three-week module before the beginning of the academic year in September.) [-]

MA in Visual Anthropology

Campus Full time 1 year August 2016 United Kingdom Canterbury

The course is designed for those who wish to gain a strong grounding in Visual Anthropology while gaining practical skills and developing their own expertise and interests in new, productive and collaborative areas. [+]

The MA in Visual Anthropology offers a unique opportunity to explore traditional and experimental means of using visual and audio-visual media to research, represent and produce anthropological knowledge. Our pioneering use of multimedia in anthropology is now complemented by an innovative interest in public and collaborative anthropology, critical engagement with policy and the use of audio-visual and internet based media in advocacy and activism. Grounded in and committed to practice-led theory in social anthropology the course critically examines the relation of the visual to the other senses and the power of media to move people to action. It also seeks inspiration from outside of disciplinary boundaries for the purposes of engaging wider audiences. The course is designed for those who wish to gain a strong grounding in Visual Anthropology while gaining practical skills and developing their own expertise and interests in new, productive and collaborative areas. Integration with linked modules in Social Anthropology ensures that the course widens career prospects and provides ideal preparation for further research. Core Courses The MA in Visual Anthropology is based on five courses assessed by five core essays, a research proposal, multimedia productions and a mixed AV/ text dissertation project of up to 15,000 words. The MA has a total 180 credit load. Visual Anthropology Theory, Anthropological Research Methods 2, Theory and Ethnography in Social Anthropology 1 & 2 are each worth 20 credits. The core practical course, Participatory (Audio-Visual) Ethnography is worth 40 credits. The dissertation is worth 60 credits. Students also attend the weekly staff/graduate student seminar, which provides a showcase for international, national and local scholarship in the field. There are two teaching terms of twelve weeks. Students have a month over Christmas and Easter to pursue their projects and are free to go into the field for their summer projects at the end of April. Why Kent? As one of only four dedicated Visual Anthropology programmes in the UK we distinguish ourselves in six main ways: - Integration with Social Anthropology - Teaching by experts - Experience based learning - Small groups & excellent facilities - Supportive, international & friendly atmosphere - Flexible and mixed AV/Text dissertation [-]

Contact

Marlowe Building

Address CT2 7NR United Kingdom
Website http://www.kent.ac.uk/
Phone +44 1227 824689