Oxford Brookes University, Faculty of Technology, Design and Environment

Introduction

The Faculty of Technology, Design and Environment at Oxford Brookes University has an international reputation for excellence, innovation and an ambitious desire to be recognised as one of the most exciting places to study in the world.

We have built a learning community underpinned with an understanding that innovation comes out of our students being able to take risks in a supportive environment. We encourage experimentation, playful trial and error, and academic curiosity. The results of this approach are there to be seen in the student satisfaction statistics, research rankings and graduate destinations.

We work closely with our graduates' future employers and marketplaces, and understand that there is a world out there with a voracious appetite for new and exciting creative ideas welded to solid business acumen.

The Faculty is home to six Schools and Departments providing specialist and interdisciplinary teaching, research and knowledge transfer across a wide range of undergraduate and postgraduate programmes in purpose-built facilities in Oxford. However, much of our portfolio is also now delivered by academic partners elsewhere around the globe.

Our Schools and Departments are:

  • The School of Arts
  • The School of Architecture
  • The Department of Planning
  • The Department of Real Estate and Construction
  • The Department of Computing and Communication Technologies
  • The Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mathematical Sciences

The Faculty integrates theory and practice within an enthusiastic and informed collegiate culture; one that embraces new technologies, creates and communicates new knowledge, and celebrates the achievements of all our stakeholders and partners - staff, students, businesses, and community organisations.

Because over a quarter of our students are from other countries, we have strong international links and friendships with individuals and institutions all across the world. International aspiration marks everything we engage in.

We hope you will join with us in open, honest debate, developing your discipline within a twenty first century context of technological development and interdisciplinary innovation. You will be made very welcome.

This school offers programs in:
  • English

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Programs

This school also offers:

Master

MArchD in Applied Design in Architecture ARB/RIBA Part 2

Campus Full time 2 years September 2016 United Kingdom Oxford

This programme is grounded on the belief that architects should be thinking well beyond the constraints of market forces and the traditional disciplinary limits... [+]

Accredited by the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) and the Architects Registration Board (ARB). Applied Design in Architecture (MArchD) at Oxford Brookes is for those who wish to become professionally qualified in the UK and provides ARB Part 2. This programme is grounded on the belief that architects should be thinking well beyond the constraints of market forces and the traditional disciplinary limits of the profession, towards forms, technology and spaces for a more sustainable future. This is a student-led programme, and you can have very different experiences within it depending on the choices of studios and courses you make.

 

 

Why choose this course?... [-]


MArch in Architecture

Campus Full time 12 months September 2016 United Kingdom Oxford

The MArch course is an experimentally minded design studio.The year's study is divided into three broad areas. In the first you will collect a storehouse or... [+]

MArch in Architecture

 

The MArch course is an experimentally minded design studio.The year's study is divided into three broad areas.In the first you will collect a storehouse or catalogue of information, both conceptual and material, in a variety of media and techniques. This provides the ingredients to speculate on and question, in the second part of the year, the implications and possibilities of architectural responses to a programme or brief which you have developed on a particular given site. In the final part of the year you will develop, propose and present individually a design project of conceptual clarity realised in considerable depth and detail.There is an emphasis not only on the materials and techniques of construction but also elements such as air, heat, water, sound, smell and lights as materials too. This will involve visits to factories and workshops where materials are manipulated in a variety of unusual ways.... [-]


MRes in Urban Design

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 24 months September 2016 United Kingdom Oxford + 1 more

The Master of Research in Urban Design is designed primarily to enable students to link a programme of substantive research training to the subsequent pursuit... [+]

MRes in Urban Design

 

The Master of Research in Urban Design is designed primarily to enable students to link a programme of substantive research training to the subsequent pursuit of a doctorate. The course is modular in structure and includes training in urban design and in research methods and methodology.Research staff are drawn primarily from the Joint Centre for Urban Design and the Department of Planning but with some contributions from the School of Architecture and the Department of Real Estate and Construction, and the wider university community. Visiting speakers from business and industry, local government, and consultancies and research bodies provide further input.You will also undertake the dissertation of 15,000 words and have the opportunity to become involved in research projects of the Joint Centre for Urban Design.... [-]


MSc

MSc/ PGDip/ PGCert Building Information Modelling and Management

Campus or Online Full time Part time 1 - 2 years September 2016 United Kingdom Oxford + 1 more

This programme has been designed to meet the challenging demands of the modern learner and the rapidly evolving needs of the built environment sector in respect to the emergence of Building Information Modelling (BIM) as a working practice. The MSc in Building Information Modelling and Management, through its intelligent use of the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE), delivers a flexible and innovative programme of study. The MSc is available both as a one year full-time programme, and in open-learning mode that is normally taken over two years (extendable up to 5 years). The course consists of four core modules plus research methods and a final dissertation. As each of these core modules is entirely self-contained students may enter the programme in either September or January. [+]

Building Information Modelling and Management - September 2016 or January 2017 MSc/ PGDip/ PGCert This course is run by the School of the Built Environment This programme has been designed to meet the challenging demands of the modern learner and the rapidly evolving needs of the built environment sector in respect to the emergence of Building Information Modelling (BIM) as a working practice, the MSc in Buiding Information Modelling and Management , through its intelligent use of the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE), is designed to deliver a flexible and innovative programme of study. The MSc is available both as a one year full-time programme, and in open-learning mode that is normally taken over two years (extendable up to 5 years). The course consists of four core modules plus research methods and a final dissertation. As each of these core modules is entirely self-contained students may enter the program in either September or January. Prior to September 2016 entry, this programme was named Construction Project Management and BIM. Why choose this course? We use an ‘applied approach’ to teaching, and our students work on real-life or reality based problems as experienced within the construction sector and its associated industries, consultants and clients. You are also exposed to behavioural aspects of managing projects, which most construction project managers only experience when their careers are well-advanced. This provides a more interesting and engaging learning environment than the traditional ‘study and examination’ approach to learning. This course in detail ... [-]

MSc/ PGDip/ PGCert Computer Science for Cyber Security

Campus Full time Part time 3 - 36 months September 2016 United Kingdom Oxford + 1 more

Cyber threats are on the increase and have been highlighted by the UK government as one of the 4 main threats to the UK. There is an increasing demand from business and government for individuals skilled in computer science and cyber security who can design, build, and maintain secure software and systems that can protect people, business and data from malicious attack. This programme builds on the knowledge gained in a first degree to equip you with advanced computer science and cyber security skills necessary to produce modern secure systems. The theory taught in the lectures is reinforced in the practicals where you have the opportunity to use industry standard tools and techniques in our dedicated security, server and networking laboratories which provide a safe space for you to practice both offensive and defensive security techniques. [+]

Cyber threats are on the increase and have been highlighted by the UK government as one of the 4 main threats to the UK. There is an increasing demand from business and government for individuals skilled in computer science and cyber security who can design, build, and maintain secure software and systems that can protect people, business and data from malicious attack. This programme builds on the knowledge gained in a first degree to equip you with advanced computer science and cyber security skills necessary to produce modern secure systems. The theory taught in the lectures is reinforced in the practicals where you have the opportunity to use industry standard tools and techniques in our dedicated security, server and networking laboratories which provide a safe space for you to practice both offensive and defensive security techniques. Why choose this course? Dedicated security, server and networking laboratories with enterprise equipment including Cisco switches, routers, firewalls and Dell servers Small, dedicated private cloud that allows you to create more complex cyber security scenarios and to investigate cloud security issues Access to a wide range of enterprise software to ensure realistic deployment environments An emphasis on live projects, alongside group work modelled on industry standard working patterns, giving you the opportunity to develop skills that are directly applicable to the workplace Staff with a wide range of expertise in computer science and cyber security An opportunity to apply to undertake a placement which enables you to practice and refine your skills within a company or organisation. This course in detail The MSc in Computer Science for Cyber Security has a modular course-unit design providing you with maximum flexibility and choice. To qualify for a master’s degree without placement, you must pass modules amounting to 180 credits. This comprises six taught modules (20 credits each) plus your dissertation (60 credits). To qualify for a master's degree with placement you need to undertake a one year placement in between the taught component and the dissertation. The Postgraduate Diploma in Computer Science for Cyber Security allows you to concentrate on the taught part of the degree and is ideal for people working in the computing industry who wish to brush up their skills. To qualify for a Postgraduate Diploma, you must pass modules amounting to 120 credits. This comprises six taught modules (20 credits each). In some cases, it may be possible for a student on a Postgraduate Diploma to do 3 taught modules (20 credits each) plus your dissertation (60 credits). The Postgraduate Certificate in Computer Science for Cyber Security allows you to concentrate on the taught part of the degree and is ideal for people working in the computing industry who wish to learn a specific area in this rapidly changing discipline. To qualify for a Postgraduate Certificate, you must pass modules amounting to 60 credits. This comprises three taught modules (20 credits each). Semester 1 has the following modules: Research and Scholarship Methods (compulsory for MSc) is designed to equip students with the tools necessary for the scholarship and research skills needed for the computer science and cyber security fields as well as equipping them with the professional skills and outlook needed for a lifelong career in the communications industry. Network Principles (compulsory for MSc) teaches the principles and practice of computer networking with an emphasis on data communications and local area network technologies and design. Secure Systems Architecture (compulsory for MSc and PG Dip), in which you will study the fundamentals of computer and network security and the ways that computer systems can be secured. This module will look at both the technological and human issues involved in securing and assessing the security level of a modern networked computer system. It also introduces basic concepts of operating systems and architecture. Semester 2 has the following modules: Operating Systems Development (compulsory for MSc and PG Dip) builds on the foundations laid in Secure Systems Architecture to look at more complex operating systems concepts and technologies. This module also covers systems development and students also learn low level systems programming which they put into practice by changing and extending existing operating systems. Secure Programming (compulsory for MSc) looks at the analysis, design, and implementation of secure software. This module considers what software engineering principles can and should be used to help ensure the security of software in a range of environments. Students will be taught the common classes of vulnerability at design and implementation stages and how they can defended and mitigated against. Low level Techniques and Tools (compulsory for MSc and PG Dip) looks at low level programming tools and techniques for the creation, detection and defence against malware. Students will learn how to examine code at the assembler level using reverse engineering techniques, as well as network level analysis of command and control structures, to obtain detailed information on malware. Students will also investigate advanced malware anti-forensics tools, such as code obfuscation, and utilise mechanisms for defeating them. As courses are reviewed regularly, the list of taught modules offered may vary from the list here. If you are studying for an MSc you will also take: MSc Dissertation, which is an individual research and development project that allows you to study a topic of your choice in depth, guided by your supervisor. The work may be undertaken in close co-operation with a research, industrial or commercial organisation. You will undertake your dissertation over the summer period. MSc students have the option to apply to undertake a placement. Placement positions are not guaranteed, however the department will help and support students in finding a placement. Students on the placement will also take: Work Experience Placement, which is an optional element of all the department's CCT programmes, and provides professional and practical experience in the computing, communications, or media industries. The nature of the work undertaken will be relevant to a student’s programme, and may provide a basis for the development of the dissertation. Teaching and learning The taught modules include lectures, seminars, library and internet research, and practical design and experimentation. Teaching staff include experienced academic staff and practitioners in the field of Computer Science and Cyber Security. Visiting speakers from business and industry help to maintain relevance to the evolution of the industry. Laboratory facilities include dedicated security, server and networking laboratories. Approach to assessment Assessments include coursework exercises, presentations, lab work, reports and examinations. Specialist facilities Our labs are equipped with industry-standard equipment and software tools. This enables students to develop skills of immediate relevance to industry needs while also providing a sound practical basis that enhances their understanding of theoretical concepts. Our security lab is on an isolated network with both investigation and victim machines to give students hands on experience of cyber security issues and techniques without risk to the rest of the network giving students the opportunity to learn offensive security analysis techniques. In addition to the physical machines in the lab, there is a dedicated Virtualisation Platform for use in cloud based scenarios. Our server lab has a mixture of client PCs and Dell servers to allow students to set up a wide variety of complex IT systems. Students have access to a range of Microsoft systems software, VMWare virtualisation management software and a wide range of other software to enable them to recreate a variety of realistic business scenarios. Networking laboratories are equipped with modern Cisco routers, switches and security devices to enable design construction and testing of complete high bandwidth, secure, wired and wireless networks. Additional costs Students on placement are responsible for living costs associated with their placement. Attendance pattern Part time study is an option on this programme for students who wish to combine their study with work. Where possible we try to ensure that part time students only need to attend for 1 day a week, although students will be expected to undertake additional independent study. [-]

MSc/ PGDip/ PGCert Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management

Campus or Online Full time Part time 1 - 2 years September 2016 United Kingdom Oxford + 1 more

The MSc in Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QSCM) programme is designed to meet the challenging demands of the modern learner and the rapidly evolving needs of the construction industry. It employs an innovative teaching structure that is integrated with Brookes’ Virtual Learning Environment (VLE). The result is the delivery of a flexible and exciting programme of study. Starting in either January or September, the MSc programme may be studied either full-time over one year, or as an Open learner over two years. [+]

Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management - September 2016 or January 2017 MSc/ PGDip/ PGCert This course is run by the School of the Built Environment The MSc in Quantity Surveying and Commercial Management (QSCM) programme is designed to meet the challenging demands of the modern learner and the rapidly evolving needs of the construction industry. It employs an innovative teaching structure that is integrated with Brookes’ Virtual Learning Environment (VLE). The result is the delivery of a flexible and exciting programme of study. Starting in either January or September, the MSc programme may be studied either full-time over one year, or as an Open learner over two years. Why choose this course? Pending confirmation, accreditation by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) and the Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB) demonstrates professional recognition of the quality of our programme and as such our programme is your first step towards becoming a chartered Quantity Surveyor Our staff sit on professional committees including CIOB and Constructing Excellence Our longstanding links with prominent companies in the sector, such as Mace, Willmott Dixon and BAM Construction, and our strong links with local companies such as Beards, Kingerlee and Bidwells together ensure that the programme is directly tailored towards the employment skills needed by the construction Industry The coursework only programme uses an applied learning approach to study. This ensures that it is real-world focused and holistic. Not only is this more effective teaching, it is much more engaging than the traditional study and examination approach. Students develop a broad range of quantity surveying and management skills and knowledge including Building Information Modelling (BIM), project finance, technology, and procurement by working on real-life problems as experienced by the construction industry. With an excellent employment record, our graduates go on to further their careers locally, nationally and globally. Our innovative programme structure which was commended at validation provides a flexible pattern of study that brings together both open and full-time learners. Students can start either in September or January, easily switch between open-learning and full-time modes of study and, if needed, extend their study up to 5 years. Professional accreditation Pending confirmation, accreditation by the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) and Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB). This course in detail ... [-]

MSc / PGDip in Spatial Planning

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 24 months September 2016 United Kingdom Oxford + 1 more

The MSc in Spatial Planning takes a spatial approach to planning. This requires a much broader level of knowledge and understanding than traditional... [+]

MSc / PGDip in Spatial Planning

 

This one-year full-time and two-year part-time MSc programme is the benchmark qualification for those wishing to enter the planning profession and is fully accredited by both the RTPI and RICS.spatialplanning.jpgThe MSc in Spatial Planning takes a spatial approach to planning. This requires a much broader level of knowledge and understanding than traditional land-use planning, and today’s planners work alongside other built and natural environment professionals to deliver development that has the concept of sustainable living at its heart.The course combines core planning education with the development of expertise in specialist areas. Our links with practitioners in both the private and public sectors ensures that the course remains at the cutting edge of practice.... [-]


MSc Construction Project Management

Campus or Online Full time Part time 1 - 5 years January 2016 United Kingdom Oxford + 1 more

The MSc in Construction Project Management (CPM)</strong> uses an innovative structure and integrative use of the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) to deliver a flexible and exciting programme of study. It is designed to meet the challenging demands of the modern learner and the rapidly evolving needs of the construction industry. [+]

The MSc in Construction Project Management - September 2016 or January 2017 Accredited by Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) and Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB). This course is run by the School of the Built Environment The MSc in Construction Project Management (CPM) uses an innovative structure and integrative use of the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) to deliver a flexible and exciting programme of study. It is designed to meet the challenging demands of the modern learner and the rapidly evolving needs of the construction industry. We continuously and extensively consult with construction companies and organisations in order to make sure that the course content remains practically relevant for the modern construction manager. The MSc is available both as a one year full-time programme, and in open-learning mode normally taken over two years (extendable up to 5 years). Why choose this course? Accreditation by the Chartered Institute of Building (CIOB) and the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) demonstrates professional recognition of the quality of our programme. Strong links with prominent companies in the sector, such as Mace, Willmott Dixon and BAM Construction who are all represented in our Professional Liaison Group (PLG), which exists to provide advice on existing and proposed courses of study, on research activities and consultancy work. The programme adopts an applied learning approach to ensure that it is real-world focused and holistic. Not only is this more effective, it is more fun than the traditional study and examination approach. Students develop a broad range of management skills and knowledge including Building Information Modelling (BIM), project finance, technology, and procurement by working on real-life or realistic problems as experienced by the construction industry, consultants and clients. The course is directly tailored to students with a background in the construction industries who want to develop their careers as Construction Managers - and our graduates go on to further their careers locally, nationally and globally. Our staff have strong links with local companies and sit on professional committees including CIOB and Constructing Excellence. This course in detail There are two modes of delivery for the MSc CPM: full-time on campus or open-learning, and there are two entry points - September or January. Extensive online learning material is provided to all students via the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) - our own intranet site to which students have access 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Module leaders can be contacted via the VLE, e-mail, telephone and Skype. Intensive Study Periods - all students attend four intensive study periods during their programme and these are normally around 3 days long. Students (and staff) enjoy these intensive sessions as they are able to share experiences and knowledge as well as renew friendships and make connections within the industry and the open-learning students get the opportunity to meet face-to-face with staff. The organisation and the collaborative nature of these intensive study periods is always praised by our students who particularly like the site visits, workshops and guest lectures from industry experts that are some of the major features. Applied or Problem Based Learning - We have responded to requests from industry to make our postgraduate education more practical by using an ‘applied’ approach to learning, sometimes called “Problem Based Learning” or PBL. This approach encourages learning by allowing students to actively puzzle through problems that are adapted from complex real situations. As real problems cross discipline boundaries and require research and collaboration, we use our links with industrial practitioners to help devise the problems we use in class. This leads to a more exciting and relevant student experience. Module Outlines People, Leadership and Organisations aims to develop the students’ knowledge and understanding of how behavioural and organisational issues influence project performance and how they can be harnessed to effectively deliver projects. It includes an overview of management approaches, an exploration of the issues around understanding self and understanding others, team theory and leadership, communication, conflict theory and resolution, conflict resolution strategies and learning from experience in project environments and also conflict and negotiation in the context of personal and cultural differences. To a large extent the module adopts a problem-based learning (PBL) approach. Here, PBL is facilitated through problem-solving exercises that are based on prominent case studies and game play exercises. Project Planning, Control and Risk prepares students to manage projects within the built environment through the use of advanced planning and control techniques. Students will learn and apply a range of skills in project planning, scheduling, monitoring and control that includes cash flow and capital expenditure analysis, value management, risk and opportunity management and the use of software-based decision support tools as used in industry. Process Management develops the necessary skills for managing procurement effectively and efficiently; the key processes which ultimately dictate project success. Starting with critical evaluation of the project life cycle, the module explores a number of alternative procurement methods whilst placing significant emphasis on supply chain collaboration and integration. Moreover, an examination of the contractual arrangements between the parties of the supply chain as well as sources of disputes and conflict management is also made. The module also investigates further key aspects of construction project management such as Health and Safety, Quality and Environmental Management. Project success and team performance criteria are also considered while a more efficient project delivery system is suggested by exploring supply chain development and lean thinking. Advanced Technology and BIM recognises that the current challenge of The UK construction industry is to find innovative solutions to meet the demands of a rapidly changing world. Sustainable Construction, Off-Site Construction and Smart Technologies are some of the methods being developed to deliver a high quality, productive and more sustainable built environment for our future generations. Though yet to be fully incorporated into standard practice, Building Information Modelling (BIM) is the emergent technology that is becoming the fundamental vehicle in driving and delivering these innovations. This module therefore explores both advanced construction technologies and innovations and the use of BIM in managing and organising construction project information Applied Research Methods provides students with the fundamentals of research design highlighting the difference between qualitative and quantitative research paradigms and demonstrates how data can be both gathered and analysed and how deductive arguments can be used to produce valid generalisations from data. It also provides students with an overview of particular research techniques such that they can choose and develop those tools most appropriate to their particular research project. Your dissertation follows on from Applied Research Methods and aims not only to generate new knowledge or insights but also to develop students’ capacities to undertake rigorous research, to plan and execute an extended project and to communicate complex ideas effectively in words and graphically. You will work with a supervisor from within the department to produce an original piece of work of publishable quality through conducting their own primary research and presenting their findings in a professional manner. Teaching and learning Teaching, learning and assessment methods are to a considerable degree determined by the use of the applied learning approach which leads to a more challenging and industrially relevant course than the traditional lecture approach. Learning takes place through groups of students puzzling through problems, often adapted from real situations with much of the complexity and context intact, using published resources, or reference to experts who are available to offer advice. In full-time mode, the delivery of new material is weekly with intermediate tutorial or seminar sessions. The intensive study weeks and a European field-trip, when students in both modes of study come together, complement this delivery pattern. For the open-learner, the virtual learning environment is the primary mode of delivery. Communication with open-learning students will be supplemented by email and telephone during the periods off-campus. Approach to assessment Assessment is 100% coursework, which includes a great variety of types of work, including quizzes taken remotely on Moodle (Brookes online learning environment). Material can be downloaded from our virtual learning environment and closed discussions can take place. It also enables on-campus and open-learning students to remain in contact with each other. Field trips There are a number of field trips and site visits which take place mainly during the intensive study periods. There is one compulsory European field trip which takes place at the end of January - usually to the Netherlands. This is heavily subsidised by the department. As well as bringing together full-time and open-learning students, the aim of this field trip is to integrate knowledge gained in the early part of the programme, to develop team skills and to build relationships. You will gain exposure to project management practices outside of the UK, and be assessed on your ability to observe and report on the different approaches to project management in the UK and overseas. The field trip normally consists of visits to prominent construction/engineering projects and sites, plus architectural attractions, both en route and at the destination. You are introduced to the development and planning practices at the destination, as well as having the opportunity to visit major complex projects. Student body The programme attracts students from diverse backgrounds and locations. Students will normally hold degrees in fields within the realm of the built environment including Civil Engineering, Construction, Architecture and Building, and have decided to contribute to the development of the built environment around us by effectively managing construction projects. Our students hail from as far afield as Nigeria, Russia and India, with backgrounds ranging from recently graduated at undergraduate level, to working with small local companies, to fully established managers in large international construction companies. This diverse group of students bring with them individual responses to the applied learning approach that is at the core of our course delivery. Typically the open-learning students are employed by a number of different organisations from the private and public sectors in different countries. They have the opportunity to share their experiences in order to gain better understanding of the industry, the range of challenges that Construction Project Managers face, and therefore the breadth of skills that they need to develop in order to perform successfully. Our full-time students benefit from contact with the open-learning students engaged in construction project management roles in a variety of built environment projects across many countries. [-]

MSc in Automotive Engineering

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 24 months September 2016 United Kingdom Oxford + 1 more

This course provides an opportunity for in-depth study of the engineering that enables and drives the automotive industry. The key components of the... [+]

MSc in Automotive Engineering

 

This course provides an opportunity for in-depth study of the engineering that enables and drives the automotive industry. The key components of the MSc in Automotive Engineering cover:

design, with a focus on vehicle chassis and performance sustainability reliability aerodynamics issues of comfort like noise, vibration and harshness.

Teaching is based in our purpose-designed engineering building on the Wheatley Campus.

 

 

Teaching learning and assessment

Teaching staff are drawn primarily from the Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mathematical Sciences. Visiting speakers from business and industry provide further input.... [-]


MSc in Computer Science

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 36 months September 2016 United Kingdom Oxford + 1 more

Our BCS accredited MSc in Computer Science aims to provide you with a diverse range of skills so that you will be able to produce optimal solutions in complex, multi-discipline projects which are increasingly widespread in industry. Examples of such projects include web technology combining networking, human-computer interface and intelligent systems, and high-speed networks using concepts from artificial intelligence and requiring intelligent front ends. This course is aimed at new graduates and those with substantial experience in the computing industry who want to gain a qualification that develops their expertise. [+]

Our BCS accredited MSc in Computer Science aims to provide you with a diverse range of skills so that you will be able to produce optimal solutions in complex, multi-discipline projects which are increasingly widespread in industry. Examples of such projects include web technology combining networking, human-computer interface and intelligent systems, and high-speed networks using concepts from artificial intelligence and requiring intelligent front ends. This course is aimed at new graduates and those with substantial experience in the computing industry who want to gain a qualification that develops their expertise. Why choose this course? Our BCS accredited MSc in Computer Science aims to provide you with a diverse range of skills so that you will be able to produce optimal solutions in complex, multi-discipline projects which are increasingly widespread in industry. Examples of such projects include web technology combining networking, human-computer interface and intelligent systems, and high-speed networks using concepts from artificial intelligence and requiring intelligent front ends. This course is aimed at new graduates and those with substantial experience in the computing industry who want to gain a qualification that develops their expertise. Professional accreditation BCS, the Chartered Institute for IT. The MSc in Software Engineering is Accredited as meeting the requirements for CITP Further Learning and partially meeting the requirements for CEng and has been awarded the EQANIE (European Quality Assurance Network for Informatics Education) label. This course in detail The MSc in Computer Science has a modular course-unit design providing you with maximum flexibility and choice. To qualify for a master’s degree, you must pass modules amounting to 180 credits. This comprises six taught modules (20 credits each) plus your dissertation (60 credits). The MSc in Computer Science with placement enables you to work in industry for a year in the middle of your course to give valuable workplace experience. Placements are not guaranteed, but the departments dedicated placement team will help with the process of finding and applying for placements. To qualify for a master’s degree with placement, you must pass modules amounting to 180 credits plus the zero credit placement module. This comprises six taught modules (20 credits each) plus your dissertation (60 credits). The Postgraduate Diploma in Computer Science allows you to concentrate on the taught part of the degree and is ideal for people working in the computing industry who wish to brush up their skills. To qualify for a Postgraduate Diploma, you must pass modules amounting to 120 credits. This comprises six taught modules (20 credits each). In some cases, it may be possible for a student on a Postgraduate Diploma to do 3 taught modules (20 credits each) plus your dissertation (60 credits). The Postgraduate Certificate in Computer Science allows you to concentrate on the taught part of the degree and is ideal for people working in the computing industry who wish to learn a specific area in this rapidly changing discipline. To qualify for a Postgraduate Certificate, you must pass modules amounting to 60 credits. This comprises three taught modules (20 credits each). You can also do a Postgraduate Certificate in Computer Science Research Project. Part-time students normally distribute the work evenly over a two-year period. Semester 1 In Semester 1 you can choose from the following modules: Research and Scholarship Methods (compulsory for MSc and PG Dip) equips students with the tools necessary for the scholarship and research skills needed for the computing field as well as equipping them with the professional skills and outlook needed for a lifelong career in the computer industry. Secure Systems Architecture (compulsory for MSc) studies computer and network security and the ways that computer systems can be secured. This module will look at both the technological and human issues involved in securing and assessing the security level of a modern networked computer system. It also introduces basic concepts of operating systems and architecture. Formal Software Engineering (optional) explores the techniques used to keep programs error-free at every stage of the software life-cycle. In particular, it focuses on the process of reasoning about the properties of programs and on machine-assisted refinement from specification to implementation. It also introduces various mathematical concepts of software engineering. Network Principles (optional) teaches the principles and practice of computer networking with an emphasis on data communications and local area network technologies and design. Semester 2 In Semester 2 you can choose from the following modules: Software Production (compulsory for MSc and PG Dip) studies the current practices, skills and techniques applied to managing software development related projects, individually and in project teams. The module combines theory with pragmatic and professional insights and considers requirements engineering, project management, risk, quality assurance, usability and HCI issues. Paradigms of Programming (optional) enables students to broaden their existing understanding of programming by learning and practising multiple programming styles and programming technologies; and by studying the underlying disciplines of programming language design, compiler/interpreter construction, formal properties of programming languages, and low-level development. Compiler Construction (optional) studies the principles, methods and techniques of compiler construction for imperative programming languages and the role of language tools in the broad context of software development. Students will work in small groups to create a compiler for a Java-like, high-level programming language. Machine Learning (optional) introduces students to the fascinating and increasingly important world of Machine Intelligence. This module will cover the key current technologies in this area and will expose students to current research directions in this rapidly evolving field. Operating Systems Development (optional) covers low level systems programming and extends the operating systems concepts covered in Secure Systems Architecture. This module gives students the opportunity to see how the code inside a modern OS is designed and implemented in a safe and secure manner. Secure Programming (optional). It is increasingly important that software must not only be functional and reliable, but they must also be secure. This module looks at the key concepts and principles used in constructing secure software and in auditing and making secure, existing software. Low Level Tools and Techniques (optional) introduces students to the basics of assembly programming and code analysis. Students on this module are taught to analyse, understand and help defend against malware by analysis of the code and the command and control structures used by the malware. Students will also have the opportunity to learn how to analyse and defend against polymorphic malware. Systems Administration (optional) studies the technical aspects of the application of theoretical concepts in operating systems, computer networks, and IT systems administration to the practical implementation of designing, implementing, and managing a small heterogeneous, multi-platform network. The material covered will prepare students for industrial and business problems they will face after graduation. This will be largely a directed study module, with students being supported in the design, implementation and subsequent maintenance of a proof-of-concept system. IT Systems Management and Governance (optional) complements the material studied in Systems Administration. The module takes a more strategic look at systems administration by considering the management and governance aspects. Students will look at how enterprise networks consisting of different, interconnecting technologies, should be managed and improved efficiently. The material covered in this module prepares the student to manage large networks according to appropriate IT governance procedures and to effectively lead system administrator teams. Multiservice Networks (optional) builds on the foundations laid in Network Principles and analyses the technologies and protocols used for multi-service networks in order to enable the student to develop the knowledge and skills required to design multi-service networks. The networks are illustrated with case studies, including state-of-the-art practice and recent research and development in the field. As courses are reviewed regularly, modules offered may differ from those listed. Students undertaking an MSc with placement will do a 1 year placement in industry. The placement will be undertaken after the taught component and before doing the dissertation. Students studying for an MSc will also take: MSc Dissertation which is an individual research and development project that allows you to study a topic of your choice in depth, guided by your supervisor. The work may be undertaken in close co-operation with a research, industrial or commercial organisation. You undertake your dissertation over the summer period. Teaching and learning Lectures provide a theoretical basis, while the practical sessions are used to strengthen your understanding by active involvement. Coursework and projects form the basis for continuous assessment. These methods have been developed to provide the varied experience that our students require, including the opportunity to discuss your work directly with the lecturers. Many of the modules are enriched by the teaching staff's research expertise. There are also visiting lecturers from research organisations and industry. The methods of assessment include examination and coursework, reflecting the development of academic content from the more practical aspects to the more conceptual. Approach to assessment Assessments include coursework exercises, presentations, lab work, reports and examinations. Specialist facilities Our labs are equipped with industry-standard equipment and software tools. This enables students to develop skills of immediate relevance to industry needs while also providing a sound practical basis that enhances their understanding of theoretical concepts. Networking laboratories are equipped with modern Cisco routers, switches and security devices to enable design construction and testing of complete high bandwidth, secure, wired and wireless networks. Our server and security laboratories provide a safe environment for students to experiment with range of complex systems and software. Additional Costs Students on placement are responsible for living costs associated with their placement. Attendance pattern Part time study is an option on this programme for students who wish to combine their study with work. Where possible we try to ensure that part time students only need to attend for 1 day a week, although students will be expected to undertake additional independent study. [-]

MSc in Computing

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 36 months September 2016 United Kingdom Oxford + 1 more

If your first degree is not in computing but you want to move into IT then our BCS accredited MSc in Computing is designed for you. The course provides the basis for starting a career in computing and IT; teaching you the fundamentals of programming, hardware, networks and software engineering. The course will enable you to develop a sound knowledge of computer software development for a range of problem areas, such as interactive websites, stand-alone applications and network systems. Because of its emphasis on software system construction and management, and data organisation, the qualification is applicable to a wide variety of fields concerned with using computers, as well as directly to the computer industry itself. [+]

If your first degree is not in computing but you want to move into IT then our BCS accredited MSc in Computing is designed for you. The course provides the basis for starting a career in computing and IT; teaching you the fundamentals of programming, hardware, networks and software engineering. The course will enable you to develop a sound knowledge of computer software development for a range of problem areas, such as interactive websites, stand-alone applications and network systems. Because of its emphasis on software system construction and management, and data organisation, the qualification is applicable to a wide variety of fields concerned with using computers, as well as directly to the computer industry itself. Why choose this course? The course is rooted in real-world and industry-relevant experiences. Lecturing staff have extensive experience in research and university teaching, as well as a wide range of previous industrial and commercial backgrounds. You will have the opportunity to put the skills you have gained into practice if you choose to undertake our 1 year optional placement You will be joining a department with a diverse and truly international postgraduate community. The universal nature of the technical skills developed in our programmes means our courses are of equal relevance to both new graduates and those with many years of industrial experience. Professional accreditation BCS, the Chartered Institute for IT. The MSc in Computer Science is Accredited as meeting the requirements for CITP Further Learning and partially meeting the requirements for CEng and has been awarded the EQANIE (European Quality Assurance Network for Informatics Education) label. This course in detail The MSc in Computing has a modular course unit design providing you with maximum flexibility and choice. To qualify for a master’s degree, you must pass modules amounting to 180 credits. This comprises six taught modules (20 credits each) plus your dissertation (60 credits). The MSc in Computing with placement enables you to work in industry for a year in the middle of your course to give valuable workplace experience. Placements are not guaranteed, but the department's dedicated placement team will help with the process of finding and applying for placements. To qualify for a master’s degree with placement, you must pass modules amounting to 180 credits plus the zero credit placement module. This comprises six taught modules (20 credits each) plus your dissertation (60 credits). The Postgraduate Diploma in Computing allows you to concentrate on the taught part of the degree and is ideal for people working in the computing industry who wish to brush up their skills. To qualify for a Postgraduate Diploma, you must pass modules amounting to 120 credits. This comprises six taught modules (20 credits each). In some cases, it may be possible for a student on a Postgraduate Diploma to do 3 taught modules (20 credits each) plus your dissertation (60 credits). The Postgraduate Certificate in Computing allows you to concentrate on the taught part of the degree and is ideal for people working in the computing industry who wish to learn a specific area in this rapidly changing discipline. To qualify for a Postgraduate Certificate, you must pass modules amounting to 60 credits. This comprises three taught modules (20 credits each). We also offer a Postgraduate Certificate Computing Research Project. Part-time students normally distribute the work evenly over a two-year period. Semester 1 You can choose from the following modules: Research and Scholarship Methods (compulsory for MSc and PG Dip) is designed to equip you with the tools necessary for the scholarship and research skill needed for the computing field as well as equipping you with the professional skills and outlook needed for a lifelong career in the computer industry. Object-Oriented Programming (compulsory for MSc and PG Dip) covers the principles of programming and object orientation, giving you the opportunity to apply these using an object-oriented programming language. Structured Data (compulsory for MSc) covers the principles and practice of structured data, including how it is represented, managed and transformed. Semester 2 You can choose from the following modules: Computer Systems and Networks (compulsory for MSc and PG Dip) introduces the concepts, operations and components of computer systems and the principles of computer networks. You will have the opportunity to create and maintain an IT system similar to that found in many SMEs. Software Production (compulsory for MSc) studies current practices, skills and techniques applied to managing software development related projects, individually and in project teams. The module combines theory with pragmatic and professional insights and considers requirements engineering, project management, risk, quality assurance, usability and HCI issues. Cyber security and the web (Compulsory for MSc) introduces key concepts in cyber security and web development giving you the skills to design and build interactive websites and to ensure that those websites are secure. As courses are reviewed regularly, the list of taught modules you choose from may vary from the list here. Students undertaking an MSc with placement will do a 1 year placement in industry. The placement will be undertaken after the taught component and before doing the dissertation. Students studying for an MSc will also take: MSc Dissertation which is an individual research and development project that allows you to study a topic of your choice in depth, guided by your supervisor. The work may be undertaken in close co-operation with a research, industrial or commercial organisation. You undertake your dissertation over the summer period. Teaching and learning Lectures serve to provide a theoretical basis, while the practical sessions are used to strengthen your understanding by active involvement. Coursework and projects form the basis for continuous assessment. Many of the modules are enriched by the teaching staff's research expertise. There are also visiting lecturers from research organisations and industry. The methods of assessment include examination and coursework reflecting the development of academic content from the more practical aspects to the more conceptual. Approach to assessment Assessments include coursework exercises, presentations, lab work, reports and examinations. Specialist facilities Our labs are equipped with industry-standard equipment and software tools. This enables you to develop skills of immediate relevance to industry needs while also providing a sound practical basis that enhances your understanding of theoretical concepts. Our server lab is equipped with servers, PCs and networking equipment in a secure environment so you can create and manage IT systems. Additional costs Students on placement are responsible for living costs associated with their placement. Attendance pattern Part time study is an option on this programme for students who wish to combine their study with work. Where possible we try to ensure that part time students only need to attend for 1 day a week, although students will be expected to undertake additional independent study. [-]

MSc in Digital Media Production

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 24 months September 2016 United Kingdom Oxford + 1 more

The MSc Digital Media Production will provide you with the techniques and the expertise with industry standard tools that are needed for the creation of... [+]

MSc in Digital Media Production

 

The MSc Digital Media Production will provide you with the techniques and the expertise with industry standard tools that are needed for the creation of contemporary media products. It is for students who have a first degree in a discipline other than a technically based media subject. The course covers video and audio production, computer graphics and animation, and the making of interactive products for distribution via new media platforms, as well as the longer established media of television, video and audio. Students work on the award-winning Brookes TV, making and producing broadcasts.You will have the opportunity to demonstrate the ability to deal with complex issues systematically and creatively, and show originality in tackling and solving problems. The course will enhance your career prospects and will offer you the opportunity to acquire the skills needed to work in the media industry.... [-]


MSc in eBusiness

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 36 months September 2016 United Kingdom Oxford + 1 more

This course is designed to enable tomorrow's business and technology leaders to fully exploit the opportunities offered by recent advances in internet technologies. The course is based on a sound understanding of the technical infrastructure of the internet and the web, but will rapidly develop your expertise in a host of convergent technologies. Issues relating to web application development, including web design and the human-computer interface, will complement a good understanding of the business potential of multimedia and database technologies. The course is run by the Department of Computing and Communication Technologies and has been developed in conjunction with our Business School. [+]

This course is designed to enable tomorrow's business and technology leaders to fully exploit the opportunities offered by recent advances in internet technologies. The course is based on a sound understanding of the technical infrastructure of the internet and the web, but will rapidly develop your expertise in a host of convergent technologies. Issues relating to web application development, including web design and the human-computer interface, will complement a good understanding of the business potential of multimedia and database technologies. The course is run by the Department of Computing and Communication Technologies and has been developed in conjunction with our Business School. Why choose this course? The programme focuses on the latest eBusiness models and technical skills that are required to build effective solutions. It provides a unique integration of theory and practice with practice orientated teaching based on real world examples. Our award winning approach to assessment using assessment that is integrated across the modules and live projects are undertaken in partnership with industry. There are regular guest lectures from award winning practitioners. You will have the opportunity to put the skills you have gained into practice if you choose to undertake our 1 year optional placement The universal nature of the technical skills developed in our programmes means our courses are of equal relevance to both new graduates and those with many years of industrial experience. This course in detail The course modules, which are all compulsory for the MSc, are listed below. To qualify for the MSc you will need to pass three compulsory modules in Semester 1 and three compulsory modules in Semester 2 as well as the dissertation and the research and study methods module. The MSc in eBusiness with placement enables you to work in industry for a year in the middle of your course to give valuable workplace experience. Placements are not guaranteed, but the departments dedicated placement team will help with the process of finding and applying for placements. To qualify for a master’s degree with placement, you must pass modules amounting to 180 credits plus the zero credit placement module. This comprises six taught modules (20 credits each) plus your dissertation (60 credits). The Postgraduate Diploma in eBusiness allows you to concentrate on the taught part of the degree and is ideal for people already working in the industry who wish to brush up their skills. To qualify for a Postgraduate Diploma, you must pass modules amounting to 120 credits. The Postgraduate Certificate in eBusiness allows you to concentrate on the taught part of the degree and is ideal for people working in the industry who wish to learn a specific area in this rapidly changing discipline. To qualify for a Postgraduate Certificate, you must pass modules amounting to 60 credits. Part-time students normally distribute the work evenly over a two-year period. Semester 1 Modules: The Business Web (compulsory for MSc and PG Dip) introduces the concepts, operations and components of the web, focusing on the way in which innovative business models can be enabled. Web Applications Development (compulsory for MSc and PG Dip) assumes no previous experience of computer programming. It covers the fundamental skills associated with creating robust, efficient and dynamic web applications. eMarketing Principles and Strategies (compulsory for MSc and PG Dip) covers emarketing issues and strategies for the rapidly changing business world. Research and Study Methods (compulsory for MSc) underpins work carried out for the dissertation. The module, delivered in a seminar style, will provide you with research skills, planning techniques, progress management and review, and the ability to use ICT support materials. You will be given guidance on the analysis and technical presentation of research material. This module continues in semester 2. Semester 2 Modules: Research and Study Methods (compulsory for MSc) is a continuation of the semester 1 module Building a Web-Based Business (compulsory for MSc) brings together key technical skills and an understanding of management practice to enable you to construct a viable ebusiness. eBusiness Information Systems (compulsory for MSc) explores the business and information strategy issues related to conducting business on the internet, including the construction and maintenance of organisational and technical infrastructures. Business eFutures (compulsory for MSc) provides an opportunity to study cutting-edge thinking and new ideas in emarketing, web-based technologies and their employment in business enterprises. Students undertaking an MSc with placement will do a 1 year placement in industry. The placement will be undertaken after the taught component and before doing the dissertation. Students taking the MSc will also take: The Dissertation: an individual research and development project of 10,000-15,000 words on a topic closely related to your programme of study. The work may be undertaken in close co-operation with a research, industrial or commercial organisation possibly linked to an optional internship. The dissertation will typically be an investigation of a commercial problem from an IT perspective leading to the design, implementation and testing of a computer based solution. Please note: as courses are reviewed regularly, the list of taught modules you choose may vary from the list here. Teaching and learning Lecturing staff have extensive experience in university teaching in computing and business, as well as coming from a wide range of industrial and commercial backgrounds. Many of the modules are enriched by the teaching staff's research expertise and ongoing commitment to serving the business community. We maintain industrial links in a variety of ways, including consultancy, courses for industry and through our industrial placement scheme. Approach to assessment Assessments include coursework exercises, presentations, lab work, reports and examinations. Specialist facilities Based at Brookes' Wheatley Campus, the Department of Computing and Communications Technology has all the general computing and IT resources you would expect to find in a modern technology department. Our labs are equipped with industry-standard equipment and software tools. This enables students to develop skills of immediate relevance to industry needs while also providing a sound practical basis that enhances their understanding of theoretical concepts. Students on eBusiness programmes have access to the departments own private cloud in order to create and deploy a variety of web technologies. Additional costs Students on placement are responsible for living costs associated with their placement. Attendance pattern Part time study is an option on this programme for students who wish to combine their study with work. Where possible we try to ensure that part time students only need to attend for 1 day a week, although students will be expected to undertake additional independent study. [-]

MSc in Environmental Assessment and Management

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 24 months September 2016 United Kingdom Oxford + 1 more

The MSc in Environmental Assessment and Management (EAM) examines the principles, procedures and methods of EAM against the background of current... [+]

MSc in Environmental Assessment and Management

 

The MSc in Environmental Assessment and Management (EAM) examines the principles, procedures and methods of EAM against the background of current British, European and international environmental policy.The MSc in Environmental Assessment and Management (EAM) is a dynamic and well-established course which attracts graduates and practitioners from around the world. It has a strong reputation for promoting best practice and innovation through links to our research expertise in the broad field of UK and international environmental policy and practice.The course adopts an integrative approach to demonstrate the complementary roles of natural resource management and planning within core areas of EAM such as Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA), as well as new and evolving fields such as mitigation banking, climate change adaptation and strategic policy-making.The course has an excellent employment record. A varied array of optional modules and practical experience of methods provide the opportunity to develop the knowledge, skills and experience you need to develop a rewarding career in this field.... [-]


MSc in Historic Conservation

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 24 months August 2016 United Kingdom Oxford + 1 more

The MSc in Historic Conservation examines the principles, procedures and practices of the preservation and conservation of historic structures and sites... [+]

MSc in Historic Conservation

 

The MSc in Historic Conservation examines the principles, procedures and practices of the preservation and conservation of historic structures and sites within the context of the wider built environment and the town planning process.The course follows the International Commission on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS) guidelines on education and training, is multidisciplinary and develops knowledge and skills in historic conservation and independent study and research capabilities. The teaching programme covers the knowledge, skills and professional capabilities identified by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC) as the foundation for professional practice.By enhancing research, analytical and prescriptive capabilities in conservation, graduates from the course are well-qualified to assist the research, conservation and enhancement of the built environment.The course is taught jointly at Oxford Brookes University and at the Department of Continuing Education, University of Oxford and is recognised by the Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC) and the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS).... [-]


MSc in Mobile and High Speed Telecommunication Networks

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 36 months September 2016 United Kingdom Oxford + 1 more

The Mobile and High Speed Telecommunication Networks course is designed to provide you with in-depth knowledge of modern high-speed telecommunication systems and to enhance your professional development in the rapidly expanding field of personal communications. This course has two main components: 2G - 4G mobile communications, and fixed high-speed and multi-service networks. Emphasis is given to developing essential industrial and commercial skills. The project is a major element of the course and gives you the opportunity to enhance your career prospects by acquiring in-depth knowledge of a key aspect of telecommunications technology. [+]

The Mobile and High Speed Telecommunication Networks course is designed to provide you with in-depth knowledge of modern high-speed telecommunication systems and to enhance your professional development in the rapidly expanding field of personal communications. This course has two main components: 2G - 4G mobile communications, and fixed high-speed and multi-service networks. Emphasis is given to developing essential industrial and commercial skills. The project is a major element of the course and gives you the opportunity to enhance your career prospects by acquiring in-depth knowledge of a key aspect of telecommunications technology. Why choose this course? You will be taught industrially relevant techniques using some of the same tools and software used by the communications industry. Our telecommunications laboratories are equipped for the design, testing and analysis of mobile wireless and optical networks using industry standard tools such Asset, Ranopt, OptSim, OpNet and Matlab. You will have the opportunity to analyse real data from operational 2G and 3G networks and to design 3G and LTE networks. Our networking laboratories are equipped with modern Cisco routers, switches and security devices to enable design construction and testing of complete high bandwidth secure, wired and wireless networks. You will have the opportunity to put the skills you have gained into practice if you choose to undertake our 1 year optional placement. The universal nature of the technical skills developed in our programmes means our courses are of equal relevance to both new graduates and those with many years of industrial experience. This course in detail MSc in Mobile and High Speed Telecommunication Networks has a modular course-unit design providing you with maximum flexibility and choice. To qualify for a master’s degree, you must pass modules amounting to 180 credits. This comprises six taught modules (20 credits each) plus your dissertation (60 credits). The MSc in Mobile and High Speed Telecommunication Networks with placement enables you to work in industry for a year in the middle of your course to give valuable workplace experience. Placements are not guaranteed, but the departments dedicated placement team will help with the process of finding and applying for placements. To qualify for a master’s degree with placement, you must pass modules amounting to 180 credits plus the zero credit placement module. This comprises six taught modules (20 credits each) plus your dissertation (60 credits). The Postgraduate Diploma in Mobile and High Speed Telecommunication Networks allows you to concentrate on the taught part of the degree and is ideal for people working in the communications industry who wish to brush up their skills. To qualify for a Postgraduate Diploma, you must pass modules amounting to 120 credits. This comprises six taught modules (20 credits each). In some cases, it may be possible for a student on a Postgraduate Diploma to do 3 taught modules (20 credits each) plus your dissertation (60 credits). The Postgraduate Certificate in Mobile and High Speed Telecommunication Networks allows you to concentrate on the taught part of the degree and is ideal for people working in the communications industry who wish to learn a specific area in this rapidly changing discipline. To qualify for a Postgraduate Certificate, you must pass modules amounting to 60 credits. This comprises three taught modules (20 credits each). We also offer a Postgraduate Certificate Mobile and High Speed Telecommunication Networks Research Project. In Semester 1 you can choose from the following modules: Research and Scholarship Methods (compulsory for MSc) equips students with the tools necessary for the scholarship and research skill needed for the communications field as well as equipping them with the professional skills and outlook needed for a lifelong career in the communications industry. Digital Mobile Communications (alternative compulsory for MSc and PGDip) teaches the principles and techniques of 2G mobile communications with particular emphasis on GSM networks. It covers infrastructure, protocols, multiplexing technologies, signalling, call set-up, data structures, system design and environmental considerations. Digital Communications (alternative compulsory for MSc) covers the principles and techniques of digital communications with particular emphasis on its applications in mobile and wireless networks. Network Principles (alternative compulsory for MSc) teaches the principles and practice of computer networking with an emphasis on data communications and local area network technologies and design. In Semester 2 you can choose from the following modules: Advanced Mobile Communications (compulsory for MSc and PGDip) provides knowledge and information about the latest trends and developments in mobile networks including WiFi, WiMax and LTE. It introduces recent advances in wireless technologies and provides detailed information on OFDM and MIMO. Radio planning tools are used to design an advanced network and network simulation software to evaluate network performance. The module will also consider the economic, risk and social issues related to the introduction of advanced mobile networks. High Speed Mobile Communications (compulsory for MSc and PGDip) teaches the concepts and techniques of 3G mobile communications. The module builds on the work covered in the module Digital Mobile Communications and aims to provide much deeper and broader understanding and interpretation of the concepts and techniques used in cellular mobile communications. Optical and Broadband Networks (alternative compulsory for MSc) teaches students the skills needed to specify, design and evaluate optical networks for telecommunications and data networks. Multiservice Networks (alternative compulsory for MSc) builds on the foundations laid in Network Principles and analyses the technologies and protocols used for multiservice networks in order to enable the student to develop the knowledge and skills required to design multiservice networks. The networks are illustrated with case studies, including state-of-the-art practice and recent research and development in the field. As courses are reviewed regularly, the list of taught modules you choose from may vary from the list here. Students undertaking an MSc with placement will do a 1 year placement in industry. The placement will be undertaken after the taught component and before doing the dissertation. Students studying for an MSc will also take: MSc Dissertation: an individual research and development project that allows you to study a topic of your choice in depth, guided by your supervisor. The work may be undertaken in close co-operation with a research, industrial or commercial organisation. You undertake your dissertation over the summer period. Teaching and learning The taught modules include lectures, seminars, library and internet research, and practical design and experimentation. Assessments include coursework exercises, presentations, essays and examinations (maximum 50% for taught modules). Teaching staff include experienced academic staff and recent recruits from the telecommunications industry. Visiting speakers give you relevant and up-to-date developments from within the industry. Laboratory facilities include the latest industry standard tools for mobile and wireless network analysis and software modelling facilities to enable network design. Approach to assessment Assessments include coursework exercises, presentations, lab work, reports and examinations. Specialist facilities Our telecommunications laboratories are equipped for the design, testing and analysis of mobile wireless and optical networks using industry standard tools such Asset, Ranopt, OptSim, OpNet and Matlab. You have the opportunity to analyse real data from operational 2G and 3G networks and to design 3G and LTE networks. Our networking laboratories are equipped with modern Cisco routers, switches and security devices to enable design construction and testing of complete high bandwidth secure, wired and wireless networks. Additional Costs Students on placement are responsible for living costs associated with their placement. Attendance pattern Part time study is an option on this programme for students who wish to combine their study with work. Where possible we try to ensure that part time students only need to attend for 1 day a week, although students will be expected to undertake additional independent study. [-]

MSc in Motorsport Engineering

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 24 months September 2016 United Kingdom Oxford + 1 more

The MSc in Motorsport Engineering course offered by Oxford Brookes provides the opportunity for you to specialise in areas such as engine technology, chassis... [+]

MSc in Motorsport Engineering

 

The MSc in Motorsport Engineering course offered by Oxford Brookes provides the opportunity for you to specialise in areas such as engine technology, chassis performance, racing engineering, management, materials, simulation and data analysis. The course provides intensive exposure to integrated design, simulation, modelling, analysis, motorsport components and racing cars. The analysis elements in the modules include structural optimisation, dynamics, internal combustion, engine thermo-fluid dynamics, vehicle performance, tuning and monitoring. Staff teaching on this course have F1 experience and design skills.

 

 

Teaching learning and assessment... [-]


MSc in Project Management in the Built Environment

Campus or Online Full time Part time 12 - 24 months January 2016 United Kingdom Oxford + 1 more

The MSc in Project Management in the Built Environment is designed to meet the growing demand for project managers in the built environment sector who can oversee the entire life cycle of any project, including unique and specialist developments. It is ideal for anyone with ambitions for project management within this sector. [+]

MSc in Project Management in the Built Environment - September 2016 or January 2017

 

The MSc in Project Management in the Built Environment is designed to meet the growing demand for project managers in the built environment sector who can oversee the entire life cycle of any project, including unique and specialist developments. It is ideal for anyone with ambitions for project management within this sector. We consult extensively with people from a wide spectrum of companies and organisations in order to make sure that the course content remains practically relevant. Some of this consultation is done through our alumni network to benefit from the views of professionals in prominent positions who were also students at Oxford Brookes University. The MSc is available as a one-year, full-time programme or as an open learning programme (a combination of distance learning with intensive on-campus study periods) which is normally taken over two years (minimum). There are two entry points: September and January. Why choose this case? The Department's membership of a select group of RICS accredited universities acting as RICS' ambassadors; and to be among the signatories to the RICS Initiative to Drive the Adoption of Sustainable Development Principles in Built Environment Higher Education in line with the Six Principles under UN PRME (Principles for Responsible Management Education). Strong links with prominent companies in the sector, such as Mace, Willmott Dixon and BAM Construction who can provide advice on existing and proposed courses of study, on research activities and consultancy work. Problem-based learning (PBL) approach which ensures that the MSc is real-world focused and holistic. Not only is this more effective, it is more fun than the traditional study and examination approach. One intensive study period in each semester where full-time and open-learning students come together on campus to attend lectures, seminars and workshops; and to share experiences. Our alumni network which spans the globe, working in countries including Malaysia, South Africa, Russia, India and USA. Our teaching is backed by strong research activity. Many of our academic staff are involved in academic research and/or professional or commercial consultancy work. In the recent Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) we were 11th in terms of Research Impact and Power Rating (GPA x number of full-time equivalent staff submitted) among the 45 institutions that submitted to our unit of assessment (UoA 16). Professional accreditation RICS and/or CIOB members are well-sought after in the job market. If you have no or very limited relevant experience in the industry, holding this RICS & CIOB accredited MSc reduces the duration of your structured training (or relevant experience post-qualification) to become a member from five years to 24 months. Many of our distance-learning students run their structured training along-side the course. Thus, they become members of these institutions shortly after the completion of the course. In summary, the programme offers a relatively quick route to RICS & CIOB membership for people who have no or very limited experience in the industry, and hence increases their potential for employment. This course in detail There are two modes of delivery for the MSc PMBE: full-time on campus or open learning, and there are two entry points - September and January. Extensive on-line learning material is provided to all students via the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) - our own intranet site. Students have access to this site 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. The course is assessed by 100% coursework submitted via the VLE. Module leaders can be contacted via the VLE, e-mail, telephone and Skype. Intensive Study Periods - all students attend four intensive study periods during their programme and these are normally around 3 days long. Students (and staff) enjoy these intensive sessions as they are able to share experiences and knowledge as well as renew friendships and make connections that extend into the industry. The open-learning students get the opportunity to meet face-to-face with staff. The organisation and the collaborative nature of these intensive study periods is always praised by our students who particularly like the site visits, workshops and guest lectures from industry experts that are some of the major features. Field Trips and Site Visits - there are a number of field trips and site visits which take place mainly during the intensive study periods. There is one European field trip during the MSc programme and this takes place at the end of January each year - usually to the Netherlands. As well as bringing together full-time and open-learning students, the aim of this field trip is to integrate knowledge gained in the early part of the programme, to develop team skills and to build relationships. With the European field trip we also expose students to project management practices outside of the UK and assess the ability of students to observe and report on the different approaches to project management in the UK and overseas. Problem Based Learning - the programme will develop knowledge of current practice and issues in the construction industry as well as building real-life skills including the exploration of interdisciplinary problems. We have responded to requests from industry to make our postgraduate education more practical by using an applied approach to learning, sometimes called “Problem Based Learning” or PBL. This approach encourages learning by allowing students to actively puzzle through problems that are adapted from complex real situations. As real problems cross discipline boundaries and require research and collaboration, we use our links with industrial practitioners to help devise the problems we use in class. This leads to a more exciting and relevant student experience. Module outlines People, Leadership and Organisations aims to develop the students’ knowledge and understanding of how behavioural and organisational issues influence project performance and how they can be harnessed to effectively deliver projects. It includes an overview of management approaches, an exploration of the issues around understanding self and understanding others, team theory and leadership, communication, conflict resolution strategies and negotiation; and learning from experience in project environments. These themes are studied in the context of personal and cultural differences. To a large extent the module adopts a problem-based learning (PBL) approach. Here, PBL is facilitated through problem-solving exercises that are based on prominent case studies and game play exercises. Project Planning, Control and Risk prepares students to manage projects within the built environment through the use of advanced planning and control techniques. Students will learn and apply a range of skills in project planning, scheduling, monitoring and control that includes cash flow and capital expenditure analysis, value management, risk and opportunity management and the use of software-based decision support tools as used in industry. Construction Law and Procurement starts with the consideration of project procedure and participants and their roles in different types of projects in the built environment. Through the aspects of law needed to understand construction procurement and contracts, to the various forms of building contracts and procurement procedures, the module covers alternative procurement routes and current trends in procurement in both the public and private sectors, placing a particular emphasis on collaboration and best practice. Furthermore, it covers the basics of planning law and building regulations and looks at specific issues related to contract terms, professional liability and property torts. Managing Technology for Sustainable Environments - design techniques and technological innovations and how they are used and managed are key elements in the development of our built environment. This module introduces these as considerations that should be made at the inception and briefing stages of a project, not as afterthoughts later in the process. It also recognises that design and construction are not devoid of the human dimension - the contexts within which a construction project is situated, including influences of climate, culture, and surrounding and supporting infrastructures are also important. There is also an examination of the design and building processes, and the end-product-buildings, as continuously changing entities. Students should not study developments in design and technology in isolation, but as part of a continuously innovating industry. In this respect, managing Building Information Modelling (BIM), developments in off-site construction and low carbon construction are covered as part of the module. Applied Research Methods provides students with the fundamentals of research design highlighting the difference between qualitative and quantitative research paradigms and demonstrates how data can be both gathered and analysed and how deductive arguments can be used to produce valid generalisations from data. It also provides students with an overview of particular research techniques such that they can choose and develop those tools most appropriate to their Dissertation. Dissertation - follows on from Applied Research Methods and aims not only to generate new knowledge or insights but also to develop students’ capacities to undertake rigorous research, to plan and execute an extended project and to communicate complex ideas effectively in words and graphically. Each student will work with a supervisor from within the department to produce an original piece of work of publishable quality, generally, through conducting their own primary research and presenting their findings in a professional manner. Teaching and learning Teaching, learning and assessment methods are to a considerable degree determined by the use of problem-based learning (PBL) which leads to a more challenging and industrially relevant course than the traditional lecture approach. Learning takes place through groups of students puzzling through problems, often adapted from real situations with much of the complexity and context intact, using published resources, or reference to experts who are available to offer advice. In full-time mode, the delivery of new material is generally bi-weekly with intermediate tutorial or seminar sessions. The intensive study periods and a European field trip, when students in both modes of study come together, complement this delivery pattern. Outside these periods, online learning is the primary mode of learning for distance-learning study. Where necessary, distance-learning students are supported by email, Skype, on-line lectures and telephone during the periods off-campus. Approach to assessment Problem-based learning (PBL), which is adopted as appropriate, results in sustainable learning when students are provided with continuous, constructive feedback. Our assessment strategy is underpinned by this need. PBL facilitates learning through solving problems. Problem-solving underpins the assessment tasks which are designed to reflect ‘real-life’ scenarios as closely as possible. Blended/open-learning students are actively encouraged to bring their work-place experiences into the ‘classroom’. Assessment is 100% coursework, which includes a great variety of types of work, including quizzes taken remotely on Moodle (Brookes' virtual learning environment- VLE). Material can be downloaded from our virtual learning environment and closed discussions can take place. It also enables on-campus and open-learning students to remain in contact with each other. Specialist facilities The Department has a computer room dedicated to building information modelling (BIM). We run 3D, 4D and 5D applications and other relevant software packages such as Microsoft Project. Where necessary, arrangements are made for the students to have remote access to the specialist software packages. Field trips A European field trip is a compulsory element of the PGCert modules. It typically takes place over a five-day period towards the end of January and is heavily subsidised by the department. The aim of this field trip is to consolidate the knowledge gained in the early part of the course and to develop team and other relationships through exposing our students to European project management practices and to assess their ability to observe and report on the different approaches to project management in the UK and in a European country. The field trip normally consists of visits to prominent construction/engineering projects and sites, plus architectural attractions, both en route and at the destination. You are introduced to the development and planning practices at the destination, as well as having the opportunity to visit major complex projects. Student body The programme attracts students from diverse backgrounds and locations. Many of our current students already hold degrees in fields outside the realm of the built environment including law, psychology and geography, and have decided to contribute to the development of the built environment around us by effectively managing projects. They hail from as far afield as Nigeria and India, with backgrounds ranging from languages to architecture. This diverse group of students bring with them individual responses to the PBL approach that is at the core of our course delivery. Typically the distance-learning students are employed by a number of different organisations from the private and public sectors in different countries. They have the opportunity to share their experiences in order to gain better understanding of the industry, the range of challenges that project managers face, and therefore the breadth of skills that they need to develop in order to perform successfully. Our full-time students benefit from contact with the open-learning students engaged in project management roles in a variety of built environment projects across many countries. Attendance pattern The University runs two semesters of 12 weeks. The last week of a semester is dedicated to revision. Full-time (FT) students take two 30-credit modules each semester, as well as the Research Methods module which is 10 credits and runs across two semesters. Typically, each 30-credit module is delivered through two two-hour sessions each week. FT students undertake their dissertation once they complete the thought part of the course. Distance-learning (DL) students can easily fit studying around their busy schedules. On-line delivery provides the flexibility for 24/7 learning. DL students are strongly advised to attend the intensive study periods, which are typically three days-long. There is one each semester. All students MUST attend the European field-trip which normally takes place in late January and runs from Sunday to Thursday. ... [-]

MSc in Racing Engine Design

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 24 months September 2016 United Kingdom Oxford + 1 more

The course provides an intensive exposure to an integrated design, simulation, modelling and analysis of racing engines. The analysis elements of the modules... [+]

MSc in Racing Engine Design

 

The MSc in Racing Engine Design is intended to enhance and extend your knowledge in engine design. The motorsport industry in the UK is a world leader and many of the world's most advanced high-performance engines are designed here. You will be taught by staff with many years' experience of racing engines, from performance road cars, through rally, IRL, Kart and F3 right up to F1.The course provides an intensive exposure to an integrated design, simulation, modelling and analysis of racing engines. The analysis elements of the modules include structural optimisation, dynamics, internal combustion engine thermo-fluid dynamics, engine performance, tuning, mapping and monitoring.Teaching is based in our purpose-designed engineering building on the Wheatley Campus.... [-]


MSc in Software Engineering

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 36 months September 2016 United Kingdom Oxford + 1 more

Our BCS accredited MSc in Software Engineering is designed to produce successful software engineers who will have an understanding of software engineering principles (and their application), design skills, knowledge of good management practice, computing science and mathematical formalism. The course aims to equip you to begin a career, or to undertake further study in this important and exciting area. The most complex engineering artifacts in existence are now software systems, and the effects of such systems are felt by almost everyone. It is vitally important that software should be of high quality; it should be built on schedule and without error and it should be safe. Software Engineering combines scientific and engineering principles with sound practice to ensure the production of high-quality, reliable software that does what it is designed to do. [+]

Our BCS accredited MSc in Software Engineering is designed to produce successful software engineers who will have an understanding of software engineering principles (and their application), design skills, knowledge of good management practice, computing science and mathematical formalism. The course aims to equip you to begin a career, or to undertake further study in this important and exciting area. The most complex engineering artifacts in existence are now software systems, and the effects of such systems are felt by almost everyone. It is vitally important that software should be of high quality; it should be built on schedule and without error and it should be safe. Software Engineering combines scientific and engineering principles with sound practice to ensure the production of high-quality, reliable software that does what it is designed to do. Why choose this course? You will have the opportunity to put the skills you have gained into practice if you choose to undertake our 1 year optional placement Professional experts contribute to the range of subjects on offer. Teaching is informed by state-of-the-art research being undertaken in the department and youwill have the opportunity to work alongside members of our Dependable Systems Research Centre and internationally renowned academics. Real word problems and current issues in Software Engineering are used to illustrate the theoretical concepts. You have the option to undertake an intensive course on compiler construction from one of Europe’s leading authorities in the field. The universal nature of the technical skills developed in our programmes means our courses are of equal relevance to both new graduates and those with many years of industrial experience. Professional accreditation BCS, the Chartered Institute for IT. The MSc in Software Engineering is Accredited as meeting the requirements for CITP Further Learning and partially meeting the requirements for CEng and has been awarded the EQANIE (European Quality Assurance Network for Informatics Education) label. This course in detail: The MSc in Software Engineering has a modular design providing you with maximum flexibility and choice. See Semester 1 and Semester 2 for information about each module. To qualify for a master’s degree, you must pass modules amounting to 180 credits. This comprises six taught modules (20 credits each) plus your dissertation (60 credits). The MSc in Software Engineering with placement enables you to work in industry for a year in the middle of your course to give valuable workplace experience. Placements are not guaranteed, but the departments dedicated placement team will help with the process of finding and applying for placements. To qualify for a master’s degree with placement, you must pass modules amounting to 180 credits plus the zero credit placement module. This comprises six taught modules (20 credits each) plus your dissertation (60 credits). The Postgraduate Diploma in Software Engineering allows you to concentrate on the taught part of the degree and is ideal for people working in the computing industry who wish to brush up their skills. To qualify for a Postgraduate Diploma, you must pass modules amounting to 120 credits. This comprises six taught modules (20 credits each). In some cases, it may be possible for a student on a Postgraduate Diploma to do 3 taught modules (20 credits each) plus your dissertation (60 credits). The Postgraduate Certificate in Software Engineering allows you to concentrate on the taught part of the degree and is ideal for people working in the computing industry who wish to learn a specific area in this rapidly changing discipline. To qualify for a Postgraduate Certificate, you must pass modules amounting to 60 credits. This comprises three taught modules (20 credits each). We also offer a Postgraduate Certificate Software Engineering Research Project. Part-time students normally distribute the work evenly over a two-year period. Semester 1 You can choose from the following modules: Research and Scholarship Methods (compulsory for MSc and PGDip) is designed to equip students with the tools necessary for the scholarship and research skills needed for the computing field as well as equipping them with the professional skills and outlook needed for a lifelong career in the computer industry. Formal Software Engineering (compulsory for MSc and PGDip) explores the techniques used to keep programs error-free at every stage of the software lifecycle. In particular, it focuses on the process of reasoning about the properties of programs and on machine-assisted refinement from specification to implementation. It also introduces various mathematical concepts of software engineering. Secure Systems Architecture (compulsory for MSc) studies computer and network security and the ways that computer systems can be secured. This module will look at both the technological and human issues involved in securing and assessing the security level of a modern networked computer system. It also introduces basic concepts of operating systems and architecture. Semester 2 You can choose from the following modules: Software Production (compulsory for MSc and PGDip) studies the current practices, skills and techniques applied to managing software development related projects, individually and in project teams. The module combines theory with pragmatic and professional insights and considers requirements engineering, project management, risk, quality assurance, usability and HCI issues. Paradigms of Programming (alternative compulsory for MSc) enables students to broaden their existing understanding of programming by learning and practising multiple programming styles and programming technologies; and by studying the underlying disciplines of programming language design, compiler/interpreter construction, formal properties of programming languages, and low-level development. Compiler Construction (alternative compulsory for MSc) studies the principles, methods and techniques of compiler construction for imperative programming languages and the role of language tools in the broad context of software development. Students will work in small groups to create a compiler for a Java-like, high-level programming language. Machine Learning (optional) introduces students to the fascinating and increasingly important world of Machine Intelligence. This module will cover the key current technologies in this area and will expose students to current research directions in this rapidly evolving field. Operating Systems Development (optional) covers low level systems programming and extends the operating systems concepts covered in Secure Systems Architecture. This module gives students the opportunity to see how the code inside a modern OS is designed and implemented in a safe and secure manner. Secure Programming (optional). It is increasingly important that software must not only be functional and reliable but also secure. This module looks at the key concepts and principles used in constructing secure software and in auditing and making secure, existing software. Low Level Tools and Techniques (optional) introduces students to the basics of assembly programming and code analysis. Students on this module are taught to analyse, understand and help defend against malware by analysis of the code and the command and control structures used by the malware. Students will also have the opportunity to learn how to analyse and defend against polymorphic malware. As courses are reviewed regularly, modules offered may differ from those listed. Students undertaking an MSc with placement will do a 1 year placement in industry. The placement will be undertaken after the taught component and before doing the dissertation. Students studying for an MSc will also take: MSc Dissertation: which is an individual research and development project that allows you to study a topic of your choice in depth, guided by your supervisor. The work may be undertaken in close co-operation with a research, industrial or commercial organisation. You undertake your dissertation over the summer period. Teaching and learning Teaching methods include lectures, which provide a theoretical basis, and practicals, which are used to strengthen your understanding by active involvement. On some occasions, lectures are held in the computer labs so that the student can apply the knowledge learned immediately. Many of the modules are enriched by the teaching staff's research expertise. Visiting lecturers are also invited from research organisations and industry. Assessment is based on a combination of examination, coursework and dissertation. The assessment methods used have been developed across all computing MSc courses at Oxford Brookes to provide varied support, and to include opportunities for you to discuss your work directly with the lecturers. Approach to assessment Assessments include coursework exercises, presentations, lab work, reports and examinations. Specialist facilities Our labs are equipped with industry-standard equipment and software tools. This enables students to develop skills of immediate relevance to industry needs while also providing a sound practical basis that enhances their understanding of theoretical concepts. Associated costs Students on placement are responsible for living costs associated with their placement. Attendance pattern Part time study is an option on this programme for students who wish to combine their study with work. Where possible we try to ensure that part time students only need to attend for 1 day a week, although students will be expected to undertake additional independent study. [-]

MSc in Sustainable Building Performance and Design

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 24 months September 2016 United Kingdom Oxford + 1 more

This unique multi-disciplinary course is taught by architects, engineers and physicists involved in practice and research. It focuses on the theory and practice of developing low carbon and sustainable buildings. The course includes a number of interlinked modules that simulate the design and development of a sustainable project. This enables students from different disciplines to develop skills and understanding relevant to their own discipline, be it design or consultancy, and in relation to a national and international context. [+]

MSc in Sustainable Building Performance and Design - September 2016

 

This unique multi-disciplinary course is taught by architects, engineers and physicists involved in practice and research. It focuses on the theory and practice of developing low carbon and sustainable buildings. The course includes a number of interlinked modules that simulate the design and development of a sustainable project. This enables students from different disciplines to develop skills and understanding relevant to their own discipline, be it design or consultancy, and in relation to a national and international context. Why choose this course? The course is run by the School of Architecture, which is recognised as one of the country's leading schools of architecture and is consistently ranked by The Architect's Journals one of the five best schools in the UK. Distinctive aspects of the course include: A complete module in post-occupancy evaluation, based on our groundbreaking research in this area, is available. We offer a sustainable built environment strategies module focusing on sustainable lifestyles and quality of life and a sustainable building design module. Our advanced low carbon building technology module uniquely combines strategic decision making with practical application within international climatic context. Our international standing as research leaders in thermal comfort is directly reflected in our teaching of building design. This course in detail The course is organised on a modular credit system, 60 credits for postgraduate certificate, 120 credits for the postgraduate diploma (9 months full-time, 20 months part-time) and 180 credits for the master's degree (12 months full-time, 24 months part-time). Modules combine a ratio of taught to self-led study. For example, a module of 20 credits approximates to 200 hours of student effort, up to 36 hours of which will normally be devoted to lectures, seminars, individual tutorials or other staff contact. The remainder of the time is devoted to student-led study and assessment. Please note: as courses are reviewed regularly, the module list you choose from may vary from that shown below. The core modules for the MSc and PGDip are: Building Physics (20 credits) provides an introduction to the basic physics required to help develop low-carbon buildings which are both energy-efficient and comfortable. The Sustainable Built Environment (20 credits) introduces the philosophy, theories and key concepts underpinning the principles of sustainable development and sustainability and quality of life in relation to the built environment within the natural world. The module introduces skills to research and formulate development strategies to create sustainable and high quality of life built environments. Post-occupancy Building Evaluation (20 credits) focuses on the complex task of assessing the actual performance of existing buildings in respect of energy use, environmental impact and occupant satisfaction, known as post-occupancy evaluation. Advanced Low Carbon Building Technologies (20 credits) introduces the principles of building design and construction that minimise the carbon impact of a building including: building form and configuration and building envelop and construction to reduce energy requirements; highly-efficient heating, cooling and ventilation systems and energy-efficient appliances to minimise energy use; renewable energy (zero carbon) systems; and subtle human control systems that empower occupants to become part of the building energy operation systems. The module emphasises the influence of the climatic context of the building, and considers techniques to achieve low carbon buildings in different climates experienced around the world. Modelling and Passive Strategies (20 credits) provides a theoretical and practical introduction to systematic building modelling as it is related to design with climate and location. Sustainable Design in Context (20 credits) provides the opportunity to apply in practice the design principles gained in previous modules. It focuses on the challenge of reconciling regional identity and tradition with contemporary needs in building design and performance, relating to technological change and social transformation arising from globalisation, climate change and other factors. The compulsory modules for the MSc are: Research Methods and Design (10 credits) aims to advance your knowledge and understanding of research methods available to those wishing to improve buildings in terms of their sustainable design and performance. It presents a variety of qualitative and quantitative research methods and provides a forum for debate about research as well as giving the opportunity to gain practical research skills. MSc Dissertation (50 credits) The synoptic research or design dissertation gives the opportunity for application and expansion of the material presented in the programme through independent research. Teaching and learning The teaching and learning methods reflect the wide variety of topics and techniques associated with sustainability, low-carbon and resource efficient design. Staff-led lectures provide the framework, background and knowledge base, and you are encouraged to probe deeper into the topics by further reading and review. Analysis, synthesis and application of material introduced in the lectures are achieved through professional and staff-led workshops, group and one-to-one tutorials, student-led seminars, case studies, and practical work that anticipates the design project. The course attracts students from a diverse range of ages, backgrounds, gender and nationalities. This offers opportunities for interdisciplinary, globally aware teaching and learning. Students are exposed to a variety of cultural perspectives and issues through the use of international case studies and draw on their diverse strengths through peer learning and group work. An annual field trip is an opportunity to directly experience some of the very best of sustainable design projects in another culture. Previous field trips have been to Germany, Scotland and Denmark. The range of subjects draws on the research strengths of the teaching staff and enables research to inform the teaching modules. You are encouraged where possible to take part in staff research projects. We attract some of the best students in the field, drawn by the integrating basis of the programme and its solid theoretical foundation on expertise within the University. Field trips We make one major field trip each year. In the past we have travelled to Scotland, Sweden, Austria and Germany where there is a wealth of sustainable buildings. Field trips give students the opportunity to experience sustainable buildings first hand and talk to building owners and operators of low energy buildings. It helps understand some of the practical difficulties and rewards of achieving very sustainable buildings. Field trips are not included in the cost of the fees and generally cost less than £500. ... [-]

MSc in Urban Planning (Developing and Transitional Regions)

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 24 months January 2016 United Kingdom Oxford + 1 more

The MSc in Urban Planning: Developing and Transitional Regions is concerned with the theory and practice of urban planning in societies undergoing rapid... [+]

MSc in Urban Planning (Developing and Transitional Regions)

 

The MSc in Urban Planning: Developing and Transitional Regions is concerned with the theory and practice of urban planning in societies undergoing rapid economic, social, environmental and spatial change. This course examines the phenomenon and processes of rapid urban growth and the nature of planning interventions within the broader framework of political, economic (including macro-economic) and cultural factors. The emphasis of the course is on institutional aspects of planning and management interventions in the urban sector and the scope of various policy instruments and planning modes to manage the emerging spatial patterns, impacts and processes of urban growth.... [-]


MSc IT Systems Administration and Management

Campus Full time Part time 3 - 24 months September 2016 United Kingdom Oxford + 1 more

The IT Systems Administration and Management programme teaches the fundamental theoretical concepts needed and gives students the opportunity to put these skills into practice in our VM platform, dedicated server laboratory, and networking laboratories. These facilities, along with access to enterprise level software, through departmental VMWare and MSDNAA subscriptions, as well as University agreements with companies such as ServiceNow and Numecent, allow students to work on complex scenarios using industry standard hardware and software. [+]

The IT Systems Administration and Management programme teaches the fundamental theoretical concepts needed and gives students the opportunity to put these skills into practice in our VM platform, dedicated server laboratory, and networking laboratories. These facilities, along with access to enterprise level software, through departmental VMWare and MSDNAA subscriptions, as well as University agreements with companies such as ServiceNow and Numecent, allow students to work on complex scenarios using industry standard hardware and software. Why choose this course? It is taught by domain experts, many of whom are also practitioners in the field. Dedicated server and networking laboratories with enterprise equipment including Cisco switches, routers and firewalls and Dell servers. Dedicated virtualisation platform to practice cloud deployment. Access to a wide range of enterprise software to ensure realistic deployment environments. An emphasis on live projects, alongside group work modeled on industry standard working patterns, gives you the opportunity to develop more business oriented skills such as project management, team management, and customer relationship management to equip them with the skills required for IT systems management. An opportunity to apply to undertake a placement which enables you to practice and refine your skills within a company or organisation. This course in detail The MSc in IT Systems Administration and Management has a modular course-unit design providing you with maximum flexibility and choice. To qualify for a master’s degree without placement, you must pass modules amounting to 180 credits. This comprises six taught modules (20 credits each) plus your dissertation (60 credits). To qualify for a master's degree with placement you need to a one year placement in between the taught component and the dissertation. The Postgraduate Diploma in IT Systems Administration and Management allows you to concentrate on the taught part of the degree and is ideal for people working in the communications industry who wish to brush up their skills. To qualify for a Postgraduate Diploma, you must pass modules amounting to 120 credits. This comprises six taught modules (20 credits each). In some cases, it may be possible for a student on a Postgraduate Diploma to do 3 taught modules (20 credits each) plus your dissertation (60 credits). The Postgraduate Certificate in IT Systems Administration and Management allows you to concentrate on the taught part of the degree and is ideal for people working in the communications industry who wish to learn a specific area in this rapidly changing discipline. To qualify for a Postgraduate Certificate, you must pass modules amounting to 60 credits. This comprises three taught modules (20 credits each). We also offer a Postgraduate Certificate IT Systems Administration and Management Research Project. Semester 1 In Semester 1 you can choose from the following modules: Research and Scholarship Methods (compulsory for MSc and PG Dip) is designed to equip students with the tools necessary for the scholarship and research skill needed for the IT management field as well as equipping them with the professional skills and outlook needed for a lifelong career in the communications industry. Network Principles (compulsory for MSc and PG Dip) teaches the principles and practice of computer networking with an emphasis on data communications and local area network technologies and design. Secure Systems Architecture (compulsory for MSc), on which you will study computer and network security and the ways that computer systems can be secured. This module will look at both the technological and human issues involved in securing and assessing the security level of a modern networked computer system. It also introduces basic concepts of operating systems and architecture. Semester 2 In Semester 2 you can choose from the following modules: Multiservice Networks (compulsory for MSc) - builds on the foundations laid in Network Principles and analyses the technologies and protocols used for multi-service networks in order to enable the student to develop the knowledge and skills required to design multi-service networks. The networks are illustrated with case studies, including state-of-the-art practice and recent research and development in the field. Systems Administration (compulsory for MSc and PG Dip) studies the technical aspects of the application of theoretical concepts in operating systems, computer networks, and IT systems administration to the practical implementation of designing, implementing, and managing a small heterogeneous, multi-platform network. The material covered will prepare students for industrial and business problems they will face after graduation. This will be largely a directed study module, with students being supported in the design, implementation and subsequent maintenance of a proof-of-concept system. IT Systems Management and Governance (compulsory for MSc) complements the material studied in Systems Administration. The module takes a more strategic look at systems administration by considering the management and governance aspects. Students will look at how enterprise networks consisting of different, interconnecting technologies, should be managed and improved efficiently. The material covered in this module prepares the student to manage large networks according to appropriate IT governance procedures and to effectively lead system administrator teams. As courses are reviewed regularly, the list of taught modules offered may vary from the list here. If you are studying for an MSc you will also take: MSc Dissertation, which is an individual research and development project that allows you to study a topic of your choice in depth, guided by your supervisor. The work may be undertaken in close co-operation with a research, industrial or commercial organisation. You will undertake your dissertation over the summer period. MSc students have the option to apply to undertake a placement. Placement positions are not guaranteed, however the department will help and support students in finding a placement. Students on the placement will also take: Work Experience Placement, which is an optional element of all the department's CCT programmes, and provides professional and practical experience in the computing, communications, or media industries. The nature of the work undertaken will be relevant to a student’s programme, and may provide a basis for the development of the dissertation. Teaching and learning The taught modules include lectures, seminars, library and internet research, and practical design and experimentation. Teaching staff include experienced academic staff and practitioners in the field of IT Systems Administration and Management. Visiting speakers from business and industry help to maintain relevance to the evolution of the industry. Laboratory facilities include dedicated server, security and networking laboratories. Approach to assessment Assessments include coursework exercises, presentations, lab work, reports and examinations. Specialist facilities Our labs are equipped with industry-standard equipment and software tools. This enables students to develop skills of immediate relevance to industry needs while also providing a sound practical basis that enhances their understanding of theoretical concepts. Our server lab has a mixture of client PCs and Dell servers to allow students to set up a wide variety of complex IT systems. In addition to the server capacity in the lab, there is a dedicated Virtualisation Platform for use in cloud based scenarios. Students have access to a range of Microsoft systems software, VMWare virtualisation management software and a wide range of other software used in the management of enterprise IT systems. Networking laboratories are equipped with modern Cisco routers, switches and security devices to enable design construction and testing of complete high bandwidth, secure, wired and wireless networks. Additional costs Students on placement are responsible for living costs associated with their placement. Attendance pattern Part time study is an option on this programme for students who wish to combine their study with work. Where possible we try to ensure that part time students only need to attend for 1 day a week, although students will be expected to undertake additional independent study. [-]

MSc Mechanical Engineering

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 24 months September 2016 United Kingdom Oxford + 1 more

The main aim of the MSc in Advanced Engineering Design is to introduce you to research, development and practice in advanced engineering design... [+]

MSc in Advanced Engineering Design

 

The main aim of the MSc in Advanced Engineering Design is to introduce you to research, development and practice in advanced engineering design and to equip you for professional practice at senior positions of responsibility.Great engineering design turns great ideas into great products. If this is your aim, then the MSc in Advanced Engineering Design will give you the skills you need to achieve it. Developing the skills to take complex products all the way from idea to fully-validated designs, you will use the most advanced CAD packages and learn the techniques required to analyse your work, testing designs in virtual reality to see how they perform and how reliable they are.Teaching is based in our purpose-designed engineering building on the Wheatley Campus.... [-]


MA

MA Development and Emergency Practice

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 24 months September 2016 United Kingdom Oxford + 1 more

The Development and Emergency Practice (DEP) course provides a unique academic setting for the study of international development, conflict, disaster management, urbanisation, humanitarianism and human rights. With its emphasis on practice, the course offers students the opportunity to develop knowledge, skills and attitudes in the rapidly changing fields of development and emergencies. The programme is targeted at those with, or seeking, careers in NGOs, bilateral or multilateral humanitarian, development and human rights agencies, or governmental and commercial organisations working in international development. This programme is run by the Centre for Development and Emergency Practice (CENDEP), which is based within the School of Architecture. [+]

MA Development and Emergency Practice - September 2016

MA/ PGDip/ PGCert

 

The Development and Emergency Practice (DEP) course provides a unique academic setting for the study of international development, conflict, disaster management, urbanisation, humanitarianism and human rights. With its emphasis on practice, the course offers students the opportunity to develop knowledge, skills and attitudes in the rapidly changing fields of development and emergencies. The programme is targeted at those with, or seeking, careers in NGOs, bilateral or multilateral humanitarian, development and human rights agencies, or governmental and commercial organisations working in international development. This programme is run by the Centre for Development and Emergency Practice (CENDEP), which is based within the School of Architecture.... [-]


MA Humanitarian Action and Peacebuilding

Campus Full time 30 months August 2016 United Kingdom Oxford

Built on the experiences and expertise developed by the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) and the Centre for Development and Emergency Practice (CENDEP) at Oxford Brookes University, the MA explores the interactions between humanitarian action and peacebuilding. It links applied knowledge and practice with theory through online lectures, action research, sharing of experiences, discussions with key practitioners, and critical reflection on practices. [+]

Humanitarian Action and Peacebuilding - January 2017 This course is run by the School of Architecture Built on the experiences and expertise developed by the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) and the Centre for Development and Emergency Practice (CENDEP) at Oxford Brookes University, the MA explores the interactions between humanitarian action and peacebuilding. It links applied knowledge and practice with theory through online lectures, action research, sharing of experiences, discussions with key practitioners, and critical reflection on practices. This programme is designed mainly for practitioners working in the fields of humanitarian action and peacebuilding, though it is open also to those working in related fields. It allows you to broaden your perceptions, critically review your role, and develop and refine hard and soft skills needed to work effectively in the fields of humanitarian action and peacebuilding. The programme is also relevant for practitioners working in other fields, interested in exploring new opportunities in conflict transformation. Why choose this course? Flexible and user-friendly online learning environment allowing you to learn from your workplace Investigating cutting-edge issues in the field of humanitarian action and peacebuilding, proposing innovative tools and reflecting on current field practices Designed and delivered jointly by Oxford Brookes University and the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) offering you access to resources and support from both institutions online and in the field through UN missions Unparalleled support from a team of academic experts and top-ranked practitioners as well as field experts for specific topics Founded on action-research, and on populations and employers' direct needs in humanitarian and peacebuilding programming Access to a worldwide community of learners. This course in detail This is the first MA aimed at investigating the interactions between humanitarian action and peacebuilding, merging knowledge and know-how developed in both fields to promote better targeted initiatives and comprehensive responses. This MA is also one of the first Masters working on the principle that long-term and sustainable peace can only be built by local and national actors and initiatives. Therefore culture sensitivity, community initiatives and local responses are at the core of the learning process. To explore the links between humanitarian action and peacebuilding and learning from field practices, the MA relies on three distinctive features brought together to propose a unique and innovative learning approach: Based entirely on online delivery to create a web-based learning community, the MA offers a flexible and diverse method based mostly on collaborative work. A large portion of the learning activities are based on discussion and confrontation of ideas and practices to enhance peer to peer learning and discourse. The workplace is intended to be the main learning environment, to allow learners from all countries to engage with this global community of reflective practitioners. As a result, case studies, action research and hands-on exercises with live and field-based problems, working with communities, practitioners and agencies are an integral part of the programme. Based on innovative multicultural and multidisciplinary approaches, the MA uses studies and theories from social sciences, peace and conflict studies, humanities, management, political sciences, law, urban planning and architecture. It also merges practice-based knowledge produced by field practitioners and research outputs from practice-oriented scholars. The diversity of learners and lecturers creates a unique opportunity to merge and discuss different cultural paradigms, perceptions and intellectual traditions. This part-time programme is usually studied over 30 months. However, you are able to take up to 5 years to complete the necessary credits or to finish it in 24 months if you can take time out of work to complete the programme. It is constituted of three core modules; three issue-based modules as well as a research skills module as preparation for the dissertation. The three core modules are: From Conflict Sensitivity to Conflict Transformation This module equips you with a sound understanding of the complexity of conflicts, including of conceptual frameworks and theoretical debates related to humanitarian action and peacebuilding in complex environments. It provides you with the analytical tools to understand the contexts of conflict and to assess the challenges faced as practitioners. Culture-Sensitivity in Conflict and Post-Conflict Settings It is agreed that emergencies, rehabilitation and peacebuilding programmes need to be embedded in local cultures. How can we be truly 'culture sensitive'? If this principle is clear, the practicalities remain confusing and difficult to put into operation. Culture sensitivity requires knowledge, skills and competences but also an attitude towards others. This module allows you to understand and deal with core issues related to culture, communication, trust building and culture-sensitivity. You also to explore issues related to cultural dimensions such as gender, displacement and identity. Leadership, Team and Self-management in Conflict Settings You will critically examine some of the personal skills (or 'soft skills') needed by professionals working in humanitarian action and peacebuilding. In particular, the module focuses on leadership skills, team management and self-management skills. The session on self-management is more specifically centred on stress and stress management and introduces you to a number of techniques that can be applied for self-support, but also to support peers and members of communities in conflict-affected countries. A PGCert in Humanitarian Action and Peacebuilding is also offered for those not wishing to undertake the full MA. It consists of the three core modules. The three issue-based modules are: Humanitarian and Peacebuilding Programmes in Urban Conflicts Focusing on urban spaces becomes increasingly important for the efficiency of humanitarian actions, but presents new challenges as humanitarian and development traditions are usually focused on 'open spaces' and rural environments. In urban conflicts, all lines are blurred and programming will need to take that into account. Conflicts particularly have an impact on the way people produce, understand and inhabit spaces and places. Rebuilding some social links and establishing communities in locations will become one of the key elements in conflict transformation and humanitarian programmes. Through action research methods, issues related to urban settings and specificities of humanitarian projects can be investigated. Protection of Civilians in Conflict and Post-conflict Settings This module reviews the critical issues related to the protection of civilians in conflict and post-conflict contexts by exploring different conceptual and operational frameworks. In its second part, the module focuses on the planning and implementation of protection activities and offers you the opportunity to apply different tools to concrete situations. The module concludes with a discussion on community-based protection strategies, including unarmed civilian protection. Post-Conflict Stabilisation and Recovery This module explores the different dimensions of post-conflict stabilisation and recovery, with a specific focus on restoration of governance and rule of law, justice and reconciliation. It specifically looks at the role of different actors, involved at different levels and in different capacities in the above mentioned processes. The second part of the module focuses on programming tools in post-conflict contexts, and introduces in a critical and non-prescriptive manner the human rights-based approach, as well as the human security-based approach to stabilisation and peacebuilding, presenting principles relating to human rights and human security in terms of potential operational standards for the planning, implementation and evaluation of interventions. Note that one of the six modules could be replaced by an independent study, should you wish to investigate a specific issue in depth. Each of these six modules is accessible to associated students and can be studied individually. The research component is constituted of: Research Methods and Dissertation/Practice-based Final Work The dissertation is a large piece of work that enables you to explore an issue or theme in depth. The dissertation is a self-driven work, where the supervisor plays the role of advisor, supporter and questioner. Teaching and learning This programme favours supportive active learning approaches centred on electronic delivery of content and active student engagement. It is based on self-led learning and strong interactive teaching tools as much on peer-to-peer as on tutors’ mentoring. This approach to the teaching and learning strategies are established to learn from the workplace, using practical cases either through action-research or through case studies; particularly in 'learning by doing', 'self-reflection' and 'action testing of theories'. It allows you to develop new knowledge based on the specifics of humanitarian action and peacebuilding, to improve related practices and to reflect and acquire attitudes and personal competences. UNITAR and Brookes have considerable experience in delivering humanitarian education directly to humanitarian actors in field operations. Insight from previous education programmes in similar settings shows that learners are often under constant stress, working in harsh conditions and commonly have limited access to internet. As a result, a variety of learning tools are applied within each module. In both institutions, students’ approach to enquiry is supported by a range of webinar, tutorials, debates, discussions, case and work-based studies, and interactions with academics, experts and field practitioners. Approach to assessment Assessment is designed to examine programme learning outcomes and is intended to demonstrate that graduates possess the competences and knowledge required in practice. In keeping with the course's emphasis on practical application and on learning from the workplace, 100% of the assessment of each module is based on coursework. Each module contains ongoing assessment through feedback and facilitation of discussions, webinars, and exchange of experiences for the group work, as well as in individual and group tutoring. You are asked to keep a reflective journal each week in which you can assess your learning experience and its relevance to your practice. This reflective journal is compulsory, and commented upon twice during the modules by tutors, but not graded. The summative assessments include individual and collective assignments to be handed in at the end of each module. Individual assignments for the core modules are the form of personal written essay, which will test your ability to synthesise critical debates, develop a critical argument and apply arguments to field practice. The individual assignment for the issues-based modules is more practical, based on problem-solving or programming issues. The six taught modules will also include a group work assessment, which will comprise reflection on tools or concepts, an individual application of those tools and concepts in work-based experiences, a collective synthesis of the lessons learnt from those experiences and a formulation of guidelines or statements for further practices. Specialist facilities You will be provided with access to Oxford Brookes Virtual Library, which has a large collection of electronic sources of information. Most electronic information, including electronic journals, can be consulted off-campus. All documents necessary for the course (core and optional readings, videos, podcasts, and so on) will be provided on Moodle. Consultations with the subject librarian for the widest access to online resources to students and to digitalise core texts, have already taken place. You will also have access to UN libraries (physical and online libraries) and access to the UNITAR Community of Practice (COP). UN libraries constitute a strong network that share expertise, best practices and resources. These libraries have become important actors in the Organisation’s information strategy. The UN Libraries are gateways to knowledge, thought and culture, facilitating the decision-making process within the Organisation. Since 1946, the Dag Hammarskjöld Library of the United Nations Secretariat in New York has arranged for the distribution of United Nations documents and publications to users around the world through its depository library system. At present, there are more than 367 United Nations Depository Libraries in over 136 countries. Students will be able to consult the material free of charge at any of these depository libraries. ... [-]

MA in Digital Publishing

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 24 months September 2016 United Kingdom Oxford + 1 more

The MA in Digital Publishing combines theory with practice and provides scope to develop specialist skills required for career development... [+]

MA in Digital Publishing

 

The MA in Digital Publishing combines theory with practice and provides scope to develop specialist skills required for career development. You will leave the course with a broad understanding of the key issues facing the publishing industry in the 21st century and a wide range of publishing and general management skills, including advanced IT skills, to help you succeed in the industry.This course is part of a group of publishing course at Oxford Brookes that enjoy a high international standing in the publishing world. We have close links with publishing companies in Oxford and London, and staff have extensive experience in national and international publishing roles.Graduates who have completed publishing courses at Oxford Brookes have been exceptionally successful in obtaining employment soon after graduation and have a strong record of career progression.... [-]


MA in Film Studies Popular Cinema

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 24 months September 2016 United Kingdom Oxford + 1 more

This course offers a film education for the 21st century. You are encouraged to develop a broad portfolio of writing and research skills by combining... [+]

MA in Film Studies Popular Cinema

 

This course combines the academic rigour of a traditional Film Studies course with practical and vocationally orientated components. This course offers a film education for the 21st century. You are encouraged to develop a broad portfolio of writing and research skills by combining academic and professional writing projects. We cover the history and theory of popular cinema in the US (classical and contemporary Hollywood), Europe and East Asia (especially Japanese cinema), as well as offering a module in advanced screenwriting.You will develop skills for a career in either academia or the media industries. The course is taught by a diverse team of film specialists with different national and cultural backgrounds, as well as by industry professional guest speakers.All Film Studies staff are active researchers. The research culture in the Film Studies course also benefits from the active involvement of our advisory panel of film industry experts, including leading directors, producers and technical specialists.... [-]


MA in International Architectural Regeneration and Development

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 24 months September 2016 United Kingdom Oxford + 1 more

Architectural regeneration is the collective activities of reusing, adapting and evolving existing buildings within an urban or rural context. The activities recognise the impacts these decisions and interventions have on the regeneration of a place, and are underpinned by the principles of environmental, social and cultural sustainability. This programme promotes an interdisciplinary approach that combines critical thinking and analysis, as well as creative design. It is based on the ethos that the regeneration and development of the inherited built environment, with its social and cultural fabric, is an essential component of sustainable development. It prepares you for a practical and leading role in organisations involved in architectural regeneration and development. It is international in focus, with an emphasis on field research and design/implementation projects. [+]

MA in International Architectural Regeneration and Development - September 2016

 

Architectural regeneration is the collective activities of reusing, adapting and evolving existing buildings within an urban or rural context. The activities recognise the impacts these decisions and interventions have on the regeneration of a place, and are underpinned by the principles of environmental, social and cultural sustainability. This programme promotes an interdisciplinary approach that combines critical thinking and analysis, as well as creative design. It is based on the ethos that the regeneration and development of the inherited built environment, with its social and cultural fabric, is an essential component of sustainable development. It prepares you for a practical and leading role in organisations involved in architectural regeneration and development. It is international in focus, with an emphasis on field research and design/implementation projects. Why choose this course? Oxford Brookes has an established international reputation for its excellence in teaching and research related to international vernacular architecture, architectural conservation and regeneration. Staff teaching on the programme, including Dr Aylin Orbasli and Dr Marcel Vellinga, combine different disciplinary backgrounds with academic and practice experience, and active involvement with projects in different parts of the world. We house the Paul Oliver Vernacular Architecture Library. We stimulate students towards more innovative approaches and dynamic ways of thinking that are now essential to secure a viable future for historic urban environments, traditional settlements and the world’s vernacular architecture. The international nature of the programme builds up skills to work in different cultural contexts and will introduce students to a network of international organisations in the field. This course in detail The course is offered at three levels: as a postgraduate certificate, a postgraduate diploma and a master's degree. Normally candidates enrol for the master's degree, but it is possible to enrol directly on the PGCert or PGDip, either on recommendation from the admissions tutor or as an exit point from the MA. In total, 180 credits are required to complete the MA in International Architectural Regeneration and Development. These are divided into two parts: 120 credits must be successfully completed to qualify for the postgraduate diploma. During Semesters 1 and 2 all MA students take taught core modules amounting to 90 credits and choose options amounting to 30 credits. Research methods seminars and the dissertation itself account for a further 60 credits required to achieve the MA. For the postgraduate certificate 60 credits are needed. The programme is made up of core (compulsory) modules and optional modules that are explained in more detail below. Core modules: Architecture, Culture and Tradition provides an introduction to the anthropology of architecture and the field of international vernacular architecture studies. Drawing upon examples of vernacular building traditions from around the world, it seeks to analyse the dynamic interaction between architecture, social structure, cultural behaviour and the natural environment. Applications in Regeneration is a lecture and seminar programme that introduces the principles that underlie sustainable regeneration and the key players involved in the process. The practices of conservation and regeneration ranging from small rural settlements to post-industrial areas are examined through case studies considering heritage value and significance, adaptation of the built fabric, community participation and economic forces such as the role of heritage, the arts and tourism in regeneration. Globalisation, Environment and Development provides a critical examination of globalisation processes, global environmental problems and their relationship with the development process. Issues around global systems theory, industrialisation, trade, debt, aid, transport, communications, food, agriculture and the environment are reviewed. Regeneration and Development Project is a studio-based module that builds on the taught modules in developing strategic planning, contextual design and project management skills to solve problems in adapting and revitalising the existing built environment. Through a project set in an international location, students are expected to develop culturally and socially sensitive, environmentally responsible and financially viable strategic plans and design interventions for historic urban quarters, post-industrial sites or rural/vernacular settlements. Master's students may also develop one aspect of the regeneration strategy through a research report in place of a design proposal. Optional modules include: Vernacular Architecture, Sustainability and Development explores the interrelation of cultural processes and building traditions, and examines how contemporary phenomena such as globalisation, tourism, resources depletion, conservation, population displacement and technology transfer have an impact on the nature and transmission of vernacular building traditions. It also discusses how vernacular knowledge may actively contribute to the development of sustainable built environments. Master Classes consists of master classes delivered by expert scholars providing opportunities for you to learn from, and engage in academic interaction with leading figures in the field through the intensive and detailed exploration of specific and current themes and problems. Subjects covered range from contemporary approaches to field research, designing in context of a historic environment, designing with tradition and creative feasibility. Development and Urbanisation is concerned with the problems of development, and of cities and inter-urban issues. It provides the theoretical and analytical base for studying the subject, and introduces themes, policy issues and processes which you can further examine in more detail, and in different contexts, in other modules. Urban Design Theory is a lecture and seminar based module in which you are introduced to the theoretical concepts underpinning current urban design practice approaches. The module includes the history and theory of urban design, the introduction of design approaches such as responsive environments, and urban morphology. You are made aware of how urban form is produced and experienced, and of the political and economic context of development. Independent Study students with research experience or with substantial practice and field experience may select a research or practice-oriented route to the MA through the Independent Study option by participating in ongoing research activities linked to the programme. Independent study may include literature reviews or be linked to research in practice. Other compulsory modules for the MA stage are: Research Methods encourages students to develop the skills needed in the research of environmental problems, including the formulation of research problems and methodology, data collection and analysis. Dissertation/Design Project is a dissertation or a major design project, supported by a project report. This component provides the opportunity for in-depth research and analysis and to develop and apply research and design skills in a specific area of architectural regeneration. The course is international in focus and throughout the course references and visits to international contexts are made. A field trip is organised each year to look at international examples of regeneration projects. The international body of students on the course are encouraged to reflect on and present experiences from their countries. NB As courses are reviewed regularly, the module list you choose from may vary from that shown here. Teaching and learning The aim of the course is to provide the knowledge and tools that will enable you to recognise the potential of, and contribute creatively to, the appropriate and sustainable regeneration of the inherited built environment in urban or rural contexts, including vernacular architecture. The course will help you develop a critical awareness of the cultural embodiment of the built environment and associated regeneration and development processes, and attain skills and tools that are necessary to propose and implement innovative yet culturally sensitive and environmentally sustainable strategies and interventions. Teaching methods include a combination of lectures and seminars, design studios, workshops and group discussions, field study and master classes. Approach to assessment You will be assessed on project work and presentations, other seminar presentations, reports, written assignments and coursework. MA students are also assessed on a subject presentation, literature review and 18,000 word dissertation. Field trips An international field trip that takes place during the winter break each year is a key component of the programme. The field study encourages you to test field research methods and engage in different cultural contexts as professionals. The field study also forms the basis and location for the second semester regeneration and development project. Please note that students are required to cover the cost of the field trip. Field trip locations in the past have included India, Cyprus, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates, Romania, Spain, Croatia, the Netherlands and Portugal. Sample work Akçiçek Village Regeneration Project (Cyprus) Walled City of Jaipur: Chowkri Modikhana Project UAE: Urban Identities - Regeneration Projects Staff profiles Dr Marcel Vellinga Reader in Anthropology of Architecture, is the Director of the Place, Culture and Identity Research Group and Research Lead for the School of Architecture. Dr Vellinga is co-editor of Vernacular Architecture in the 21st Century: Theory, Education and Practice, co-author of the Atlas of Vernacular Architecture of the World and editor in chief of the Encyclopedia of Vernacular Architecture of the World. Dr Aylin Orbasli Reader in Architectural Regeneration, is an architect and international consultant with extensive experience in the Mediterranean and Middle East. She is the author of the books Tourism in Historic Towns: Urban Conservation and Heritage Management and Architectural Conservation. Julia Wedel, an associate lecturer, is an architect with both practice and international researcher experience, with a particular focus on development issues. In addition, leading scholars in the field will be invited to provide specialist master classes on subjects relating to the programme content. The programme is also supported by the work of Professor Paul Oliver, editor of the award-winning Encyclopedia of Vernacular Architecture of the World and recipient of an MBE for his contributions to architectural education. Attendance pattern The programme requires a minimum of two days attendance a week during the first and second semesters, with a possible further day depending on how optional modules are scheduled. Students attending the programme on a full time basis should allow sufficient time to complete course work, undertake reading assignments and to participate in group work. A week long field study will take place during the winter break, usually towards the end of January. Although the dissertation module running over the summer is self guided, students are encouraged to spend this time in Oxford to take advantage of the School’s research facilities, the excellent library facilities found in Oxford and to maintain regular contact with their tutors. ... [-]

MA in Music

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 24 months August 2016 United Kingdom Oxford + 1 more

The MA in Music offers distinctive pathways in Music and Popular Culture, Music on Stage and on Screen, Music in 19th-Century Culture and... [+]

MA in Music

 

The MA in Music offers distinctive pathways in Music and Popular Culture, Music on Stage and on Screen, Music in 19th-Century Culture and Contemporary Practice in Composition. It provides you with a thorough grounding in advanced musical studies and can pave the way, where desired, to doctoral research.

 

 

Teaching learning and assessment

The MA in Music is taught through a combination of seminars, tutorials and skills-based workshops. Assessment methods include essays, student presentations, literature reviews, dissertations and (for composers) compositions using scores, recordings, software patches or live electronics, performances and installations.During your time here you will be engaged in lively discussions and original research. We aim to give you an in-depth understanding of recent critical debates, scholarship and practice in your chosen field, as well as to broaden your knowledge of musical repertoire. Our pathways are original, exciting and flexible and one of the most striking features of the Music Department is its breadth of subject expertise. All staff members in Music, with whom MA students work closely, are actively engaged in research and we have published our work in top journals and with the most highly respected publishers.... [-]


MA in Publishing

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 24 months September 2016 United Kingdom Oxford + 1 more

The course combines relevant theory with practice and, by equipping you with appropriate knowledge and skills, will enhance your employment... [+]

MA in Publishing

 

The course combines relevant theory with practice and, by equipping you with appropriate knowledge and skills, will enhance your employment prospects in publishing and related work. The MA in Publishing at Oxford Brookes is respected throughout the world. The course gives you a broad understanding of the key issues facing the publishing industry in the 21st century, and provides scope to develop specialist skills required for career development. It also enables in-depth exploration of specialist areas through independent study and the dissertation.You will develop a wide range of publishing and general management skills, including advanced IT skills. Graduates who have completed publishing courses at Oxford Brookes have been exceptionally successful in obtaining employment soon after graduation and have a strong record of career progression.Publishing courses at Oxford Brookes enjoy a high international standing in the publishing world. We have close links with publishing companies in Oxford and London, and staff have extensive experience in national and international publishing roles.... [-]


MA in Social Sculpture

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 24 months September 2016 United Kingdom Oxford + 1 more

The MA in Social Sculpture is an internationally renowned programme, running since 2006, linked to the Social Sculpture Research Unit at Oxford Brookes. A dedicated team of international specialists and emerging practitioners delivers innovative cross-disciplinary and socially-engaged creative practices that many students have described as 'life changing'. [+]

MA in Social Sculpture This unique transdisciplinary course, open to people from all backgrounds, offers a special focus on contemporary social sculpture, ecological citizenship, connective eco-social practices, cultural activism, expanded art practices and transformative, creative action. It enables you to explore strategies of engagement, agency and the relationship between imagination and transformation. The programme also makes special reference to the proposals and legacies of Joseph Beuys, Schiller and Goethe, as well as other pedagogies of transformation such as Joanna Macy's and Paulo Freire's. It introduces theoretical and philosophical frameworks, with a special emphasis on phenomenology and experiential knowing; explores the relationship of social sculpture to ecological sustainability and offers practice-based research methodologies and creative strategies as the basis for developing individual and collaborative social sculpture processes, interdisciplinary expanded arts and reflective social practice. The MA is Social Sculpture is, with the MA in Sound Arts, one of two taught postgraduate courses for socially-engaged artists, composers and transdisciplinary practitioners currently offered by the School of Arts at Oxford Brookes University. These MAs share two core modules in Creative Strategies and Phenomenological Methods of practice-based work. These shared modules enable cross-pollination and potential for collaboration between social sculpture and connective practice practitioners and those working in the field of sound arts. The MA in Social Sculpture is linked to the Social Sculpture Research Unit and is part of a thriving post-graduate research culture. There are opportunities to volunteer in social sculpture projects like University of the Trees: Lab for an Eco-Social Future. Why choose this course? The MA in Social Sculpture is an internationally renowned programme, running since 2006, linked to the Social Sculpture Research Unit at Oxford Brookes. A dedicated team of international specialists and emerging practitioners delivers innovative cross-disciplinary and socially-engaged creative practices that many students have described as 'life changing'. Participating in a community of dialogue and reflection: the unique 'Feedback Forum' approach which runs throughout the programme replaces the traditional art-school 'crit', offering a radical, supportive and creative form of feedback on your work. Another special feature is the regular MA Forum, in which students and staff meet to discuss creative practice in a supportive and stimulating environment. It also offers fortnightly individual tutorials and small group supervision. Coherent and unique teaching approach: a carefully sequenced set of modules enable you to uncover, explore and develop your own concerns within the field of contemporary social sculpture, creative cultural action and other interdisciplinary connective practices. Research culture and opportunities beyond the programme: MA Social Sculpture students are welcome to participate in 7 day-long 'PhD Social Sculpture Fora' per year. This is part of a stimulating environment where tutors, alumni, research fellows and student interns work closely together in the Social Sculpture Research Unit, and in projects like University of the Trees: Lab for New Knowledge and an Eco-Social Future. Based in the School of Arts' beautiful Richard Hamilton Building: situated very close to the city centre in a wooded landscape and arboretum, it offers excellent technical support; well-equipped workshops in video, photography, sound, artists books, printmaking and a variety of 3-D processes; a well- equipped library with materials appropriate to our programme and dedicated support for practice-based research students. There is bookable installation space, a group studio base and 24/7 studio access. Wider context: research and teaching programmes in the School of Arts are linked to some of Oxford’s leading cultural organisations such as Modern Art Oxford, and the annual Social Sculpture Festival of MA student work takes place in an around Oxford, using accessible local venues as a hub. You are encouraged to make links with local communities and social and ecological organisations as well as being able to design certain projects related to their home contexts. Once you graduate from the programme you have the opportunity to participate in the annual Social Sculpture Platform which is open to the public. Teaching and learning Our teaching methods include: seminars and lectures on interdisciplinary creative practice, practice-based research, phenomenological root methodologies and social sculpture team teaching in group seminars, involving research methodologies for practice-based research feedback from staff and students during group feedback sessions, in which you receive constructive feedback on your work staff-led group discussions arising out of practical presentations regular individual tutorials that address your research concerns introductions to creative strategies for generating and making practice-based social sculpture and other forms of connective cultural action and reflective social practice. introductions to the School of Arts technical facilities induction sessions with subject librarians. The learning methods include: regular forums where staff and students formulate and articulate responses to work social sculpture and interdisciplinary creative practice presentations presentations of practical research the researching and writing of reflective reports, assignments and self-evaluations private research and study presentations to peers and group feedback via the 'feedback forum' approach to 'reception theory' in practice. Approach to assessment The approach to assessment can be described as dialogic. You interrogate your own work using a form of phenomenological analysis, and we assess and respond to this careful 'dialogue' that you have with your own work. The assessment forms and methods include: practical presentations of resolved social sculpture, interdisciplinary creative actions and reflective social practice written self-evaluations on the evolution, development and resolution of all creative practices and projects written case-studies a final presentation of practical work as part of the MA Social Sculpture and Connective Practice Festival which includes projects in specific contents and related documentation, interventions, exhibitions and events. Entry requirements The general entry requirements are: a good honours degree, minimum 2.1, in any subject an internationally recognised qualification equivalent to a good British honours degree. Applicants without a first degree, but with extensive experience in the arts or other disciplines relevant to this programme may also be considered Please contact the Admissions Tutor, Liming Chen on lchen@brookes.ac.uk to discuss this. Please also see the university's general entry requirements. English language requirements Please see the university's standard English language requirements English requirements for visas If you need a student visa to enter the UK you will need to meet the UK Visas and Immigration minimum language requirements as well as the university's requirements.Find out more about English language requirements. International applications Preparation courses for International and EU students We offer a range of courses to help you to meet the entry requirements for this course and also familiarise you with university life. You may also be able to apply for one student visa to cover both courses. Take our Pre-Master's course to help you to meet both the English language and academic entry requirements for your master's course. If you need to improve your English language, we have pre-sessional English language courses available to help you to meet the English language requirements of your chosen master’s. If you are studying outside the UK, for more details about your specific country entry requirements, translated information, local contacts and programmes within your country, please have a look at our country pages. How to apply You apply for this course through UCAS Postgraduate. Through UCAS Postgraduate, you should use the UKPASS portal to make your application, which will then be forwarded directly to our Admissions Office. You should send supporting documentation to us directly using the email addresses on the UKPASS application form. Once we have received your UK Pass application we will contact you to set up an interview, in person, or by Skype if you are not near Oxford. The interview is a two-way process. At this point we will discuss further why you want to do this programme and will request to see previous practice. You will also have an opportunity to ask us questions and discuss the programme. If you are not an arts practitioner we will need to hear about other work and experience, and understand how it equips you for this programme. Conditions of acceptance When you accept our offer, you agree to the conditions of acceptance. You should therefore read those conditions before accepting the offer. Careers and professional development How this course helps you develop This course helps you develop new ways of thinking and engaging and a set of social sculpture root methodologies. The exceptional transferable skills that students develop on the programme have been described by many participants as 'life changing'. This new knowledge and skill also enhances and supports the development of new forms of reflective social practice and interdisciplinary social sculpture. The knowledge and skill gained can be taken into your original discipline or area of work or help you to develop new areas of work in the transdisciplinary arts, in academia, in integrative activism, education, creative cultural action and reflective social practice. Social Sculpture 'root methodologies' in mapping, active listening, dialogue processes, journaling and other practices for connecting inner work and outer action enable a powerful sense of agency and generate much confidence and energy for becoming 'agents of alternatives' in an extremely challenging world. Careers In this unique programme graduates develop excellent creative capacities and new ways of thinking that enable them to identify and develop interdisciplinary arenas and contexts for public engagement with specific communities, organisations and other constituencies. A strong aspect of the programme is the way it enables graduates to return to existing professions and contexts in new ways: as interdisciplinary practitioners with insightful understandings, greatly enhanced imaginal capacities and knowledge of new forms of reflective and interdisciplinary connective practice. Many Social Sculpture graduates continue as social sculpture practitioners or eco-cultural activists, whilst others develop careers related to their knowledge, expertise or interests, for example within organisational change, social enterprise programmes, festival management, tertiary education, agro-ecology, arts administration; arts and music teaching, medical humanities, educators and practitioners in arts for health, promoting ecological citizenship, community cross artform work and as sustainability activists. These diverse career possibilities have much to do with the close relationship between the content and the pedagogic approaches offered on the MA Social Sculpture programme with its focus on experiential knowing, active citizenship and connective practices. Combining the rigour of a traditional academic programme with innovative practical and vocational components makes graduates well placed for roles as practitioners as well as for further research in territory that includes the arts and sustainability, ecological citizenship, individual and community change processes, cultural and ecological activism and the field of contemporary social sculpture and connective aesthetics. The methodologies taught also enable new forms of interdisciplinary and postdisciplinary practice and research. Free language courses for students - the Open Module Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses. Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are: studying at a Brookes partner college studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses. [-]

MA in Urban Design

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 24 months September 2016 United Kingdom Oxford + 1 more

The Urban Design course combines students' existing strengths with focused design training to produce urban designers capable of managing the complex problems... [+]

MA in Urban Design

 

The Urban Design course combines students' existing strengths with focused design training to produce urban designers capable of managing the complex problems of development, urban space and form.The course combines students' existing strengths with focused design training to produce urban designers capable of managing the complex problems of development, urban space and form.The certificate and diploma stages introduce theoretical concepts and practical methods of urban design. They will enable you to understand processes of urban design production and consumption and to develop skills and techniques for communicating three-dimensional urban design.

... [-]

MA Publishing Studies (distance learning)

Online Part time 1 - 5 years January 2016 United Kingdom Oxford

This programme closely follows the established campus based MA publishing degrees. All modules are newly designed to be delivered online using interactive features of the virtual learning environment. [+]

Publishing Studies (distance learning) - January 2015 MA/ PGDip/ PGCert This course is run by the School of Arts. This programme closely follows the established campus based MA publishing degrees. All modules are newly designed to be delivered online using interactive features of the virtual learning environment, Moodle. The 10-week 10-unit modules are delivered by a variety of media including video, audio, written materials and supplied text books, designed to accommodate a range of learning styles and personal circumstances. Your study is supported by a tutor responsible for a small number of other students who together make up a study group. Further academic guidance comes from the Programme Lead. Assessment is through reports, discussion submissions, essays and independent research topics. Why choose this course? a flexible learning programme offering the skills and knowledge necessary for a successful entry into publishing that can be studied from home designed to be studied in conjunction with employment in any field, the programme addresses evidenced publishing employers' needs unparalleled support from tutors and state-of-the-art learning technologies your enrolment at Oxford Brookes within the Oxford International Centre for Publishing Studies provides you with relevant and tailored learning opportunities. There is no similar distance learning provision offered by higher education institutions in the UK or Europe. develop the skills and knowledge necessary to address the marketing, production and editorial functions in publishing, as well as skills in data analysis and writing practices - expertise that is currently in demand by the publishing industry which requires individuals who are able to asses, evaluate and synthesize data. This course in detail This part-time programme is usually studied over two years. However, you are able to take up to 5 years to complete the necessary credits. Four core compulsory modules make up the first year and address marketing and sales, digital production and workflow, and editorial as publishing-related topics and research skills as preparation for the later dissertation. In the second year, you choose one module from each of two groups: either International publishing and rights or Independent study; and then either Culture of Publishing, Journals or Independent study. The independent study module is specifically designed to provide you with a structured pedagogic framework in which to reflect on and develop your experience of work in publishing. You may, however, select the independent study module once only. Your programme is completed with a longer period of research and writing(about 6 months), supported by a supervisor, which culminates in a 15,000-word dissertation. Marketing and sales management for publishing This module provides a systematic examination of the key concepts and disciplines of marketing and sales and their relationships and relevance to the marketing and business practices in the publishing industry. The core marketing and sales issues required for print and electronic products and services are covered along with the concepts and tools necessary to operate in a marketing and sales environment. Students are engaged with specifics of marketing in a publishing context including the marketing mix, consumer behaviour, segmentation, targeting and positioning, and elements of market research. Marketing theory and its application to publishing is presented and the module provides opportunities for students to apply this knowledge in producing a marketing plan for a new product. Digital production and workflow management This module focuses on the production and delivery of publishing products in a digital environment. It examines project management and workflow issues associated with the design and production of both printed and digital products. Particular attention is given to analysing and evaluating the changes that digital technology is bringing about to the ways in which products are developed and produced in the publishing industry. Key issues affecting the design and production strategies and business practices for print, ebooks, and web are discussed. Management skills such as planning, organising, briefing, costing and controlling a project from inception to completion are developed. Strategies and practices for international aspects of the publishing industry are investigated and the opportunities and constraints for the publisher are assessed. Editorial management, functions and strategies This module introduces the role of the commissioning editor in contemporary publishing, within a range of market sectors. Students explore the strategic role of the editor in the publishing process and acquire the knowledge and skills required for the development of economically viable new projects in both print and digital form. This module includes coverage of the editorial process in a digital environment, both in terms of content delivery and workflow. Topics covered include the importance and application of market research, working with authors and agents, and the management and exploitation of intellectual property. The financial responsibilities of the editor are presented and the necessity of business acumen demonstrated. The development of new products, with particular emphasis on list building and adding value to a company, are key subjects for study. Through a variety of learning methods and activities this module emphasizes the knowledge base and the intellectual, interpersonal and practical skills needed by editors to face the opportunities for and threats to publishers in the 21st century. Research skills This module provides an in-depth introduction to the culture of research, to research methods and skills such as critical reading and level 7 academic writing skills. It guides students in theorising, structuring and designing research for publishing and ultimately in the approaches required for writing the dissertation. Data sources for publishing are examined and the final proposal prepares students for the later dissertation, although the skills learned and practised in this module are also applicable to practical evaluation of live projects necessary during work in publishing. International management of publishing and rights This module addresses different strategic options for the international development and management of contemporary publishing organisations and explores models for the commercial exploitation of intellectual property rights worldwide, including: exporting, licensing and building locally. The module will cover the important aspects of copyright and moral rights, the sale of translation rights and co-editions and other subsidiary rights. Digital licensing and the protection of IP against infringement are also covered. Culture of publishing This module explores theoretical approaches to print culture and transitions in the publishing industry from the early 20th century to the present day. Through reading a range of key texts in the discipline, and through participation in online seminar discussions, students consider a wide range of interpretations and critiques of the role of the publisher in society. Included are a discussion of methodologies for studying book history and publishing culture, both sociological and paratextual. There is a consideration of the gate-keeping function of the publisher, and the publisher’s role in the negotiation of cultural and commercial value in texts. The module then considers how ideological challenges are linked to specific developments in the history of publishing in the past century. Management of journals This module introduces students to the economically and academically important area of journals publishing. It covers both electronic and paper-based serial publications across science, technology, medicine, the humanities and social sciences, and the arts. Journals publishing is characterised by rapid technological change from workflow and production to online submissions systems. Students investigate leading edge technologies and address the responses of publishers to this fast-changing environment, evolving business models, and the wider context set by the academy, government and the international knowledge economy. Independent study This module offers students the opportunity to formulate a programme of study with assessment criteria that is based on work experience in the publishing or closely related industries. The aim is to enable students to devise, negotiate, organise and carry out reflective analysis of a period of work or a specific project according to a set of learning outcomes and assessment criteria in collaboration with the module leader and a supervisor. The programme of study is aimed at practical industry-based experiences and may include, for example, reporting on practical exploration of an issue of relevance to the publishing industry; or developing a practical project (e.g. web site, newsletter, promotion materials). Critical reflection on their own work and on that of others is an integral aspect of the module. Dissertation The dissertation is a defining and essential component for the award of the MA Publishing Studies. As a major in-depth investigation of a subject, theme or issue of significance to the study of publishing, it enables the student to put into practice the investigative and communication skills developed in the previous modules. In addition, students are able to demonstrate an ability to formulate and evaluate an independent study through research and an extended piece of academic written work of 15,000 words. Please note: as our courses are reviewed regularly, the list of modules you choose from may vary from that shown, although this is a rare occurrence. Teaching and learning Teaching is presented in a structured modular framework of compulsory and optional modules which provide both core competencies and knowledge while offering the opportunity for you to tailor your programme. You will be encouraged through discussion forums, individual reading and investigative practices in the modules to engage actively with your study. This approach is informed by and based on the understanding that your’ learning should be relevant to your interests In presenting the learning materials online, each module clearly outlines the structure of the 10 units at the start, identifies points of increased input, discussion areas, activities and assessments enabling you to adjust your engagement with the learning, within the requirements of the module, to suit your individual timetables. Within the modules and during the course of the programme, culminating in the dissertation, your autonomy in your learning increases through structured activities that start with close guidance and build towards greater independence. Flexibility, where possible, while aiming for a cohesive and supportive group of fellow students, is built into the timetable of discussion forums, communication with associate tutors and other students. Study groups: You are entered into a small study group with an Associate Tutor who pays particular attention to your involvement, responses and learning within individual modules and throughout the programme. This support structure is enhanced by the Subject Coordinator and the Programme Lead who will oversee the tutors’ involvement with you, provide the tutors with guidance and act as a second level of support to you. Work experience: The global nature of the students studying on this programme body makes the universal guarantee of the provision of work experience or work-based learning unattainable. However, OICPS will draw on its international network of contacts and alumni to provide, where possible, links for you while studying on the programme if you desire and are available for work experience. Approach to assessment The assessment strategy for the programme as a whole provides course work assignments appropriate to the core and optional modules. As a culmination to the programme, an independent research project leads to a 15,000 word dissertation. The assessments are designed to promote a dialogue between students and staff around assignments and feedback, and recognise that it is a joint responsibility. Use is made of peer formative feedback in some modules. Within the modules, two or three assignments with increasing weighting provide you with an initial low percentage summative assessment, leading to assignments of greater weight towards the end of the study period. Formative feedback is provided for the larger weighted assignments. Marks and feedback are provided for all assignments. Written coursework includes such assignments as reports, reading diaries, academic essays and proposals. Feedback is provided using an assessment matrix derived from the learning outcomes and includes discursive comments and the opportunity to discuss feedback with your tutor. Marking by Associate Tutors is monitored by the Programme Lead/Subject Coordinator team and a percentage of double marking monitors the summative assignments. Specialist facilities The extensive electronic library resources support the programme and are assisted by the provision of up to two selected text books for each module studied. This particular unique feature of the programme provides text for directed reading and acts as a resource for further investigation of module topics. Key facts Department School of Arts Course length Part-time: PGCert One Year, PGDip 18 months, MA Two years Teaching location Distance learning Start date January 2015 UKPass code 52101 Tuition fees Home / EU part-time off-campus fee: £6,995 (nearly £3,500 per year) International part-time off-campus fee: £11,600 (£5,800 per year) Entry requirements Entrants to the programme should possess the following qualifications: a) A 2:1 honours degree or above or international equivalent in any subject. b) A demonstrable interest in the creative publishing industries, such as work experience or voluntary work in a publishing company or fulfilling a publishing-related function in a non-publishing organisation. c) Two references; these may be, for example, two academic references, or one academic reference and one from an employer. d) This programme is delivered through web technology and makes extensive use of digital resources. In order to study effectively on this programme, students require access to the Internet through broadband or fast modem on a daily basis and should have experience and familiarity with computer technology. The following hardware and software specifications are required for access to Moodle: PC Requirement: 1GHz CPU, Windows XP or later, 1Gb of RAM, 40Gb hard disk, Broadband internet access, Graphics Card with at least 128MB of memory, Sound card, Microphone and speakers or headphones. Macintosh Requirements: 1Ghz Processor, Mac OS X or later, 1Gb of RAM, 40Gb hard disk, Broadband internet access, Graphics Card with at least 128MB of memory, Sound card, Microphone and speakers or headphones The above should meet minimum requirements to use Brookes VLE software and enhance the learning experience. However, content linked and stored within the VLE may require higher specifications. Software: Microsoft Office XP or later, Java 2 Runtime Environment version 1.6.0_05 (or the latest version) Browser: Mozilla Firefox Version 3.0 Browser Plug-ins Students will also need the following plug-ins for use with Moodle: Apple Quick Time, Shockwave, Flash & Authorware, Adobe Acrobat Reader, Real Networks RealPlayer, Microsoft Media Player. These plug-ins are free to download and the latest versions are required. International applications Preparation courses for International and EU students We offer a range of courses to help you to meet the entry requirements for this course and also familiarise you with university life. You may also be able to apply for one student visa to cover both courses. Take our Pre-Master's course to help you to meet both the English language and academic entry requirements for your master's course. If you need to improve your English language, we have pre-sessional English language courses available to help you to meet the English language requirements of your chosen master’s. If you are studying outside the UK, for more details about your specific country entry requirements, translated information, local contacts and programmes within your country, please have a look at our country pages. Careers and professional development How this course helps you develop This course is targeted at individuals who either want to start a career in publishing or who are already working and want to enhance their career with an advanced degree. If you are a recent graduate who wants to enter publishing but are unable to continue with full time study then this programme enables you to develop appropriate knowledge of the industry. If you are already working and want to progress your career or change career, then the topics we cover in this programme provide the basis for this change. Careers Career destinations for graduates of this programme are centred on the global creative industries that exploit intellectual property. These include editorial, project management, marketing and sales roles, including rights selling in global publishing companies offering print and electronic products. Increasingly, graduates will also be entering the more diverse environment offered by small independent publishing enterprises and medium size companies. In addition, the skills and knowledge gained in this programme enable student to progress in fields which publish data and information, but which are not usually considered as part of the publishing industry; for example, companies in the pharmaceutical and financial services industries publish large amounts of information and require individuals with a knowledge of managing efficient dissemination processes. Free language courses for students - the Open Module Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses. Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are: studying at a Brookes partner college studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses. [-]

MA Sound Arts

Campus Full time Part time 12 - 24 months September 2016 United Kingdom Oxford + 1 more

MA Sound Arts is a creative, interdisciplinary course that enables you to investigate exploratory and innovative Sound Arts practices including experimental composition, sound installation, field recording, site-specific practice, sonic art and improvisation. [+]

MA Sound Arts MA Sound Arts is a creative, interdisciplinary course that enables you to investigate exploratory and innovative Sound Arts practices including experimental composition, sound installation, field recording, site-specific practice, sonic art and improvisation. This programme is enhanced by a group of internationally active sound artists, composers and field recordists who curate and participate in the activities of the SARU (Sonic Art Research Unit) and the annual festival Audiograft. The weekly Listening Group complements the core provision and introduces you to the vibrant research culture around Sound Arts. You will develop individual and collaborative practice-based work in a stimulating environment that encourages dialogue and growth as part of a reflective community. This is a good basis for the intensive, fascinating and challenging work that thrives in this supportive, innovative and creative context. Why choose this course? The School of Arts offers state-of-the-art technical facilities for Sound Arts and 24-hour studio access. This course is taught by leading Sound Arts practitioners creating ‘world-leading’ research as defined by the REF2014 (Research Excellence Framework). You will have access to expertise in sound art, field recording, electroacoustic composition, site-based practice, experimental composition and improvisation. Sound Arts is situated in an interdisicplinary context and you will work with students from Art & Design and Music. The Sonic Art research Unit (SARU) and the annual ACE funded audiograft festival provide a stimulating environment for innovation and experimentation in your creative practice. Many of our Arts MA students progress to PhD study. Teaching and learning Teaching methods include: Lectures and seminars held by staff on specialised topics. Team teaching in group seminars involving generic issues in research methodologies for practice based research. Feedback from staff during group feedback sessions, where staff make comments and provide you with constructive criticism and analysis of your work. Staff led group discussions arising out of your practical work presentations. Individual tutorials that address your individual research concerns. Specialised introductions to creative strategies for generating and making practice based work. Approach to assessment Practical presentations of resolved ‘artworks’ and regular summative work-in-progress feedback. Regular in-module formative feedback and formative feedback tutorials to ensure you are aware of your progress. Written self evaluations for each creative project that reflect on all that has been achieved in the module, and how relevant insights will be carried forward. A written reflection at the culmination of the programme that reflects on all that has been achieved on the programme and in particular the Major Project and how these insights will be carried forward. This summative self reflective process is integral to the programme and in developing the necessary skills for ongoing focused practice-based research and/or ongoing independent research and practice. Written case-studies, assignments and reports. A final presentation of practical works as part of the MA exhibition/event/festival. How to apply / Entry requirements Entry requirements The general entry requirements are: a good honours degree, ie an upper second or first, in any subject an internationally recognised qualification equivalent to a good British honours degree. Applicants without a first degree, but with extensive experience in the arts or other disciplines relevant to our programmes may also be considered. Please contact the Admissions Officer to discuss this. Please also see the university's general entry requirements. English language requirements If your first language is not English, or if you have not studied a higher education degree in English, then an English language level of IELTS 7.0 overall with 6.0 in each component is required. There is a fair amount of discussion on the programme - both in the feedback sessions and in the weekly seminar-meetings. It is therefore very important to be able to understand and speak English well enough to participate in a group conversation. Please also see the university's standard English language requirements English requirements for visas If you need a student visa to enter the UK you will need to meet the UK Visas and Immigration minimum language requirements as well as the university's requirements.Find out more about English language requirements. International applications Preparation courses for International and EU students We offer a range of courses to help you to meet the entry requirements for this course and also familiarise you with university life. You may also be able to apply for one student visa to cover both courses. Take our Pre-Master's course to help you to meet both the English language and academic entry requirements for your master's course. If you need to improve your English language, we have pre-sessional English language courses available to help you to meet the English language requirements of your chosen master’s. If you are studying outside the UK, for more details about your specific country entry requirements, translated information, local contacts and programmes within your country, please have a look at our country pages. How to apply You apply for this course through UCAS Postgraduate. Through UCAS Postgraduate, you should use the UKPASS portal to make your application, which will then be forwarded directly to our Admissions Office. You should send supporting documentation to us directly using the email addresses on the UKPASS application form. Once we have received your UKPASS application we will contact you to set up an interview in person, or by Skype if you are not near Oxford. At this point we will discuss further why you want to do this programme and will request to see previous practice. If you are not an arts practitioner we will need to hear about other work and experience, and understand how it equips you for this programme. Conditions of acceptance When you accept our offer, you agree to the conditions of acceptance. You should therefore read those conditions before accepting the offer. Careers and professional development How this course helps you develop This unique programme enables you to develop excellent creative capacities, combining the rigour of a more traditional academic arts programme with innovative practical and vocational components which makes eligible for a variety of practice based or research careers in arts and sustainability, individual and community change processes, cultural and environmental activism and the creative sector as well as working as musicians. Careers Combining the academic rigour of a traditional programme with practical and vocational components, sonic arts and composition students at Oxford Brookes are well placed for a variety of careers in the creative sector. Many master's students who have developed their practice at postgraduate level will continue as practicing sound artists and new music composers, whilst others take up careers related to their knowledge, expertise or interests. This includes within teaching further or higher education; the media and new technologies, and cultural administration. Free language courses for students - the Open Module Free language courses are available to full-time undergraduate and postgraduate students on many of our courses, and can be taken as a credit on some courses. Please note that the free language courses are not available if you are: studying at a Brookes partner college studying on any of our teacher education courses or postgraduate education courses. [-]

Contact

Oxford Brookes University

Address Headington Campus, Headington Road,
OX3 0BP Oxford, United Kingdom
Website http://www.tde.brookes.ac.uk
Phone +44 1865 484848