University of Kent, School of European Culture and Languages

School of European Culture and Languages

Introduction

The School of European Culture and Languages (SECL) is one of the largest academic schools at the University of Kent. The School offers an extensive range of undergraduate and postgraduate programmes in all aspects of European cultural life within our nine departments: Classical & Archaeological Studies, Comparative Literature, English Language & Linguistics, French, German, Hispanic Studies, Italian, Philosophy and Religious Studies. We offer a range of single-honours degrees as well as joint-honours degree programmes combining subject areas within the School, the Faculty of Humanities or other parts of the University.

SECL has long-standing links and exchange agreements with some of Europe’s most prestigious institutions, is the founder of the University of Kent at Paris, runs an MA in Heritage Management in Athens and two new MA programmes in Ancient History and Roman History and Archaeology with terms in Rome.

SECL offers high-quality teaching by staff whose research is internationally recognised. We scored above the national average for student satisfaction in the National Student Survey 2014 and were ranked in the top 10 in the UK for the following subjects: Comparative Literature (1st); Hispanic Studies (1st); Philosophy (4th); Religious Studies (5th); French (8th); English Language & Linguistics (9th); and Archaeology (10th).

This school offers programs in:
  • English

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Programs

This school also offers:

MA

BA in Art History and Classical & Archaeological Studies (Hons)

Campus Full time 3 years September 2016 United Kingdom Canterbury

This new programme offers a critically engaging and expansive approach to the discipline of art history combined with classical and archaeological studies. [+]

BA in Art History and Classical & Archaeological Studies (Hons) This new programme offers a critically engaging and expansive approach to the discipline of art history combined with classical and archaeological studies. It has been designed to equip you with the key visual, critical and professional skills necessary for a career in the art world and for a range of other employment opportunities. In your first year, you are given a firm foundation in some of the aesthetic, interpretative and methodological approaches to the discipline of art history. Throughout your second and third years, there are opportunities for you to develop and expand your engagement with the discipline through a range of specialist modules. As well as options that explore Renaissance and Baroque art, modernism, contemporary art, French painting, Surrealism, photography and aesthetics, this programme also offers an introduction to work-related skills directly relevant to employment in the visual arts sector, such as visual arts writing and exhibition curation. The Classical & Archaeological Studies element of your degree offers a hugely interesting and varied range of subjects including: literature, mythology, drama, archaeology, architecture, art, languages and philosophy, and looks at the way they all connect in the study of ancient civilisations. Independent rankings In the National Student Survey 2013 Archaeology ranked 12th and Classics 14th for student satisfaction. In addition, 93% of arts students were satisfied with the quality of their course. In The Guardian University Guide 2014, Classics and Archaeology at Kent are ranked 8th and 11th respectively whilst Art at Kent ranked 6th overall and 6th for graduate prospects. [-]

MA in Ancient History

Campus Full time Part time 1 year September 2016 United Kingdom Canterbury + 1 more

The MA in Ancient History has a focus on research training that will place students in a strong position for further study for a PhD or for careers outside academia that require research skills. [+]

MA in Ancient History The MA in Ancient History has a focus on research training that will place students in a strong position for further study for a PhD or for careers outside academia that require research skills. The MA provides a full study of the use of a variety of types of evidence that is underpinned by a core module focussed on interpretation. A wide range of modules in both Greek and Roman History are offered that can be chosen as part of the MA. This allows students not only choice, but also the ability to specialise in a particular area of the subject. Course content A 12-month MA programme by full-time study for 180 credits (part-time enrolment possible). Core modules CL900: Research Skills in Ancient History: Understanding the City in Antiquity Optional modules Students choose three from the following (subject to availability): CL820 The Political, Social and Economic History of the Hellenistic World CL821: Ancient Greek Science: Astronomy and Medicine CL823: Sexuality, Secrecy and Sin: Ancient Christianity and the World of Late Antiquity Latin or Ancient Greek at an appropriate level (Beginners, Intermediate or Advanced, according to ability) Who should apply? This degree is ideal for those who have studied BA degrees in Ancient History; Ancient History and Archaeology; Classical Studies; Classical and Archaeological Studies and other combinations that have involved the study of Ancient History/Classical Studies/Classics/Archaeology. It is also open to students of other disciplines, who can display a degree of prior knowledge of the subject. Students will hold a degree of Bachelor in a relevant discipline with a grade of 2:1 or its equivalent at least at this or any other university. [-]

MA in Ancient History with a Term in Rome

Campus Full time 1 year September 2016 United Kingdom Canterbury Italy Rome + 2 more

Focusing on Rome and the cities of the Roman Empire, Kent’s exciting new taught MA programmes in Ancient History allows you to spend your academic year in two great locations: Canterbury and Rome. [+]

MA in Ancient History with a Term in Rome Focusing on Rome and the cities of the Roman Empire, Kent’s exciting new taught MA programmes in Ancient History allows you to spend your academic year in two great locations: Canterbury and Rome. You study the monuments and artefacts of ancient Rome at first hand, visiting relevant sites and museums, with options to study site conservation and museum presentation as well as the history of the city. Outline This unique MA is designed for students who wish to adopt a twin-tracked approach to the past by using both historical sources and archaeological evidence. The focus of the MA is on research training in preparation for further study for a PhD or for a career outside academia that require research skills. A key focus of the programme is on the cities of the Roman Empire, including the capital – Rome. There is also the possibility of specialising in the study of Age, Gender and Ethnicity, as well as taking modules in the wider history and archaeology of the Roman period. The MA in Ancient History with a Term in Rome has a focus on research training that will place students in a strong position for further study for a PhD or for careers outside academia that require research skills. The programme provides a full study of the use of a variety of types of evidence that is underpinned by a core module focused on interpretation. A key focus of the MA is on the cities of the Roman Empire, especially the capital, Rome. A term is spent in Rome, in which you study the monuments and artefacts of the ancient city at first hand, visiting relevant sites and museums, with options to study site conservation and museum presentation as well as the history of Rome. University of Kent staff are present for part of the spring term in Rome to ensure continuity of academic guidance and pastoral support. Entry requirements A first or upper second class honours degree in Ancient History and Archaeology, Ancient History, Classical and Archaeological Studies or another relevant subject (or the equivalent). Please also check our general entry requirements (including English language requirements). [-]

MA in Applied Linguistics for TESOL

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years September 2016 United Kingdom Canterbury + 1 more

The MA in Applied Linguistics for TESOL is aimed at teachers who are at the beginning of their careers and those who have more experience but would like to develop, deepen and enhance their knowledge, skills and practice. [+]

MA in Applied Linguistics for TESOL The MA in Applied Linguistics for TESOL is aimed at teachers who are at the beginning of their careers and those who have more experience but would like to develop, deepen and enhance their knowledge, skills and practice. The programme covers the areas of linguistics that inform classroom practice (such as syntax, morphology, semantics, pragmatics and phonetics), raising awareness of these fields and applying them to Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL). Practical teaching opportunities are a feature of the programme, including teaching to your peer-group and international students from other programmes. There will also be an opportunity to visit a local language college and observe classes. Course structure The programme starts with three linguistics modules (Sounds, Structure and Meaning) and a module on language awareness for teachers (Language Awareness and Analysis) so that you have a firm grasp of the linguistic bases of language teaching and how to apply them to the classroom. In the spring term the focus is on how languages are learned (Second Language Acquisition), how you can improve classroom technique (The Practice of TESOL), plan for your students’ needs (Course and Syllabus Design) and provide them with materials which will be interesting, effective and motivating (Materials Evaluation and Development). The dissertation will be an opportunity to plan and develop a piece of empirical research which can be of direct relevance to your current or planned teaching situation. Modules The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you. LL832 - Meaning LL833 - Structure LL834 - Second Language Acquisition LL838 - Sounds LL840 - Course and Syllabus Design for TESOL LL841 - Language Awareness and Analysis for TESOL LL842 - Materials Evaluation and Development for TESOL LL843 - The Practice of TESOL LL899 - Research Dissertation Assessment Modules are typically assessed by a 3,000 - 4,000 word essay, but assessment patterns can include practical/experimental work, report writing, proposal writing, critiques, problem-solving, and seminar presentations. On successful completion of taught modules, you will write a 12,000 - 15,000 word research dissertation (included in your final grade) on a topic agreed with your supervisor. [-]

MA in Archaeology

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years September 2016 United Kingdom Canterbury + 1 more

The MA introduces students to the archaeology of selected themes, evidence types, periods and regions through a distinctive and unique programme, relating this to wider spheres of information and understanding in archaeology. [+]

MA in Archaeology The MA introduces students to the archaeology of selected themes, evidence types, periods and regions through a distinctive and unique programme, relating this to wider spheres of information and understanding in archaeology. It provides students with a robust grounding in theories, methods and approaches within contemporary archaeology (covering, for instance, phenomenology and materiality) through a core taught module. Students can then specialize in selected periods, regions and evidence types through a range of taught and directed study modules. The programme aims to engage students directly with first-hand archaeological evidence, exploring areas such as the relationship of sites to their wider landscape and cultural setting, processes of continuity and change within the archaeological record, and the interpretation of material culture. The teaching is geared towards students’ interests and career needs where possible. Applicants with an interest in material culture/artefact studies are especially welcome to apply. Entry requirements A first or second class honours degree in Archaeology, Classics, Ancient History, or related subject. Modules The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you. CL805 - Contemporary Archaeology: Theories, Methods and Issues CL807 - Settlement and Society in the Transmanche Region during the Iron Age CL821 - Ancient Greek Science: Astronomy and Medicine MT864 - Reading the Medieval Town: Canterbury, an International City CL897 - CL Dissertation [-]

MA in Comparative Literature

Campus Full time Part time 1 year September 2016 United Kingdom Canterbury + 1 more

The MA in Comparative Literature is aimed at graduates in modern languages who are seeking to consolidate their knowledge in a wider context, graduates in English and/or American Literature wishing to diversify their interests, and graduates in a range of other Humanities subjects [+]

MA in Comparative Literature The MA in Comparative Literature is aimed at graduates in modern languages who are seeking to consolidate their knowledge in a wider context, graduates in English and/or American Literature wishing to diversify their interests, and graduates in a range of other Humanities subjects (including History, Philosophy, and Theology) who would like to bring their preoccupations to bear on literary material. Non-linguists are able to study exclusively through the medium of English while modern linguists (in French, German, Italian, and Spanish) have the opportunity to read extensively in their specialist language or languages. The MA programme is designed to offer students the opportunity to study a range of major writers and key themes in European and American literature from the eighteenth century to the present day. Students take four 30-credit taught modules during the Autumn and Spring terms, and write one 12,000-word dissertation (60 credits) over the summer. Modules Students on the MA in Comparative Literature take at least three of the following Comparative Literature modules (subject to availability): CP805 European Modernism: Sexual and Textual Deviance CP808 Writing the Self: Autobiography in the Modern Period CP810 Comparative Literature in Theory and Practice CP811 Writing Unreason: Literature and Madness in the Modern Period CP813 Literature and Medicine Modules offered by the departments of French and German that are particularly suitable for students studying for the MA in Comparative Literature, and that may be taken as an alternative to one of the above modules, include (subject to availability): FR807 Postmodern French Detective Fiction FR872 Theories of Art in Modern French Thought GE804 German Modernism GE807 Writing the City: The Modern Metropolis in German Literature Upon successful completion of their four coursework modules, students proceed to write a dissertation over the summer. Students on the MA also have the opportunity to attend the research seminar series organized by the Centre for Modern European Literature. [-]

MA in Comparative Literature (Paris)

Campus Full time 1 year September 2016 United Kingdom Canterbury France Paris + 2 more

This programme enables you to study in Canterbury in the autumn term and in Paris in the spring term. The autumn term modules are the same as those for the standard MA in Comparative Literature. [+]

MA in Comparative Literature (Paris) This programme enables you to study in Canterbury in the autumn term and in Paris in the spring term. The autumn term modules are the same as those for the standard MA in Comparative Literature. The spring term modules are taught by staff from the University of Kent and occasional guest lecturers, ensuring consistent academic standards and assessment throughout the year. These modules are designed to be specifically relevant to the experience of living and studying in Paris. You are encouraged to make full use of Paris’ cultural resources and to integrate these into your studies. University of Kent staff are resident in Paris during the spring term to ensure year-long continuity of academic guidance and pastoral support. Modules The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you. CP810 - Comparative Literature in Theory and Practice CP812 - Enlightenment and Counter-Enlightenment in the Long Eighteenth Century CP813 - Literature and Medicine FR803 - Paris and the European Enlightenment FR809 - Identity, Trauma and Sexuality in Modern French Literature FR820 - Paris: Reality and Representation CP807 - Diaspora and Exile CP998 - Comparative Literature Dissertation Assessment Assessment is by one 5,000-word essay for each module, and the dissertation. Learning outcomes Programme aims This programme aims to: provide the opportunity to obtain a postgraduate qualification (MA) in one year, and to allow, if required, a smooth transition to doctoral studies allow you to spend the first term in Canterbury, studying modules in comparative literature, and the second term in Paris, studying modules in French, European, English and American literatures enhance your knowledge of European literature and European cinema enable an in-depth exploration of areas of modern European culture develop your knowledge and understanding of relevant aspects of contemporary Paris and the cultural history of the city as reflected in modern French, European, English and American literatures and other artistic media develop a critical awareness of these topics build an understanding of critical theories linked with the study of these topics introduce various methodological approaches develop knowledge of relevant databases provide teaching which is informed by current research and scholarship and which requires you to engage with aspects of work at the frontiers of knowledge provide access to intercultural awareness and understanding provide opportunities for the development of your personal, communication and research skills and other key skills appropriate for graduate employment both in industry and in the public sector develop your critical, analytical, problem-solving and other transferable skills. Knowledge and understanding You will gain knowledge and understanding of: aspects of comparative literature Modernism as an international movement in literature and art and the role of Paris as a site of modernist experimentation the cultural history of modern Paris, as reflected in art and literature research methodology critical theory and its application to appreciation of literature and to a research dissertation. Intellectual skills You develop intellectual skills in: language skills: reading, comprehension and communication skills in English problem-solving skills: the ability to reason logically, critically and analogically how to evaluate complex information critically how to synthesise complex information from a number of sources in order to gain a coherent understanding of the subject research methodology: gather, organise and deploy evidence, data and information from a variety of secondary and primary sources academic skills: identify, investigate, analyse, formulate and advocate solutions to problems. Develop reasoned arguments, synthesise relevant information and exercise critical judgement adaptation skills: learn to work in different environments by adapting to the educational, cultural and professional environments of England and France, while adopting an interdisciplinary approach to literary studies. Subject-specific skills You gain subject-specific skills in: analyse a variety of sources, both textual and visual, in English develop an appreciation of a variety of literary styles and art forms and their lines of divergence and convergence develop in-depth knowledge of European culture and literature develop a comprehensive knowledge of the cultural development of modern Paris, as expressed in literature and art a comprehensive understanding and ability to apply and evaluate various theoretical approaches to the study of literature and other art forms. Transferable skills You will gain the following transferable skills: oral communication: the ability to communicate orally at a high standard written communication: the ability to produce written work of a high standard, in appropriate register, in English IT: a high level of competence in information processing using relevant databases and online research teamwork: the ability to undertake group tasks that will encourage co-operative skills utilise problem-solving skills in a variety of theoretical and practical situations time management living and working in diverse cultural environments: you will participate and work in academic communities in both Canterbury and Paris. You will thus develop cultural knowledge and understanding, flexibility, imagination, resourcefulness and tolerance. [-]

MA in French and Comparative Literature

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years September 2016 United Kingdom Canterbury + 1 more

The MA in French and Comparative Literature introduces you to a wide range of theoretical perspectives, with the aim of enriching your appreciation of the cultures, texts and critical practices examined in the programme’s various modules. [+]

MA in French and Comparative Literature The MA in French and Comparative Literature introduces you to a wide range of theoretical perspectives, with the aim of enriching your appreciation of the cultures, texts and critical practices examined in the programme’s various modules. The centres of interest of the programme are designed to be complementary and to encourage comparison in a variety of contexts: national literatures, genres, media and theory. The MA is aimed at graduates in Modern Languages wanting to consolidate their knowledge in a wider context, graduates in English wishing to diversify their interests, and graduates in other humanities subjects (history, philosophy, theology, for example) who would like to apply their knowledge and critical skills to literary and visual material. Modules will be taught over two terms and will normally consist of ten classes of two hours duration.The programme comprises four 30-credit taught modules, each of which is taught in English and assessed by one 5,000-word essay. Students will also prepare, under supervision, a dissertation of 12,000 words (60 credits) in either English or French on an approved topic. All students are expected to attend the relevant postgraduate studies skills courses offered by the Faculty. Along with other research students in the School of European Culture and Languages, Students are also encouraged to attend the department's research seminar series, especially those events organised by the Centre for Modern European Literature [-]

MA in French and Comparative Literature (Paris)

Campus Full time 1 year September 2016 United Kingdom Canterbury France Paris + 2 more

This programme enables you to study in Canterbury in the autumn term and in Paris in the spring term. In Canterbury, you choose two relevant 30-credit modules. [+]

MA in French and Comparative Literature (Paris) This programme enables you to study in Canterbury in the autumn term and in Paris in the spring term. In Canterbury, you choose two relevant 30-credit modules. You then spend the spring term in Paris, where your studies are based at our teaching and research centre in Montparnasse. During that term, you take two modules taught by staff from the University of Kent and occasional guest lecturers, thus ensuring consistent academic standards and assessment throughout the year. The modules are designed to be specifically relevant to the experience of living and studying in the city. You are encouraged to make full use of Paris’ cultural resources and to integrate these into your studies. University of Kent staff are resident in Paris during the spring term to ensure year-long continuity of academic guidance and pastoral support. Modules The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you. FR866 - Literature and Theory FR872 - Theories of Art in Modern French Thought CP812 - Enlightenment and Counter-Enlightenment in the Long Eighteenth Century CP813 - Literature and Medicine FR803 - Paris and the European Enlightenment FR809 - Identity, Trauma and Sexuality in Modern French Literature FR820 - Paris: Reality and Representation CP807 - Diaspora and Exile FR998 - French Dissertation Assessment Assessment is by one 5,000-word essay for each module and the dissertation. Subject-specific skills You gain the following subject-specific skills: the ability to communicate at an advanced academic level in French and English an advanced knowledge and effective understanding of the various structures and registers of French an advanced ability to analyse a variety of sources, both textual and visual, in French and English develop an appreciation of a variety of literary styles and art forms and their lines of divergence and convergence develop a comprehensive knowledge of the cultural development of modern Paris, as expressed in literature and art a comprehensive understanding and ability to apply and evaluate various theoretical approaches to the study of literature and other art forms. [-]

MA in Heritage Management

Campus Full time 3 semesters September 2016 Greece Athens

The MA in Heritage Management is an intensive three semester (one and a half academic year) postgraduate programme which uniquely combines the worlds of archaeology and business and is taught in Athens at Eleusina, an area of world-class archaeological significance. [+]

MA in Heritage Management The MA in Heritage Management is an intensive three semester (one and a half academic year) postgraduate programme which uniquely combines the worlds of archaeology and business and is taught in Athens at Eleusina, an area of world-class archaeological significance. It focuses on teaching the skills required for the management of heritage sites across the world and how to effectively work with archaeologists, architects, conservators, marketing and education specialists while fundraising and supervising specific projects. The MA in Heritage Management will give you the opportunity to combine tuition by renowned international academics with practical experience in the effective management and planning of an archaeological site. Through a large number of extracurricular activities you will be able to develop your academic and professional skills, acquire Greek as a foreign language and live in the exciting city of Athens. The programme is taught next to the world-class site of Eleusina, one of the religious centres of Athens, and close to many other important sites including the Acropolis, Ancient Corinth, Nemea and Thebes. Teaching is through lectures and small group seminars. Part of the instruction will be done on site so that students gain hands-on experience and understand the issues involved. In the second half of the academic period students will work on actual world-wide projects. Innovative collaboration This new master’s programme is a collaborative dual award from the University of Kent in UK and the Athens University of Economics and Business (AUEB) in Greece, a partnership that ensures world-class tuition and an interdisciplinary learning environment. A critical element in the local dynamism and global relevance of the programme is provided by the Initiative for Heritage Conservancy, an innovative education and research project (supported by prominent international and Greek bodies and philanthropists) that creates its own opportunities in the field. [-]

MA in Hispanic Studies and Comparative Literature

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years September 2016 United Kingdom Canterbury + 1 more

The MA in Hispanic Studies and Comparative Literature is available as a full-time (one year) programme or a part-time (two years) programme. [+]

MA in Hispanic Studies and Comparative Literature The MA in Hispanic Studies and Comparative Literature is available as a full-time (one year) programme or a part-time (two years) programme. Students enrolled on the MA in Hispanic Studies and Comparative Literature take four taught modules in total, each of which is assessed by one 5,000-word essay. One module must be taken in Hispanic Studies, and one module from Comparative Literature. For their remaining modules, students may choose from either from those offered each year in Hispanic Studies, or from another MA programme in the Faculty of Humanities (including English and American Literature, French, German, Hispanic Studies, etc.). Modules There is one core module for this MA: CP810: Comparative Literature in Theory and Practice You choose one of the following modules per term (please note that not all modules are available every term): LS804: National and Regional Consciousness in Modern Spanish Literature LS805: Modern Spanish Art, Music and Popular Culture LS806: Spanish Cinema LS809: Myth, Image, Fashion and Propaganda in the Cuban Revolutionary Era LS810: History and Memory: Exploring the Independence Period through Memoir Students take one additional module offered from the MA in Comparative Literature. Dissertation LS998: Dissertation Upon successful completion of their four coursework modules, students proceed to write a 12,000-word dissertation over the summer on a comparative topic of their choice. Each student is assigned a supervisor with expertise in the area of study chosen for the dissertation. (60 credits) [-]

MA in Italian Theory

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years September 2016 United Kingdom Canterbury + 1 more

Kent offers an ideal environment for the postgraduate study of modern Italian society, literature and thought, within a broadly European context. [+]

MA in Italian Theory Without doubt, Italy is a cornerstone of European culture as well as providing a controversial and stimulating area of studies in the modern period. Kent offers an ideal environment for the postgraduate study of modern Italian society, literature and thought, within a broadly European context. With the research interests of staff covering the modern period, postgraduates can also benefit from the Italian studies interdisciplinary research seminar series and the activities of the newly established Centre for Critical Thought, both coordinated by the Department, which include lectures by prestigious guest speakers. The Department is also running a PhD co-tutelle programme with the Istituto Italiano di Scienze Umane (SUM), one of the leading research institutions in Italy. Course structure Students from Italian Studies or wider Humanities backgrounds will be able to develop and specialise in Italian Theory on this MA, comparing specific Italian critical approaches to literary and political texts associated with other critical traditions. The major areas focussed upon include biopolitics, political thought, Italian psychoanalytic criticism, ‘militant criticism’ (critica militante), and ‘academic literary criticism’ (critica accademica), as well as the significant interconnections between these different disciplines and methodologies. Students will embark on a learning experience informed by the latest research and scholarship, at the frontier the Italian Studies and Critical Theory disciplines. Students will gain the ability to develop complex arguments and critically evaluate current research, articulating the similarities and differences between different critical approaches to literature and philosophy, as well as their political significance. Assessment Learning is assessed via seminar presentations, essays, and a dissertation of up to 15,000 words. [-]

MA in Linguistics

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years September 2016 United Kingdom Canterbury + 1 more

The MA in Linguistics at Kent is designed for graduates with a background in language and related areas (for example, English, Modern or Classical Languages, Linguistics, Psychology, Anthropology) [+]

MA in Linguistics The MA in Linguistics at Kent is designed for graduates with a background in language and related areas (for example, English, Modern or Classical Languages, Linguistics, Psychology, Anthropology) looking to explore the theory and methodology of linguistics in-depth, from the study of sound (phonetics and phonology) to the study of words, sentences and meaning (morphology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics). Options on sociolinguistics, psycholinguistics and language learning and teaching allow you to develop your areas of interest, and engage with aspects of your chosen discipline which are informed by the latest research and scholarship. The programme offers a smooth transition to doctoral work for those who wish to pursue their studies further. Department of English Language and Linguistics English Language and Linguistics (ELL), founded in 2010, is the newest department of the School of European Culture and Languages (SECL). We have a strong team of research-active staff, a lively teaching and research culture with regular seminars by staff and visiting speakers, and Erasmus teaching and research links with, among others, Switzerland (Berne), Netherlands (Nijmegen) and Spain (Autonomous University of Madrid). Benefits for ELL students include ‘Linglunch’ seminars with both local and invited speakers, and Advanced Core Training in Linguistics (ACTL) classes for those who would like additional training in syntax, semantics and phonology. In addition, the Syntax Reading Group provides a space where staff, postgraduates and final-year undergraduates with an interest in syntax, psycholinguistics and first/second language acquisition, have the opportunity to exchange ideas about current research issues. [-]

MA in Modern European Literature

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years September 2016 United Kingdom Canterbury + 1 more

The MA in Modern European Literature covers a range of national literatures (English, French, German, Italian, and Spanish), and gives students the opportunity to read major literary works in their language of original composition. [+]

MA in Modern European Literature The MA in Modern European Literature covers a range of national literatures (English, French, German, Italian, and Spanish), and gives students the opportunity to read major literary works in their language of original composition. Students select modules covering at least two different European literatures (in addition to English) from the indicative list below (subject to availability): CP805 European Modernism: Sexual and Textual Deviance CP808 Writing the Self: Autobiography in the Modern Period CP810 Comparative Literature in Theory and Practice CP811 Writing Unreason: Literature and Madness in the Modern Period CP813 Literature and Medicine FR807 Postmodern French Detective Fiction FR872 Theories of Art in Modern French Thought GE804 German Modernism Once students have passed the coursework modules, they proceed to write a Dissertation of 12,000 words over the summer vacation on a relevant topic of their choice. You gain subject-specific skills in: the ability to read and analyse complex texts in at least two languages, as well as English the ability to read literature in a comparative European context the ability to differentiate between the formal implications of differing genres (ie poetry, prose, drama) and to respond to the differing problems of these genres the ability to situate literary texts in their socio-historial context. [-]

MA in Modern French Studies

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years September 2016 United Kingdom Canterbury + 1 more

The MA in Modern French Studies offers students the opportunity to study a range of major writers and key themes in French literature, visual culture and thought from the eighteenth century to the present day. [+]

MA in Modern French Studies The MA in Modern French Studies offers students the opportunity to study a range of major writers and key themes in French literature, visual culture and thought from the eighteenth century to the present day. This programme is designed for students with a variety of interests, including literature, the visual arts, philosophy and aesthetics. It also reflects the research specialisms and publications of the members of staff involved. Students take four 30-credit taught modules during the Autumn and Spring terms, each of which is taught in English and assessed by one 5,000 word essay in either English or French, and write one 12,000-word dissertation (60 credits) in either English or French over the summer. Modules The modules offered on this programme are as follows (subject to availability): FR807: Postmodern French Detective Fiction FR866: Literature and Theory FR869: Varieties of Artifice: The Painting in the Text in Modern French Studies FR870: Through a Lens: The Photograph in the Text in Modern French Studies FR872: Theories of Art in Modern French Thought Modules will be taught over two terms and will normally consist of ten classes of two hours' duration. All students are expected to attend the relevant postgraduate studies skills courses offered by the Faculty. Along with other research students in the School of European Culture and Languages, French students are also encouraged to attend research seminars organised by the Centre for Modern European Literature. [-]

MA in Modern French Studies (Paris)

Campus Full time 1 year September 2016 United Kingdom Canterbury France Paris + 2 more

This programme enables you to study in Canterbury in the autumn term and in Paris in the spring term. In Canterbury, you choose two relevant 30-credit modules. [+]

MA in Modern French Studies (Paris) This programme enables you to study in Canterbury in the autumn term and in Paris in the spring term. In Canterbury, you choose two relevant 30-credit modules. You then spend the spring term in Paris, where your studies are based at our teaching and research centre in Montparnasse. During that term, you take two modules taught by staff from the University of Kent and occasional guest lecturers, thus ensuring consistent academic standards and assessment throughout the year. The modules are designed to be specifically relevant to the experience of living and studying in the city. You are encouraged to make full use of Paris’ cultural resources and to integrate these into your studies. University of Kent staff are resident in Paris during the spring term to ensure year-long continuity of academic guidance and pastoral support. Modules The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you. FR866 - Literature and Theory FR872 - Theories of Art in Modern French Thought CP812 - Enlightenment and Counter-Enlightenment in the Long Eighteenth Century CP813 - Literature and Medicine FR803 - Paris and the European Enlightenment FR809 - Identity, Trauma and Sexuality in Modern French Literature FR820 - Paris: Reality and Representation CP807 - Diaspora and Exile FR998 - French Dissertation Assessment Assessment is by one 5,000-word essay for each module and the dissertation. [-]

MA in Modern German and Comparative Literature

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years September 2016 United Kingdom Canterbury + 1 more

This MA is aimed at students who want to deepen their knowledge of modern German literature within a broader European context. [+]

MA in Modern German and Comparative Literature This MA is aimed at students who want to deepen their knowledge of modern German literature within a broader European context. Kent is one of the few universities in the UK to have a thriving Comparative Literature department; within an expanding school of European culture, students will hone their literary and analytical skills not only on German texts, but also on a broader range of modern literature. As a taught course, the MA is suitable both for those who wish to take their undergraduate studies a stage further, and for those who wish to go on to a career in literary studies or intend to do a PhD. The programme consists of four modules, each of which is assessed by a 5000-word essay. This will then be supplemented by a dissertation (approximately 12,000 words) on a subject arising out of the student’s work over the course of the year. Prior knowledge of German (proven by BA degree or equivalent) will be a course requirement. The programme is offered on a full-time basis, with completion of the programme in one year, or on a part-time basis, with completion of the programme in two years. [-]

MA in Modern Hispanic Studies

Campus Part time 2 years September 2016 United Kingdom Canterbury

The MA in Modern Hispanic Studies leads you towards a better understanding of modern Hispanic society and its culture. [+]

MA in Modern Hispanic Studies The MA in Modern Hispanic Studies leads you towards a better understanding of modern Hispanic society and its culture. It consists of two parts: a literary element, taught in conjunction with the MA in Hispanic and Comparative Literature, and a cultural element which is particular to this programme. The MA in Hispanic and Comparative Literature helps you acquire a deeper conceptual awareness of the function and role of literature in Spain, and assess and evaluate it within a wider European context. The MA in Modern Hispanic Studies is currently only available as a part-time (two year) programme. Students enrolled on the MA take four taught modules in total, each of which is assessed by one 5,000-word essay. Modules Students choose one of the following modules per term (please note that not all modules are available every term): LS803: From Pure to Committed Literature LS804: National and Regional Consciousness in Modern Spanish Literature LS805: Modern Spanish Art, Music and Popular Culture LS806: Spanish Cinema LS809: Myth, Image, Fashion and Propaganda in the Cuban Revolutionary Era LS810: History and Memory: Exploring the Independence Period through Memoir You may choose one module from other SECL taught MA programmes. Dissertation LS998: Dissertation Upon successful completion of their four coursework modules, students proceed to write a 12,000-word dissertation over the summer on a topic of their choice. Each student is assigned a supervisor with expertise in the area of study chosen for the dissertation. [-]

MA in Philosophy

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years September 2016 United Kingdom Canterbury + 1 more

This programme is designed for students who wish to broaden their study of philosophy and make a gradual transition to research. [+]

MA in Philosophy This programme is designed for students who wish to broaden their study of philosophy and make a gradual transition to research. It is ideally suited to students with previous philosophical training who would like to widen their knowledge of topics, gain more training in philosophical methodology, and/or narrow down their interests of specialisation in preparation for an MPhil/PhD. The flexibility of this programme ensures that students are able to negotiate their own path of study through a range of modules which reflect the research specialisms and publications of the teaching staff, who are nationally and internationally recognised experts in their fields. Modules The MA in Philosophy comprises four 30-credit coursework modules (for a total of 120 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits). The four coursework modules are: PL805 Special Topics I PL806 Special Topics II PL855 Theoretical Philosophy PL856 Practical Philosophy There are three ways to receive credit for these modules: MA students are expected to attend, and may choose to be assessed on the basis of essays on topics covered in, our Graduate Seminars. The seminars are divided into two streams: Theoretical Reasoning, and History of Philosophy and Practical Philosophy. Topics covered vary each year in line with current staff research. Recent topics include the epistemology of disagreement, paradoxes, game theory, and Derek Parfit's On What Matters. In addition to attending the graduate seminars, MA students may, in consultation with the MA Programme Director, choose from a number of mixed undergraduate/graduate modules, typically assessed by a 4,000-word essay. The module offering varies from year to year. For a complete list of what is currently offered, please consult the Stage 2/3 module list. MA Students are also able to choose from, and be assessed on the basis of, any of the modules available on the MA in Reasoning as well as the Philosophy modules offered on the MA in Aesthetics. Special topics are also available from other approved MA programmes in the School of European Culture and Languages, the School of Arts, and the Kent Law School. Dissertation Upon successful completion of the four coursework essays, students proceed to the writing of the dissertation (60 credits): PL998 Dissertation This component is assessed on the basis of a 10,000-word dissertation on an approved topic. Students work with their dissertation supervisor during the six-week Summer Term and have the summer to write up. [-]

MA in Reasoning

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years September 2016 United Kingdom Canterbury + 1 more

This MA programme offers a selection of topics related to reasoning and inference. It covers areas such as cognitive science and AI; scientific, mathematical, logical, causal and inductive reasoning; philosophy of mind, logic and language. [+]

MA in Reasoning This MA programme offers a selection of topics related to reasoning and inference. It covers areas such as cognitive science and AI; scientific, mathematical, logical, causal and inductive reasoning; philosophy of mind, logic and language. The programme is ideally suited to students with philosophical training who would like to pursue their undergraduate interests yet develop skills that make them attractive to a broad range of employers, or who would like the advanced training required for a PhD in this area. The flexibility of this programme enables you to negotiate your own path of study through a range of topics. Students can focus exclusively on philosophical topics or can study reasoning-related topics in Psychology, Computing, Statistics, Law, Social Policy, Biosciences and History. Modules The MA in Reasoning comprises four 30-credit coursework modules (for a total of 120 credits) and a dissertation (60 credits). You take the coursework modules in conjunction with students on the MA in Philosophy, but focus on reasoning-related topics. The four coursework modules are: PL805 Special Topics I PL806 Special Topics II PL855 Theoretical Philosophy PL856 Practical Philosophy There are three ways to receive credit for these modules: All MA students are expected to attend, and may choose to be assessed on the basis of essays on topics covered in, our Graduate Seminars. The seminars are divided into two streams: Theoretical Reasoning, and History of Philosophy and Practical Philosophy. Topics covered vary each year in line with current staff research. If you choose to be assessed in this way, you will be expected to write on reasoning-related topics. In addition to attending the graduate seminars, MA students may, in consultation with the MA Programme Director, choose from a number of mixed undergraduate/graduate modules, typically assessed by a 4,000-word essay. The module offering varies from year to year, and you will be expected to focus on modules relating to reasoning. For a complete list of what is currently offered, please consult the Stage 2/3 module list. You can also take a range of non-core modules which vary year on year. Please note that not all modules will run every year. The range of modules available for selection in any particular year depends on student demand, staff sabbatical arrangements and timetable constraints. If you would like further information, please contact us. Dissertation Upon successful completion of the four coursework essays, students proceed to the writing of the dissertation (60 credits): PL998 Dissertation This component is assessed on the basis of a 10,000-word dissertation on an approved topic on reasoning. Students work with their dissertation supervisor during the six-week Summer Term and have the summer to write up. Postgraduate research in Reasoning If you are considering taking a Research Masters or PhD on a topic connected with the study of reasoning and inference, do consider studying at the Centre for Reasoning. To find out more about the opportunities available please contact us, or contact members of the Centre for Reasoning whose interests coincide with your own. PhD students can take advantage of our membership of the Reasoning Club to access the expertise of a network of researchers around Europe. [-]

MA in Religion

Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years September 2016 United Kingdom Canterbury + 1 more

The programme offers an overview of key theoretical debates in the study of religion, as well as methodological issues and approaches for conducting fieldwork. You also study two modules of your choice, suited to your own specific interests. [+]

MA in Religion Our MA in Religion provides core training for students wanting to pursue further postgraduate research or research in other contexts. The programme offers an overview of key theoretical debates in the study of religion, as well as methodological issues and approaches for conducting fieldwork. You also study two modules of your choice, suited to your own specific interests. You have the opportunity to refine ideas for a research project through your taught modules and dissertation, and you also receive guidance on writing research proposals and seeking funding. The part-time PCert in Religion enables those working as clergy, social workers, teachers or similar, to study towards a higher level qualification alongside their work. On this programme, you study two modules of your choice from the range within the course structure. It is possible to register for the Certificate and then transfer to the MA programme. The Department of Religious Studies Collectively, the staff at Kent cover all the current methodologies and theoretical approaches (from empirical research to psychology of religion to continental philosophy and history of ideas). As well as offering expertise in all the major ‘world religions’, we are widely recognised for groundbreaking work at the edges of the category of religion as well as for work on the invention of the category of ‘religion’. [-]

MA in Religion (Paris)

Campus Full time 1 year September 2016 United Kingdom Canterbury France Paris + 2 more

Our MA in Religion (Paris) is a new programme providing core training in metholodogies of the study of religion while encouraging wider interdisciplinary work. Following an Autumn term at our Canterbury campus, you spend a Spring term studying in Paris, where you gain a specific insight into the influence of religion in a European context. [+]

MA in Religion (Paris) Our MA in Religion (Paris) is a new programme providing core training in metholodogies of the study of religion while encouraging wider interdisciplinary work. Following an Autumn term at our Canterbury campus, you spend a Spring term studying in Paris, where you gain a specific insight into the influence of religion in a European context. Your knowledge is enhanced and shaped through the independence that is gained by living abroad for a period of time. Collectively, the staff at Kent cover all the current methodologies and theoretical approaches (from empirical research to psychology of religion, and to continental philosophy and history of ideas). As well as offering expertise in all the major world religions, we are widely recognised for leading work at the fringes of the category of religion, as well as for work on the invention of the category of ‘religion’. Among the many options covered in the department are: religion and media, religion and politics, religion and comparative literatures, and religion and society. See the staff research tab for further details. The Department supports cross-disciplinary work and students are encouraged to take advantage of the wide range of postgraduate classes and seminars that are available within the School of European Culture and Languages (SECL) and across the University as a whole. The programme is primarily for students who wish to pursue further postgraduate research or research in other contexts. The MA offers an overview of key theoretical debates in the study of religion, as well as methodological issues and approaches for conducting fieldwork. You are also able to select optional modules that will help you to develop your specific interests. As demand for doctoral research funding becomes increasingly competitive, you also receive guidance on seeking funding and writing research proposals, as well as the opportunity to refine ideas for a research project through the taught modules and dissertation. [-]

MA in Roman History and Archaeology

Campus Full time Part time 1 year September 2016 United Kingdom Canterbury + 1 more

This unique MA is designed for students who wish to adopt a twin-tracked approach to the past by using both historical and archaeological evidence. [+]

MA in Roman History and Archaeology This unique MA is designed for students who wish to adopt a twin-tracked approach to the past by using both historical and archaeological evidence. The aim of the programme is to provide research training in preparation for further study for a PhD or for a career outside academia that requires research skills. A key focus of the MA is on the cities of the Roman Empire, including the capital, Rome. There is also the possibility of specialising in the study of age, gender and ethnicity, as well as taking modules in the wider history and archaeology of the Roman period. Modules The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you. CL805 - Contemporary Archaeology: Theories, Methods and Issues CL900 - Research Skills in Ancient History - Understanding the City in Antiquit CL807 - Settlement and Society in the Transmanche Region during the Iron Age CL820 - The Political, Social and Economic History of the Hellenistic World:An CL821 - Ancient Greek Science: Astronomy and Medicine CL897 - CL Dissertation Assessment The programme is assessed by coursework for each of the modules and by the dissertation. Learning outcomes Programme aims This programme aims to: provide research training in the subject area of Roman history and archaeology expand your depth of knowledge of key subject areas in Roman history and archaeology attract outstanding students, irrespective of race, background, gender or physical disability from both within the UK, and EU, and also from overseas develop new areas of postgraduate teaching in response to the advance of scholarship provide you with skills to equip you for a further career either for doctoral research in Roman history and archaeology, or in employment with, the use of these transferable skills develop your competence in applying skills to analysis of a diverse body of ancient evidence develop your critical and analytical powers in relation to the ancient material provide you with the skills to adapt and respond positively to change develop critical, analytical problem-based learning skills and the transferable skills to prepare you for graduate employment enhance the development of your interpersonal skills provide you with opportunities for shared multidisciplinary learning with religious studies and philosophy assist you to develop the skills required for both autonomous practice and team-working. Knowledge and understanding You will gain knowledge and understanding of: a complex range of disciplines, cultural relationships and varied geographical regions at an advanced level the research skills associated with the use of ancient evidence to produce historical and archaeological narratives and analyses that engage with the most recent development in research in Roman history and archaeology basic philosophical issues by thinkers of very different cultural and linguistic assumptions from our own the nature of the societies and political systems of antiquity familiarity with an appropriate and diverse range of primary materials: material culture, epigraphy, papyrology, literature, visual material, and history a broad and systematic knowledge developed within a coherent framework of complementary subjects, including archaeology and history. Intellectual skills You develop intellectual skills in: how to apply the skills needed for academic study and enquiry how to evaluate research and a variety of types of information and evidence critically how to synthesise information critically from a number of sources in order to gain a coherent understanding of theory and practice how to apply strategies for appropriate selection of relevant information from a wide source and large body of knowledge how to utilise problem-solving skills how to analyse, evaluate and interpret the evidence underpinning archaeological, historical, linguistic and literary evidence critically. Subject-specific skills You gain subject-specific skills in: have an advanced understanding of another culture, whether focused on its archaeology, history, literature, thought, art and religion, or its history and political and social organisation, or its material culture, demonstrate a critical engagement with it, develop an informed sense of the similarities and differences between it and our own culture have a broad knowledge, developed within a coherent framework, of complementary subjects, drawn from such fields as archaeology, history, art, literature, linguistics, language, and philosophy, or theme-based topics which cross the boundaries between them (eg religion, gender studies), and periods familiarity with, and be able to evaluate, an appropriate and diverse range of primary materials, eg archaeological and historical texts, art objects, and inscriptions. command a range of techniques and methodologies, such as bibliographical and library research skills, a range of skills in reading and textual analysis, the varieties of historical method, the visual skills characteristic of art criticism, use of statistics (eg in archaeology), philosophical argument and analysis. Transferable skills You will gain the following transferable skills: the ability to communicate effectively with a wide range of individuals using a variety of means the ability to evaluate your own academic performance the ability to manage change effectively and respond to changing demands the ability to take responsibility for personal and professional learning and development (personal development planning) the ability to manage time, prioritise workloads and recognise and manage personal emotions and stress the ability to understand your career opportunities and challenges ahead and begin to plan your career path the ability to information management skills, eg IT skills. [-]

MA in Roman History and Archaeology with a Term in Rome

Campus Full time 1 year September 2016 United Kingdom Canterbury Italy Rome + 2 more

Focusing on Rome and the cities of the Roman Empire, Kent’s exciting new taught MA programme in Roman History and Archaeology allows you to spend your academic year in two great locations: Canterbury and Rome. [+]

MA in Roman History and Archaeology with a Term in Rome Focusing on Rome and the cities of the Roman Empire, Kent’s exciting new taught MA programme in Roman History and Archaeology allows you to spend your academic year in two great locations: Canterbury and Rome. You study the monuments and artefacts of ancient Rome at first hand, visiting relevant sites and museums, with options to study site conservation and museum presentation as well as the history of the city. The MA in Ancient History with a Term in Rome has a focus on research training that places you in a strong position for further study for a PhD, or for careers outside academia that require research skills. The programme provides a full study of the use of a variety of types of evidence that is underpinned by a core module focused on interpretation. A key focus of the MA is on the cities of the Roman Empire, especially the capital, Rome. A term is spent in Rome, in which you study the monuments and artefacts of the ancient city at first hand, visiting relevant sites and museums, with options to study site conservation and museum presentation as well as the history of Rome. University of Kent staff are present for part of the spring term in Rome to ensure continuity of academic guidance and pastoral support. The American University of Rome was founded in 1969 and runs a wide-ranging series of programmes in the arts and in business administration, including the subjects of archaeology, classics, and cultural heritage. The campus is located in the Monteverde district of Rome, a picturesque district with a wide range of shops and amenities. From nearby Trastevere, it is a short bus-ride to the historic centre of Rome with its extensive array of Roman sites, monuments and museums. Modules The following modules are indicative of those offered on this programme. This list is based on the current curriculum and may change year to year. Most programmes will require you to study a combination of compulsory and optional modules. You may also have the option to take modules from other programmes so that you may customise your programme and explore other subject areas that interest you. CL805 - Contemporary Archaeology: Theories, Methods and Issues CL828 - Rome-The Imperial City CL829 - Rome Optional Module CL900 - Research Skills in Ancient History - Understanding the City in Antiquit CL897 - CL Dissertation Assessment The programme is assessed by coursework for each of the modules, an examination in Latin or Ancient Greek and by the dissertation. [-]

Contact

University of Kent at Paris

Address Rue de Chevreuse
75006 Paris, France
Website http://www.kent.ac.uk/paris/
Phone +44 1227 764000