Part time Master's Degree in Literature in Glasgow City in United Kingdom

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Literature

Master-level studies involve specialized study in a field of research or an area of professional practice. Earning a master’s degree demonstrates a higher level of mastery of the subject. Earning a master’s degree can take anywhere from a year to three or four years. Before you can graduate, you usually must write and defend a thesis, a long paper that is the culmination of your specialized research.

Literature refers to creative written works in categories such as poetry, novels and fiction to name a few. A literature program may allow students to explore different literature types. A student may choose to specialize in an area such as British literature or drama, or example.

Education in the United Kingdom is a devolved matter with each of the countries of the United Kingdom having separate systems under different governments: the UK Government is responsible for England, and the Scottish Government, the Welsh Government and the Northern Ireland Executive are responsible for Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, respectively.

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Master of Letters in English Literature

University of Glasgow
Campus Part time 2 semesters August 2017 United Kingdom Glasgow

This programme gives you the opportunity to pursue your own interests in English Literature at postgraduate level across a wide range of courses led by internationally renowned experts. [+]

Part time Masters in Literature in Glasgow City in United Kingdom. English Literature MLitt This programme gives you the opportunity to pursue your own interests in English Literature at postgraduate level across a wide range of courses led by internationally renowned experts. A core research training course will introduce you to key skills in postgraduate study, while a flexible degree structure allows you to select from the rich variety of optional courses on offer from the School of Critical Studies and elsewhere in the College of Arts, or even beyond. You can also pursue one of the specialist pathways offered by English Literature, including Fantasy, Medieval and Early Modern, Modernities, and Victorian Literature. The programme ends with an opportunity to write a dissertation on an appropriate English Literature-related topic of your choice. Why this programme The structure of the degree allows you to follow either a bespoke English Literature MLitt programme, constructing your own pathway through a range of different courses, or one of several specialist pathways to suit your interests (see below). You will have access to world class libraries and museums, as well as the extraordinary diversity of cultural, literary and artistic events that makes Glasgow such a vibrant place for postgraduate study. The core research skills programme includes tailored workshops with the University’s archives and world-class Special Collections, as well as providing the academic and technical skills you will need to succeed at postgraduate level in the university and other professional environments. Programme structure There are five different pathways through the MLitt in English Literature at Glasgow: MLitt in English Literature MLitt in English Literature: Fantasy MLitt in English Literature: Medieval and Early Modern Literature and Culture MLitt in English Literature: Modernities: Literature, Culture, Theory MLitt in English Literature: Victorian Literature  Each pathway will give you a different mix of core and optional courses. All students take our 20 credit core English Literature Research Training Course. You then take five more 20 credit courses, some of which may be compulsory for your chosen pathway, and one 60 credit dissertation. The structure for full-time students is as follows: Semester 1:  English Literature Research Training Course plus two 20 credit courses Semester 2:  Three 20 credit courses Summer:  Dissertation Part-time students take the English Literature Research Training Course and three 20 credit courses in their first year of study, and two 20 credit courses and the dissertation in their second year. Pathways English Literature Build your own English Literature postgraduate degree, drawing on the rich range of optional courses available from English Literature, the School of Critical Studies, and elsewhere in the College of Arts or even beyond. Core courses: English Literature Research Training  English Literature Dissertation Optional courses: Of the five further 20 credit courses you take, two must be from any of those offered within the English Literature MLitt programme. The remaining three 20 credit courses may be either from English Literature or, with the convenor’s permission, from elsewhere in the College of Arts and beyond, e.g. Celtic Studies, Classics, History of Art, the School of Education, etc. English Literature courses may include: The American Counterculture, 1945-75 American Fiction of the 1930s Creative Writing Fiction Workshop (cross-discipline) Decadence and The Modern Embodiments: Literature and Medicine, 1750-1900 Explaining Change: Science and Literary Culture 1830-1880 F Scott Fitzgerald, Edith Wharton and Dialogues of American Literary Modernism Fantasy c. 1780 to 1950 Fantasy 1950 to the present Fictions of Adultery From Medieval to Early Modern Genres and Canons Historic and Critical Approaches to Medieval and Early Modern English Literature The Mind of the Contemporary American Novel The Modern Everyday Modernist Sexualities Modernities 1: Literature, Culture and Theory 1880-1945 Modernities 2: Literature, Culture and Theory 1945 to the present Neo-Victorianism The Novel Now Proust in Theory Victorian Literary History Virginia Woolf Writes Modernity Writing Empire English Literature: Fantasy This programme is designed to give you an overview of fantasy literature in English from the era of revolutions at the end of the eighteenth century to the present. As well as charting the history of modern fantasy, including major children’s fiction where this had a significant impact on the development of adult fantasy literature, the course will introduce you to a range of contemporary critical and theoretical approaches to fantasy and the fantastic. Visiting speakers will be invited, which will give you the opportunity to meet contemporary writers, critics and publishers. There is a Fantasy Film Club and you will also be encouraged to participate reflectively in fantasy-related conventions, conferences and festivals, and to join us on field trips and other events. The Masters in Fantasy is a programme run by enthusiasts for enthusiasts, and we hope this will show. Core courses: Fantasy 1: c. 1780-1950 Fantasy 2: 1950 to the present English Literature Research Training Optional courses: You then take a further three 20 credit courses. These can be from: the options listed under the General English Literature pathway  elsewhere in the College of Arts and beyond (with the convenor's permission). E.g. Celtic Studies, Classics, History of Art, School of Education, and many more.   English literature: Medieval and Early Modern Literature and Culture The MLitt in Medieval and Early Modern English Literature and Culture offers students the opportunity to study one of the most vibrant and intellectually challenging periods of literary history. This is an interdisciplinary programme offering a mixture of compulsory and option courses; students may choose options across the range of postgraduate taught courses on offer across the University. You will work with a team of internationally renowned experts with an unparalleled range of medieval and early modern interests, and develop your research skills in manuscripts and print culture by working with the rich manuscript and printed collections held at Glasgow University, the Hunterian, and the Kelvin Hall.  You will also have the option to study a language (i.e. Old English or Latin).  Core courses: From Medieval to Early Modern Historic and Critical Approaches to Medieval and Early Modern English Literature English Literature Research Training Optional courses: You then take a further three 20 credit courses. These can be from: the options listed under the General English Literature pathway  elsewhere in the College of Arts and beyond (with the convenor's permission). E.g. Celtic Studies, Classics, History of Art, School of Education, and many more.  English Literature: Modernities This programme provides the opportunity for advanced study of literary modernism and the avant-garde, and postmodern and contemporary developments in culture and theory. You will investigate the key texts and concepts which shape our understanding of literature and culture across a period of radical change, through an examination of the aesthetic and cultural assumptions of different modern movements; and through an examination of issues in modern writing, particularly those relating to modernity (such as mass culture, revolution, war and empire) and post-modernity (such as simulation, spectacle, performativity and trauma). Throughout, you will study texts in relation to developments in other cultural practices, such as film, theatre and the visual arts. Core courses: Modernities 1: 1890-1945 Modernities 2: 1945 to the present English Literature Research Training Optional courses: You then take a further three 20 credit courses. These can be from: the options listed under the General English Literature pathway  elsewhere in the College of Arts and beyond (with the convenor's permission). E.g. Celtic Studies, Classics, History of Art, School of Education, and many more.  English Literature: Victorian Literature This programme is designed to give you a wide-ranging knowledge of Victorian literature and literary history, introducing you to the period or building on any previous experience of it you may have. You will study a great variety of Victorian writers, genres and forms, and will hone your skills in close reading, historical contextualisation, and use of critical and theoretical sources.  You will also have the opportunity to explore your particular interests in detail, working with staff who are specialists in many aspects of Victorian literature and culture. Glasgow has outstanding resources for the study of Victorian literature including our Special Collections and library. Glasgow is in many ways a Victorian city and you will be working amid some of the most important and beautiful Victorian architecture and landscapes in the UK.  The programme is designed to help you develop research, writing and professional skills which will be transferrable to doctoral study or employment. Previous graduates have gone on to pursue PhDs at Glasgow, Oxford, Cambridge, and other universities, and to careers in teaching, journalism, and consultancy, among other areas. Core courses: Genres and Canons Victorian Literary History English Literature Research Training Optional courses: You then take a further three 20 credit courses. These can be from: the options listed under the General English Literature pathway  elsewhere in the College of Arts and beyond (with the convenor's permission). E.g. Celtic Studies, Classics, History of Art, School of Education, and many more.  Dissertation The two semesters of coursework are followed by one term of supervised work towards a dissertation of up to 15,000 words which you will submit at the beginning of September. The topic normally arises out of the work of the previous two semesters, but the choice is very much open to the student’s own initiative. If you are on a named pathway, then your dissertation topic should fall within the scope of that pathway. If you are on the general pathway, you are welcome to choose a topic from anywhere in the field of English Literature. Your supervisor helps you to develop the proposal and plan the most appropriate reading and methodology. It is also possible to write a dissertation made up of creative writing with a critical component. Normally this possibility is only available to students who have taken the Creative Writing Fiction Workshop (cross-discipline) as one of their options. Entry requirements For entry in 2017 Entry requirements for postgraduate taught programmes are a 2.1 Honours degree or equivalent qualification (for example, GPA 3.0 or above) in a relevant subject unless otherwise specified. We also require: a sample of written work, about 3,000 words in length. This can be a previous piece of work from an undergraduate degree. The work should be written in English and the content does not have to cover a topic related to this specific programme. a short statement of around 500 words outlining your interest in this programme. two academic references. International students  with  academic  qualifications below those required should contact our partner institution, Glasgow International College, who offer a range of pre-Masters courses. English language requirements For applicants whose first language is not English, the University sets a minimum English Language proficiency level. Career prospects Our MLitt programmes provide excellent preparation for PhD studies and an academic career. They also develop key skills sought by many employers, including: the ability to find, select and manage large quantities of information; confident and persuasive oral and written communication; and problem solving through creative and critical thinking. Past Glasgow MLitt graduates have gone on to pursue successful careers in writing, editing, publishing, teaching, the media, heritage and creative industries, and numerous other related professions. [-]

MLitt/PgDip/PgCert Literature, Culture & Place

University of Strathclyde: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences
Campus Part time 12 - 24 months September 2017 United Kingdom Glasgow

This course allows graduates with first degrees in literature, cultural studies, or related areas to take their studies to a more specialised level or in an entirely new direction. [+]

Why this course? This course allows graduates with first degrees in literature, cultural studies, or related areas to take their studies to a more specialised level or in an entirely new direction. The course is unique in the UK. It combines a broad range of periods and places. Specialist expertise is provided by teaching staff, who are members of the Literature, Culture & Place research group. You’ll use rare local resources, such as: the University library's collections of eighteenth-century travel writing the National Gallery of Scotland's landscape collection the Canadian collections at the National Library of Scotland You’ll study You'll complete a number of compulsory and elective classes as well as a dissertation. Dissertation MLitt students will write a dissertation of 15,000 words on a relevant subject of their choice. You’ll be guided by an expert supervisor. Entry requirements First- or upper second-class Honours degree, or equivalent in English Literature or a related subject. Pre-Masters Preparation Course The Pre-Masters Programme is a preparation course for international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the entry requirements for a Masters degree at the University of Strathclyde. The Pre-Masters programme provides progression to a number of degree options. Fees & funding How much will my course cost? All fees quoted are for full-time courses and per academic year unless stated otherwise. Scotland/EU 2015/16 - Mlitt Literature, Culture & Place full-time £7,150 2015/16 - Mlitt Literature, Culture & Place part-time £3,575 2015/16 - PgDip Literature, Culture & Place full-time £5,335 Rest of UK 2015/16 - Mlitt Literature, Culture & Place full-time £7,150 2015/16 - Mlitt Literature, Culture & Place part-time £3,575 2015/16 - PgDip Literature, Culture & Place full-time £5,335 International 2015/16 - Mlitt Literature, Culture & Place full-time £12,155 2015/16 - Mlitt Literature, Culture & Place part-time £6,078 2015/16 - PgDip Literature, Culture & Place full-time £12,155 How can I fund my course? The fees shown are annual and may be subject to an increase each year. Careers Students with a first degree in literary or cultural studies (or a related subject) will find this course relevant to careers in: teaching the media the arts heritage tourism other fields Those considering a PhD will also find it a valuable stepping stone. Where are they now? 90% of our graduates are in further work or study* *Based on the results of the National Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey (2010/11 and 2011/12). [-]