Royal Agricultural University

Introduction

Established in 1845, we are recognised nationally and internationally as a leader in the delivery of education, research and consultancy, in and relating to, agriculture and the rural environment.

Our Heritage

The Royal Agricultural College (RAC), now the Royal Agricultural University (RAU), is the oldest agricultural college in the English speaking world and has been at the forefront of agricultural education since 1845. Our historic campus in the Cotswold countryside provides a stimulating and unique learning environment.

Studying at the University

We offer courses at foundation, undergraduate and postgraduate levels to over 1,200 students from over 40 different countries. Subjects include business and management, agriculture, food supply, agribusiness, equine, international rural development, real estate and rural land management.

The career-focused courses are designed and updated to meet the changing needs of the employment market and combine academic excellence with practical application. Courses are managed and taught by experienced staff and specialist consultants, all of whom are leaders within their fields.

The University maintains strong industry links, creating an unrivalled reputation in terms of the networking opportunities available and the calibre of work placements offered to students. Students have gone on to enjoy success and make a significant contribution in a wide range of professions around the world.

Our undergraduate and postgraduate courses help our students to achieve their future dreams in the agricultural, land, business management, food, equine and property industries.

You will find all aspects of life at the RAU varied and exciting. We pride ourselves on being large enough that many facilities are on-site; yet small enough to create a friendly atmosphere.

Steeped in history and tradition, our picturesque campus also makes the ideal venue for weddings and conferences in the Cotswolds.

This school offers programs in:
  • English

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Programs

This school also offers:

MSc

Master of Science in Business Management

Campus Full time Part time 18 - 48 months September 2016 United Kingdom Cirencester + 1 more

This MSc allows you to focus solely on general business or to select modules enabling a focus on wine, food, equine, agriculture, sustainability or international business to contextualise your studies in a sector of your choice. [+]

MSc Business Management

This MSc allows you to focus solely on general business or to select modules enabling a focus on wine, food, equine, agriculture, sustainability or international business to contextualise your studies in a sector of your choice. It offers an opportunity for those who would like to work in this area to study the marketing, finance, economics, people management and strategic issues faced by businesses both in the UK and internationally.

Who is the course for?

Applications are invited from those with an undergraduate degree who want to acquire a Masters degree in business management. The course is designed to accommodate graduates from a wide variety of backgrounds and disciplines, and is well-suited to international as well as UK students. At the end of the MSc, you will be able to take a management role within a rural business or, alternatively, develop a career in general business management.... [-]


Master of Science in International Real Estate

Campus Full time 13 months September 2016 United Kingdom Gloucester

This one-year MSc, with Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) accreditation, recognises the need for new graduates with an international perspective and offers you invaluable overseas experience via mentor-supported placements. [+]

MSc International Real Estate

Real estate has become a global market, with many organisations having interests throughout the world. This gives rise to a need for advisers with a clear understanding of the way in which real estate markets function and an ability to quickly analyse the systems and institutions that underpin a market. This one-year MSc, with Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) accreditation, recognises the need for new graduates with an international perspective and offers you invaluable overseas experience via mentor-supported placements.Real estate has become a global market, with many organisations having interests throughout the world. This gives rise to a need for advisers with a clear understanding of the way in which real estate markets function and an ability to quickly analyse the systems and institutions that underpin a market. This one-year MSc, with Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) accreditation, recognises the need for new graduates with an international perspective and offers you invaluable overseas experience via mentor-supported placements.... [-]


Master of Science in International Rural Development

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 18 months October 2016 United Kingdom Cirencester + 1 more

This MSc course meets the needs of recent graduates, those already working in rural development who wish to further their career prospects, and those seeking a career change. [+]

MSc International Rural Development

Rural communities face major challenges such as increasing population, increasing pressure for development, the impacts of peak oil production and climate change. They must therefore develop their management of natural resources and land to meet the twin challenges of sustainability whilst increasing food production. Any such development must meet the triple perspectives of economic viability, social acceptability and preservation of environmental quality.

This course explores whether this approach to food production and the management of natural resources is sustainable and what alternatives such as organic production, precision farming or even genetic modification will play in the food systems of the 21st century. It also explores the management and use of other resources available to rural communities. We are confident that this course, with its specialist pathways, will enable you to develop the skills and knowledge to significantly contribute to rural community development.... [-]


Master of Science in Rural Estate Management

Campus Full time 12 months September 2016 United Kingdom Cirencester

This one-year Masters degree provides a highly-regarded course of studies to equip you for such a career. Not only does it provide an opportunity to gain an MSc in Rural Estate Management, but also a fast-track route to qualification as a chartered surveyor, as the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) fully accredits this course. Qualification as a chartered surveyor can be gained by completion of this MSc, followed by undertaking two years of professional experience, known as the Assessment of Professional Competence (APC). [+]

The aims of the course are to enable you to acquire the specialist knowledge and skills necessary for professional practice as a rural property manager and for entry to the relevant professional bodies, such as RICS and the Central Association of Agricultural Valuers (CAAV). It is an intensive 12-month study programme with an emphasis on the practical integration and development of the traditional core elements of a land management course. Modules are designed to provide an understanding of the areas of professional involvement and practice that will have to be considered when delivering advice on all manner of decisions relating to rural estate management. The final part of the course will take the form of a research-based dissertation on a topic of your choice. To assist you with your dissertations, there is a series of workshops on research methodology and the preparation of a research dissertation. In addition, a member of staff is assigned to supervise your dissertation and you will also have a personal tutor. The eight core modules run concurrently for the first eight months of the course, with final examinations taking place at the end of May. The dissertation needs to be submitted by the middle of September, which gives you the opportunity to write up your dissertations over the summer. Please note, all of our degree courses begin at the end of September each year (see the term dates on our website). Modules Rural Policy - A review of the policy creation and implementation process in the fields of planning and social policy, environmental policy and agricultural policy. Agriculture - Introduction to agriculture and farm production systems. Agricultural resource appraisal, including the use of farm buildings and fixed equipment, diversification and new enterprises. Environment and Woodland Management - Management of woodlands for timber, landscape, habitat, and sporting objectives. Rural conservation and environmental considerations including policy, environmental assessment and protection. Rural Planning and Development - The components of the Town and Country Planning system. Development plans, development control, and the process of development. Business Management - Introduction to management theory and practice with particular reference to the management, taxation and financing of rural estates. Rural Valuation - The mathematics of valuation. Investment and the property market, valuation of freeholds and leaseholds, valuations for various statutory purposes. Rural Property Law - A general overview with particular attention to Landlord and Tenant law and statutory provisions relating to the rural environment. Rural Asset Management - Appraisal of rural property and estates, identification and evaluation of alternative uses of rural buildings, and other rural assets, and preparation of rural asset plans. Dissertation - A dissertation of a target length of between 15,000 and 25,000 words on an approved topic of the student’s choice, normally related to a field of rural practice surveying in his/her own region or country. What is the learning Style? You will attend lectures, smaller group tutorials and practical sessions, depending on the particular subject being taught. We have our own arable and livestock farms to demonstrate a range of farm enterprises, both conventional and organic, together with conservation principles and other property management issues. You will also visit local farms, commercial properties and rural estates where owners, occupiers and their professional advisors can provide additional insights into the issues arising from the management of rural property. Leading professional practices also support the course, both practically and financially, with prizes being awarded for various assignments. Assessment A variety of methods are used to assess your performance, but assessed course work features strongly throughout the course, often based on case studies which help you to see the practical application of the subjects you are studying. Pre-university work experience and preparation You are encouraged to undertake practical farming and professional experience in the property sector before starting the course. This work experience not only gives you an invaluable insight into the diverse work undertaken by rural property managers, but is also a good opportunity to make some useful contacts – indeed a few students get job offers as a result of such work experience, even before they start the course. The Course Manager will be happy to provide further guidance to you about what work experience would be most suitable for your circumstances. You are also encouraged to undertake pre-course preparation work. Prior to starting the course, you will receive reading lists and study material so that you can develop a basic grounding in study areas with which you may not be familiar. Entry Requirements The normal minimum entry requirement will be an Honours degree at upper second level. Mature candidates with significant relevant work experience and lower academic qualifications may also be considered for entry, following personal interview with the Course Manager. If your first language is not English, we will accept the International English Language Test (IELTS) with a minimum score of 6.5 average with no element below 5.5. If you have other qualifications, including overseas awards and alternative English language qualifications, you are advised to contact Admissions to discuss the suitability of your award for entry onto the course. Career Prospects Relevant areas of work include those directly involved in managing all types of rural property from private farms and estates, to the landholdings of public and private institutional bodies. The professional work of the rural property manager is wide ranging. This may include: Agency (the sale of land and rural buildings) Tax and financial strategy Compensation claims Tenancy agreements and their review Farm business planning and diversification Forestry Property development. We have an excellent employment record and a wide network of former students in the land management and property profession. Nationally and internationally recognised firms of chartered surveyors recruit regularly from this course. We also place graduates in many other APC training posts, including smaller firms, private estates and other large landowners, such as the National Trust and county councils. This MSc will also open doors to a variety of careers outside the surveying profession, including: Planning and environmental consultancy Research and education Leisure management Rural conservation Investment management. [-]

Master of Science in Rural Tourism Management

Campus Full time 1 year September 2016 United Kingdom Cirencester

The tourism and events industry is experiencing continued growth and deepening diversification, becoming one of the fastest growing economic sectors in the world. In 2013, word tourism alone generated 9% of GDP and accounted for 1 in 11 jobs (UNWTO Tourism Highlights, 2014). [+]

The tourism and event industry is seeking graduates with excellent business management and marketing skills, and entrepreneurial talent. There is also a need for a more professional approach as competition between enterprises, companies and destinations intensifies. Todays’ tourism specialists must have a thorough understanding of sustainability and cultural issues, and a sound grasp of the policies, consumer trends and theories that drive the industry. Our rural tourism and event champions will be those who can lead, communicate, innovate and optimise returns from our natural, cultural and built environment. This course is ideal if you are from the UK and abroad, with a range of first degrees (or equivalent) and want to: Develop a new rural tourism or events enterprise Manage an existing rural tourism or events enterprise Advise on tourism and rural development in developed or developing nations Manage tourism projects and initiatives in the public or charitable sector Seek senior management positions in tourism businesses Seek a career in rural event management This unique and exciting MSc is a one year 180 credit course. You will study: Four core business management modules (worth 60 credits) Four tourism and event management focus modules (45 credits) One 15 credit (or two 7.5 credit) modules from the elective module list (15 credits) Undertake a focused research project (either a start-up business plan, development business plan or organisational study) or a traditional dissertation (60 credits) You will engage in several trips to top regional tourism enterprises and events. In addition, each cohort will also take part in a student-led international study tour. This challenging problem-based learning tour will be designed by the students to help meet their own group needs and interests. The course runs from October each year with teaching concentrated into the first two 10 week terms. Research and exams are the main focus of the third term. The summer months are spent completing the dissertation. Part-time study (one day a week or concentrated blocks) is also possible, and a January start may be available in due course. Exit routes at Postgraduate Diploma (120 credits) and Postgraduate Certificate (60 credits) are also available. We are currently seeking CMI (Chartered Management Institute) status for this course and APM (Association of Project Management) accreditation for the Project Management module. Business Strategy Financial Management Marketing Planning & Strategy Critical Issues in Management Rural Tourism and Event Industry Tourism and Development Rural Tourism Enterprise Event Project Management Event Management (Equine) Project Management Operations Management Entrepreneurial Start-up Innovation Process & Practice E-Business Systems and Technology Family Business Natural Resource Appraisal Sustainable Development Economics of the Environment Equine Industry Wine Industry Game and Deer Management Farm Business Management You choose a suitable research enquiry, plan a research strategy, review and appraise relevant literature. You will decide on the most appropriate methods of collecting data and information. Learn how to manipulate and analyse data and information, then arrive at suitable conclusions and make appropriate recommendations. This course blends practical hands-on learning with theoretical knowledge, drawing on in-house expertise and the RAU’s unique network of inspirational speakers, enterprising alumni, local businesses and international contacts. The course is delivered by a mix of traditional lectures (small groups), guest speakers, seminars, individual and student-led research, case studies and field visits. You will be expected to link with the industry to solve real-life problems and issues. There may also be short work placement opportunities with a local tourism or events organisation during the course. Performance will be assessed using a range of techniques, including group and individual coursework (essays, reports and business plans), presentations and examinations. An element of reflective assessment will also be used following field trips and the study tour. Completion of one individual research project and dissertation is required in order to be awarded a Masters degree. You will study research methods as part of this element and benefit from a dedicated academic supervisor who will offer support throughout. The normal entry requirement will be an Honours degree at upper second level (any subject). Students with a degree in a relevant subject (business studies, rural land management, marketing, countryside management, sustainable development, agricultural management) would be of particular interest. Mature candidates with significant relevant work experience and lower academic qualifications may also be considered for entry, following personal interview with the course manager. For students whose first language is not English, the University will accept International English Language Test (IELTS) with a minimum score of 6.5 average with no element below 5.5. Students with other qualifications, including overseas awards and alternative English language qualifications, are advised to contact admissions via admissions@rau.ac.uk or by calling 01285 889912 to discuss the suitability of their award for entry to their preferred course of study This is a new course, but it is anticipated that graduates with an MSc in Rural Tourism Management will go on to progress their career in: Their own start up or diversified rural tourism or events enterprise A successful rural tourism company The public sector The charitable sector A rural tourism sector body A tourism and rural development organisation on the international stage A rural event management company The sound management foundation provided in this MSc course will also open doors to other exciting and rewarding positions in business. Recent surveys of 2013 graduates reveal that 97.5% of postgraduates are in employment or further study within six months of leaving the RAU. For more information click here. This degree is currently subject to validation and course content is subject to change. It is due to launch in October 2015. publications.rau.ac.uk/rm/ [-]

Master of Science in Sustainable Agriculture and Food Security

Campus Full time 12 months October 2016 United Kingdom Cirencester

This course combines the principles of sustainable development with an examination of the various systems of food production in the context of providing a secure supply to meet the ever-changing requirements of a growing world population. It provides an opportunity for graduates or professionals in other disciplines to direct their careers towards agriculture and food supply. [+]

The principal aim of the course is to enable you to gain the specialised knowledge, understanding, skills and attitudes necessary to contribute effectively and ethically to strategic decision making, opinion forming and operational management for the sustainable development of agricultural and food supply systems. Who is the course for? Anyone who is concerned that our food production systems will not be fit for purpose by the middle of this century! This is the ideal course for those looking for a career in production, policy, and sustainable development focusing on food or resource consumption in agriculture. You should have a degree in a related subject or an interest in a career in one of the key themes. This course attracts students from a wide age group and a wide range of backgrounds and is particularly appropriate for more mature students who are re-directing their careers. The following themes will be developed: Human exploitation of the Earth's resources for food production and the global and local implications of human development. Exploring a wide variety of food production systems from small, local scale to intensive modern large scale, allied to wider environmental and landscape considerations. The role and function of institutional structures and policies in relation to development, resource exploitation and food production. The application of development paradigms, models and tools to build capacity within communities, institutions and individuals. How is the course organised? The course may be studied full-time over one academic year, or part-time over two years. The taught modules run in 10 week blocks, there are two entry points to the programme, either in late September or in early January. You will study 4 modules in each term. The research project is introduced in January but mainly carried out over the summer period and submitted at the end of September regardless of start date. (see the term dates on our website). Those starting in September will study four modules in the autumn term, four modules in the spring term then complete their research project by the end of September. Those starting in January will study four modules in the spring term then complete their research project by the end of September and then study four modules in the autumn term to finish in December. Course structure: You will study five core modules outlined below: Integrated Agricultural Systems - Evaluates the sustainability of major types of tropical and temperate farming systems that have evolved globally, in relation to the prevailing agro-climatic zones. This module considers the influences of economic factors and changing global markets on such systems, from subsistence farming, through integrated and low input systems, to industrialised agriculture in relation to economic, environmental, social, cultural, food safety, and ethical considerations. Principles and practices of sustainable farming, of particular consequence to small, resource-poor farmers, are also explored. Agriculture and Rural Policy - Evaluates the role of policy formulation, implementation, and review in providing a framework for sustainable development using examples from around the world. CPD workshops explore the integration of sustainability criteria into planning and policy, including Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA), Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA), Environmental Due Diligence (EDD) and Agricultural and Rural Extension strategies. Poverty and Food Security - Examines the main drivers behind issues of poverty and food insecurity, such as population growth, aspirations for better diets, trends in production systems, and food chain management. The module utilises various case studies to explore how different systems can solve problems of both food supply and food quality. Sustainable Management of Soil and Water - This module evaluates the traditional management strategies for soil and water as factors in food production, and applies sustainable principles to their use and management in various agro-climatic zones and production systems. Soil is considered in terms of physical, chemical, and biological properties in relation to nutrient cycling processes, structural quality, risk of erosion, and contamination. Water in agriculture links climate and hydrology to water collection and use, crop requirements, potential evapotranspiration and water balances, water quality and salinisation, drainage and leaching, and water conservation techniques. Development Project Management - Sets the scene for studies on sustainable development through the introduction of the key principles and concepts and their application to rural development issues, which are then used to evaluate a series of case studies from around the world. The module develops project management skills through a series of Continuing Professional Development (CPD) style workshops and exercises, that will explore the key skills required for being an effective project manager. Three team projects are developed: a competitive tendering project, production of a magazine and organisation of a national conference. You will then choose three additional modules, choosing at least two from those listed below: Sustainable Agricultural Intensification - Against a challenging background of population growth and demographics, changing economic development, global food demand, and future food security in a prevailing production environment of diminishing resource, this module evaluates the need to secure ‘more from less’ in an increasingly sustainable manner. It uses examples from major farming enterprises in different parts of the world of broad acre intensification in the tropics and temperate regions, and intensive production systems in protected agriculture. The importance of innovation is highlighted through new science and technology development, including breeding and biotechnology adoption, protected agricultural systems, and advancing post-harvest biology and storage opportunities. Small Scale Farming and Local Food Supply - Around half of the world’s population depends on subsistence farming. Approximately 40% of cultivatable land is worked by small farmers, and some 60% of all farms are small-scale. This demonstrates the significance of small-scale farmers to agricultural production and food security. In contrast, agricultural and food policies often focus on globalisation of food supply and international trade, favouring larger commercial producers and those who dominate regional, national, and international food supply. This means that small-scale farming not only suffers from capacity constraints, but also the failure of domestic policies, structural adjustments, international trends and spikes in market prices for raw materials, energy, and finance. This module explores the dimensions of small scale farming and local food supply in the context of public policies, market structures, consumers, society and the sustainability of food supply at local, regional, national, and international levels. In doing this, three countries (UK, South Africa and Cuba) will be used as examples. Organic Production and Marketing - Initially focusing on regulatory, market and consumer attitudes to organic food, it goes on to examine developed and emerging economies. This module explores organic philosophies in relation to ecological, social, and economic dimensions of sustainable development. Practical examples of farming systems and enterprise integration are then evaluated in relation to soil management and plant-soil relationships, animal health and nutrition, and enterprise performance, considering the actual and potential contribution of organic systems to food supply. Research Project - You will complete an independent research project on a topic related to one of the key themes of the course, presented as two journal papers, one a review of the topic, the other a research paper. What is the learning style? You will gain a broader understanding of relevant issues through knowledge acquisition, intellectual enquiry, debate, and team/individual research. The course will also provide a learning environment that encourages you to explore factors influencing sustainability while at the same time reflecting on your own actions and attitudes, and those of others. In addition to lectures, you will participate in case studies, seminars and management projects dependent on module selections. This approach fosters teamwork and complements individual study and student learning. Entry Requirements: The normal minimum entry requirement will be an Honours degree at upper second level. Mature candidates with significant relevant work experience and lower academic qualifications may also be considered for entry, following personal interview with the Course Manager. If your first language is not English, we will accept International English Language Test (IELTS) with a minimum score of 6.5 average with no element below 5.5. If you have other qualifications, including overseas awards and alternative English language qualifications, you are advised to contact Admissions to discuss the suitability of your award for entry onto the course. Career Prospects This course is closely related to the MSc International Rural Development where graduates have entered careers in research, consultancy, policy formulation and project management for international organisations, government departments and national agencies, NGOs, research institutes and commercial companies across the world. [-]

MSc Agricultural Technology and Innovation

Campus Full time August 2017 United Kingdom Cirencester

This degree will explore the high level of technical innovation currently being applied to agricultural and horticultural production. [+]

This degree will explore the high level of technical innovation currently being applied to agricultural and horticultural production. Overview In the future, agricultural and horticultural production will demand new intellectual and technological understanding and skills. The new technologies of sensors, computing, data analysis, remote sensing, robotics, drones and systems of analysis and interpretation will allow new and sophisticated ways of managing both productive and natural environments. This course will be of particular relevance to those wishing to start a career in this emerging industry, join an established company, or looking to develop the skills needed to start their own enterprise. Graduates will be equipped with the management and the entrepreneurial skills that will be of fundamental importance to those entering this dynamic, technical based sector. It is highly likely that you go on to pursue a career within the high-tech agricultural and environmental sectors, government and international agencies, or technical consultancy. Structure The course may be studied full-time over 12 months. You will study six modules in the autumn and spring terms, followed by the Research Project which is carried out over the summer to be submitted the following September. This may include a viva voce examination. You will have the opportunity to engage with real-world problems, to find solutions to current issues, and experience the working world of new technologies in animal and crop production and the natural environment. Modules will be assessed primarily by coursework, there may be some exams. Modules Crop Production Technologies Livestock Production Technologies Production Resource Management Environmental Technologies Computing and Information Technology Business Development in the Agri-tech Sector Research Project Entry requirements Honours degree from a UK university (usually a min. of 2:1 classification) or an equivalent academic qualification from a comparable international institution. Prospects Graduates are highly likely to go on to pursue a career within: The high-tech agricultural and environmental sectors Industries allied to crop and animal production Technical consultancy Government and international agencies The development of new companies through entrepreneurial initiatives Potential job opportunities include: Agricultural and horticultural engineering Information technology Resource appraisal Agronomy Farm management [-]

MSc Applied Equine Science

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3 years August 2017 United Kingdom Cirencester + 1 more

This MSc specialises in applying recent advances in equine research and development to the management and welfare of horses. [+]

This MSc specialises in applying recent advances in equine research and development to the management and welfare of horses. Overview Our courses attract students from a variety of academic and practical backgrounds, both from the UK and overseas, who are interested in pursuing careers in all areas of the equine industry. Previous graduates are directors of equine businesses, whilst others are pursuing academic and research careers. Structure The MSc may be studied full-time over 12 months or part-time over two or three years. You will study eight modules in the autumn and spring terms. The Research Project is then carried out to be submitted the following April. It will be presented as a thesis or a research paper within one year of completion of the taught element. You are expected to produce a Research Project that is of a standard suitable to be published in an academic journal or scientific conference proceedings. Previous graduates have published papers in the Equine Veterinary Journal, Animal Science, and the Proceedings of the European Workshop for Equine Nutrition, and delivered papers at the British Society of Animal Science, the European Workshop for Equine Nutrition, and the Equine Health and Nutrition Congress. If you do not wish to undertake the Research Project you may choose to take a Postgraduate Diploma following successful completion of eight modules (120 credits) or a Postgraduate Certificate following completion of four modules (60 credits). If you wish to undertake part-time study you should contact the course manager to discuss appropriate study arrangements. You will learn through lectures, tutorials, seminars, laboratory practicals, and industry-based presentations and visits. Small teaching groups enable a vibrant and creative learning environment with plenty of scope for in-depth discussion. Although significant amounts of private study are required, you will receive approximately 40-50% staff contact time during the week. Modules are assessed through literature reviews, laboratory reports, presentations and written examinations. Modules Research Methodology (half module) Equine Genetics and Breeding Management of Reproduction Equine Pasture, Forage and Turf Management (half module) Equine Nutrition Exercise Physiology Research Methodology and Statistics Equine Health Equine Behaviour and Welfare Research Project Entry requirements A good honours degree in a cognate scientific subject (preferably a bioscience at least 2:1) Other FHEQ level 7 academic qualifications with extensive relevant professional or other experience, although exceptional entry may be offered to persons who do not fulfil these requirements. The course team may be available to aid such students prior to entry, to assess their learning requirements. The use of formative assessments during this time has been standard practice for those who have not recently been in HE. Mature candidates with significant relevant work experience and lower academic qualifications may also be considered for entry, following interview with the course manager. IELTS: For students whose first language is not English, the University will accept International English Language Test (IELTS) with a minimum score of 6.5 average with no element below 5.5. Students with other qualifications, including overseas awards and alternative English language qualifications, are advised to contact Admissions to discuss the suitability of their award. Prospects Our graduates are prepared for a variety of career paths within the equine industry. Over the years, they have applied their in-depth understanding of equine science to the following areas: Nutrition – working in feed companies and in research and development Research and development Veterinary – from assistants to physicians Lecturers and trainers Laboratory technicians Partners and directors for national organisations Livery – from setting up their own business to managerial positions in established yards Journalism [-]

MSc Food Safety and Quality Management

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years Open Enrollment United Kingdom Cirencester + 1 more

This MSc embraces the implications of food safety and quality management against the backdrop of an increasingly globalised [+]

This MSc embraces the implications of food safety and quality management against the backdrop of an increasingly globalised food industry. The course aims to provide graduates with the necessary training, education, and industry experience to progress their career and become food safety and quality management professionals. It addresses supply chain food safety and quality management in the wider context of food security. Context Recent incidents of major food safety breakdowns, in both developed and developing nations, have had a huge impact on people’s livelihoods, their business viability, and the wider food supply. As a result of consumer protection legislation, those at the consumer end of food supply are increasingly sensitised to their liabilities and have developed sophisticated systems of risk assessment, management and communication. These systems permeate along the whole supply chain and require professional and scientific management. As such, there is a constant demand for such professionals either as new entrants or through industry re-training. Consumers and advocacy groups are increasingly demanding to know more about how food is produced, processed, and distributed, and the industry needs professionals that understand consumer behaviour and can respond appropriately. There is an increasing recognition by leading international experts and influential food buyers for the need for higher levels of management skills and professionalism both within the manufacturing and production sector and also within service providers to the food industry such as Certification Bodies (CB’s) and the audit staff they engage. Often key elements of government legislation are included in current industry standards, especially in relation to food hygiene, traceability, risk management and, in the case of agriculture, environment. Within large corporations, technical, food safety and quality managers now require targeted food safety and quality management skills training and education to improve their professionalism in preventing food safety incidents, costly recalls and a loss of consumer confidence. Who is the course for? This course is designed to be equally relevant to UK and overseas graduates as well as those working in the agri-food industries who are seeking to ensure that the food we eat is as safe as it can be and of the quality demanded. The programme is also of relevance to public administrations that have regulatory oversight for food safety and responsibilities to the agri-food industries. The course is also available part-time for industrial employees in the agri-food sector to gain advanced knowledge and understanding of the food safety and quality management issues relevant to their professional careers. You will gain a deeper understanding of the importance of regional, national, and international standards in regulatory processes, and the role of public institutions in delivering safe, quality foods to consumers. You will be able to use internationally accepted tools for food safety and quality management, evaluate the effectiveness of existing food safety and quality management systems, and design a plan to critically investigate a problem and generate an appropriate solution. Course structure The course may be studied full-time over one academic year or part-time over two. You will study six core modules: - Food Chain - Fundamentals of Food Science - Systems for Food Safety Management - Food Business Quality Systems - Sustainability and the Food Industry - Leadership and Innovation in the Agri-food industries Plus two further modules from the following list: - Poverty and Food Security - Fisheries and Aquaculture Management - Global Red Meat Chains - Global White Meat Chains - Global Dairy Chains - Tourism and Development - Sustainable Management of Soil and Water - Organic Production and Marketing As well as any one other level 7 or 6 module, subject to agreement by the course manager and relevant module leader, timetabling and availability, to complete the Postgraduate Diploma. Upon successful completion of the eight modules a Postgraduate Diploma can be awarded, a Master of Science will be awarded for the successful completion of these modules together with the Individual Research module. What is the learning style? This course is delivered through a combination of lectures, guest speakers, small group workshops and seminars, individual and student-led research, computer-assisted learning, and visits. You will use case studies, practical workshops, field studies, group projects, and role play exercises to help put the theory into practice and develop both independent and team skills. You will also have the opportunity to work with an organisation in the industry to solve real-life problems and issues through ‘Leadership and innovation in the Agri-food industries module. Assessments A variety of methods are used to assess your performance. This includes written examinations and coursework, such as case study analysis, report writing, essay writing, critical literature review, oral and poster presentations, and assessed group and individual seminars. You will be required to complete an Individual Research project in order to be awarded a master’s degree. This will involve the submission of two research papers; a review paper and a research paper, written to the submission requirements of a specified scientific journal. Entry Requirements - The normal minimum entry requirement will be an Honours degree at upper second level - Mature candidates with significant relevant work experience and lower academic qualifications may also be considered for entry, following personal interview with the course manager - If your first language is not English, we will accept International English Language Test (IELTS) with a minimum score of 6.5 average with no element below 5.5 - If you have other qualifications, including overseas awards and alternative English language qualifications, you are advised to contact Admissions to discuss the suitability of your award for entry onto the course Scholarships Funding is available for some students who meet the requirements of our scholarships and bursaries. [-]

Contact
Location address
Royal Agricultural University, Stroud Road, Cirencester,
Cirencester, England, GL7 6JS GB