University of East Anglia Faculty of Arts and Humanities

Introduction

UEA Faculty of Arts and Humanities

WRITE your debut novel. DISCOVER a new way of thinking about the 'American Dream'. LAUNCH your journalism career. CREATE a successful business in the Creative Arts. GET deeper into your favourite period of history...

Whatever your passion - studying as a postgraduate in the Faculty of Arts and Humanities at UEA allows you to immerse yourself in every detail.

As a postgraduate student at UEA, you're joining one of Britain's most successful universities for the Humanities, who attributes its success to a close bond between researching, teaching and a continued innovative approach to their courses.

Forty years ago UEA were the first university to introduce the study of creative writing to UK higher education. That pioneering programme has since provided critical reflection and creative practice to prize-winning novelists including Ian McEwan, Anne Enright, Kazuo Ishiguro and Tracy Chevalier, remaining just as committed to offering unique qualities in their programmes today. The Faculty also hosts a renowned biannual Literary Festival and organises unique creative events throughout the year.

By choosing to study in the Faculty of Arts and Humanities at UEA, you will be supported in an environment that is built upon high quality, creative research.

The Faculty has several Schools of Study, each with brilliant international reputations for success:
• American Studies
• Art History and World Art Studies
• Film, Television and Media Studies
• History
• Philosophy
• Language and Communication Studies
• Political, Social and International Studies
• Literature, Drama and Creative Writing

Postgraduate Funding

Postgraduate Scholarships, Bursaries and PhD Studentships are available to students within the Faculty of Social Sciences and are usually awarded on the basis of academic merit. Application deadlines vary, so you are strongly advised to apply as early as possible in your year of entry. To explore further detail on funding linked to your area of study visit UEA’s dedicated page for Postgraduate funding opportunities.

UEA: WORLD LEADING INSTITUTION WITH STUDENTS AT ITS HEART

The University of East Anglia (UEA) is an internationally renowned, campus-based university that delivers top quality academic, social and cultural facilities to over 15,000 students. UEA's postgraduate community is around 3,500 students, forming one of the central strengths of the University.

Proving its pioneering spirit, UEA proudly sits in the Top 1% of universities in the world (Times Higher World League Table 2015) and consistently performs in the Top 5 for student experience in the National Student Survey since it began 10 years ago.

The campus is located in a lush, green area of Norwich, England's first UNESCO City of Literature. It's just two miles from the heart of the city, which is easily reached by foot, bike or bus. The stunning Norfolk coast is 1 hour away, and London a swift 2 hours by train. This uniquely-placed University is also part of the Norwich Research Park, one of Europe's biggest concentrations of researchers in the fields of environmental, health and plant science.

Sporting facilities on campus include the Sportspark, which houses an Olympic-sized swimming pool and regularly hosts local and international athletic events. UEA also offers the world famous Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts and hosts an International Literary Festival that featuring famous names such as Ian McEwan, Kazuo Ishiguro and Anne Enright (all UEA Creative Writing course alumni).

If you want to change the world with your degree, make an impact in your industry and reach your full potential - the University of East Anglia is a brilliant next step.
This school offers programs in:
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Programs

This school also offers:

Master

MFA Creative Writing

Campus Full time 2 years August 2017 United Kingdom Norwich

The Creative Writing programme at UEA was the first of its kind in the UK, and is distinguished by the unrivalled success of its alumni. We introduced the first MA in 1970, the first PhD in 1987, and students now join us from all over the world. [+]

The Creative Writing programme at UEA was the first of its kind in the UK, and is distinguished by the unrivalled success of its alumni. We introduced the first MA in 1970, the first PhD in 1987, and students now join us from all over the world. In 2011 we were awarded the Queen's Anniversary Prize for Higher and Further Education in recognition of our continuing excellence in delivering innovative courses at a world-class level. Our MFA Creative Writing builds on our extensive connections with publishers and agents, meaning that our students will graduate fully equipped to launch their careers as publishing writers, and will have sufficient training and experience to support their writing careers as teachers of writing. Over the duration of two years, the first year of the MFA will be coterminous with our existing MA Creative Writing Prose Fiction, offering all the benefits of the workshop-based approach to teaching writing, while the second year will be structured on the model of the PhD, offering one-to-one supervision of works-in-progress and culminating in the submission of a full-length work for assessment. Additionally, the MFA is an entry-level qualification for a career in academia in the USA, giving many graduates the opportunity immediately to pursue roles in teaching at undergraduate level. The MFA presents an alternative to a PhD, requiring fewer years out of employment, and offers the possibility of completing a work of publishable length (60,000 words or longer) under supervision, which will enable you to take full advantage of the excellent links we maintain with literary agents and publishers, many of whom visit the campus to talk to students during the programme. How many classes will I attend? In the Autumn and Spring semesters of your first year, you will attend the weekly workshop and an accompanying optional module. Your work will be peer-reviewed six times in the workshop, and on each occasion this will be followed by a one-to-one tutorial with your workshop tutor. In the follow-on individual meetings with your tutor there will be an opportunity to discuss your work and your ambitions for your writing in greater detail. Your optional module may also be practice-based, offering further opportunities to submit creative work in a critical context, or may be chosen from the full range of scholarly and critical modules offered in the School of Literature, Drama and Creative Writing. In the post-Easter dissertation period you will be assigned an individual supervisor for a series of one-to-one tutorials, and will attend a series of weekly presentations from visiting agents and publishers. The second year is taught on the model of the PhD and comprises a series of regular editorial meetings with your supervisor to discuss your work-in-progress. In the Autumn semester you will also follow a course of teaching training, supplemented with classroom observation, and in the Spring you will be offered an opportunity to teach on the undergraduate Literature and Creative Writing programme. Will I receive individual tutorials? Yes, in the first year you will have individual meetings with your workshop tutor each time your work is peer-reviewed, followed by a series of one-to-one tutorials leading into the summer recess. The second year is structured around a series of eleven individual tutorials. These meetings will allow your supervisor to provide constructive editorial feedback on your work-in-progress and answer any questions you may have. How often will my work be seen by my tutors? Including workshops, tutorials and the double-marking of assignments, your work will be read and commented upon by faculty members around 35 times over the course of the MFA. There will often also be opportunities to show your work to visiting writers, such as our UNESCO professors, who have recently included the novelists Ali Smith, James Lasdun and Margaret Atwood. I’ve already taken a BA in Literature and Creative Writing, and attended other writing workshops. What can this course offer me? During the course your work-in-progress will be regularly and constructively critiqued by other writing students of an extremely high calibre and by experienced tutors on the UK’s most successful writing programme. In the peer review of your classmates’ works-in-progress, you will become practiced in key critical and editorial skills that you will then bring to bear on your own works-in-progress. Over the two years you will have numerous opportunities to meet literary agents and publishers, and on completion of the MFA you will be ready to approach them with a complete draft of a novel or collection of stories. You will also graduate with experience of teaching at undergraduate level. [-]

MRes Philosophy

Campus Full time 1 year August 2017 United Kingdom Norwich

The Master of Research is a research training programme designed to prepare students for independent research, either as part of a one-plus-three year route leading to the PhD or to give students a cutting edge on the job market. The programme has an undiluted Oxbridge format, with teaching structured around one-on-one tutorials. [+]

Philosophy at UEA As a student within Philosophy, you will benefit from a dynamic and friendly environment with a highly distinctive research profile – an ideal place in which to be inducted into philosophical research. While actively supporting research in all core areas and periods of philosophy, we have particular research strengths at various frontiers of the subject: philosophy and the arts (literature, film, music), philosophy and linguistics, environmental philosophy, and metaphilosophy (epistemology and methodology of philosophy) are among its distinctive specialisms. Some of these benefit from the proximity to worldwide leading departments in related areas (including literature and creative writing, and environmental studies). We are a leading centre for research on Wittgenstein, while our members also work on ancient philosophy, early modern philosophy and Kant, phenomenology, and the history of analytic philosophy. Weekly guest lectures and workshops add to the vibrancy of Philosophy at UEA and make it easy for newcomers to blend into the graduate community of about thirty, and be in constant touch with academic staff. The MRes Programme The Master of Research is a research training programme designed to prepare students for independent research, either as part of a one-plus-three year route leading to the PhD or to give students a cutting edge on the job market. The programme has an undiluted Oxbridge format, with teaching structured around one-on-one tutorials. Students typically take four supervised study modules consisting of three such tutorials each. Each module involves doing research on individually agreed topics from one area of the subject, under the guidance of a member of academic staff. Results are presented in three essays. After feedback from the supervisor, two essays are revised and submitted for assessment. Students taking two such modules per semester will have fortnightly essay deadlines and tutorials. One or two supervised study modules can be replaced with appropriate taught modules from the menu of PHI MA modules. Alternatively, it is also possible to take language training (e.g. Ancient Greek, or German for philosophical research purposes) in place of one or two of the modules. One-on-one supervisions are complemented by the Philosophy Postgraduate Research Training Workshop, a research skills module for all Masters’ students. From May to September, students write a dissertation (12-15,000 words) on a topic chosen in consultation with the course director and under the guidance of a supervisor. [-]

MA

MA American Studies

Campus Full time 1 year August 2017 United Kingdom Norwich

This is a broad-ranging programme that combines the study of cultural theory, literature, film, history and international relations. All students take Theories of American Culture (team-taught by eight faculty members) and choose two other modules taught within American Studies, for example. [+]

Why does the United States of America matter so much to us all? Wealth, but world-wide credit crisis? Automobiles and highways? War on terror? First black president? International movie industry? The American dream? Patriotism and flag waving? Whatever the reasons the United States matters to you, studying for one of our MA degrees [American History; American literature; American Studies; or American Studies and Film] will allow you to explore the events and forces that shaped the United States, and gain a deeper understanding of how this powerful nation moulds and influences the cultural, political, and economic lives of its own peoples and the world. Why Study America at UEA? American Studies has come 5th in the UK with 74% of its research rated 4* (world leading) or 3* (internationally excellent) in The Research Excellence Framework (REF2014), a major Government analysis of university research quality. Within the Area Studies Unit of Assessment we were the highest rated for American Studies. Our vibrant research community ensures that faculty and graduate students meet regularly for research seminars and social events. The Arthur Miller Centre organises an annual Literary Festival, bringing major North American writers to the campus every year. All our MA programmes are interdisciplinary and are among the most established and prestigious in Britain. Course Content and Structure: Students build on their undergraduate training to develop exceptionally high levels of theoretical understanding and knowledge of American thought, culture, literature, history, politics and film. Faculty members and students of American Studies work within and across traditional disciplinary boundaries. All teaching is in small seminar groups, which provides students with the opportunity to engage fully with their own ideas and those of others. MA in American Studies This is a broad-ranging programme that combines the study of cultural theory, literature, film, history and international relations. All students take Theories of American Culture (team-taught by eight faculty members) and choose two other modules taught within American Studies, for example: Twentieth-Century American Novel; The Black Atlantic; Slave Life in the Antebellum South; Native American History; American Foreign Policy Interventions; Race and Resistance; Gender and Genre in Contemporary Cinema; Postcolonial Theory. The fourth module is a free choice; students can select this additional module within American Studies, or take a module in a complementary MA programme, such as Studies in Fiction, Life Writing, Film Studies, Culture and Communication, History, or International Relations. Final Dissertation A dissertation of 12-15,000 words is prepared over the summer for submission at the start of September. Students are encouraged to select topics which have stimulated or grabbed their interest during the course of the year. Each student is allocated a supervisor whose expertise and interests match their chosen dissertation project. All students receive intensive one-on-one supervision and mentoring. Course Assessment There is no written examination. Assessment is on the basis of coursework (essays and sometimes class presentations) and the dissertation. The dissertation counts for half the marks of the course. Research Community MA students are valued members of the American Studies’ research community and the Faculty of Arts and Humanities, and interact intellectually and socially with faculty members and Ph.D students. As part of your training you will attend weekly research seminars, where distinguished scholars from the UK, USA and elsewhere present their research for discussion with the UEA American Studies research community. Postgraduate students are encouraged to present their work in this supportive environment, where they can critically engage in scholarly debates. Transferable Skills: Many transferable skills are developed through the MA programmes in American Studies, including: research and writing skills; ITC skills; presentational skills; practice in public speaking and academic debate; team-work; time and project management. [-]

MA Applied Translation Studies

Campus Full time 1 year August 2017 United Kingdom Norwich

This course enables you to apply the theory of translation in a wide range of practical ways, offering a wealth of opportunities to expand your practical experience in readiness for a move into professional translation. [+]

Translation is a huge growth industry and the demand for well-qualified translators is steadily increasing across the globe. This course enables you to apply the theory of translation in a wide range of practical ways, offering a wealth of opportunities to expand your practical experience in readiness for a move into professional translation. These include: Developing an individual portfolio of your own translations in consultation with a professional translator Experience of working on practical group projects in a real working environment Being trained in the application and use of the latest technological tools for translators The MA also provides a solid base for those wishing to pursue further postgraduate research in Translation Studies. You will benefit from our established experience in Applied Translation Studies where we are continually building on the MA’s proven strengths. This course is distinctive because we are able to cater for students with a very wide range of language pairs, one of which is always English. We welcome students from across the globe and this makes seminars particularly engaging for staff and students alike as we all learn a great deal about each other’s languages and cultures. All seminars have a generic focus which is then applied in practice via projects and essay work. Course Content and Assessment The course runs for one-year on a full-time basis but can also be taken part-time over two years. You will take a combination of compulsory and optional modules, to build a solid foundation in the discipline and then specialise in areas that particularly interest you. In your first semester, you will take these compulsory modules: Translation and Theory Research Methods You will have the choice of one of these two optional modules: Translation in Context The Power of Discourse: Representation and Interaction In your second semester, you will take these compulsory modules: Technological Tools for Translators Research Methods In option ranges, you can specialise further with pathways dedicated to professional translation, forensic linguistics and translation or intercultural communication. The range usually includes: Translation Work Experience Translation as a Profession Forensic Linguistics and Translation Language Issues in a Global Multilingual Context Intercultural Communication in Practice Assessment is on the basis of coursework which principally involves presentations, translations, commentaries and essays. Final Dissertation In addition to the modules above, you will have the opportunity to write a dissertation. This can be a 90 credit translation and commentary of 15,000 words, or a critical essay on a topic of your choice (12,000-15,000 words in length). If you decide to take two optional modules in the second semester, you will take a 70 credit dissertation where the word counts are 12,000 for the translation and commentary and 10,000-12,000 for the critical essay. Transferable Skills and Careers You will develop a high level of theoretical and practical knowledge of applied translation, including how to evaluate the relevance and usefulness of a range of critical approaches to your needs and circumstances, refine your ability to read and utilise research literature, and learn how to participate effectively in written and oral debate. Many of our students go into the translation industry but also enter a wide range of other professions. [-]

MA Arts of Africa, Oceania and the Americas

Campus Full time 1 year August 2017 United Kingdom Norwich

The one-year course provides students with detailed knowledge of the visual arts, contemporary and historical, of the three geographical areas (Africa, Oceania and the Americas). It also highlights the methodological and theoretical issues involved in their analysis and display, both in their original contexts and in the contexts of museums and exhibitions. [+]

The one-year course provides students with detailed knowledge of the visual arts, contemporary and historical, of the three geographical areas (Africa, Oceania and the Americas). It also highlights the methodological and theoretical issues involved in their analysis and display, both in their original contexts and in the contexts of museums and exhibitions. Consideration of this material occurs at the interface of anthropology, art history, archaeology and museology. The MA course is therefore essentially cross-disciplinary to frame regional developments and important shared themes (e.g., traditions in art and architecture, making, ritual, social/power relations, colonialism, contemporary arts). Throughout the programme, there is a strong emphasis on comparison and examination of current theory, while highlighting the complexity of each area. The flexible range of topics for essays and the dissertation, and a research tutorial option, allows the course to be tailored to a student's interests. Thus someone wishing to focus, for example, on the anthropology of art, archaeology, or Mesoamerica can weight the course in that direction by selecting essay subjects in that area. Working closely with academic staff, the dissertation (max. 15,000 words) also allows students to study intensively a topic of their choice, possibly as a precursor to doctoral research. Places on the course are restricted to a maximum of eight, allowing an unusually high degree of regular individual supervision and small-group tuition. Course structure The programme consists of three taught regional units (30 credits each), tuition leading up to a timed essay (10 credits) and the dissertation (80 credits). A student wishing to conduct advanced pre-PhD study can substitute one of the regional units with a research tutorial option (30 credits), on a specific theme approved by staff. Taught units Over the fall and spring terms, academic staff present a series of weekly lecture-discussions. The sessions, besides providing students with a survey of each area's visual arts, also introduce the main methodological and theoretical issues raised in the area literature, and develop the background against which coursework by students will be delivered. For each of the three units, the student produces two essays: a research seminar and a gallery talk (on a Sainsbury Collection object). Practical instruction is provided in presentation and teaching techniques, so that students become experienced in presenting written and visual material to an academic audience. Series on museums and material culture In addition to the regional units, the MA course also provides instruction on diverse topics broadly centred on material culture and museums: display(s), anthropology of art, style, value systems, looting and cultural property, the history of collections, authenticity, the art market, and the Sainsbury Collection. These directions are enhanced by guided visits to museums (e.g., London, Paris, Cambridge, Oxford) and, where feasible, to temporary displays and auctions of ethnographic materials. These sessions culminate with a timed essay assessment but they are also to help develop other work (essays, dissertation). Supplementary sessions Strong emphasis is placed on the development of skills and training through special interactive sessions on: research techniques, library use, bibliographic research, object handling and conservation, computing, work presentation, editing, design and other professional matters. In addition, students are encouraged to attend lectures and seminars, in programmes organised by Art History and World Art Studies, SRU and the Sainsbury Centre. [-]

MA Biography and Creative Non-Fiction

Campus Full time 1 year August 2017 United Kingdom Norwich

This MA programme is for anyone who wants to develop their own writing in any of these genres while studying at the country’s leading university for the teaching of Creative Writing. [+]

Literary non-fiction is currently undergoing rapid change and reformation. Instead of the old ‘cradle to grave’ narratives of well-known literary or political figures, our best writers are now experimenting with new forms and subjects. Nature-writing, the personal essay, food journalism, art criticism and memoir are all part of the exciting emerging mix. This MA programme is for anyone who wants to develop their own writing in any of these genres while studying at the country’s leading university for the teaching of Creative Writing. Why Study Biography and Creative Non-Fiction at UEA? All the teaching staff are acclaimed writers. Kathryn Hughes is an award-winning biographer and Guardian literary critic. Her most recent book is The Short Life and Long Times of Mrs Beeton. Ian Thomson’s Primo Levi won the W H Heinemann Award and his book about Jamaica, The Dead Yard: Tales of Modern Jamaica was awarded the Ondaatje Prize in 2010. Helen Smith is the winner of a Jerwood Award for Non-Fiction and the Biographers’ Club Prize for her book on Edward Garnett. The programme aims to provide students with the tools they need to develop their interest as readers and writers of non-fiction. Course Content and Structure The MA in Biography and Creative Non-Fiction may be taken full-time over one year or part-time over two. The seminars are timetabled to be convenient to those who wish to travel from London. Students take three compulsory modules: Writing Lives, The Life of the Book and Writing the First Person. In addition they take a fourth module chosen from the wide range available within the School of Literature, Drama and Creative Writing. Teaching is by 3 hour seminar. During this time we may be discussing a set text, presenting papers on a recent work of non-fiction or workshopping students’ own writing. We will also invite leading non-fiction writers to address students on aspects of their craft. Recent guests include Kate Summerscale, Alexander Masters, Richard Holmes and Philip Hoare. The seminars are supplemented by one-to-one tutorials with the module leader. In most years students also choose to set up informal reading and writing groups amongst themselves. Students are encouraged to take advantage of UEA’s vibrant literary culture. Each year a dozen or so leading novelists, poets and non-fiction writers visit Norwich to take part in our Autumn and Spring literary festivals. Students also have the opportunity to meet some of the UK’s leading agents and publishers who make regular visits to talk to students. An anthology of students’ writing is published each year and distributed to a key list of editors, agents and critics. In addition, students are encouraged to post their writing on UEA’s Creative Writing website, a new platform designed to showcase the best work emerging form the course. There is no workshop in the Summer semester (May-June). Instead, students will have one-to-one sessions with a tutor as they work on their dissertation – a 15,000 word piece of non-fiction. How is the course assessed? In addition to the final dissertation, submitted in September, each module is assessed on a 5,000 word essay. Who does Biography and Creative Non-Fiction at UEA? We require a Bachelor’s degree, but this doesn’t have to be in any particular subject. Previous students have included doctors, barristers, teachers, therapists and an asparagus farmer. We also take younger people who have just completed their first degree. What we are looking for is evidence of interest in and engagement with non-fiction of all kinds (this might include memoir, travel writing, nature writing, sports biographies and food journalism.) What kinds of things to students write about? Anything and everything. Football, murderers, wine, poets, saints and music. What happens to students afterwards? Each year a couple of students will go on to publish with a major house. Many others will go on to produce work for smaller, more specialist publishers. Some choose to stay with us to undertake a PhD, working on a full-length project. Others return to their original discipline (teaching, journalism, the law) with the intention of integrating what they have learned into their practice. [-]

MA Broadcast Journalism: Theory and Practice (part time only)

Campus Part time 1 year August 2017 United Kingdom Norwich

This MA degree is designed to give students both core practical and theoretical skills and understanding in the field of journalism and electronic communications – equipping you for work within the communications industries, or a related career. [+]

This MA degree is designed to give students both core practical and theoretical skills and understanding in the field of journalism and electronic communications – equipping you for work within the communications industries, or a related career. As well as gaining practical broadcast and journalistic skills, you will develop the ability to reflect critically on the nature and limitations of news coverage. The legal framework within which journalists work will be considered, along with ethical concerns for media professionals. You will practice interviewing, reporting, video and radio production and learn how to produce and structure news stories for broadcast and online dissemination. Videos produced by students can be seen on the project’s online TV platform – seame.tv, which was developed as part of an international EU media project (SeaMedia). Every year, students have the opportunity to join a number of visits, including political and media institutions locally, in London, and in Northern Europe, working with partner academic institutions in Belgium. The course has a close working relationship with BBC Voices, a community production unit based in Norwich, which gives many students an opportunity to work on video production with BBC producers. Practical aspects of the course are primarily taught by experienced broadcast and broadcast production journalists. Course Content and Structure The course is made up of a number of core modules which run throughout the year. These are ‘Broadcast Journalism’, ‘Contemporary Journalism, Ethics and Practice’, and either ‘Essential Public Affairs and Law for Journalists’ (recommended for students envisaging a Journalism career in the UK) or ‘Media and Society’ (recommended for students envisaging a career elsewhere). All students will complete a ‘Dissertation by Practice’, which is a substantial production of video or radio journalism. There is one other optional module, selected to reflect the individual student’s interests. Broadcast Journalism This module will provide you with a thorough overview of all aspects of broadcast journalism including journalism skills – reporting and editorial - as well as technical elements of television and radio news production such as audio recording and editing, camera operation, sound, video editing, studio practice and production. You will be expected to generate your own stories, and to go out into the local community to research and produce them. We work with local media to arrange work experience placements and other production opportunities. In previous years, students were placed at the BBC East, Future Radio, BBC Voices, Radio Norwich, Archant and EPIC Studios. Final assessment for this module includes observation of students during an extended session working as a professional journalists from the department’s own electronic newsroom in the centre of Norwich. Contemporary Journalism, Ethics and Practice This module will enable students to develop reporting and writing skills while developing their appreciation of a proper ethical framework for journalism. Students will look at how newsrooms are run, the reporter’s working day and how stories are found and developed. Journalistic practice has come under the spotlight in the UK following disclosures of malpractice at the ‘News of the World’, and the establishment of the Leveson inquiry. Students will consider industrial pressures which are often considered to underscore journalism’s failings, and how the industry is adapting. Within the context of contemporary journalism, online is a rapidly expanding field. This module looks at changes within the industry underlying this development. It will also give you further practical experience of the issues and techniques of journalism, particularly as they relate to developing content for online news and information sites. Essential Law and Public Affairs for Journalists Students will learn how law and legal process impact upon newsgathering and publication for audio and audio-visual media. They will be made aware that legal precedents established in online practice (now a core element of multi-platform journalism) are gaining more widespread application. Teaching will survey the judicial system of England and Wales and journalist’s rights and responsibilities within it. It will ask, where relevant to journalism, how UK membership of the European Union and the Council of Europe influences the British judicial system and legislation. Practical sessions will include students attending and reporting Magistrates’, Crown and/or Coroners’ Courts. Taught sessions will reflect on the principles of democracy, freedom of the press, freedom of information and the public interest as these relate to broadcasting regulation. Public Affairs covers principal elements of the UK political system, including the electoral process, the roles of elected members of local authorities, British and European parliaments; the role of civil servants, politicians, political parties, government communication techniques, contemporary political issues and government finance. Students shall be given opportunity to practice the rights, responsibilities, and techniques of journalists in relation to the British and EU systems. Students will be helped to develop a critical understanding and familiarity with current affairs, particularly in relation to the reporting of issues such as national identity, citizenship, cultural diversity, and the role of the media in such matters. Media and Society This module is designed to provide all students studying media related postgraduate degrees with a broad, current and inter-disciplinary understanding of the media today. The guiding philosophy informing this module is the belief that in order properly to understand the media, whether as a lawyer, economist, development studies professional, media studies specialist or political scientist, it is essential to have a wide-ranging and multi-disciplinary understanding of the modern media. Accordingly, it looks at the structure of the media industry today in the UK and globally. It considers, from several different academic perspectives, how media content is constructed, what factors and influences go to shape content and how content may be controlled and even censored. It will also look at the media industry, examining how it is currently organised and managed, what factors influence its current organisation and consider how it might develop. It also examines how media affects people and society and considers assumptions that are made about the impact of the media. Finally, it seeks to draw together key aspects of modern media. Dissertation by Practice The dissertation by practice is an opportunity for you to produce a video or radio project which is both a substantial piece of journalism, and a demonstration of broadcast production skills. You will also reflect on the development and practical execution of your project. You will be assigned a member of staff as a supervisor to advise you on the production and written elements of this dissertation. The subject and format of your practice-based dissertation will be agreed in discussions with your supervisor. Modern digital video, audio and editing equipment will be available to you for completion of this project. [-]

MA Communication and Language Studies

Campus Full time 1 year August 2017 United Kingdom Norwich

As language and cultural exchanges become ever more frequent and diverse, so does our need to comprehend the nature of intercultural communication and how it may best be promoted. The interdisciplinary MA in Communication and Language Studies, focuses firmly on language as a crucial key to comprehending the world today and participating in the world of tomorrow. [+]

Globalisation has broken down barriers of time and space and led to the ever greater centrality of knowledge and information. The increased contact between different linguistic communities (through migration, tourism, education, and information and media flows) has not, however, resolved the problem of linguistic and cultural barriers, quite the opposite. As language and cultural exchanges become ever more frequent and diverse, so does our need to comprehend the nature of intercultural communication and how it may best be promoted. The interdisciplinary MA in Communication and Language Studies, focuses firmly on language as a crucial key to comprehending the world today and participating in the world of tomorrow. We are also particularly interested in exploring today's increasingly complex and varied networks of communication and culture from different perspectives, and this makes what we offer very distinctive. The course provides a broad-based approach to the study of language both as a cultural resource and a cultural practice and makes use of a variety of analytic approaches from Discourse Analysis and ethnolinguistics to semiotics and cross-cultural pragmatics. Options dealing with communication in media and cultural products from the completely different standpoints of, for example, film and television studies or political, social and international studies, provide opportunities to diversify and compare approaches, methodologically and interculturally. The course is intended specifically for international students and integrates English proficiency and skills training into the overall programme of study. It will be of interest to students who are seeking to deepen their knowledge of language as a cultural object and of its uses across communicative contexts and media, as well as a range of professionals concerned with issues of interpersonal and intercultural communication across different fields. Why study Communication and Language Studies at UEA? Several factors combine to make UEA a particularly exciting choice. UEA has a long-established reputation for interdisciplinarity and the MA builds on this tradition: you explore issues from the point of view of language with specialists in language and cross-cultural communication, but you also have the opportunity to work with specialists in Politics and Social Sciences or Film and Television Studies, for example, and to diversify and compare approaches, methodologically and cross-culturally. As a student within Language and Communication Studies, you will benefit from a vibrant environment with a focus on issues relating to contemporary language and translation. The work we undertake has successfully positioned us at the cutting edge of research, ensuring our graduates are well-informed and highly employable. Our research focuses on cross-cultural communication, with all staff sharing an interest in the cross-over of language, translation and media in a multilingual framework. The different standpoints from which they approach the interaction between language and forms of communication constitute complementary and mutually enriching perspectives. The wide range of linguistically diverse students enrolled on both this and other MA programmes within Language and Communication Studies provides a rich environment in which to study intercultural communication. We also provide a friendly and stimulating environment in which to study. The size of Language and Communication Studies at UEA allows for more personal staff-student contact and individual academic support than in many larger institutions. Furthermore, we house the James Platt Centre for Language Learning which provides an extensive range of language resources including live satellite broadcasts, CDs and DVDs in various foreign languages, as well as a wide variety of foreign language printed matter. These materials complement the excellent holdings of the UEA library. IT facilities are excellent throughout the University. Course Content and Structure The MA in Communication and Language Studies is a one-year, full-time taught course but it can also be taken part-time over two years. The course provides students with a high level of theoretical and practical training, combined with the opportunity to focus on issues of particular individual interest. Teaching is mainly through the media of seminars and individual dissertation supervision. The course consists of six taught modules, three compulsory and three selected from a range of options from within Language and Communication Studies or the Faculty of Arts and Humanities. There is also a compulsory Research Methods module taken by all LCS MA students. Example of modules: English, Communication, Culture; Language Issues in a Global Multilingual Context; Textual Interactions and Ideology; Linguistic Communication among Cultures; Cultural Representations and Language; Politics and Popular Culture, Politics and Mass Media, European Media and the EU, Japanese Film: National Cinema and Beyond. Course Assessment: Assessment is on the basis of coursework, (seminar papers, oral case studies, essays, for example), and the dissertation. Final Dissertation: The final compulsory element is an 8,000-word dissertation on a subject chosen by students in consultation with members of academic staff. Work on the dissertation starts at Easter for submission at the beginning of September. Transferable Skills: Students who successfully complete the MA will have developed to a high level their awareness and understanding of issues of culture and communication against claims of globalisation. They will have become familiar with different approaches to these issues, and gained the ability to assess these approaches critically and to evaluate their usefulness to their own needs and circumstances. They will also have honed their practical and analytical grasp of English language and culture and achieved the level and range of skills consonant with the requirements of study at postgraduate level in a British academic environment: ability to read and utilise research literature, independent research, with a focus on appropriate methodology, data collection, analysis, synthesis and evaluation, presentation skills (oral and written), IT skills required to achieve these goals. The programme will provide a suitable foundation for further postgraduate studies at MPhil and PhD level. [-]

MA Creative Entrepreneurship

Campus Full time Part time August 2017 United Kingdom Norwich

This innovative one-year MA course, launched by Mark Lawson, is for artists, writers, musicians, composers, performing artists and recent Arts graduates establishing careers in visual arts, music, literature or engaged in cultural provision. The first course of its kind in the UK, it offers opportunities to showcase and exhibit creative work with placements in arts or business organisations across the UK. [+]

A course that presents an exciting and challenging opportunity to prepare for a creative career in the Arts & Creative Industries, providing the ways and means to make it happen. Why study Creative Entrepreneurship at UEA? This innovative one-year MA course, launched by Mark Lawson, is for artists, writers, musicians, composers, performing artists and recent Arts graduates establishing careers in visual arts, music, literature or engaged in cultural provision. The first course of its kind in the UK, it offers opportunities to showcase and exhibit creative work with placements in arts or business organisations across the UK. Students have recently held successful showcases and exhibitions of their work at the Espacio Gallery East London and the Anise Gallery Shad Thames opposite Terrance Conran HQ. Other locations include Spitalfields Arts Market, a pop-up shop in Bethnal Green and collaborations with sponsors Clyde & Co. Further opportunities to work in Norwich include the Sainsbury Centre of Visual Arts and the Norwich Writers Centre. Click here to find more information on student showcases. The Masters in Creative Entrepreneurship links creativity to entrepreneurship. The course is designed to enable the creative artist to lead with integrity, innovation and enterprise The course defines the artist as `creative entrepreneur’ - an artist able to retain their creative integrity, sustain an independent arts practice and survive in the light of 21st-Century challenges. What skills will I learn? Gain access to inspiring cultural leaders while working alongside fellow creative practitioners to give you a wider awareness of the arts sector. With the support of our experienced team of arts professionals, you will develop a full range of key skills to advance your creative practice; this will include, copyright and contracts, financial management for self-employment, effective communications, public relations, digital technology and social media strategies. Additionally, you will address key issues of accessing resources, fundraising and explore alternative solutions. Over the year, you will be helped to explore your personal opportunities, develop and advance your creative work for a professional context and devise new routes to your target market. What are the career opportunities? This pioneering course has enabled its students from the UK, USA, China, Russia and the Far East to achieve success in establishing their creative careers in many ways. Students have formed theatre companies, achieved published creative writing, held gallery exhibitions in London and Norwich, appeared in West End performances, produced street art and environmental projects. Students have also recorded albums of their own songs, performed poetry slams, created films and video, run festivals and workshops, launched pop up creative enterprises and started up on line creative ventures. Course Content and Structure This programme is flexible and responsive to your needs, through an extensive programme supported by over 20 specialist visitors, reflecting the aspirations of each cohort of students. Visiting speakers are drawn from across the UK creative industries including the Arts Council, Arts and Business, Charitable Trusts, Corporate Sponsors, the National Lottery and Local Authorities. Leading professionals from key sectors provide technical briefings in financial management, communications, law, marketing and digital technology. Seminars and talks are given by publishers, agents, collectors, curators, concert promoters and festival directors with individual contributions by successful entrepreneurial artists, composers, writers and prominent cultural leaders. Links are maintained with the University of East Anglia's Schools of Literature, Drama and Creative Writing and Art, Media and American Studies as well as the Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts and the Norwich Writers Centre. Taught sessions are held two days per week to enable students to continue their creative practice. The course comprises four taught modules and a dissertation or creative equivalent. Entry Requirements Degree Subject: Humanities or Social Sciences (preferred)* Degree Classification: 2:1 or international equivalent All applicants will need to submit a sample of their work alongside their application and might be interviewed by the Course Director. * A degree is preferable but not essential. All applications will be considered based on the applicant's background and experience. Students for whom English is a Foreign language We welcome applications from students whose first language is not English. To ensure such students benefit from postgraduate study, we require evidence of proficiency in English. Our usual entry requirements are as follows: IELTS: 6.5 (minimum 6.0 in all components) PTE (Pearson): 62 (minimum 55 in all components) Test dates should be within two years of the course start date. Other tests, including Cambridge English exams and the Trinity Integrated Skills in English are also accepted by the university. [-]

MA Creative Writing Crime Fiction (Part time)

Campus Part time 2 years August 2017 United Kingdom Norwich

The Creative Writing low-residency MA in Crime Fiction at UEA provides the opportunity to create a full-length novel under the guidance of award-winning crime writers and experienced creative writing tutors – without having to relocate or give up work. [+]

Crime Fiction, A Global Success The Creative Writing low-residency MA in Crime Fiction at UEA provides the opportunity to create a full-length novel under the guidance of award-winning crime writers and experienced creative writing tutors – without having to relocate or give up work. The course is delivered over two years via a specifically designed distance learning online platform, and three short residential periods per year, in September, January and May. Students can stay at UEA’s on-campus hotel. All residential periods incorporate a mix of creative and critical workshops and seminars, and a masterclass from a leading crime writer. Visits from literary agents and editors of crime fiction lists also take place during the May residential period. Modules delivered by distance learning include tutor and student lead group presentations, discussions, workshopping, and one-on-one Skype tutorials. Course material will be easily available on the programme’s specific web pages, while the course director and technical support will be on hand during working hours. Crime Fiction and Facts Crime/thriller fiction is the most popular literary genre in the world, with UK sales alone rising by 80 per cent in the last decade. UEA is at the forefront of both critical and creative study within the genre. Creative Writing began in the UK at UEA over 40 years ago and the university offers a number of highly regarded creative writing programmes. MA Creative Writing (Crime Fiction) builds on our world leading expertise, presenting a unique opportunity for those who wish to further their knowledge and skills within the crime/thriller genre. Critical crime fiction modules are now firmly embedded throughout all levels of taught study within the School of Literature, Drama and Creative Writing, while doctoral research and supervision in the area is growing at the university. UEA is also a founding partner in ‘Noirwich’, Norwich’s annual Crime Writing Festival, which takes place in September, to coincide with the September residential. People We have exceptional links with leading crime writers, critics, publishers and agents. Ian Rankin will be UEA’s UNESCO Visiting Professor in autumn 2016. Other writers associated with UEA and the ‘Noirwich’ festival include Lee Child, Val McDermid, Megan Abbott and Sophie Hannah. Funding Leading publisher Little, Brown sponsor a £3,000 award for the final assessment manuscript they judge the best. The literary agency David Higham Associates sponsor a £5,000 bursary towards fees. UEA’s Centre of Creative and Performing Arts sponsors a full Home Fees bursary. Low-residential students have the same access to all UEA facilities and resources as resident students. You We are seeking writers and readers with an interest in exploring the particularly broad and dynamic crime fiction genre. Our admissions process places an emphasis on both the quality and potential of the writing in the applicant's portfolio (in this case 5000 words of fiction, though not necessarily crime fiction), and commitment. While a good first degree is desirable, it is not essential. Course structure MA Crime Fiction comprises five modules, designed specifically for the course, but following the same creative and academic integrity of the school’s other Creative Writing MAs. Creative Writing will be supplemented with the critical study of landmark crime texts, while practical and theoretical issues of creative writing, and writing within the genre, will address, among other things, characterisation, place, plot, and suspense. Assessment During the first year, students will complete the three creative, critical and practical/theoretical modules. There is continual (formative) assessment, with marked (summative) assessments occurring at the end of the academic year. In year two students will undertake one module, the completion of a full-length, market ready, work of crime fiction. Again this will be assessed throughout the year, and marked at the end of the course. A final module requires attendance at the residential days. For more details see the Course Profile tab. [-]

MA Creative Writing Poetry

Campus Full time 1 year August 2017 United Kingdom Norwich

You have been writing poetry for long enough to know that it is as vital part of your life. You need expert guidance and feedback in order to develop further. One-off workshops and short courses are not enough, and you need to work in a group that is of a consistently high level, and which offers rigorous feedback and intensive support. You are also committed to offering this in return. [+]

Why study for an MA in writing poetry? You have been writing poetry for long enough to know that it is as vital part of your life. You need expert guidance and feedback in order to develop further. One-off workshops and short courses are not enough, and you need to work in a group that is of a consistently high level, and which offers rigorous feedback and intensive support. You are also committed to offering this in return. You want a chance to put poetry at the forefront of your life, to be absorbed in writing and reading, and to discover more about your imaginative, artistic and intellectual capabilities. You want to do this in an academic context because you want to learn more about poetry across time and place, about form and technique, concept and theory, cause and effect. You want to read the kinds of poetry you’ve never come across and discover things about its potential that you’ve never known. Your aim is to write poetry of a publishable standard and with this in mind you want to learn more about publishing procedures and opportunities, readings, awards, etc. You want to benefit from the ways in which the study of poetry enhances analytical, conceptual and verbal skills as well as refining your powers of precision, argument and logic. What are we looking for? We are not looking for a particular kind of poet nor do we have a house style. The students we choose come from all kinds of backgrounds and write in very different ways. What we look for is an emerging poetic self, the beginnings of a voice unlike any other, a deep engagement with all poetry, an understanding of how a poem might work, and the analytical and imaginative capacity to bring a poem to fruition. What do we offer? A year of intensive reading, writing, exploration and risk-taking during which our students develop a body of work close in length to a first collection. We aim to create a supportive but rigorous environment in which students feel encouraged to test, extend and refine their poetic technique – an experience that is often exciting and sometimes uncomfortable but always rewarding. How is the course structured? The core element of the course is the weekly three-hour workshop in a group of around 12 students. The workshop structure varies but generally consists of looking at the work of three students plus a session on some aspect of poetry. Work is circulated a week in advance and annotated in detail before being returned to its author. The tutor may also circulate texts for discussion. In addition to the weekly workshop, the MA includes a course on Poetics, Writing, Language and a number of options ranging from publishing to translation. Students receive regular individual tutorials and extensive written feedback on their coursework. There is no workshop in the summer semester (May to June), during which time you have one-to-one sessions with your dissertation tutor. In July and August you work independently although students usually continue with the workshop in some form. How is the course assessed? There are two coursework submissions of 12 poems each in January and May. The dissertation consists of 15 poems plus a commentary and is submitted in September. Who are the course tutors? The two main tutors for this course are Professor Tiffany Atkinson and Dr Sophie Robinson, both of whom are published poets with extensive experience in their field. What else do we offer? Students also have the opportunity to meet some of the UK’s leading poets and poetry editors, and to benefit from their insight and expertise. The annual anthology is professionally published and distributed to a key list of poetry houses and other contacts. The UEA literary festival attracts some of our leading poets (this year Carol Ann Duffy, Don Paterson, Simon Armitage and Robin Robertson) who not only give readings but usually agree to spend time in conversation with the MA writing students as well. UEA is also part of a thriving network of regional poetry activity which offers plenty of opportunity to gain performance experience and to get involved in publication. [-]

MA Creative Writing Prose Fiction

Campus Full time 1 year August 2017 United Kingdom Norwich

The Creative Writing (Prose Fiction) MA at UEA is the longest-running in the UK and has enjoyed unparalleled success in terms of the publications and prizes achieved by its alumni (see News, Alumni and Interview pages). Our continuing success means we are fortunate in being able to attract many writers of great talent and potential. [+]

The Creative Writing (Prose Fiction) MA at UEA is the longest-running in the UK and has enjoyed unparalleled success in terms of the publications and prizes achieved by its alumni (see News, Alumni and Interview pages). Our continuing success means we are fortunate in being able to attract many writers of great talent and potential. Our course offers an intensive immersion in the study of the writing of Prose Fiction. Students take core creative modules, but can choose from a wide range of critical courses, and benefit from our proven strengths in modernism and Creative-critical studies, amongst others. Our faculty teach our core courses. At UEA we also maintain close links with our alumni, who regularly come to UEA to give lectures, seminars and masterclasses; recently Ian McEwan, Kazuo Ishiguro and Andrew Miller have spoken to our students. Recent and upcoming visiting professors are Margaret Atwood, James Lasdun, Ian Rankin, Ali Smith, Steven Poliakoff and Tim Parks; Creative Writing Teaching Fellows also contribute to teaching; UEA alumni James Scuadmore, Richard Beard, John Boyne and Helen Cross are all associated with the programme. How is the Prose Fiction MA structured? One year or two? How many terms? The MA lasts for one year, full-time, and is organized over two semesters of 12 weeks, followed by a dissertation period of 6 weeks. The Autumn semester lasts from September to December, and the Spring semester from January to April. The dissertation period ends in June. The final piece of work is submitted in September at the start of the next academic year. The MA can be taken part-time over two years. Typically you would attend one workshop and one optional module in your first year, the same in your second year, and submit your dissertation at the end of your second year. How many classes must a student attend? Students enroll for two modules per semester. One of these - in both semesters - is the compulsory Prose Fiction workshop, which takes place on Tuesday afternoons and lasts for three hours. The other module in each semester is chosen from a range of options available to all Masters students in the School of Literature, Drama and Creative Writing, for instance ‘Theory and Practice of Fiction’, ‘Novel History’, The Art of Short Fiction, ‘Poetics, Writing, Language’, ‘Fiction After Modernism’ ‘Ludic Literature’, ‘The Writing of Crime/Thriller Fiction’ etc. Each of these modules requires attendance at a three-hour seminar. Typically they are timetabled for Mondays, Wednesdays or Thursdays. Do students also attend lectures? All MA students are required to attend the Research Methodology series of lectures, which takes place in the latter half of the Spring semester. Most of our Creative Writing tutors give a lecture on their own working methods. We also encourage Creative Writing students to attend the undergraduate lecture series as these can help extend students’ awareness of the wider historical and conceptual context of their own writing. Will I receive individual tutorials? You should expect to attend a follow-up tutorial with your class tutor each time your work is discussed in Prose Fiction workshop. In the Summer dissertation period you will then be assigned a supervisor for a series of four individual tutorials to discuss the dissertation that you’ll write independently over the summer vacation. How is the Prose Fiction workshop organised? There are currently three workshop groups of approximately 10 students. Each group is assigned a tutor for the Autumn semester, and a different tutor for the Spring semester. Groups are ‘shuffled’ in December, so that students can encounter the widest range of peer responses to their work during the course of the MA. Teaching styles vary, but typically three students each week will have their work discussed by the group. The work in progress (typically 5,000 words) is circulated a week in advance, and annotated copies are returned to the student at the end of the session. The emphasis is always on constructive criticism, and the expectation is that the group will gain as much from the discussion as the individual whose work is being discussed. Students should expect their writing to be workshopped at least six times over the course of the two semesters. [-]

MA Creative Writing Scriptwriting

Campus Full time 1 year August 2017 United Kingdom Norwich

The MA will explore both theory and practice of dramatic writing, addressing contemporary critical debates, analysing written and performance texts, and experimenting with a range of techniques in original writing. [+]

The MA will explore both theory and practice of dramatic writing, addressing contemporary critical debates, analysing written and performance texts, and experimenting with a range of techniques in original writing. Writers develop skills in constructive criticism and creative editing of each other's writing, towards the creation of a supportive writers' network. Modules will be taught by theorists and practitioners, and will be supplemented by Master classes given by visiting specialists. Teaching will be via seminar discussions and presentations, screenings, workshops, readings and may also include performance visits. Students will be assessed through an analytical essay, original creative writing and working process materials. The full-time Scriptwriting strand of the MA in Creative Writing is taken over one academic year (or two years, part-time). Students take four taught modules (two in the Autumn semester, two in Spring) and write a dissertation during the summer, with tutorial supervision. Three of the four taught modules are taken within the candidate's MA specialisation, two in Autumn, one in Spring; these are compulsory modules. Each module is independently assessed, and is weighted at 20 credits. The other taught module is an option choice taken from the range of modules offered within the Graduate School (excluding other Creative Writing workshops). These are self-contained modules of one semester duration, independently assessed. Each is weighted at 20 credits. The dissertation is weighted at 90 credits ( 50% of the overall course grade). For Scriptwriters, the Dissertation is a full-length (90-120 minutes or variation, subject to negotiation) original script to at least second draft stage, for stage, screen (TV or feature film), or radio. The dissertation is written independently, but students receive regular tutorial supervision and advice. Entry Requirements Degree Subject: UK BA (Hons) 2.1 or equivalent Special Entry Requirements: Sample of work [-]

MA Cultural Heritage and Museum Studies

Campus Full time Part time 1 year August 2017 United Kingdom Norwich + 1 more

This MA course combines the theory and practice of managing cultural heritage (including townscapes and landscapes, historic buildings, archaeological sites). The MA is tailored to respond to the local and international need for qualified, responsible and adaptable cultural heritage professionals with highly developed conceptual and analytical skills. [+]

This MA course combines the theory and practice of managing cultural heritage (including townscapes and landscapes, historic buildings, archaeological sites). The MA is tailored to respond to the local and international need for qualified, responsible and adaptable cultural heritage professionals with highly developed conceptual and analytical skills. The course may also be taken as preparation for more advanced research into the global and local problems and issues surrounding the management of the cultural heritage. The course is available both full-time and part-time. It is structured so as to explore the essentially interdisciplinary nature of cultural heritage and its management. The taught components of the course include aspects of archaeology, architecture, art history, conservation, cultural resource management, heritage management, museum studies and other related fields such as development studies and environmental studies. Under the supervision of the course director, teaching is undertaken by a unique constellation of highly qualified and experienced researchers, lecturers and active heritage professionals. Specially invited professionals from regional, national and international heritage organisations also contribute. Course structure The taught part of the course includes the compulsory modules: ‘Critical Perspectives in Cultural Heritage’, ‘Interpretation and Participation’, ‘World Heritage’,and ‘At Close Quarters: The English Country House and its Collections’. The modules include field trips. Students also gain heritage management experience by undertaking a two- to three-week work placement with an appropriate heritage organisation. The work placement is to be arranged by the student, but our staff will be able to assist in finding an appropriate heritage organisation. Students on this course have worked in a great variety of heritage organisations. On the basis of their placement, students are expected to write an 8,000-word management plan. The plan focuses on one heritage location, monument or group of objects, chosen by the student from those under the care of the placement host organisation and in consultation with that organisation and the course organisers. Finally, students prepare an independently researched dissertation of 12,000 words, which allows students to work intensively on a topic of their choice. [-]

MA Early Modern History

Campus Full time 1 year August 2017 United Kingdom Norwich

This course provides an in-depth examination of power, ideology, culture and social change, between roughly 1500 and 1750. It provides students with all the skills needed by an early modern historian, including paleography (reading 16-17thC handwriting), using primary sources in archives, conceptualizing research topics, and writing up results, with special emphasis on referencing and bibliographical conventions. [+]

Why Study Early Modern History at UEA? The School of History has one of the strongest concentrations of early modern historians in the UK outside London and Oxbridge. 77% of research in the School of History was rated 4* (world leading) or 3* (internationally excellent) according to the Research Excellence Framework (REF2014), a major Government analysis of university research quality. This course provides an in-depth examination of power, ideology, culture and social change, between roughly 1500 and 1750. It provides students with all the skills needed by an early modern historian, including paleography (reading 16-17thC handwriting), using primary sources in archives, conceptualizing research topics, and writing up results, with special emphasis on referencing and bibliographical conventions. Guidance will also be given on how to present research findings orally. In the Core and Supplementary Modules, students will receive a thorough grounding in key ideas and contemporary texts, incorporating and inter-connecting political, social, cultural and religious history, with a particular focus on early modern England. The early modernists are: Prof Malcolm Gaskill, Prof Geoff Plank, Dr Silvia Evangelisti, Dr Polly Ha, Dr Jess Sharkey, Dr Katherine Hill, Dr Joel Halcomb, and Dr Emily Cockayne. Entry Requirements Degree Subject: History or a related subject Degree Classification: UK BA (Hons) 2.1 or equivalent Special Entry Requirements: Applicants must submit a sample of written work (in English). This should be a typed essay on a historical subject, 2-3,000 words long, preferably a photocopy of an assessment marked by a tutor, complete with critical comments and a percentage or grade. The essay should address a specific question, and must demonstrate an ability to construct a historical argument, familiarity with the conventions of academic writing, and competence in English. This should be uploaded to your online application. [-]

MA Film, Television and Creative Practice

Campus Full time 1 year August 2017 United Kingdom Norwich

The MA in Film, Television and Creative Practice allows you to combine study in creative film and television production with historical and theoretical approaches to film, television and related media. [+]

The MA in Film, Television and Creative Practice allows you to combine study in creative film and television production with historical and theoretical approaches to film, television and related media. We have identified creativity and development as key areas of knowledge that are essential for any budding career in film and television, and we include a specialist module that considers the essential role of creating, developing and pitching successful film and programme ideas. Focusing on the production knowledge needed to work in the creative sector, you will also engage with practical skills such as camera operating, digital editing and screenwriting, as well as gaining an understanding of visual grammar, syntax and structure. The activities offered within our MA in Film, Television and Creative Practice offers skills that you will be able to apply in production-related careers. All students gain hands-on experience with a range of film and television production equipment, including digital cameras, editing and scriptwriting tools. You will also be equipped to develop ideas for creative projects in both film and television, and present them to a range of different audiences. Course Content and Structure Taught by academic specialists and industry professionals from the UK and the US, our MA in Film, Television and Creative Practice offers you the chance to take over 50% of your studies in practical work, with all students delivering a dissertation by practice in supervision from Film,Television and Media Studies staff. Our MA in Film, Television and Creative Practice also allows you to choose from a wide range of Film and Television Studies modules that run alongside the training, enabling you to focus on topics including contemporary Hollywood blockbusters, Asian cinema, and television’s relationship with reality. Students on the MA in Film, Television and Creative Practice take the following compulsory modules: Studying Media This module will provide you with the key approaches and research skills needed for the study of film and television, whether you are retraining in the discipline or have some existing academic knowledge. You will learn to identify the key theories and methods in film and TV analysis, including approaches around textual analysis, reception studies and ethnography. You will also receive some preparatory guidance on undertaking a dissertation by practice. Video Production In this module you will be introduced to key skills in film and television production, including the processes of screenwriting, camerawork and editing. The module is also designed to develop students’ understanding of key debates and approaches to the study of film and uses this as a basis for practice based work. The module also explores the connections between academic or theoretical analysis and the practice of working with visual, narrative based media. Students will engage in the analysis of image, narrative and character and consider the technical construction of a range of media forms and genres. Students will gain an understanding of the entire production process through their practice work in which they take an idea from inception through the process of development and pre-production through to production and final delivery of a short film piece. Creativity and Development in Film and Television Production This module will introduce you to key skills in film and television development practice. It will provide an understanding of the processes of creative script and project development, including film and TV business, the activities of the market, and dealing with bodies responsible for commissioning films and television programmes. You will explore how the film and television business functions, begin to develop skills in approaching commissioning and financing bodies, and understand the process of developing film and TV scripts. Film Studies Dissertation (by practice) The Dissertation (by practice) is an opportunity for you to produce a dissertation project that demonstrates production skills, engages with relevant theoretical material, and which reflects on the development and practical execution of that project. You will be assigned a member of staff as a supervisor to advise you on the research and writing up of this dissertation. The format of your practice-based dissertation will be agreed in discussions with your supervisor. [-]

MA Film Studies

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years August 2017 United Kingdom Norwich + 1 more

The MA in Film Studies is taught as either a one-year full-time course or a two-year part-time course. This course is intended to provide students with a range of expertise and training. [+]

We live in a world that, more than ever, is mediated by moving images produced by a diverse range of media industries. Whether our priority is to preserve moving images, engage in the creative activity of making them, or learn more about their role in shaping or reproducing social and cultural values, we need to explore the history, development and character of these important audio-visual cultures. The MA in Film Studies at UEA is one of the longest-established programmes of its kind in the UK. With a broad range of modules that explore the history, political significance and formal qualities of sound and image, we offer a programme specially designed to deepen students’ knowledge and skill in understanding film, catering to those who have studied media in depth before and those who are newer to the subject area. Graduates from our MA programmes have gone on to a variety of careers in the media, archiving, journalism and teaching. Why Study Film at UEA? We offer an exciting and in-depth exploration of the moving image, giving students access to leading scholars and a thriving graduate community. 82% of research in Film, Television and Media Studies was rated 4* (world leading) or 3* (internationally excellent) according to the Research Excellence Framework (REF2014), a major Government analysis of university research quality. Additionally, our research output was rated 4th in the UK in the Times Higher Education REF2014 rankings. We have launched innovative module options on national cinema, genre, television studies, and film and television production, supported by research staff who are experts in these fields. This range of options allows students to extend or deepen their knowledge of the field, or ‘retrain’ in a new discipline. Our graduate community offers a thriving peer group experience, which is augmented by regular symposia and conferences, research seminars and talks from media professionals.We also work extensively with the East Anglian Film Archive (EAFA), a major resource for archive material, located in Norwich. Course Content and Structure The MA in Film Studies is taught as either a one-year full-time course or a two-year part-time course. This course is intended to provide students with a range of expertise and training. The MA in Film Studies offers students the chance to choose their own pathway through the degree. Through individual module choice, students can opt for historical, theoretical or practical modules, choosing from topics as diverse as genre, national cinema or reception studies. Teaching is mainly in the form of seminars and screenings, although the compulsory module ‘Film Studies: History, Theory, Criticism’ taken in the Autumn semester will have a lecture component. There will also be opportunities to attend additional talks and discussion groups on a wide variety of film, television and media topics. Module options currently on offer include: Fantasy Genres Women and Film Effects, Audiences and Media British Cinema: Realism and Spectacle Transferable Skills In addition to the areas of skills outlined above, students will also learn more generally applicable skills, including the ability to research, select, and analyse from a variety of archive and textual materials; present evidence in verbal and written form (including public speaking); select and justify appropriate methodological approaches; be able to write accurately and grammatically (using appropriate conventions); construct coherent and independent arguments; manage a large and disparate body of information; use IT effectively; develop inter-personal skills and how to work well in teams. Individual Supervision / Final Dissertation Students begin researching the 12,000-15,000 word dissertation in the Spring semester and work on it through the summer, for submission at the beginning of September. In the Dissertation module, students pursue an area of specialist study which will allow them to investigate a particular academic methodology or topic (e.g. genre, authorship, reception studies). Each student will be assigned a member of staff as a supervisor to advise them on the research and writing up of this dissertation. Course Assessment There is no written examination for any of the Film Studies MA courses. Assessment is on the basis of coursework: including, but not limited to, essays and seminar papers, presentation reports, reflective learning journals, and the final dissertation. [-]

MA History of Art

Campus Full time 1 year August 2017 United Kingdom Norwich

The MA in the History of Art exposes students to critical theories and methods developed in different disciplines for the visual, historical and contextual analysis of art. The degree actively encourages students to evaluate critical approaches through class discussion, presentations and written research assignments. [+]

The MA in Art History offers study in an exceptionally wide range of artistic cultures, periods and forms. The flexible structure of the course allows students to choose from seminar modules on the arts of Europe, the Americas, Africa, Asia and the Pacific, and from antiquity to the present day. Teaching takes place in small groups, with regular opportunities for individual supervision. Students select four modules from a range of options and in addition receive guidance on the methodological and historiographic aspects of advanced study in the History of Art. Students also write a dissertation of 12,000 words, which allows them to focus on a topic of their choice and can draw on the expertise of our staff members for guidance in the research and writing of their dissertations. The MA can be taken in one year, or part-time, over two years. The degree develops critical skills in research, analytical thinking and communication, and prepares students for either a higher research degree or a career in the visual arts sector. As a member of the Sainsbury Institute for Art, Art History and World Art Studies at UEA offers students an extraordinary range of academic resources and researchers. The Inspiring Environment of Art History and World Art Studies We encourage innovative lines of inquiry both within the discipline of art history and also by moving across and beyond disciplinary boundaries. 79% of research in Art History and World Art Studies was rated 4* (world leading) or 3* (internationally excellent) according to the Research Excellence Framework (REF2014), a major Government analysis released today. Additionally, the impact of the research was rated the 2nd highest in the UK for Art History in the Times Higher Education REF2014 rankings.Depth and breadth of expertise expose students to different strands of critical thinking about the place of art in the world. Exposure to Cutting-Edge Research The Sainsbury Institute for Art’s commitment to the study of the arts across the world has contributed to its reputation for high-quality research by individual staff members and by teams. Collaborative projects include exhibitions at the Norwich Castle Museum, the Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts, the British Museum, and other major national and international museums and art galleries. Students are encouraged to participate in these projects and the Institute’s research culture more generally. Students and academic staff come together for weekly seminars, in which invited speakers discuss their latest research. Weekly postgraduate seminars provide a supportive and friendly forum for the presentation of student research, and an opportunity to try out ideas and conference presentations. With computers and other IT facilities in dedicated postgraduate areas, students are provided with an ideal and welcoming environment in which to develop their expertise, specialist skills and research projects. Research Skills, Analytical and Critical Capacities The MA in the History of Art exposes students to critical theories and methods developed in different disciplines for the visual, historical and contextual analysis of art. The degree actively encourages students to evaluate critical approaches through class discussion, presentations and written research assignments. Students are equipped with the art-historical skills expected of curators, professional art writers, auction house experts, and entrants to PhD programmes in the History of Art and other humanities disciplines. Fieldwork Opportunities Depending on your choice of modules, there will be occasions to see works of art and architecture in locales that range from Sutton Hoo in Suffolk and the country house in Norfolk, to Rome and Bologna in Italy. Whenever possible, students are also provided with opportunities to handle archaeological objects and historical manuscripts, to conduct on-site research in West Africa, and to visit the wealth of artworks and historic buildings in East Anglia (including its many country houses, its uniquely rich medieval heritage and the significant collection of Old Master, British and modern art held by the Norwich Castle Museum). to analyse built structures, both ruined and standing to examine manuscripts so as to understand their makeup and production to relate artefacts of all kind to existing documentation to place art and architecture in its historical and cultural context to outline the development of art and architecture in East Anglia (and beyond) in the period 1100-1550 to understand the nature of the major institutions involved in art patronage. [-]

MA International Relations

Campus Full time 1 year August 2017 United Kingdom Norwich

It is ever more important to understand how the world works. Few problems today can be easily confined to the domestic arena. A better knowledge of the world and international relations can help explain why problems – from terrorism to financial crises – occur and how best to resolve them. [+]

Why Study International Relations? It is ever more important to understand how the world works. Few problems today can be easily confined to the domestic arena. A better knowledge of the world and international relations can help explain why problems – from terrorism to financial crises – occur and how best to resolve them. Why Study International Relations at UEA? In PSI, we pride ourselves on providing top quality teaching. Independent monitors have given us top marks for our teaching and we have consistently scored highly in student surveys too. We offer research-led teaching which means that your lecturers will be able to give the most up-to-date, cutting edge information on your subject of study. We think you will find it a stimulating environment to study. Many students come from Britain, of course, but many others come from all over the world. It will only help in your studies to meet and learn from people from all sorts of different cultures. 70% of research in Politics and International Relations was rated 4* (world leading) or 3* (internationally excellent) according to the Research Excellence Framework (REF2014), a major Government analysis of university research quality. Courses, Content and Structure The MA lasts twelve months for full-time students and two years for those studying part-time. You will have seminars and lectures during the first two semesters and then over the summer you will work on your dissertation which is handed in at the start of September. Transferable Skills Over the course of the MA, you will develop a variety of transferable skills. These include debating, giving oral presentations, team work, project work and essay writing. All students also take a module called Methods of Social Enquiry which is specifically designed to help you improve your research skills. This will enable you to write a better dissertation, but it will also be useful if you decide to take up a career in research. Dissertation The dissertation is a very important part of the MA. Students choose their own topic and are allocated an individual supervisor who gives advice on all aspects of writing and researching a dissertation. We also organise a Postgraduate Day when all postgraduates, including MA and PhD students, meet together and discuss their research. There is a session set aside for MA students to discuss their dissertation proposals. A guest speaker also gives a talk on the subject of his or her research and there is still time to socialise over a free buffet lunch. Course Assessments Assessment is based on a mix of dissertation, essays, research papers, performance in seminars, tests and a formal examination. Brussels Trip Most years, a trip to Brussels is organised for MA students. The trip includes two or three nights in a city centre hotel at a subsidised rate. We visit the EU and NATO and there are opportunities to ask officials and military people questions about their work. We also meet graduates from UEA who are now working in or near Brussels. Postgraduate On-Line Journal At their own initiative, MA students recently set up an e-journal, called Irrational, which publishes the work of students. It can be found at the PSI website: www.irrationalmagazine.org Careers It is difficult at the moment to find good jobs, but it is always good to have an extra qualification, and an MA is an excellent way of making yourself look a bit different from the rest. The career centre at the University is an excellent resource, and it helps us put on special days for students studying Politics when people working in the field come and discuss their jobs and how they got into them. Recent graduates from our MA programmes have taken up jobs in a wide variety of fields, including: business, teaching, research, journalism, the UN and many other international organisations. [-]

MA International Security

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years August 2017 United Kingdom Norwich + 1 more

This course will provide a theoretical and empirical understanding of international security and international relations. The International Security Masters (ISMA) will help you to develop a range of valuable transferable skills, particularly if you are seeking a professional career in international security, whether as a policy analyst, journalist or researcher. The degree will also appeal if you are intending to pursue postgraduate research in international security and international relations. [+]

This course will provide a theoretical and empirical understanding of international security and international relations. The International Security Masters (ISMA) will help you to develop a range of valuable transferable skills, particularly if you are seeking a professional career in international security, whether as a policy analyst, journalist or researcher. The degree will also appeal if you are intending to pursue postgraduate research in international security and international relations. Course Structure This is a new 12-month, full-time (or 24-month, part-time) MA degree. The first compulsory module ‘International Relations Theory’ is central to all our international politics MA degrees and provides an essential grounding in International Relations theory. It provides a current and inter-disciplinary understanding of international politics and does not require previous knowledge of theory. The second compulsory module, ‘International Security’, examines the study of security in the international system, through its roots in Cold War strategic studies to the development of the more broadly focused field of security studies today. The module critically analyses contemporary security issues and provides a sound theoretical base for considering practical issues of security, including new wars, intervention and terrorism. The final compulsory taught module, ‘War Games’, introduces students to some of the major issues and ideas concerning diplomacy and military strategy in International Relations. You will learn about the theoretical and practical challenges concerning strategic relations between states, developing a more nuanced understanding of war and peace in international politics. You will also have the opportunity to choose three optional modules, open to all MA International Relations students. The remaining core component of the course is the ‘Dissertation’ module. You are required to write a dissertation on an agreed topic with a specialist supervisor. This module develops the skills required in conducting independent research and you will gain valuable experience in producing lengthy pieces of research on topics of your own choice. Assessment Assessment is a mixture of the more traditional academic approach - coursework and exams - alongside course tests and reflective reports. All modules will seek to improve your engagement and encourage independent learning. The majority of teaching relies on lectures and seminars, but will utilise, where appropriate, films and scenarios in order to explore different ideas and examples, both thematically and empirically. [-]

MA Landscape History

Campus Full time 1 year August 2017 United Kingdom Norwich

The MA in landscape history discusses key elements in the history of the English countryside from prehistory to the present day. The core module revolves around four major themes that impacted upon the landscape in different ways in different periods: [+]

Why Study Landscape History at UEA? The English landscape has been described as ‘the richest historical record we possess’ and this MA programme focuses both on the skills of ‘reading the landscape’ and also the practical and theoretical issues involved in the study of the historic countryside. The importance of landscape history is not something that is confined to the academic seminar room, however, as an understanding of the historic environment has relevance to the heritage industry, conservation agencies, local government and archaeological management. Landscape History at UEA is deliberately eclectic in its approach: it is not constrained by period or geographical boundaries. The teaching material therefore ranges from early prehistory to the Cold War, from henges and hillforts to historic gardens and wartime pillboxes. An emphasis is also placed on long term trends over time and the way in which the landscape has had an enduring legacy in the structuring of attitudes and beliefs of local and regional communities. The MA programme offers an intensive and practical preparation for those people who wish to undertake further post-graduate study in landscape history, but also for those who wish to enter a profession for which knowledge of the historic environment is desirable. Content and Structure of the Course The MA in landscape history discusses key elements in the history of the English countryside from prehistory to the present day. The core module revolves around four major themes that impacted upon the landscape in different ways in different periods: What is Landscape History? explores the ways in which landscape history is practiced and its relationship with other disciplines. Landscape and Environment discusses the history and archaeology of various manmade and semi-natural environments (such as woodpasture, heaths and moors) and introduces ideas of historical ecology and what is sometimes, mistakenly, called ‘environmental determinism’. Society and Landscape is more concerned with human agency in the landscape and the more obvious signs of manipulation of the countryside. It discusses ideas concerning landscape design, enclosure and the impact of modernity. Regions and Regionality, takes a slightly different approach and examines patterns of regionality in the landscape. Why do regions exist? Are they created by social and economic behavior that reflects different regional identities or more the product of later ‘attrition’? Needless to say, all overlap to a certain extent and should not be thought of as neat boundaries between different practices; in effect, they encompass a range of issues and methodologies that are really part of a single whole. Course Tutors and Research Interests Dr Rob Liddiard – medieval history and archaeology of secular and ecclesiastical landscapes; vernacular landscape; parks and hunting; tenurial geography Dr Tom Williamson – all aspects of English landscape; designed landscapes, esp. eighteenth- and nineteenth-century parks and gardens; landscape archaeology [-]

MA Language and Intercultural Communication

Campus Full time 1 year August 2017 United Kingdom Norwich

In the MA Language and Intercultural Communication we are particularly interested in providing a broad-based approach to the study of language both as a cultural resource and a cultural practice. [+]

In the MA Language and Intercultural Communication we are particularly interested in providing a broad-based approach to the study of language both as a cultural resource and a cultural practice. From the former perspective both the range of linguistic forms available within a language as well as the patterns of linguistic usage by its speakers gives expression to that culture’s worldview, socio-cultural norms and values. From the latter, the very act of linguistic communication is used to both create and sustain our sense of personal, cultural and national identity. To further the study of these cultural patterns, the programme makes use of a variety of different analytic approaches ranging from Discourse Analysis and ethnolinguistics to semiotics and cross-cultural pragmatics. The course will be of interest to students of English and other languages who are seeking to deepen their knowledge of language as a cultural object, as well as a range of professionals, including language teachers, concerned with issues of interpersonal and intercultural communication. Why Study Language and Intercultural Communication at UEA? Several factors combine to make UEA an exciting choice: As a student within Language and Communication Studies, you will benefit from a vibrant environment with a focus on issues relating to contemporary language and translation. The work we undertake has successfully positioned us at the cutting edge of research, ensuring our graduates are well-informed and highly employable. Research focuses on cross-cultural communication, with all staff sharing an interest in the study of language use (pragmatics), translation, interpreting and media in an intercultural and multilingual framework. The different standpoints from which they approach the interaction between language and forms of communication constitute complementary and mutually enriching perspectives, in line with UEA’s tradition of interdisciplinary research and Critical Linguistics research. We provide a friendly and stimulating environment in which to study. The size of Language and Communication Studies at UEA allows for more personal staff-student contact and individual academic support than in many larger institutions. Furthermore, we house the James Platt Centre for Language Learning which provides an extensive range of language resources including live satellite broadcasts, CDs and DVDs in various foreign languages, as well as a wide variety of foreign language printed matter. These materials complement the excellent holdings of the UEA library. IT facilities are excellent throughout the University. The wide range of linguistically diverse students enrolled on both this and other MA programmes within Language and Communication Studies provides a rich environment in which to study intercultural communication. Course Content and Structure The MA in Language in Intercultural Communication is a one-year, full-time taught course but it can also be taken part-time over two years. The structure of the programme allows individuals to develop their own interests within a structured framework of theoretical training. Some flexibility is built into the course by allowing one module to be chosen from any relevant MA module offered within the Faculty of Arts and Humanities. Teaching is mainly through the media of seminars and individual dissertation supervision. The programme consists of three compulsory taught modules: Linguistic Communication amongst Cultures, Textual Interaction and Ideology: The Power of Discourse, and Cultural Representations and Language. The fourth taught module is selected either from Language Issues in a Global Multilingual Context or any other approved MA module from within Language and Communication Studies or the Faculty of Arts and Humanities. There is also a compulsory Research Methods module which is taken by all LCS MA students. Final Dissertation: The final compulsory element of the programme is a 15,000 word dissertation on a subject chosen by the student in consultation with members of academic staff. Work on the dissertation starts at Easter and proceeds full-time until its completion at the beginning of September. Course Assessment: Assessment is on the basis of coursework and the dissertation (although modules taken from outside of Language and Communication Studies may contain an examined element). Transferable Skills: Students who successfully complete the MA will have developed to a high level their awareness and understanding of issues of culture and communication through language. They will have become familiar with different approaches to these issues, and gained the ability to assess these approaches critically and to evaluate their usefulness to their own needs and circumstances. They will also have honed their academic skills including, the ability to read and utilise research literature, independent research, with a focus on appropriate methodology, data collection, analysis, synthesis and evaluation , presentation skills (oral and written), and the IT skills required to achieve these goals. The programme will provide a suitable foundation for further postgraduate studies at MPhil and PhD level. [-]

MA Literary Translation

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years August 2017 United Kingdom Norwich + 1 more

The MA in Literary Translation at The University of East Anglia (UEA) is unique in that it both combines translation practice with translation theory and also specifically looks at the link between the two. [+]

The MA in Literary Translation at The University of East Anglia (UEA) is unique in that it both combines translation practice with translation theory and also specifically looks at the link between the two. Should translators know about theory? Does theory describe what translators do or is it a practical tool that the translator can use? These are some of the questions we consider throughout the programme, recently described by its external examiner Dr Francis Jones as "deservedly a UK leader in literary translation studies". Many of our MA students go on to become practising translators, or to teach translation. Others work in areas related to translation, such as publishing or the media. Why Study Literary Translation at UEA? The MA in Literary Translation (MALT) is based in the School of Literature, Drama and Creative Writing, whose members teach and research in English and World Literature (including French, German, Indian, and other literatures), Literary Translation, Literary Theory and Creative Writing. The School has a reputation for excellence in teaching and research and is highly-ranked in the National Students' Survey. Of particular interest to MALT students is our annual programme of readings, visits and residencies by writers and translators. BCLT, which is based in the School, runs a Summer School which MALT students can attend at a reduced rate, and there is also the opportunity, at a very reasonable cost, to learn a language in the School of Language and Communication Studies. Students on the MA in Literary Translation can also take part in the BCLT Internship programme. Course Content and Structure The MA is a one-year full-time or two-year part-time course, that provides an academic qualification for professional translators and is also a good basis for further research. Few other taught courses in Literary Translation in the UK combine practical work with a strong emphasis on stylistic and cultural issues. MALT consists of four modules: Stylistics for Translators, Translation Theory, Case Studies, Process and Product in Translation. In the first semester, students also assemble a dossier of their translations for submission to a tutor, an expert in their source or target language. This, like the practical Translation Workshops, is a non-assessed element. The Workshops on varied topics include translation editing, and a member of the Translators Association advises on how to approach a publisher. Students also have the opportunity to join the editing team for our journal Norwich Papers. Arc Publications’ Visible Poets series of bilingual poetry books is edited by Jean Boase-Beier in the School, and provides useful study material. Some of our best former students have been published by Arc; others have published translations of children’s literature, novels and drama. Many have won awards for their work. Course Assessment Students may work with any languages, as long as these include English. We have many language specialists in the School and the Humanities Faculty, as well as external assessors. Modules are assessed by essay, and there is a 15,000 to 20,000 word dissertation, either a translation with commentary or a critical essay. Work on the dissertation, with a supervisor, begins for full-time students in the spring and goes on until the beginning of September. The Course Team Many members of the School and the Faculty are practising translators or work in translation. Those who currently contribute substantially to MALT, with their main areas of interest, are: Professor Jean Boase-Beier, Convenor (stylistics; translation theory; modern German and English poetry and translation; Holocaust writing and translation); Dr BJ Epstein (translation studies; children's literature; lgbtq literature; contemporary Scandinavian literature). Dr Cecilia Rossi (translation of poetry, especially modern Latin American poetry; translation, editing and creative writing). We also have a very dynamic body of PhD students working in Literary Translation. Past and current topics include: the translation of Russian poetry, Ancient Greek drama translation, the translation of Turkish idioms, Japanese feminist translation. [-]

MA Media, Culture and Society

Campus Full time 1 - 2 years August 2017 United Kingdom Norwich

This MA provides students with an opportunity to study contemporary media from a variety of perspectives and disciplines. The distinctive approach is best revealed in the compulsory module which brings together key aspects of modern media. [+]

This MA provides students with an opportunity to study contemporary media from a variety of perspectives and disciplines. The distinctive approach is best revealed in the compulsory module which brings together key aspects of modern media. It looks at the role of media in global citizenship, at media law and economics, and at different media systems. This module provides a foundation to explore in more detail a number of related issues on the rest of the course. WHY STUDY MEDIA, CULTURE AND SOCIETY AT UEA? This is a relatively new MA. It was launched in 2008-2009 and it draws on the University’s international reputation for teaching in media and culture. The MA is fully inter-disciplinary and you will be taught by experts in media law, economics, political communication and identity politics. COURSES, CONTENT AND STRUCTURE The MA lasts twelve months for full-time students and two years for those studying part-time. You will have seminars and lectures during the first two semesters and then over the summer you will work on your dissertation which is handed in at the start of September. TRANSFERABLE SKILLS Over the course of the MA, you will develop a variety of transferable skills. These include debating, giving oral presentations, team work, project work and essay writing. All students also take a module called Methods of Social Enquiry which is specifically designed to help you improve your research skills. This will enable you to write a better dissertation, but it will also be useful if you decide to take up a career in research. DISSERTATION The dissertation is a very important part of the MA. Students choose their own topic and are allocated an individual supervisor who gives advice on all aspects of writing and researching a dissertation. We also organise a Postgraduate Day when all postgraduates, including MA and PhD students, meet together and discuss their research. There is a session set aside when MA students have a chance to discuss their dissertation proposals. You will also be able to meet a leading scholar who comes to the university to lecture on their current research. COURSE ASSESSMENTS Assessment is based on a mix of dissertation, essays, research papers and performance in seminars. BRUSSELS TRIP Most years, a trip to Brussels is organised for MA students. The trip includes two or three nights in a city centre hotel at a subsidised rate. We visit regional organisations, including the EU and NATO, and meet with their communications officers, we also meet journalists and other media specialists living in Brussels. PRACTICAL MEDIA We have recently introduced a new module, called Practical Media, which is designed to give you an opportunity to work in a state-of-the-art TV studio in Norwich. It is a chance to get advice from professionals and to make your own TV programme. POST-GRADUATE ONLINE JOURNAL At their own initiative, MA students recently set up an e-journal, called Irrational, which publishes the work of students. It can be found at the PSI website: www.irrationalmagazine.org CAREERS It is difficult at the moment to find good jobs, but it is always good to have an extra qualification, and an MA is a good way of making yourself look a bit different from the rest. The career centre at the University is an excellent resource, and it helps us put on special days for students studying our degrees in media, culture and politics. People working in the field come to the university and discuss their jobs and how they got into them. Recent graduates from our MA programmes have taken up jobs in a wide variety of fields, including: business, teaching, research, journalism, the UN and many other international organisations. [-]

MA Media and Cultural Politics

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years August 2017 United Kingdom Norwich + 1 more

This MA reflects an important and developing area in the social sciences, the impact of which can be detected in the rise of identity politics and the new social movements, as well as in the emergence of an alternative, broader conception of politics, one that does not refer only to formal political agencies, but to the private realm and to cultural life more generally. [+]

This MA reflects an important and developing area in the social sciences, the impact of which can be detected in the rise of identity politics and the new social movements, as well as in the emergence of an alternative, broader conception of politics, one that does not refer only to formal political agencies, but to the private realm and to cultural life more generally. The impact of cultural politics is apparent in the rise of nationalism, the politics of multiculturalism and the importance attached to the mass media. It can also be witnessed in the debate about, and response to, globalisation. Why Study the Media and Cultural Politics at UEA? This MA is different because it offers a genuinely inter-disciplinary approach to the study of cultural politics, building on the common interests of political scientists, philosophers, economists, literary theorists, historians as well as experts in media and cultural studies. The MA will give you the opportunity to analyse the changing politics of contemporary culture and communication, and to reflect on their effect on the conduct and character of social practice. Courses, Content and Structure The MA lasts twelve months for full-time students and two years for those studying part-time. You will have seminars and lectures during the first two semesters and then over the summer you will work on your dissertation which is handed in at the start of September. Transferable Skills Over the course of the MA, you will develop a variety of transferable skills. These include debating, giving oral presentations, team work, project work and essay writing. All students also take a module called Methods of Social Enquiry which is specifically designed to help you improve your research skills. This will enable you to write a better dissertation, but it will also be useful if you decide to take up a career in research. Dissertation The dissertation is a very important part of the MA. Students choose their own topic and are allocated an individual supervisor who gives advice on all aspects of writing and researching a dissertation. We also organise a Postgraduate Day when all postgraduates, including MA and PhD students, meet together and discuss their research. There is a session set aside when MA students have a chance to discuss their dissertation proposals. You will also be able to meet a leading scholar who comes to the university to lecture on their current research. Course Assessments Assessment is based on a mix of dissertation, essays, research papers and performance in seminars. Brussels Trip Most years, a trip to Brussels is organised for MA students. The trip includes two or three nights in a city centre hotel at a subsidised rate. We visit regional organisations, including the EU and NATO, and meet with their communications officers, we also meet journalists and other media specialists living in Brussels. Practical Media We have recently introduced a new module, called Practical Media, which is designed to give you an opportunity to work in a state-of-the-art TV studio in Norwich. It is a chance to get advice from professionals and to make your own TV programme. Post-Graduate Online Journal At their own initiative, MA students recently set up an e-journal, called Irrational, which publishes the work of students. It can be found at the PSI website: www.irrationalmagazine.org Careers It is difficult at the moment to find good jobs, but it is always good to have an extra qualification, and an MA is a good way of making yourself look a bit different from the rest. The career centre at the University is an excellent resource, and it helps us put on special days for students studying our degrees in media, culture and politics. People working in the field come to the university and discuss their jobs and how they got into them. Recent graduates from our MA programmes have taken up jobs in a wide variety of fields, including: business, teaching, research, journalism, the UN and many other international organisations. [-]

MA Medieval and Early Modern Textual Cultures, 1381-1688

Campus Full time 1 year August 2017 United Kingdom Norwich

This MA course offers you the opportunity to study medieval and early-modern literature in its historical, intellectual, cultural and material contexts. You will be given an advanced introduction to a range of major English texts from the period and to the continental European authors who informed and shaped them. [+]

This MA course offers you the opportunity to study medieval and early-modern literature in its historical, intellectual, cultural and material contexts. You will be given an advanced introduction to a range of major English texts from the period and to the continental European authors who informed and shaped them. We set Chaucer, Lydgate, Henryson, Spenser and Sidney beside Petrarch, Poliziano, Erasmus, Rabelais and Montaigne. MA "Medieval and Early Modern Textual Cultures, 1381 - 1688" At the centre of the course is an emphasis on the varieties of medieval and early-modern 'humanism', a complex movement which enabled new understandings of the classical world, of our place within history and of our relationship to language. Our teaching is founded upon the close-reading of primary texts. Large historical and intellectual issues are allowed to grow out of specific passages, without losing sight of literary texts' formal and aesthetic qualities. The MA has a strongly interdisciplinary character, which means you will be introduced to the broad range of cutting-edge methods by which scholars are currently researching the cultures of these periods. You will be encouraged, for instance, to move freely between texts, material artifacts, and visual art and to think about the ways in which unpublished manuscript evidence can help us to understand the priorities of medieval and early-modern readers. The course not only encourages you to read widely across the boundary between 'medieval' and 'Renaissance' cultures, but also to interrogate that boundary itself, to understand its historical and conceptual origins and to reflect on the many ways it continues to shape modern scholarly understandings of both periods. And by enabling you to work closely with local archival sources, the MA will leave you with a strong understanding of the way in which global narratives, like the rise of 'humanism' or the 'early-modern', shaped the rich literary and intellectual culture of Norwich itself. Aims of the Course Equip you with necessary skills in archival research, such as bibliography and palaeography. Enable you to develop your own innovative critical thinking by introducing you to the modern interdisciplinary study of the medieval and early-modern periods. Give you the opportunity to read widely in English medieval and early-modern literature and to read continental works in translation. To rethink the conceptual issues at stake in the division between the medieval and early-modern periods. To give you a thorough understanding of the crucial cultural and literary phenomenon of 'humanism', including a grounding in the classical sources which lie behind medieval and early-modern literary texts. To let you explore the vibrancy of Norwich's medieval and early-modern literary culture, and to give you the skills you need to approach the array of surviving heritage of that period. To equip you with the skills you need to prepare you for doctoral research. To equip you with the transferable skills in research, project management and critical thinking that you would need to pursue a career outside academia. Norwich's Archival Resources East Anglia was home to an extraordinarily rich literary culture in the medieval and early-modern periods. That culture has left behind it an interlocking network of archives, which provide ideal resources for graduate students undertaking research into the medieval and early-modern periods. Thousands of early-modern printed books, and some medieval manuscripts, are preserved in the Norfolk Heritage Centre. The heart of that collection is the Norwich City Library: founded in 1608, it is one of England's most important and best-preserved regional libraries. The Cathedral library is home to another important collection of printed books. And the Norfolk Record Office houses an extraordinary collection of medieval and early-modern manuscripts, which include not only documentary records of the history of East Anglia, but also poetry miscellanies, letters, maps, heraldic papers, histories, and many other kinds of document. Together these archives bear witness to Norwich's role as a vibrant, cosmopolitan, and religiously diverse, international centre of North Sea trade and culture. The MA course will give you the opportunity to explore this archival landscape and, if you wish, to develop your own original research projects based on these collections. Medieval and Early-Modern Research at UEA At UEA, you will have the opportunity to participate in a field-leading medieval and early-modern research community, which will encourage you to develop your own innovative research questions, approaches and projects. Important areas of faculty research include: the history of medieval and early-modern reading practices, the study and practice of literary imitation and translation, the history and development of historiography, early-modern drama and Shakespeare, literary and intellectual biography, the development of distinct East Anglian identities, conceptions of the landscape, and the cultural importance of medieval saints' lives. Several research seminars are held throughout the term, which showcase the work of UEA's own scholars and of visiting external speakers. UEA is also at the forefront of adapting medieval and early-modern texts for the stage, and in doing so unleashing their dramatic potential as well as bringing them to a wider audience. And the Sainsbury Centre, on UEA's campus itself, will illuminate the visual art of the medieval and early-modern periods for you. Course Outline The MA will lead you through a tightly-focussed series of modules which, taken together, give you the understanding of literary culture, critical methods and archival skills which you need to tackle your own dissertation research project. Many of the modules will be taught by more than one faculty member: this approach helps to give you the fullest possible understanding of the way our periods are being discussed and interpreted. [-]

MA Medieval History

Campus Full time 1 year August 2017 United Kingdom Norwich

The MA in Medieval History provides in-depth training in the study of the high and late middle ages in England and northern France. The broad chronological range of the course, running from the 11th through to the 15th centuries, represents the extensive expertise of the School’s medieval historians. [+]

Why Study Medieval History at UEA? The MA in Medieval History provides in-depth training in the study of the high and late middle ages in England and northern France. The broad chronological range of the course, running from the 11th through to the 15th centuries, represents the extensive expertise of the School’s medieval historians. We introduce you to high-level debates in specialist research fields, featuring cultural, political, social, economic and ecclesiastical perspectives. Lively seminars, led by experienced scholars, are based on key sources for the period. You will also have the opportunity to specialise when producing assessed work, guided by our team. The culmination of our MA course is the dissertation, a unique and rewarding exercise undertaken in the second half of the degree. This independent study will be completed under the supervision of one or more members of the School. UEA’s location in the medieval city of Norwich gives students access to the unparalleled medieval archives housed in the Norfolk Record Office, the extensive collections in the Castle Museum and the Norfolk Archaeological Unit, and the material remains of numerous medieval buildings. Content and Structure of the Course The MA in Medieval History is a one-year full-time programme or a two-year part-time programme. The course provides students with the skills and knowledge to undertake independent research at an advanced level. In the first instance, students practice these skills on the dissertation, but the course is also designed to prepare students for doctoral study, should this prove desirable and feasible. Training is given in Latin and Latin palaeography over the course of two semesters. The 60-credit core module, England and the Continent in the High Middle Ages, also runs over two semesters. In this module the following themes and topics may be covered, according to the needs and interests of participants: Society, 970-1066; Domesday Book; Letter Collections; Historical Writing; Charters; the Royal Household; Royal Record Keeping; Urban Communities 1200-1500; Rural Communities 1200-1500; Monasticism; the Church; Canon Law; Magna Carta. Teaching is carried out mainly a weekly seminar, preparation for which is a requirement of the course. The MA is assessed through coursework and the dissertation, which constitutes half the credits for the degree. Entry Requirements Degree Subject: History or a related subject Degree Classification: UK BA (Hons) 2.1 or equivalent Special Entry Requirements: Applicants must submit a sample of written work (in English). This should be a typed essay on a historical subject, 2-3,000 words long, preferably a photocopy of an assessment marked by a tutor, complete with critical comments and a percentage or grade. The essay should address a specific question, and must demonstrate an ability to construct a historical argument, familiarity with the conventions of academic writing, and competence in English. This should be uploaded to your online application. [-]

MA Modern British History

Campus Full time 1 year August 2017 United Kingdom Norwich

Modern British History at UEA is taught by a group of historians who represent one of the largest concentrations of expertise in this period in a British university, with specialisms including foreign and imperial policy, economic and social history, gender history and a range of other interests. [+]

Why Study Modern British History at UEA? Modern British History at UEA is taught by a group of historians who represent one of the largest concentrations of expertise in this period in a British university, with specialisms including foreign and imperial policy, economic and social history, gender history and a range of other interests. The concentration of expertise provides an ideal research environment for anyone with an interest in Britain’s role in the modern world and the political debates about it, from the mid-nineteenth century to the post-war retreat from Empire. This course enables students to explore the latest developments in areas with vibrant debate and rich historiographies that have been growing steadily in recent years, not least through the work of scholars at UEA. The MA course provides the opportunity to examine a diverse range of topics, from the era of industrialisation and ‘gunboat diplomacy’ to the impact of the Great War on British politics and society, through the Second World War and, ultimately, to imperial decline. Seminars are led by scholars who have extensive research experience, and are based on a series of key sources for the period. Guided by specialist teaching staff, and supported by a trained archivist in the same discipline, students are encouraged to develop the skills essential for postgraduate research. The culmination of the MA course is the dissertation, undertaken in the second half of the degree. This independent study will be completed under the supervision of one or more members of the School. Content and Structure of the Course The MA, which can be taken either as a one-year full-time programme or a two-year part-time degree, aims to equip students with the advanced skills and intensive subject knowledge they need to proceed to further independent research. This preparation is provided by three main elements. The first is the dissertation, the completion of which will provide all MA students with the experience and expertise to go on to doctoral study should they so wish. The second is a core module in British history, which runs over both semesters, and the third is an optional module examining aspects of British and/or European history, reflecting the challenges of coming to terms with the modern age. Course Tutors and Research Interests Geoff Hicks: British political history and foreign policy in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries Anthony Howe: free trade; William Cobden; William Huskisson and the British State; international and national political economy, 18th to 20th centuries Thomas Otte: diplomatic and international history in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries Camilla Schofield Ben Jones Jayne Gifford Emma Griffin Jennie Davey [-]

MA Modern European History

Campus Full time 1 year August 2017 United Kingdom Norwich

The MA in Modern European History offers you the opportunity to work with a group of historians of modern Europe who continue UEA’s long-standing reputation as a major centre for the study of the continent. [+]

Why Study Modern European History at UEA? The MA in Modern European History offers you the opportunity to work with a group of historians of modern Europe who continue UEA’s long-standing reputation as a major centre for the study of the continent. There is a particular and distinctive concentration of expertise in the history of Central and Eastern Europe in the 19th and 20th centuries. This provides an ideal environment for students interested in the dilemmas and challenges faced by the great autocratic dynasties of Russia, Germany and the Habsburg Empire from the mid-19th century onwards. We also cover the dramatic and devastating consequences of social and political change not just for these countries, but for Europe as a whole (including Italy and France). There will be ample scope to pursue comparative approaches to the history of Europe, particularly around themes such as nationalism and national identity, political mobilisation, or violence and genocide. Content and Structure of the Course The MA, which can be taken either as a one-year full-time programme or a two-year part-time degree, aims to equip students with the advanced skills and intensive subject knowledge they need to proceed to further independent research. This preparation is provided by three main elements. The first is the dissertation, the completion of which will provide all MA students with the experience and expertise to go on to doctoral study should they so wish. The second is a core module which focuses on the problem of nationalism and violence in modern European history. The third element is an optional module, examining aspects of Russian or British history. Entry Requirements Degree Subject: History or a related subject Degree Classification: UK BA (Hons) 2.1 or equivalent Special Entry Requirements: Applicants must submit a sample of written work (in English). This should be a typed essay on a historical subject, 2-3,000 words long, preferably a photocopy of an assessment marked by a tutor, complete with critical comments and a percentage or grade. The essay should address a specific question, and must demonstrate an ability to construct a historical argument, familiarity with the conventions of academic writing, and competence in English. This should be uploaded to your online application. [-]

MA Museum Studies

Campus Full time 1 year August 2017 United Kingdom Norwich

The course combines the cutting-edge research and curatorial experience of our academic staff with the professional resources and experience of the SCVA. It also draws on resources in London and in the region, notably the Norfolk Museums Service, and incorporates a number of museum visits and expert speakers. Students undertake a year-long work placement in tandem with their degree. [+]

Art History and World Art Studies runs one of the longest-established programmes in Museum Studies in the UK – and the only one based inside an art gallery, the Norman Foster-designed Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts (SCVA). The course combines the cutting-edge research and curatorial experience of our academic staff with the professional resources and experience of the SCVA. It also draws on resources in London and in the region, notably the Norfolk Museums Service, and incorporates a number of museum visits and expert speakers. Students undertake a year-long work placement in tandem with their degree. A maximum intake of 12 students per year means that the course is student-centred and offers intensive preparation for either a career in the museum profession or a higher research degree in museum studies. Students gain an understanding of the history and theory behind museums plus hands-on training in all aspects of museum work – conservation and curation; education and outreach; exhibition design and visitor services; and governance, legal frameworks, marketing and development. Employability is central to the programme, with exposure to a wide range of career options and contact with professionals from across the sector. The MA is available full-time. Throughout the degree, students spend one to two days a week on a tailored, individual placement with a local museum; up to four students receive Museum Studies Internships for placements in the SCVA. The taught components of the course bring together in-depth historical and theoretical approaches to museums with practice-based modules addressing the public role of the museum, collections management and interpretation, with an emphasis on topical issues and responsive engagement. Course Structure The taught element of the master’s degree includes a compulsory module on the history and theory of museums in the autumn semester and practice-based training in the curation of collections in the spring. Students also undertake two interconnected autumn and spring modules on professional practice, which include museum visits with privileged access and regular lectures by leading professionals. These modules are taken together with the cohort of students on the MA in Cultural Heritage and Museum Studies, offering a lively and supportive peer learning environment. Previous guest speakers have hailed from institutions as diverse as the British Museum, the Houses of Parliament, the National Trust and Tate Britain, as well as from private businesses serving the museum and heritage sector. In addition to the taught modules, students on the Museum Studies degree complete two individual forms of assessment: a substantial management plan or project report based on their work placement (due in May), and a dissertation of 12,000 words (due in September). Working closely with a supervisor, students choose a dissertation topic that combines their academic and museological interests. [-]

MA Philosophy and Literature

Campus Full time 1 year August 2017 United Kingdom Norwich

As a student within Philosophy, you will receive a broad and deep education in many areas of philosophy – in, for example, Wittgenstein, Kant and Chomsky, phenomenology, metaphilosophy, C20th analytic and Classical philosophy – but we have a distinctive concentration of expertise in the area of philosophy and literature. [+]

Philosophy at UEA As a student within Philosophy, you will receive a broad and deep education in many areas of philosophy – in, for example, Wittgenstein, Kant and Chomsky, phenomenology, metaphilosophy, C20th analytic and Classical philosophy – but we have a distinctive concentration of expertise in the area of philosophy and literature. UEA was one of the first departments to concentrate its research efforts on this subject, largely because of its Wittgensteinian leanings, and it is currently one of the country’s leading centres for research in this area. One member of staff focuses almost exclusively on philosophy and literature, and at least three others have made distinctive contributions to its development. In all cases, their research into the subject is informed by a wide knowledge of other arts, especially music and film. The Subject Philosophy and literature is one of the most exciting growth areas in modern Anglo-American philosophy. Over the last thirty years, under the influence of such major figures as Stanley Cavell and Martha Nussbaum, the subject has transformed itself from a minority interest to a major component in the curriculum. It is now widely acknowledged that because the literary form of philosophy is part of its philosophical value, and the philosophical knowledge provided by literature is part of its literary value, both subjects suffer impoverishment when kept unnaturally apart. The MA The MA in Philosophy and Literature offers a one-year interdisciplinary course in the two subjects, and explores the deep links between them at many levels. Students can choose from a wide range of modules in both subjects, while sharing a research workshop and core units jointly taught by philosophers and literary specialists. This makes the MA a genuinely joint degree, and not one in which the two subjects are only taught in parallel. Two core modules are compulsory - the Philosophy of Literature Seminar in the first semester, and the Philosophy and Literature Seminar in the second - and students select two other modules to complement these. All four modules are assessed by two coursework essays per module. Students also write a 12-15,000 word dissertation to be handed in at the end of the summer vacation, and participate in the philosophy postgraduate workshop. When studied part-time, students take two modules a year for two years and write their dissertation during the second year. The MA is an ideal supplement to an undergraduate degree in either philosophy or literature, and an excellent introduction to advanced research work in either field. [-]

MA Politics

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years August 2017 United Kingdom Norwich + 1 more

This MA is designed for students who want a general introduction to Politics rather than specialisation in one particular field. It is ideal for those students who may have graduated in another subject but wish to secure a grounding in Politics. However, anyone with a degree in Politics can usefully broaden and deepen their knowledge of political science by taking this programme. [+]

This MA is designed for students who want a general introduction to Politics rather than specialisation in one particular field. It is ideal for those students who may have graduated in another subject but wish to secure a grounding in Politics. However, anyone with a degree in Politics can usefully broaden and deepen their knowledge of political science by taking this programme. Non-graduates with suitable qualifications and relevant governmental or political experience, who wish to stand back from everyday concerns in order to secure an academic perspective, may also be eligible for admission, subject to their basic educational qualifications. Why Study Politics at UEA? In PSI, we pride ourselves on providing top quality teaching. Independent monitors have given us top marks for our teaching and we have consistently scored highly in student surveys too. We offer research-led teaching which means that your lecturers will be able to give the most up-to-date, cutting edge information on your subject of study. We think you will find it a stimulating environment to study. Many students come from Britain, of course, but others come from all over the world. It will only help in your studies to meet and learn from people from all sorts of different cultures. Courses, Content and Structure The MA lasts twelve months for full-time students and two years for those studying part-time. You will have seminars and lectures during the first two semesters and then over the summer you will work on your dissertation which is handed in at the start of September. Transferable Skills Over the course of the MA, you will develop a variety of transferable skills. These include debating, giving oral presentations, team work, project work and essay writing. All students also take a module called Methods of Social Enquiry which is specifically designed to help you improve your research skills. This will enable you to write a better dissertation, but it will also be useful if you decide to take up a career in research. Dissertation The dissertation is a very important part of the MA. Students choose their own topic and are allocated an individual supervisor who gives advice on all aspects of writing and researching a dissertation. We also organise a Postgraduate Day when all postgraduates, including MA and PhD students, meet together and discuss their research. There is a session set aside for MA students to discuss their dissertation proposals. A guest speaker also gives a talk on the subject of his or her research and there is still time to socialise over a free buffet lunch. Course Assessments Assessment is based on a mix of dissertation, essays, research papers and performance in seminars. Post-Graduate Online Journal At their own initiative, MA students recently set up an e-journal, called Irrational, which publishes the work of students. It can be found at the PSI website: www.irrationalmagazine.org Careers It is difficult at the moment to find good jobs, but it is always good to have an extra qualification, and an MA is a good way of making yourself look a bit different from the rest. The career centre at the University is an excellent resource, and it helps us put on special days for students studying Politics when people working in the field come and discuss their jobs and how they got into them. Recent graduates from our MA programmes have taken up jobs in a wide variety of fields, including: business, teaching, research, journalism, the UN and many other international organisations. [-]

MA Theatre Directing: Text and Production

Campus Full time 1 year August 2017 United Kingdom Norwich

The MA in Theatre directing at the University of East Anglia is one of the longest established in the country. Following the Gulbenkian Report on director training of 1989 it was founded by Tony Gash, a Shakespearean scholar who had studied at Oxford and taught at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art. [+]

Text-based directing, and performance based theory The MA in Theatre directing at the University of East Anglia is one of the longest established in the country. Following the Gulbenkian Report on director training of 1989 it was founded by Tony Gash, a Shakespearean scholar who had studied at Oxford and taught at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art. It was made possible by the building of a newly designed Studio Theatre at the University, which was opened by Harold Pinter in 1993. Its earliest advisers included the practitioners Cicely Berry( RSC) Max Stafford-Clark (Royal Court/Out of Joint) and Mike Alfreds (Shared Experience/ Method and Madness) who are all also published writers on directorial method. One of the founding principles of the MA ever since has been to establish a firm connection between the academic or critical study of dramatic texts and the director’s working with actors. We do this by, on the one hand, refusing to separate theatrical theory or literary reading from performance (the texts are scripts) and, on the other, by refusing to separate ‘performance art’ or ‘physical’ theatre from working in detail with texts, verse and language. We do not isolate theory from practice, but, often working in the Studio, search continually for the points of intersection between the verbal, emotional and the physical, both practically, and via the two concepts of speech acts and scenic structure. To this end the MA directing students start by regularly rehearsing student actors on scenes of their own choosing which are then re-worked by their instructors in such a way as bring out an alternative aspect of the scene. In a supporting class they learn how to apply a variety of directing methods , many of which are commonly used in professional directing and actor training - e.g. Stanislavskian objectives, Laban’s effort anaylsis, Lecoq’s levels of tension., Keith Johnstone’s status, Meisner’s interactivity, but now, in the University context, also subjected to philosophical and historical scrutiny. This is where ‘speech acts’ the common theme of philosophy, literary criticism, linguistics and the great directors Stanislavski and Brecht come in; as does the recurrent rivalry between the claims of truth and those of form. By seeking out the foundational questions which underlie modern theories of the theatre, we are also able to see how great playwrights, like Shakespeare, are already implicit theorists and directors before those terms were used. Interdisciplinarity One of the strong appeals of the 'MA Theatre Directing: Text and Production' at the University Of East Anglia is its place within the School of Literature, Drama and Creative Writing. It has been usual for individual MA directing students to study alongside graduate scriptwriting students in some units available to both, such as Adaptation and Interpretation or Scriptwriting: Dramaturgy, and sometimes to direct their work in rehearsed readings or performances. But equally important is the possibility of working with critics who specialize in cultural history and dramatic criticism, such as Peter Womack, Professor of Literature and Drama, who offers a unit in The Actor in Space, which is of great value to any director working with a designer. Just as important for any modern director is a consideration of the influence of globalization, immigration, and ‘interculturalism’ on modern theatre throughout the world. This is the emphasis of an optional unit on Contemporary World Theatre, which also gives an opportunity to the Theatre Directing students to meet Theatre and Development graduates registered in the adjoining School of Development.Studies. In their search for new theatrical possibilities, Theatre Directing students are also able to draw on the British Centre for Literary Translation. All these explorations of so-called ‘interdisciplinarity’ are not so much journeys outward from one subject to another as inwards to the heart of the theatrical art-form where many modes which are academically separated, such as the sociological and the aesthetic, or literary and plastic arts are here experienced in their unity. For this reason too we like to consider applicants from a range of disciplines or professions. Individual development and practical research Each year a very small number of Theatre Directing students are selected. All are encouraged to recognize that, in spite of the misleading word, ‘directing’ is a collaborative process, where directors are facilitators who, on the one hand, must serve the skills of their collaborators, but, on the other, must discover and communicate their own creative strengths. Both semesters provide opportunities for the MA students to direct undergraduate students in formal, but not public, contexts where directors and actors will be assessed. In the first semester, there is a regular Scene Class where the directors are encouraged to range generically and historically while practising newly learned techniques. In the second, the study of the work of contemporary theory and performance groups in Postmodernism in Performance culminates in the application some of their methods and styles to the production of extracts from two or three modern plays performed by undergraduate drama students. After Easter each student will pursue one of a number of personally chosen modes of practical research independently, culminating in either a written dissertation, a public production, or various combinations of the two. The evidence of practical research must be the equivalent of the 15000 word written dissertation demanded by the other MA courses. Applications for university studio productions are competitive and will be adjudicated by the course director and senior technician, but there are sometimes opportunities to direct outside the university. If a public production is undertaken, the student must provide a detailed design, financial and casting plan well in advance, but even more importantly the production must have some original idea or text behind it. Last year, for example, a successful studio production undertook a montage of a variety of plays on the theme of master and servant, thus creating a new but unified play. But there are also forms of research into particular methods or texts or themes which may be better suited to assessment by workshops or master classes: last year an individual’s research into Kantor’s aesthetics led to such a series of workshops, and was accompanied by pictures and model-boxes as well as writing. Another possibility is to combine a placement at a professional theatre, or Drama School, with written recording and analysis of the rehearsal process in which the student may participate as assistant director. And yet another is to base a dissertation on a combination of historical research and a review of contemporary productions. New translations of plays from another language into English, or adaptatations from a non-dramatic genre may also be submitted. All these, and many other possibilities depend on the individual’s interests, ingenuity, strengths and career plans, which may include teaching, writing or doctoral research as well as professional directing. Choices and development will be regularly discussed with each student in personal tutorials. Personnel The course is still led and taught by its founder Tony Gash. In 2008-9 he was joined by Dr. Holly Maples, who was trained in acting at the Central School of speech and Drama, and has a Ph.D. from Trinity College, Dublin, for her research into the Abbey Theatre. She is now a full time lecturer at UEA and directs professionally. Other professional directors and designers visit regularly, including some who have themselves studied at UEA. In the Summer of 2009 two ex-UEA students directed at the Globe Theatre, and in May, the Drama programmes at UEA were listed in the Guardian league table as the best in the country. In the same year both Sam West and Richard Eyre lectured here on their personal conceptions of directing. [-]

MA Writing in the Modern World

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years August 2017 United Kingdom Norwich + 1 more

Writing the Modern World is devoted to the critical and creative study of twentieth- and twenty-first-century literature. Its premises are simple yet radical: that writing and reading matter, and that attending to literature and related writings can make a difference both to us and to the world. Writing is understood here not only as what we read but also what we make, and the interrelation of the two activities is central to the life of the MA. [+]

Writing the Modern World is devoted to the critical and creative study of twentieth- and twenty-first-century literature. Its premises are simple yet radical: that writing and reading matter, and that attending to literature and related writings can make a difference both to us and to the world. Writing is understood here not only as what we read but also what we make, and the interrelation of the two activities is central to the life of the MA. The history of literary writing over the last century-and-a-bit is complex and exciting. It involves the bold experiments of the early twentieth century, the explosion of the anglophone canon to include hitherto unheard voices, and writings from all parts of the globe, the challenging playfulness of postmodernism and the eclectic, hybrid, generically-various texts being written today. Modern and contemporary writing has responded in a variety of ways to the – traumatic or exhilarating – events of the times and to the challenges posed by developments in other media, and has in its turn served to shape our sense of the history out of which it is written. And the idea of the literary has itself been radically transformed in response to rich and challenging theoretical texts, texts which themselves offer various possibilities for writing’s futures. As a student on Writing the Modern World you will both reflect on and participate in this on-going dynamic of thinking, reading and writing about modern and contemporary literature. Why Study Modern and Contemporary Writing at UEA? The School of Literature, Drama and Creative Writing has a strong reputation in the fields of modern and contemporary writing, with a particular concern for the relationships between the critical and the creative. UEA is a place where literary critics and theorists rub shoulders, and exchange ideas, with practising poets, novelists, dramatists and biographers. As a post-graduate here you’ll be part of a vibrant mix of MA and PhD students who are engaged in ‘writing the modern world’ in a variety of ways, whether it be through producing critical studies of novels, poetry or plays or through writing their own. As well as being taught by prize-winning scholars and authors, you will also – through the UEA Literary Festival – encounter the foremost figures in contemporary writing today. Course Content and Structure The course takes one year of full-time or two years of part-time study. At its heart are two innovative core modules, one taken in the autumn semester, the other in the spring. The first of these is Living Modernism. The focus here is on the extraordinary experiments of the early decades of the twentieth century (in writers such as Joyce and Kafka) and on the living legacy their inventive works bequeath to contemporary critical and creative writing (in the work by writers as diverse as Samuel Beckett and Walter Benjamin, Kazuo Ishiguro and Theodor Adorno, Denise Riley and Mladen Dolar). In the spring, the focus shifts to Creative-Critical Writing, a module in which contemporary hybrids of fiction and criticism (by writers including Geoff Dyer and Jacques Derrida, Anne Carson and John Wilkinson) are read, pondered and played with, and in which you are encouraged to experiment with your own critical voice. Theory in both of these modules is treated, not as a free-standing body of knowledge, but as an interactive component of the twentieth- and twenty-first-centry literary tradition. Two further modules must then be selected, one in each semester. Options include Culture and its Discontents, Fiction after Modernism, Ludism: Play and Postmodern Art, and ‘World Literature’ to the ‘Global Text’. Students are also able to select modules from related MA programmes, including the likes of Describing Poetry, Novel History, The Persistence of the Aesthetic, and Critical Theories of the Western Self. The programme concludes with a dissertation, begun in the spring and completed at the start of September. Here, students work one-to-one with a tutor on a topic of the student’s own choosing. This extended research project serves as the culmination of the work, both literary-critical and theoretical, conducted over the course of the programme. Many students have used the dissertation as a testing ground for further study at PhD-level. [-]