Paris College Of Art

Introduction

Paris College of Art is a dynamic forum for exchanging ideas, methods and professional experience. Our students and faculty combine curiosity, experimentation and enthusiasm in the pursuit of learning. At Paris College of Art, we believe that finding a design solution, creating a work of art and facilitating the production of a creative team are intellectual processes of undeniable value. Developing critical awareness through hands-on research and discussion is essential to professional maturation and individual growth. Artistic practice demands a high level of personal commitment and discipline, and we expect our students to participate actively in class so that they can explore differing points of view and engage our creative resources.

Paris College of Art is rooted in a city of primary art and design production. Experiencing the uniqueness of the Parisian metropolis provides a rich source of visual inspiration. Sharing this experience with individuals from over 40 different countries gives our students a unique perspective on the variety of expression existing throughout the world.

The legacy of Paris College of Art and its successful graduates is something to be proud of and to contribute to in the years to come.

Mission

Paris College of Art, a new name for a college with over 30 years of experience, promotes the artistic and intellectual maturation of promising students into exceptional artists, art historians, photographers, designers, and design managers. Grounded in the Parisian landscape, informed by the European art and design world, nourished by a faculty of leaders in the creative industries from the world over, and replenished by students from over 50 countries, Paris College of Art is a truly international college.

Paris College of Art was established as an independent degree-granting institution with the mission to:

1) provide the highest international standard of art and design education taught within an American pedagogical paradigm while being influenced, informed and drawing from our French/European environment and

2) open up French educational opportunities to the world and international education to the French.

This school offers programs in:
  • English

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Programs

This school also offers:

MA

MA/MFA in Photography and Image Making

Campus Full time 1 - 2 years September 2017 France Paris

Master of Arts (MFA) in Photography and Image Making is a two-year program in Photography with a specific focus on new types of visual storytelling: still image, moving image, and multimedia, with a curriculum that emphasizes new media and transdisciplinary skill sets, and understands photography as a hybrid and emerging art form. The program explores digital-image-making as a force and it is designed as a practiced-based and process-oriented program. [+]

MA/MFA in Photography and Image Making Master of Arts (MFA) in Photography and Image Making is a two-year program in Photography with a specific focus on new types of visual storytelling: still image, moving image, and multimedia, with a curriculum that emphasizes new media and transdisciplinary skill sets, and understands photography as a hybrid and emerging art form. The program explores digital-image-making as a force and it is designed as a practiced-based and process-oriented program. Based on the intersection of visual phenomena, new media, critical studies, and creative production, the program offers a unique blend of studio practice, and theoretical and art historical training. Students who pursue the program at Paris College of Art have potential for connection-building while they are still in the program. Students with an undergraduate background in photography and demonstrated technical skills (black & white and color photography, digital photography, lighting techniques, common software programs for editing) will be considered for admission. The program combines technical knowledge and principles of photography and image-making research and theory. Studio classes and workshops conducted by professionals emphasize the mastery of contemporary techniques and professional practices, while theory-based and methodology courses help students develop their personal creative visions. Thanks to internships during the photo events held in Paris several times a year and ongoing partnerships between PCA and relevant Parisian institutions, students will be well prepared to enter the job market and will have started to create a professional network by the time they graduate. Students specialize in photography and image-making, choosing to produce a final portfolio of either still or moving images, while at the same time continuing to broaden their knowledge and skills through supportive art & design courses and electives. In addition to studio and research, there is a focus on scholarship and preparation for teaching since graduates may chose to pursue a career in academia. Curriculum MA Year 1 Fall Spring Studio: Portfolio Development I & II 3 3 Digital Lab I: Video & Digital Lab II: Photo 2 2 Contemporary Issues I & II 3 3 Seminar I & II: Introduction to Research & Methodology 3 3 MA Thesis 0 2 Degree Project 0 2 Electives 4 0 Total 15 15 MFA Year 1 Fall Spring Studio: Portfolio Development I & II 3 3 Digital Lab I: Video & Digital Lab II: Photo 2 2 Contemporary Issues I & II 3 3 Seminar I & II: Introduction to Research & Methodology 3 3 Electives 4 4 Total 15 15 Year 2 Fall Spring Studio: Portfolio Development III & IV 3 3 Digital Lab IlI: New Digital Media and Technology 2 0 Contemporary Issues III 3 0 Seminar III: Advanced Research & Methodology 3 0 Seminar IV: MFA Thesis 0 3 Electives 4 0 Degree Project 0 9 Total Credits Required for Degree Completion: 60 15 15 Electives Fall Spring Photo 2.0 2 0 Alternative Processes Image-making 0 2 Time-based Photography 2 0 Intellectual Property Rights 0 2 Photography as Installation 2 0 Professional Practice Workshop Series 0 2 Concept Development Storytelling 2 0 French 1-2 2 2 French 3-4 3 3 Educational Principles 3 0 ADMISSIONS CRITERIA Paris College of Art seeks serious, responsible, and highly motivated applicants who demonstrate potential for growth. A prospective student’s potential for artistic achievement is one of the most important criteria in evaluating candidates for admission, whether it be at the undergraduate or graduate level. PCA students work with high level professionals in their chosen field of study, and a level of maturity and autonomy is expected of our students. English proficiency is a requirement, but we seek to serve an international student body where no one national group is dominant in numbers. We also care deeply about the sense of community that an institution of PCA’s size is able to offer, and respectful collaboration and teamwork are important values at PCA. While students may apply before completing their undergraduate eduction they must have successfully received their Bachelor’s (or equivalent) to enroll at PCA. PROGRAM SPECIFICS MA in Photography Students with an undergraduate background in photography and demonstrated technical skills (black & white and color photography, light, common software programs for editing) will be considered for admission. ENGLISH PROFICIENCY All of PCA’s programs are taught in English and students must have a high level of English proficiency to be successful. As part of the Admissions process, non-native English speakers are required to submit TOEFL or IELTS test results. so that we may evaluate their level of English proficiency. [-]

Master of Arts (MA) in Accessories Design: Jewelry and Leather Goods

Campus Full time 1 year September 2017 France Paris

PCA proposes a Master of Arts (M.A.) in Accessories Design, a one-year program aimed at emerging designers interested in specializing in accessory design, specifically jewelry and leather goods. The program meets the demands of an expanding market for accessories, especially in the fashion and luxury industries. [+]

PCA proposes a Master of Arts (M.A.) in Accessories Design, a one-year program aimed at emerging designers interested in specializing in accessory design, specifically jewelry and leather goods. The program meets the demands of an expanding market for accessories, especially in the fashion and luxury industries. Students with an undergraduate background in fashion, fine arts or crafts will be particularly suited for this program. A mix of prior disciplinary experiences is a benefit to their overall learning. The program combines technical knowledge and principles of design research and theory. Studio classes and workshops conducted by professionals emphasize the mastery of traditional handcraft and modern techniques, while theory-based and methodology courses help students develop their personal creative visions. Thanks to the multidisciplinary crossover of this program, students will be well-prepared to enter the professional world of contemporary design. Students focus in either leather goods or jewelry, while also continuing to broaden their knowledge and skills through supporting courses on technical drawing and still life photography. Graduates will be able to apply their skills in settings as varied as independent designers and entrepreneurs, designers for international fashion and accessories brands, and makers of leather goods for the luxury industry. The structure of the M.A. is composed of three types of classes: - Studio: Creativity & Inquiry In studio classes, students master traditional, modern and experimental design and manufacturing techniques. They also use cross-disciplinary technical skills, combining materials, tools and concepts from different industries. - Research: Investigation Research seminars will teach students to appreciate design theory and a conceptual methodology that will enhance their creative output; develop skills in the written and verbal expression of ideas. - Professional Skills Professional skills workshops and classes will enable students to enhance their preparedness for the job market CORE ART & DESIGN COURSES Leather/Jewelry Studio I & II Students engage in experimentation through different techniques and materials, with a focus on leather crafts or on jewelry. The studio time is composed of guided exercises and hands-on projects, allowing students in their second semester to start developing their graduation collection. Students are assigned short individual projects every 2-3 weeks that are reviewed in class and critiqued by faculty and peers. At the end of the semester, a jury is convened, composed of PCA faculty (fall) and outside professionals (spring). Students show their emerging (fall) or final (spring) collection and supporting sketchbooks and research notes. Concept & Development I & II This course aims at stimulating students’ creative skills as well as self-sufficiency capacities. Students are taught that the creative design processes suppose intent, content, methodology and product. Students will complete several projects, progressively building on each other, including a group project in order to develop collaborative work. Contemporary techniques and alternative materials will be encouraged. During the second semester, students will conduct a project in partnership with an external company, in order to experience industry and sub-contracting realities. Atelier I The Atelier is the place for students to work on their individual final projects and graduation collection. Free access to equipped studios with technical support will allow them to complete the production of a series of 4-6 pieces. Upon concepts created in the Concept & Development class, students have the opportunity to use techniques and materials of their choice in a safe and efficient environment, and to eventually sub-contract parts of their projects to external professionals, as needed. This is a two-credit course because the majority of the work is done by students outside direct classroom instruction time. Atelier II/Graduation Collection Students will apply the skills gained during their course of study to the design, development and final presentation of an accessories collection of either leather goods or jewelry. They will have to demonstrate their understanding, technical skills, and capacities in all aspects of the accessories design process: research, analysis, innovative and realistic solutions, communication, finances, and management. Students’ graduation collection will be evaluated on specific research, design and outcome criteria by a jury composed of faculty members, external professional designers and company managers. This is a two-credit course because the majority of the work is done by students outside direct classroom instruction time. SUPPORTING ART & DESIGN COURSES History of Fashion & Accessories In this course, students will review the history of fashion (including accessories) in the 20th and 21st centuries. Students will consider how it is represented in catalogs, newspapers and other visual supports. The Maciet archives at the Bibliothèque du Musée des Arts Décoratifs (Library of the Museum of Decorative Arts), a PCA partner institution, will be an invaluable resource for student research. The main focus will be on Europe in order to take advantage of the resources at hand. Professional Practice Workshop Series Professionals from the Parisian fashion world will come in to introduce students to their professional practice and engage them in practical exercises preparing them for the job market. Instructors will be drawn from a broad range of fields: designers of accessories for men and women, designers of sportswear, children’s apparel, lingerie, buyers, magazine editors, I.P. and licensing lawyers, etc. Technical Drawing: Hand & Digital This course aims at providing a rational approach to describe objects. The first part of the semester is dedicated to the observation of objects, the use of measurement tools, the learning of industrial representation rules, and the representation of technical data by hand. The second part of the semester is dedicated to the learning of digital representation through CAD software programs Illustrator and Rhino. Still Life Photography The main aim of this class is to provide students with the tools and techniques required to document their work in a professional manner in order to share it with prospective clients. Students in all the new M.A. programs (accessories design, fashion design, fashion photography, interior design) will need to be proficient in photographing objects and/or interiors. Photographing still life is different from portraiture or street photography, and requires mastery of lighting and mise en scène. Master’s Thesis Students will document the research they conduct on the theme of their final project, as well as the research they have done on the cost and means of production of their project. Some of the criteria for evaluating the thesis will be the extent to which the student’s work is situated in a historic and cultural context, the quality of the student’s research, and the appropriate use of documentation, artifacts, and the learning resources available to them in Paris. ELECTIVES French Students take a placement test to be placed into one of three levels of French language: introductory, intermediate and advanced. Classes meet twice a week for written and oral exercises designed to strengthen vocabulary and grammar. These courses use dialogues, oral exercises, short compositions and literary texts to establish a firm foundation in the language. Students approach everyday life situations in French, while learning the fundamentals of grammar and the complexity of conversation. The intermediate and advanced courses serve as a more sophisticated introduction to French culture and lifestyle and as a means of consolidating grammar and vocabulary. Concept Development: Storytelling In this semester-long course, students learn to quickly develop and research concepts to tell a story using images and words. The aim is to provide them with the tools, skills and processes that they will need to respond to a client brief in a professional and convincing manner. It is open as an elective to students from other departments, since the ability to come up with creative ideas, researching them and then “packaging” them in a compelling verbal and visual story is a key skill for any designer, whether it is to develop a story for a fashion editorial, an accessories line, or the concept for a new restaurant layout. The disciplinary mix of students also serves to prepare them to work within interdisciplinary teams, which is what they will be faced with in the professional world. Intellectual Property Rights The I.P. course covers issues related to copyright, patents, contracts and liabilities as they apply to art and design. Students will learn about international laws related to copyright and patents and understand how to protect their intellectual property and the best strategies to adopt in different circumstances. Designer’s Social & Ethical Responsibilities In this course, students are brought to think about the ethical implications of a designer’s choices on the life cycle of an object (materials, means and conditions of production, recycling, etc.). Each student will select a garment line from a given brand and research its life cycle. [-]

Master of Arts/Master of Fine Arts in Drawing

Campus Full time 1 - 2 years September 2017 France Paris

The program is designed with an emphasis on professional practice and research, and, for the MFA program, with a focus on the teaching of drawing, providing students with possibilities to further their work outside the context of the school. Students are taught how to apply ‘drawing’ in its many forms to unfamiliar and diverse situations, and are encouraged to invent projects that will continue beyond the scope of the MA/MFA. [+]

Master of Arts/Master of Fine Arts in Drawing The work that students make in their studio is central to the content and structure of the course. Each core workshop draws upon the individual investigations and questions arising and evolving in the studio as a starting point and provides the students with new contexts to rethink their work – to test out methods, materials and ideas. The aim is to explore contemporary and emerging approaches to drawing alongside the continued acquisition and practice of academic skills. There is an expectation that students will explore a convergence rather than opposition of the two. At PCA Students may choose either the 1-year MA Degree Track or the 2-year MFA (Terminal) Degree Track. The first year is common to both degree tracks with the exception of a spring semester Degree Project for MA candidates. MA students who choose to continue into the MFA would be required to complete the 3rd and 4th semesters and the MFA Thesis Project. The program is designed with an emphasis on professional practice and research, and, for the MFA program, with a focus on the teaching of drawing, providing students with possibilities to further their work outside the context of the school. Students are taught how to apply ‘drawing’ in its many forms to unfamiliar and diverse situations, and are encouraged to invent projects that will continue beyond the scope of the MA/MFA. Every student will take part in a form of collaboration where they will bring their drawing practice into dialogue/conversation/exchange with artists, designers and creative professionals from other fields. The collaborations are devised according to each student’s needs in order to challenge each individual and are expected to provoke potentially radically different departures for their work. The program is open to any applicant who has successfully completed an undergraduate degree (BFA, BA, BSc, BID, BArch, etc.) with a studio component, or acquired basic technical skills (e.g., drawing) through other educational or professional experiences. (Applicants without a BFA are required to have at least two semesters of Art History. A portfolio will be required demonstrating a fine arts practice). Curriculum MA Year 1 Fall Spring Studio 1 + 2: Experimentation/Collaboration 6 6 Masterclass series 1 3 0 Degree Project 0 3 Research Seminar 1 + 2 3 3 Thesis 0 2 Electives 2 2 Total Credits 14 16 MFA Year 1 Fall Spring Studio 1 + 2 6 6 Masterclass series 1 + 2 3 3 Research Seminar 1 + 2 3 3 Electives 3 3 Total Credits 15 15 Year 2 Fall Spring Studio 3: Drawing in Art & Design Education 6 0 Masterclass series 3 3 0 Research Seminar 3 3 0 Educational Principles 3 0 Electives 3 0 Thesis Project 0 9 Research Seminar 4 Thesis 0 3 Total 18 12 ADMISSIONS CRITERIA Paris College of Art seeks serious, responsible, and highly motivated applicants who demonstrate potential for growth. A prospective student’s potential for artistic achievement is one of the most important criteria in evaluating candidates for admission, whether it be at the undergraduate or graduate level. PCA students work with high level professionals in their chosen field of study, and a level of maturity and autonomy is expected of our students. English proficiency is a requirement, but we seek to serve an international student body where no one national group is dominant in numbers. We also care deeply about the sense of community that an institution of PCA’s size is able to offer, and respectful collaboration and teamwork are important values at PCA. While students may apply before completing their undergraduate eduction they must have successfully received their Bachelor’s (or equivalent) to enroll at PCA. ENGLISH PROFICIENCY All of PCA’s programs are taught in English and students must have a high level of English proficiency to be successful. As part of the Admissions process, non-native English speakers are required to submit TOEFL or IELTS test results. so that we may evaluate their level of English proficiency. [-]

Master of Arts in Transdisciplinary New Media

Campus Full time September 2017 France Paris

Designed for those who are interested in exploring the wide-ranging creative field of New Media that goes beyond traditionally defined art and design disciplines, this program employs methods of transdisciplinary practice through collaborative teamwork. Through a shared creative process, students will re-frame their current understanding of different tools, technologies, theories and methods, developing hybrid systems and solutions that go beyond any one discipline. [+]

Designed for those who are interested in exploring the wide-ranging creative field of New Media that goes beyond traditionally defined art and design disciplines, this program employs methods of transdisciplinary practice through collaborative teamwork. Through a shared creative process, students will re-frame their current understanding of different tools, technologies, theories and methods, developing hybrid systems and solutions that go beyond any one discipline. At PCA, students can complete either a Masters of Art (MA) or a Masters of Fine Arts (MFA) in Transdisciplinary New Media. The first two semesters (fall and spring) of these programs follow a common curriculum. Then, students either go on to complete a full-time summer term to receive the MA degree or continue for two semesters of study in the following academic year (fall and spring) to receive the MFA. Graduates of both the MA and MFA will go on to apply their skills to collaborative projects in domains as varied as online and traditional publishing, video games, art installations, exhibitions, live performances, web design, interaction/interface design, software development, service design, etc. As well, the MFA, which is considered a terminal degree in this field, will open the doors to teaching opportunities in higher education for our graduates. The program is open to any applicant who has successfully completed an undergraduate degree (BFA, BA, BSc, BID, BArch, etc.). To encourage this transdisciplinary approach, candidates from varied backgrounds-including art, design, programming, business, literature, philosophy, science, music and theory-are actively encouraged to apply. Because we want to encourage students with varied skill sets and perspectives some students may be required to take preparatory summer undergraduate courses or pre-requisites: applicants without a BFA are required to have at least two semesters of Art or Design History; applicants with non-technical backgrounds will be required to attend a summer undergraduate Digital Crash Course prior to enrollment; and certain elective courses may be made mandatory to shore up skills that may otherwise be lacking. The PCA Digital Crash Course is comprised of 3 two-week intensive courses including: Video, Web (HTML, CSS, PHP), and Processing. CORE STUDIO CLASSES: THEORY & PRACTICE Master Classes as a Component of the Core Studio Each semester, a selection of master classes are proposed to bring highly accomplished professionals into the classroom within the framework of the Core Studio course. For one intensive week, all graduate students will engage in this period of collaborative workshops that allow for professional networking and varied perspectives on the art and design world today. Master class faculty, enrollment limits, schedules and projects vary. Participation in the Master Class is required, as it is an integral component of the Core Studio course. Core Studio I 6 credits, Fall Only Introductory phase: students draw upon their previous knowledge and experience to contribute to the collaborative process. Projects are set to test preconceived ideas and the limits of students’ understanding. Core Studio II 6 credits, Spring Only An increased understanding of the team dynamic and the student’s role in the collaborative process enables a higher level of conceptual development. Methodologies are defined and tools and materials identified. Core Studio III 6 credits, Fall Only Projects at this stage will be designed and realized independently by the group with an advanced level of understanding and ambition. CORE LAB CLASSES: PRACTICE & TECHNOLOGY Each Core Lab class builds on its predecessor, so that over three semesters, students have had an opportunity to be introduced to a wide variety of tools and techniques. Core Lab I 3 credits, Fall Only Introductory phase: students master the relatively familiar tools and techniques such as digital photography, editing and lighting, video and film production/post production, web design and sound design. Projects illustrate the standard workflow, are set to test preconceived ideas and the limits of students’ skills. Core Lab II 3 credits, Spring Only Intermediate phase: students are introduced to 2D and 3D animation techniques and visual programming. Team-based projects may be implemented here. Core Lab III 3 credits, Fall Only Advanced phase: students are introduced to iterative design processes, pervasive application programming, clusters and peripherals. CORE SEMINAR CLASSES: RESEARCH, WRITING AND METHODOLOGY Intro to Research & Methodology: Design Process Methods 3 credits Research and Methodology is a wide field that involves an inter- and multi-disciplinary approach. In this course, students will be introduced to the basic tenets of research in order to support their reasoning with respect to the design process. Foremost, they will learn to formulate a design research problematic; engage in data gathering and analysis; differentiate between primary and secondary research sources; carry out quantitative and qualitative research. Students will be introduced to the basic tenets of design research and methodology supporting data gathering and analysis with respect to quantitative and qualitative research in a design context. Intermediate Research & Methodology: Physical, Cognitive and Cultural HF, Ethnographic Research 3 credits This course focuses in depth on various research methods currently used to inform the design process. It builds on knowledge and skills acquired in the first semester to introduce students to specific research methods for designers. The course will cover research in physical human factors; cognitive human factors; cultural human factors; and ethnographic fieldwork. Students will learn how to apply these methods to the design process through hands-on projects requiring a multidisciplinary approach. Advanced Research & Methodology: Applied Projects 3 credits Advanced research and methodology requires an appreciation of designers’ use of intuition, bricolage (tinkering) and improvisation. Building on the knowledge acquired during the first year, students will progress from ambiguity to uncertainty to explicit knowledge by applying the specific methods learned in previous courses. Empathy, inspiration, alternative data approaches will be explored as additional knowledge informing the transition from abstract to concrete ways of knowing in the design process. MA Degree Project 6 Credits, Spring Only After their second semester, students embark on an MA Degree Project that includes a 20-30 page written thesis and corresponding body of work, culminating in a public exhibition or conference. With the help of faculty, students work in small teams – publishing jointly like in scientific communities – on sponsored projects. Non-credit tutorials are defined on a case by case basis to help students in areas of their original research. MFA Thesis 6 Credits, Spring Only In their fourth semester, students embark on an MFA Thesis project that includes a 40-60 page written thesis and corresponding body of work, culminating in a public exhibition or conference. With the help of an advisor, students may work either in self-defined teams – publishing jointly like in scientific communities – or work solo. Non-credit tutorials are defined on a case by case basis to help students in areas of their original research. ELECTIVE CLASSES App Culture: DIY Software Development 3 Credits (Offered on a rotating basis starting Y3, Fall) Smartphones, PDAs and digital tablets and their corresponding application ecosystems (iTunes, Google Store, etc.) have created enormous opportunities for small software development teams to quickly create and publish their work with highly simplified logistics. This collaborative course focuses on the development and publishing of an iPhone App in less than 15 weeks while working in teams of 2 or 3. Emotion and Design 3 Credits (Fall, Offered Year 2) This course moves beyond consideration of physical, human and cultural factors to address the importance of emotions for design from product design, to fashion and style. How do emotions, affects, feelings and/or sensations inform the design of products, style and services? Students will explore how people engage with and interact with design artifacts and interfaces from a sensorial and experiential standpoint as well as in terms of the specific types of emotional relations they establish with them. [-]

One year Master of Arts (MA) in Fashion Film and Photography

Campus Full time 1 year September 2017 France Paris

The Master of Arts (MA) in Interior Design is a one-year program aimed at emerging designers and conceived to provide them with the necessary tools and skills to become professionals in this field. [+]

The Master of Arts (MA) in Interior Design is a one-year program aimed at emerging designers and conceived to provide them with the necessary tools and skills to become professionals in this field. This program prepares students to meet the demands of an expanding high-end residential and commercial property market in capital cities around the world. Students with an undergraduate background in the arts or in design will be particularly suited for this program. A demonstrated ability to draw and sketch is an admissions criteria. Interdisciplinary in nature and structure, the program conceives the studio and the classroom as complementary spaces for developing design thinking, technical and professional skills, as well as creative expression in developing an interior design project. Since this is an initial terminal degree where graduates are expected to join the job market upon graduation, the focus of the program is on studio and research, rather than on scholarship and preparation for teaching. Graduates of the program will be able to apply their skills in settings as varied as independent interior design consultants and entrepreneurs for individual residential clients, for commercial clients (hotel chains and luxury brand flagship stores), as in-house designers for commercial retail and hotel chains, or in architecture firms. The combination of core, supporting and elective classes ensures depth and breadth of content. CORE ART & DESIGN COURSES Interior Design Studio I & II In this year-long course, students are first provided with the cultural and technical tools needed to understand inhabited spaces. Exemplary existing projects (published projects or on location in Paris) are analyzed for space elements such as: urban context, masses, negative and positive spaces, lighting, furniture functions, interior decoration, textures, color schemes. Students work on short projects to demonstrate their progressive ability to generate design solutions, select images, color and finishes, consider building-code constraints and barrier-free design. Project Fundamentals I & II In the first semester of this year-long course the focus is on business and management, shifting to communication in the second semester. Using the team project as an application, students consider professional feasibility of an idea: estimation of timeframes of each part within the whole project, measurements, budget comparisons, contract and construction costs, construction team management, and professional ethics. In the second semester, students apply the technical proficiency they have acquired in the fall CAD course to perfect their mastery of digital and hand drawing and sketching to visualize and communicate interior design projects. Students develop and explore new concepts, methods, and ideas to visually illustrate and present the various phases of the design process: concept boards, fast scale models, graphics and materials samples. Oral presentation skills to accompany their visual communication are the focus of continuous feedback for improvement. Team Project In the first semester, students work in teams on either a residential or a commercial space. They select an existing space in Paris and build the project on a proposed transformation of this space. This is a two-credit course because the majority of the work is done by students outside direct classroom instruction time. Students work in teams and meet with their instructor for 2 hours per week to review progress, receive feedback and technical conceptual suggestions for moving the project to completion. A peer review and critique with all student teams is organized at the end of weeks 5, 10, and 15. For the final critique after week 15 several faculty and at least one outside professional are also part of the jury that sets the grade. Final Individual Project A semester-long project will be conducted individually to give students the opportunity to apply all the interdisciplinary skills and knowledge gathered during the first semester to either a residential or a commercial space. The project will be accompanied by a written thesis summarizing the research (historical, social, contextual and technical) in which the project is grounded and comprising a budget and timeline. This is a two-credit course because the majority of the work is done by students outside direct classroom instruction time. Students meet with their instructor for 2 hours per week to review progress, receive feedback and technical and conceptual suggestions for moving the project to completion. A peer review and critique with all student teams is organized at the end of weeks 5, 10, and 15. For the final critique after week 15 several faculty and outside professionals are also part of the jury that sets the grade. SUPPORTING ART & DESIGN COURSES History of World Architecture and Interiors The course will analyze and compare 20th and 21st century architectures and interiors in Japan, Scandinavia, North America, South America, and the Mediterranean. Students will work towards situating design and architecture practices within larger intellectual and historical frameworks by exploring the indissoluble connections linking ideas and products of human culture. Students will acquire the critical methodologies applicable to design and architecture to think more systematically about the evolution of architecture and interiors over time. Technical Drawing This course is meant to provide students with the necessary practical skills to describe and represent space. It is dedicated to 2D technical drawing (measures, plan, section, views, and axonometric projections) using CAD software programs Adobe Creative Suites, AutoCAD, 3 D Studio Max, Sketchup and VRAY, as needed for most projects. PCA has a license for all its students, faculty and staff to use lynda.com, a platform for online tutorials for all software programs required for art and design. Professional Practice Workshop Series Professionals from the Parisian design world will come in to introduce students to their professional practice and engage them in practical exercises preparing them for the job market. Instructors will be drawn from a broad range of fields, including designers, architects, fashion designers, magazine editors, buyers, headhunters, etc. Master’s Thesis Students will document the research they conduct on the theme of their final project, as well as the research they have done on the cost and means of production of their project. One of the criteria for evaluating the thesis is the extent to which the student’s work is situated in an art-historic and cultural context, requiring students to conduct art historical research using written documentation, artefacts, and the learning resources available to them in Paris. ELECTIVES French Students take a placement test to be placed into one of three levels of French language: introductory, intermediate and advanced. Classes meet twice a week and propose a combination or written and oral exercises designed to strengthen vocabulary, grammar, written and oral expression. Concept Development: Storytelling In this semester-long course students learn to quickly develop and research concepts to tell a story in images and words. The aim is to provide them with the tools, skills and processes that they will need to respond to a client brief in a professional and convincing manner. It is open as an elective to students from other departments, since the ability to come up with creative ideas, researching them and then “packaging” them in a compelling verbal and visual story is a key skill for any designer, whether it is to develop a story for a fashion editorial, an accessories line, or the concept for a new restaurant interior). The disciplinary mix of students also serves to prepare them to work within interdisciplinary teams, which is what they will be faced with in the professional world. Intellectual Property Rights The I.P. course covers issues related to copyright, patents, contracts and liabilities as they apply to art and design. Students will learn about international laws related to copyright and patents and learn how to protect their intellectual property and the best strategies to adopt in different circumstances. Designers’ Social and Ethical Responsibility In this course students are brought to think about the ethical implications of a designer’s choices on the life cycle of an object (materials, means and conditions of production, recycling, etc.). Each student will select a garment line from a given brand and research its life cycle. [-]

One year Master of Arts (MA) in Interior Design

Campus Full time 1 year September 2017 France Paris

The Master of Arts (MA) in Interior Design is a one-year program aimed at emerging designers and conceived to provide them with the necessary tools and skills to become professionals in this field. This program prepares students to meet the demands of an expanding high-end residential and commercial property market in capital cities around the world. [+]

The Master of Arts (MA) in Interior Design is a one-year program aimed at emerging designers and conceived to provide them with the necessary tools and skills to become professionals in this field. This program prepares students to meet the demands of an expanding high-end residential and commercial property market in capital cities around the world. Students with an undergraduate background in the arts or in design will be particularly suited for this program. A demonstrated ability to draw and sketch is an admissions criteria. Interdisciplinary in nature and structure, the program conceives the studio and the classroom as complementary spaces for developing design thinking, technical and professional skills, as well as creative expression in developing an interior design project. Since this is an initial terminal degree where graduates are expected to join the job market upon graduation, the focus of the program is on studio and research, rather than on scholarship and preparation for teaching. Graduates of the program will be able to apply their skills in settings as varied as independent interior design consultants and entrepreneurs for individual residential clients, for commercial clients (hotel chains and luxury brand flagship stores), as in-house designers for commercial retail and hotel chains, or in architecture firms. The combination of core, supporting and elective classes ensures depth and breadth of content. CORE ART & DESIGN COURSES Interior Design Studio I & II In this year-long course, students are first provided with the cultural and technical tools needed to understand inhabited spaces. Exemplary existing projects (published projects or on location in Paris) are analyzed for space elements such as: urban context, masses, negative and positive spaces, lighting, furniture functions, interior decoration, textures, color schemes. Students work on short projects to demonstrate their progressive ability to generate design solutions, select images, color and finishes, consider building-code constraints and barrier-free design. Project Fundamentals I & II In the first semester of this year-long course the focus is on business and management, shifting to communication in the second semester. Using the team project as an application, students consider professional feasibility of an idea: estimation of timeframes of each part within the whole project, measurements, budget comparisons, contract and construction costs, construction team management, and professional ethics. In the second semester, students apply the technical proficiency they have acquired in the fall CAD course to perfect their mastery of digital and hand drawing and sketching to visualize and communicate interior design projects. Students develop and explore new concepts, methods, and ideas to visually illustrate and present the various phases of the design process: concept boards, fast scale models, graphics and materials samples. Oral presentation skills to accompany their visual communication are the focus of continuous feedback for improvement. Team Project In the first semester, students work in teams on either a residential or a commercial space. They select an existing space in Paris and build the project on a proposed transformation of this space. This is a two-credit course because the majority of the work is done by students outside direct classroom instruction time. Students work in teams and meet with their instructor for 2 hours per week to review progress, receive feedback and technical conceptual suggestions for moving the project to completion. A peer review and critique with all student teams is organized at the end of weeks 5, 10, and 15. For the final critique after week 15 several faculty and at least one outside professional are also part of the jury that sets the grade. Final Individual Project A semester-long project will be conducted individually to give students the opportunity to apply all the interdisciplinary skills and knowledge gathered during the first semester to either a residential or a commercial space. The project will be accompanied by a written thesis summarizing the research (historical, social, contextual and technical) in which the project is grounded and comprising a budget and timeline. This is a two-credit course because the majority of the work is done by students outside direct classroom instruction time. Students meet with their instructor for 2 hours per week to review progress, receive feedback and technical and conceptual suggestions for moving the project to completion. A peer review and critique with all student teams is organized at the end of weeks 5, 10, and 15. For the final critique after week 15 several faculty and outside professionals are also part of the jury that sets the grade. SUPPORTING ART & DESIGN COURSES History of World Architecture and Interiors The course will analyze and compare 20th and 21st century architectures and interiors in Japan, Scandinavia, North America, South America, and the Mediterranean. Students will work towards situating design and architecture practices within larger intellectual and historical frameworks by exploring the indissoluble connections linking ideas and products of human culture. Students will acquire the critical methodologies applicable to design and architecture to think more systematically about the evolution of architecture and interiors over time. Technical Drawing This course is meant to provide students with the necessary practical skills to describe and represent space. It is dedicated to 2D technical drawing (measures, plan, section, views, and axonometric projections) using CAD software programs Adobe Creative Suites, AutoCAD, 3 D Studio Max, Sketchup and VRAY, as needed for most projects. PCA has a license for all its students, faculty and staff to use lynda.com, a platform for online tutorials for all software programs required for art and design. Professional Practice Workshop Series Professionals from the Parisian design world will come in to introduce students to their professional practice and engage them in practical exercises preparing them for the job market. Instructors will be drawn from a broad range of fields, including designers, architects, fashion designers, magazine editors, buyers, headhunters, etc. Master’s Thesis Students will document the research they conduct on the theme of their final project, as well as the research they have done on the cost and means of production of their project. One of the criteria for evaluating the thesis is the extent to which the student’s work is situated in an art-historic and cultural context, requiring students to conduct art historical research using written documentation, artefacts, and the learning resources available to them in Paris. ELECTIVES French Students take a placement test to be placed into one of three levels of French language: introductory, intermediate and advanced. Classes meet twice a week and propose a combination or written and oral exercises designed to strengthen vocabulary, grammar, written and oral expression. Concept Development: Storytelling In this semester-long course students learn to quickly develop and research concepts to tell a story in images and words. The aim is to provide them with the tools, skills and processes that they will need to respond to a client brief in a professional and convincing manner. It is open as an elective to students from other departments, since the ability to come up with creative ideas, researching them and then “packaging” them in a compelling verbal and visual story is a key skill for any designer, whether it is to develop a story for a fashion editorial, an accessories line, or the concept for a new restaurant interior). The disciplinary mix of students also serves to prepare them to work within interdisciplinary teams, which is what they will be faced with in the professional world. Intellectual Property Rights The I.P. course covers issues related to copyright, patents, contracts and liabilities as they apply to art and design. Students will learn about international laws related to copyright and patents and learn how to protect their intellectual property and the best strategies to adopt in different circumstances. Designers’ Social and Ethical Responsibility In this course students are brought to think about the ethical implications of a designer’s choices on the life cycle of an object (materials, means and conditions of production, recycling, etc.). Each student will select a garment line from a given brand and research its life cycle. [-]

One year Masters of Arts (MA) in Fashion Design: New Materials & Technologies

Campus Full time 1 year September 2017 France Paris

The Master of Arts (M.A.) in Fashion Design proposed by PCA, focused on new materials and technologies, is a one-year program aimed at equipping designers with the knowledge and skills required to make the most of emerging new technologies and materials. [+]

The Master of Arts (M.A.) in Fashion Design proposed by PCA, focused on new materials and technologies, is a one-year program aimed at equipping designers with the knowledge and skills required to make the most of emerging new technologies and materials. New materials are being developed at a fast rate, enabling garments to do more than clothe: they can measure temperature, transmit information about the wearer’s physiological state, provide stimulation, release compounds into the skin, etc. These materials are often used for sportswear and underwear, but they can serve a purpose outside of technical wear. The goal of the program is to encourage and enable designers of ready-to-wear to incorporate them into their design, whether it be men’s, women’s or children’s wear. Students will also learn to work with new technologies, such as using 3D printing to produce a garment or creating connected garments. France hosts many companies specializing in innovative materials (Lytess is a pioneer in cosmetotextiles, which are textiles containing a substance or preparation intended to be released permanently on different parts of the epidermis) and connectivity (Cityzen Sciences was the first to launch a connected T-shirt), and we will draw on this local expertise for our Professional Practice Workshop Series. The program combines technical knowledge and principles of design research and theory. Studio classes and workshops conducted by professionals from relevant fields (materials experts, engineers, designers) emphasize the mastery of new materials and technologies and their incorporation into a wide range of designs (not only technical gear), while theory-based and methodology courses help students develop their personal creative visions. Students with a background in fashion design or tailoring will be well-suited to enter the program, while also continuing to broaden their knowledge and skills through supporting courses on sustainable production processes and ethical responsibilities. The structure of the this degree is composed of three types of classes: Studio: Creativity & Inquiry (core and elective courses) Research: Investigation (core and elective courses) Professional Skills (core and elective courses) CORE ART & DESIGN COURSES Studio I & II: New Materials & Technologies Each semester, the Studio course brings in experts in new materials and technologies to teach for a 4-5 week segment each. Workshop topics include cosmetotextiles (a textile containing a substance or preparation intended to be released permanently on different parts of the epidermis), illuminated textiles that can be used for phototherapy, textiles that conduct heat or that can capture body temperature and heart rate, textiles incorporating LED screens, and 3D printing, among others. In each segment students learn a different technique and are encouraged to apply it to their little black dress (fall) and final graduation collection (spring). Students will attend the international professional fair dedicated to new materials, Première Vision, which is held in Paris each September and February. Connected Garments In this course students will study examples of connected garments, the next frontier after smart watches, smart glasses, and fitness bands. Students will visit and study cases such as Cityzen Sciences, which innovates in the field of data collection and management through integrated solutions involving sensors, smart devices and data management. They will then work with students in the M.A./M.F.A. in Transdisciplinary New Media to come up with prototypes for connected garments outside the realm of technical gear for specific athletic disciplines. The Fashion Lab In the second semester, after the Studio class on new materials and garments and the Connected Garments class in the fall, students will develop projects for Dassault Système’s Fashion Lab incubator. Atelier I: From Ready-to-Wear to Haute Couture Design and create three versions of a little black dress: one for mass retail, one for ready-to-wear retail and one for a couture house. The learning objectives are to teach students about different market segments, to teach them to calculate costs and to adapt a design to different buyers. The final productions will be reviewed by a jury of industry professionals representing the three market segments, and students will be asked to explain and justify their design choices for each one of the three versions of the dress. Atelier II: Graduation Collection In this project-based semester-long class students have to design and create a collection of six looks (garments, accessories, etc.) that will be presented to a jury of professionals at the end of the semester. Students will complete research around the theme they will have selected and apply the techniques they will have acquired in the Couture Craftsmanship and other studio classes and elective courses. SUPPORTING ART & DESIGN COURSE History of Fashion & Accessories In this course, students will review the history of fashion (including accessories) in the 20th and 21st centuries. Students will consider how it is represented in catalogs, newspapers and other visual supports. The Maciet archives at the Bibliothèque du Musée des Arts Décoratifs (Library of the Museum of Decorative Arts), a PCA partner institution, will be an invaluable resource for student research. The main focus will be on Europe in order to take advantage of the resources at hand. Sustainable Production Processes Students learn about sustainable production alternatives through readings, discussions, case studies and direct applications to their studio work in the Atelier. How will the garment they are designing be produced? What are the costs and benefits of this production at every step of the process? Students also select a garment from one brand that they research to unveil its entire life cycle, from the choice of materials and means of production to the final recycling or destruction. Professional Practice Workshop Series Professionals from the Parisian fashion world will come in to introduce students to their professional practice and engage them in practical exercises preparing them for the job market. Instructors will be drawn from a broad range of fields: designers of accessories for men and women, designers of sportswear, children’s apparel, lingerie; buyers, magazine editors, I.P. and licensing lawyers, etc. Master’s Thesis Students will document the research they conduct on the theme of their final project, as well as the research they have done on the cost and means of production of their project. Some of the criteria for evaluating the thesis will be the extent to which the student’s work is situated in a historic and cultural context, the quality of the student’s research, and the appropriate use of documentation, artifacts, and the learning resources available to them in Paris. Designer’s Social & Ethical Responsibility In this course, students are brought to think about the ethical implications of a designer’s choices on the life cycle of an object (materials, means and conditions of production, recycling, etc.). Each student will select a garment line from a given brand and research its life cycle. ELECTIVES French Students take a placement test to be placed into one of three levels of French language: introductory, intermediate and advanced. Classes meet twice a week for written and oral exercises designed to strengthen vocabulary and grammar. These courses use dialogues, oral exercises, short compositions and literary texts to establish a firm foundation in the language. Students approach everyday life situations in French, while learning the fundamentals of grammar and the complexity of conversation. The intermediate and advanced courses serve as a more sophisticated introduction to French culture and lifestyle and as a means of consolidating grammar and vocabulary. Concept Development: Storytelling In this semester-long course, students learn to quickly develop and research concepts to tell a story using images and words. The aim is to provide them with the tools, skills and processes that they will need to respond to a client brief in a professional and convincing manner. It is open as an elective to students from other departments, since the ability to come up with creative ideas, researching them and then “packaging” them in a compelling verbal and visual story is a key skill for any designer, whether it is to develop a story for a fashion editorial, an accessories line, or the concept for a new restaurant layout. The disciplinary mix of students also serves to prepare them to work within interdisciplinary teams, which is what they will be faced with in the professional world. Still Life Photography The main aim of this class is to provide students with the tools and techniques required to document their work in a professional manner in order to share it with prospective clients. Students in all the new M.A. programs (accessories design, fashion design, fashion photography, interior design) will need to be proficient in photographing objects and/or interiors. Photographing still life is different from portraiture or street photography, and requires mastery of lighting and mise en scène. Intellectual Property Rights The I.P. course covers issues related to copyright, patents, contracts and liabilities as they apply to art and design. Students will learn about international laws related to copyright and patents and understand how to protect their intellectual property and the best strategies to adopt in different circumstances. [-]

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Paris College of Art

Address Rue Fénelon 15
Paris 75010, France
Phone +33 1 45 77 39 66