School of Advanced Study, University of London

Introduction

The School of Advanced Study (SAS), University of London brings together 10 internationally-renowned research institutes to form the UK's national centre for the support and promotion of research in the humanities. The School also hosts a multidisciplinary centre, the Human Rights Consortium.

Located in the heart of intellectual London in Bloomsbury - surrounded by University of London Colleges, including UCL, LSE, SOAS, Birkbeck, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Institute of Education as well as the British Museum and the British Library - SAS offers a unique scholarly community for postgraduate students in the humanities. Our students benefit from easy access to incredibly rich research resources including Senate House Library, the University of London's central library and one of the UK's biggest humanities research collections.

Six of the School's institutes offer a range of taught Master's programmes and doctoral supervision in their areas of expertise in: History, Art history, French / German / Hispanic / Italian / Portuguese cultures and literatures, English Studies, Law, Politics and international development, Human rights, Commonwealth Studies, Latin American Studies, Refugee Studies, International corporate governance and financial regulation, and Taxation.

SAS receives higher than national average satisfaction rates. In the 2013 national postgraduate student surveys, 85% of MA students stated that their teaching and learning experience had exceeded their expectations and 88% of research degree students reported that their overall experience had exceeded their expectations.

Funding: SAS Studentships

Postgraduate Support Scheme (2015-16 only)
There are five awards of up to a maximum of £10,000 to cover tuition fees and contribute towards maintenance costs (where applicable) which are available for 2015-16 only via the HEFCE-funded Postgraduate Support Scheme. This one-year scheme aims to support students from under-represented groups among the School’s taught masters population, who wish to undertake a postgraduate taught programme.

Eligibility: Awards will be restricted to students who are:

  • Progressing from an undergraduate course for which they were charged the higher tuition fee applying since 2012-13 and who do not have an Equivalent Lower Qualification (ELQ) i.e. already have a masters or higher degree;
  • Undertaking masters courses in any subject, excluding MRes, Distance Learning, PGDip and PGCert;
  • Studying full-time or part-time for a maximum of two years;
  • Domiciled in the UK or European Union;
  • Self-funded;
  • From a group that is evidentially under-represented among the School’s taught masters population.
NB: Candidates must meet all of the above criteria. It is for the School to determine which students are from under-represented groups among the School’s taught masters population. Data and examples will be provided to the panel.

Application: In order to apply for a Postgraduate Support Scheme studentship at the School, you must have applied to study here. Please see our Master’s degrees webpage or Institute websites, and then the information on how to apply. The Postgraduate Support Scheme studentship competition for 2015-16 closes on Monday 1st June 2015.

SAS Studentships (Coffin Fund for Promising Students)
The School is able to provide two SAS Studentships via the Coffin Fund for Promising Students. In 2015-16, the awards are £12,500 to cover tuition fees and contribute towards maintenance costs (where applicable) and will be awarded to two students who have demonstrably excelled in their undergraduate degree.

Eligibility: The primary criterion on which applications are judged is academic merit. The successful applicant will be of exceptional quality, evidenced by previous academic achievement at undergraduate level, with an outstanding mark achieved in the final-year project/dissertation. Successful applicants will have a genuine and demonstrable interest in undertaking a master’s degree at the School of Advanced Study. In addition, awards are open to students who are:

  • Self funded and domiciled in the UK, European Union (EU) or overseas;
  • Studying full time or part time for a maximum of two years;
  • Undertaking masters courses in any subject (excluding MRes, Distance
  • Learning,PGDip and PGCert).

Application: In order to apply for a Postgraduate Support Scheme studentship at the School, you must have applied to study here. Please see our Master’s degrees webpage or Institute websites, and then the information on how to apply. The Postgraduate Support Scheme studentship competition for 2015-16 closes on Monday 1st June 2015.
This school offers programs in:
  • English

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Programs

This school also offers:

MA

MA in Cultural and Intellectual History 1300–1650

Campus Full time 12 months October 2016 United Kingdom London

This degree at the Warburg Institute aims to equip students for interdisciplinary research in Medieval and Renaissance studies and in the reception of the classical tradition. [+]

About the degree The Warburg Institute MA in Cultural and Intellectual History aims to equip students for interdisciplinary research in Medieval and Renaissance studies and in the reception of the classical tradition. Students will become part of an international community of scholars, working in a world-famous library. They will broaden their range of knowledge to include the historically informed interpretation of images and texts, art history, philosophy, history of science, literature, and the impact of religion on society. Students will improve their knowledge of Latin, French and Italian and will acquire the library and archival skills essential for research on primary texts. This twelve-month, full-time course is intended as an introduction to the principal elements of the classical tradition and to interdisciplinary research in cultural and intellectual history from the late Middle Ages to the early modern period. Although it is a qualification in its own right, the MA is also designed to provide training for further research at doctoral level. It is taught through classes and supervision by members of the academic staff of the Institute and by outside teachers. The teaching staff are leading professors and academics in their field who have published widely. Research strengths include: the transmission of Arabic science and philosophy to Western Europe; the later influence of classical philosophy (Aristotelianism, Platonism, Epicureanism and Stoicism); and religious nonconformism in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Europe. For further details on the research interests of teaching staff see the module table in this leaflet or visit www.warburg.sas.ac.uk/home/staff-contacts/academic-staff. Degree overview The MA programme aims to: „„ Act as an introduction to interdisciplinary research in the cultural and intellectual history of Western Europe from the late Middle Ages to the early modern period, and is in large part focused on the legacy of classical antiquity. „„ Cover aspects of cultural and intellectual history seldom studied in any depth in under-graduate courses, for example Renaissance philosophy, iconology, humanism and history, as well as two more specialised areas of study. The main emphasis is on Italy, but consideration is also given to the rest of Western Europe. „„ Provide students with a solid grounding in current scholarship in the areas covered, largely through the study of primary source material in the original languages. „„ Provide training in reading Medieval and Renaissance Latin, Italian and French, in Latin and Italian palaeography, and in the description of manuscripts and early printed books. „„ Equip students to undertake research, and to give them experience of such research through the writing of a dissertation. Although a qualification in its own right, the MA also serves as an introduction to further research. Many students have progressed to PhD study at the Warburg and elsewhere and many are pursuing successful academic careers in institutions across the globe including at the Universities of Cambridge, Copenhagen, Notre Dame (US), Padua, University College London, Birkbeck, La Sapienza (Rome), Warwick and Yeshiva (New York). Structure The course begins in early October with a Foundation Week, in which students are introduced to the main topics and themes to be covered over the year. In addition, there is a regular series of classes throughout the three terms on Techniques of Scholarship, which include description of manuscripts, palaeography, printing in the 15th and 16th centuries, editing a text, preparation of dissertations and photographic images. Some of these classes are held outside the Institute, in locations such as the British Library or the Wellcome Library. Students are given the opportunity to examine early printed books and manuscripts. Reading classes in Latin, Italian and French are provided to help acquire the necessary familiarity with those languages as written in the late Middle Ages and the Renaissance. Students are also encouraged to attend the Director’s weekly seminar on Work in Progress and any of the other regular seminars held in the Institute that may be of interest to them. These at present include History of Art and Maps and Society. The third term and summer are spent in researching and writing a dissertation, under the guidance of a supervisor from the academic staff. All students take two compulsory core courses and two optional subjects. The core courses are taught in the first term and will vary from year to year. The optional subjects are taught in the second term and the options available will vary from year to year. Teaching, learning and assessment The normal format for classes is a small weekly seminar, in which students usually discuss texts in their original languages. In most courses, students also give short presentations of their own research, which are not assessed. The emphasis is on helping students to acquire the skills necessary to interpret philosophical, literary and historical documents as well as works of art. Each compulsory or optional module will be assessed by means of a 4,000 word essay to be submitted on the first day of the term following that in which the module was taught. A dissertation of 18,000–20,000 words, on a topic agreed by the student and supervisor, has to be submitted by 30 September. The course is examined on these five pieces of written work, and on a written translation examination paper in the third term. Students are allocated a course tutor and, in addition, are encouraged to discuss their work with other members of the academic staff. Because of our relatively small cohort, students have unusually frequent contact, formal and informal, with their teachers. Entry requirements The normal minimum entry requirement is an upper second-class honours degree from a British university, or an equivalent qualification from a foreign institution, in any discipline in the humanities which is related to the course. A reading knowledge of one European modern language, apart from English, and of Latin is required. An understanding of Italian is particularly useful. All students whose first language is not English must provide recent evidence that their written and spoken English is adequate for postgraduate study. Funding Coffin Fund for Promising Students The School is able to provide two SAS Studentships via the Coffin Fund for Promising Students. In 2015-16, the awards are £12,500 to cover tuition fees and contribute towards maintenance costs (where applicable) and will be awarded to two students who have demonstrably excelled in their undergraduate degree. Eligibility: The primary criterion on which applications are judged is academic merit. The successful applicant will be of exceptional quality, evidenced by previous academic achievement at undergraduate level, with an outstanding mark achieved in the final-year project/dissertation. Successful applicants will have a genuine and demonstrable interest in undertaking a master’s degree at the School of Advanced Study. In addition, awards are open to students who are: Self funded and domiciled in the UK, European Union (EU) or overseas; Studying full time or part time for a maximum of two years; Undertaking masters courses in any subject (excluding MRes, Distance Learning,PGDip and PGCert). In order to apply for a SAS studentship (Coffin Fund) at the School, you must have applied to study here. For further information on SAS postgraduate studies, please see Master’s degrees or the Institute websites, and then the information on how to apply. [-]

MA in Garden and Landscape History

Campus Full time Part time 12 months October 2016 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The MA in Garden and Landscape History at the Institute of Historical Research will provide an academically rigorous environment in which students will develop their academic research and writing skills, and gain a profound understanding of gardens and landscapes spanning the globe and the centuries. [+]

The MA in Garden and Landscape History at the Institute of Historical Research will provide an academically rigorous environment in which students will develop their academic research and writing skills, and gain a profound understanding of gardens and landscapes spanning the globe and the centuries. This course will be particularly useful for graduates who have completed a first degree in a related subject, as well as for architects and landscape gardeners looking to deepen their subject knowledge or add an edge to their curriculum vitae. Teaching will occur at the Institute of Historical Research, with a strong emphasis on tutor-student interaction in class. There will also be an emphasis on practical training, with sessions at museums and libraries, and visits to gardens in London. The course includes an optional field trip to Rome and Tivoli in the spring, with visits to the Vatican, Villa Borghese and Villa Adriana, amongst a number of other magnificent historic cultural sites. Course structure The course will be run on a full-time basis over one year. Teaching will take place on Thursdays from 10:00 to 17:00 and will be divided between two terms. The third term will be dedicated to dissertation preparation and writing. Students must complete core module 1, core module 2 (selecting three options from the seven provided), and core module 3 – a 15,000 word dissertation in order to be awarded the full MA. However, there are a range of options available for flexible study: Those wishing to pursue this course on a part-time basis can complete Modules 1 and 2 (the taught elements of the course) in their first year and Module 3, the dissertation, in their second year Module 1 can be undertaken as a standalone unit leading to a diploma, the credit for which can be banked should the student wish to complete the MA at a later date (within a prescribed time frame) Please enquire for further details. Assessment The MA is assessed through essays and examinations and through innovative forms of assessment based on practical work reflective of that undertaken in the human rights field, including legal reports, a media project, and a mock funding proposal. Class participation also forms an element of the MA assessment. Funding Coffin Fund for Promising Students The School is able to provide two SAS Studentships via the Coffin Fund for Promising Students. In 2015-16, the awards are £12,500 to cover tuition fees and contribute towards maintenance costs (where applicable) and will be awarded to two students who have demonstrably excelled in their undergraduate degree. Eligibility: The primary criterion on which applications are judged is academic merit. The successful applicant will be of exceptional quality, evidenced by previous academic achievement at undergraduate level, with an outstanding mark achieved in the final-year project/dissertation. Successful applicants will have a genuine and demonstrable interest in undertaking a master’s degree at the School of Advanced Study. In addition, awards are open to students who are: Self funded and domiciled in the UK, European Union (EU) or overseas; Studying full time or part time for a maximum of two years; Undertaking masters courses in any subject (excluding MRes, Distance Learning,PGDip and PGCert). In order to apply for a SAS studentship (Coffin Fund) at the School, you must have applied to study here. For further information on SAS postgraduate studies, please see Master’s degrees or the Institute websites, and then the information on how to apply. [-]

MA Refugee Protection and Forced Migration Studies

Online Full time Part time 2 - 5 years October 2016 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The MA in Refugee Protection and Forced Migration Studies provides a rigorous theoretical and practical understanding of the field of international refugee law and forced migration. [+]

MA Refugee Protection and Forced Migration Studies via distance learning (DL) (Refugee Law Initiative) Apply now for the first distance learning MA in Refugee Protection and Forced Migration Studies. If you already work or volunteer in organisations active in this area, or would like to move into the sector, this Masters will give you: a prestigious qualification to open doors in your career the tools to work in the field and to undertake campaigning and advocacy work an understanding of the fundamental issues and debates and the key legal concepts. Benefit from supported online learning As you study by online learning you can fit your studies around your other commitments. You will also be able to share ideas with others who are studying for this programme and receive tuition from leading experts from around the globe. Developed by leading academics The MA in Refugee Protection and Forced Migration Studies was developed by the Refugee Law Initiative, a University of London research centre. The lead academics and tutors will draw on their wide practical expertise in delivering this programme. The MA has two intakes per year with application deadlines for the coming year on 1 February 2016 and on 1 September 2016. Gain a prestigious MA in Refugee Protection and Forced Migration Studies by distance learning The MA in Refugee Protection and Forced Migration Studies provides a rigorous theoretical and practical understanding of the field of international refugee law and forced migration. It is unique in being the only programme of its type offered by distance learning. The MA degree will enable you to acquire a solid legal, practical and theoretical understanding of refugee protection and forced migration, developing expertise through a choice of elective modules. You will hone your self-reliance in dealing with - and critiquing - law, policy and practice in the field, and will also learn how to gather, organise and deploy evidence to form balanced judgements and develop policy recommendations. Career enhancement This MA enables you to combine your studies with your ongoing professional and domestic commitments. This programme is designed for those who wish to pursue careers in a range of professional contexts in the refugee, human rights or humanitarian fields. Potential employers include international agencies, such as the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) and the International Organisation on Migration (IOM), governmental bodies and non-governmental organisations. Your time commitment Core and elective modules are run in two study sessions (16 weeks) throughout the year, while the dissertation module (30 weeks) is divided into four study sessions. You register for one core module or two elective modules per session of study and should expect to devote between 15-20 nominal hours a week to your studies during these periods. Programme details You study: 6 modules (two core, four elective) plus a dissertation Study period: 2-5 years Cost (2014-15): £7,350 Summary of key dates Application deadline: 1 February 2016 ; 1 September 2016 Registration deadline: 1 March 2016; 1 October 2016 Course starts: mid-march 2016; mid-October 2016 Examinations take place: July 2016 and February 2017; February 2017 and July 2017 Academic Requirements An undergraduate degree (e.g. bachelor) which is considered at least comparable to a UK upper second class honours degree, in a social science related subject, from an institution acceptable to the University. If you do not meet the entrance requirements you may still apply. Each application will be considered on an individual basis by the Programme Director. Work experience There is no minimum work experience requirement for entry to this programme. Language Requirements For awards at FHEQ level 7, students must provide satisfactory evidence showing that they have passed within the previous three years a test of proficiency in English at the following minimum level: IELTS with an overall grade of at least 7.0. Tests of English proficiency from other providers will be considered on an individual basis. Where an applicant does not meet the prescribed English language proficiency requirements but believes that they can demonstrate the requisite proficiency for admission the University may, at its discretion, consider the application. Note: Some programmes will require greater proficiency in English language; these requirements will be reflected in the relevant programme regulations. Computer Requirements All students must have regular access to a computer and the internet. This may be for accessing the Student Portal, downloading course materials from the virtual learning environment or accessing resources from the Online Library. You will also need suitable hardware capacity on your computer for document storage as well as basic software such as a PDF reader. We recommend that you use the latest version of Internet Explorer, Firefox or Chrome and that your screen resolution is 1024 x 768 or greater. JavaScript and cookies must be enabled to access particular online services such as the Student Portal. Some programmes have courses or modules that use additional software. Where this is the case, information is given with the relevant course descriptions. [-]

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