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Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

,[text] =>

Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

Investing in Education

In conjunction with the Group of Eight Committee (Go8), CASE first debuted its Charitable Giving to Universities in Australia and New Zealand Survey in 2012. Its aim? To provide accurate data for the countries’ development officers, alumni staff, and institutional leaders.

The most recent news is, indeed, promising. In 2015, universities in Australia and New Zealand received 26 percent more in new funds and 25 percent more in cash income than in the previous year. Concluded Tim Dolan, Chair of Go8’s Committee of Chief Advancement Officers, “This is not just a matter of anecdote and impression. With the survey of charitable giving now in its fourth year, we are accumulating real evidence and can begin to see helpful trends in the data collected.”

Even more tellingly, according to Dolan?  “This growth has continued notwithstanding an economy that was less confident than in recent years and despite political uncertainty over funding structures and deregulation. We can see that the right fundraising behaviour, consistently and professionally followed, produces satisfying results.”

Other areas of growth include total number of donors and alumni donors as well as participation by universities -- particularly Australian institutions.

Progress Ahead...With a Catch

While the increased generosity of donors bodes well for a boost to world-class research and university at the region’s higher education institutions, insiders warn of the dangers of complacency. Said Dolan, “One reason for this is the ongoing frustration generated by the shortage of appropriate fundraising professionals. We have all found that the right people are hard to find and difficult to keep. If we could double our fundraising teams, the resulting impact would be phenomenal.” Conversely, failure to find these professionals could stunt university growth.

The takeaway for students looking for an exciting and in-demand career path? A master’s in fundraising management or other fundraising-related topic may be the fast-track to success. 

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Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

,[db_lead] =>

Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

,[text] =>

Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

Investing in Education

In conjunction with the Group of Eight Committee (Go8), CASE first debuted its Charitable Giving to Universities in Australia and New Zealand Survey in 2012. Its aim? To provide accurate data for the countries’ development officers, alumni staff, and institutional leaders.

The most recent news is, indeed, promising. In 2015, universities in Australia and New Zealand received 26 percent more in new funds and 25 percent more in cash income than in the previous year. Concluded Tim Dolan, Chair of Go8’s Committee of Chief Advancement Officers, “This is not just a matter of anecdote and impression. With the survey of charitable giving now in its fourth year, we are accumulating real evidence and can begin to see helpful trends in the data collected.”

Even more tellingly, according to Dolan?  “This growth has continued notwithstanding an economy that was less confident than in recent years and despite political uncertainty over funding structures and deregulation. We can see that the right fundraising behaviour, consistently and professionally followed, produces satisfying results.”

Other areas of growth include total number of donors and alumni donors as well as participation by universities -- particularly Australian institutions.

Progress Ahead...With a Catch

While the increased generosity of donors bodes well for a boost to world-class research and university at the region’s higher education institutions, insiders warn of the dangers of complacency. Said Dolan, “One reason for this is the ongoing frustration generated by the shortage of appropriate fundraising professionals. We have all found that the right people are hard to find and difficult to keep. If we could double our fundraising teams, the resulting impact would be phenomenal.” Conversely, failure to find these professionals could stunt university growth.

The takeaway for students looking for an exciting and in-demand career path? A master’s in fundraising management or other fundraising-related topic may be the fast-track to success. 

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The Chinese government recently announced a plan attract more international students from Southeast Asian countries.  Find out why and learn more about higher education initiatives in China. 

,[text] =>

ASEAN-China Center Secretary General Yang Xiuping recently announced that China would like to improve collaboration in education and culture with ASEAN countries.  He said, “Foreign students from Southeast Asian countries are the bridge and future of the relationship between ASEAN [countries] and China.”

Why the push? This push comes partly from the 21st Century Maritime Silk Road.  The Chinese government recently initiated this development strategy and framework to both unite and expand collaborative efforts in education and trade between China and other countries on the Silk Road route.  Attracting more international students from Southeast Asia not only gives students an incredible learning opportunity; it also allows them to be a part of a new collaboration between China and the rest of the region.   

Currently, about 68,000 students from Southeast Asia study in China.  The Chinese government would like to increase that number to at least 100,000 within the year.  Yang commented, “We want to see more exchange students from ASEAN countries in China.” 

This initiative reflects a larger trend in Chinese higher education.  Last year was a record year for the numbers of international students in China.  Why?  China’s outward international strategy for 2020 focuses on making China a global study destination, not just in Southeast Asia.    Some of the countries with the largest numbers of students studying in China?  You guessed it: ASEAN members Thailand and Indonesia, among other global players. 

Learn more about studying in China

 

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The Chinese government recently announced a plan attract more international students from Southeast Asian countries.  Find out why and learn more about higher education initiatives in China. 

,[db_lead] =>

The Chinese government recently announced a plan attract more international students from Southeast Asian countries.  Find out why and learn more about higher education initiatives in China. 

,[text] =>

ASEAN-China Center Secretary General Yang Xiuping recently announced that China would like to improve collaboration in education and culture with ASEAN countries.  He said, “Foreign students from Southeast Asian countries are the bridge and future of the relationship between ASEAN [countries] and China.”

Why the push? This push comes partly from the 21st Century Maritime Silk Road.  The Chinese government recently initiated this development strategy and framework to both unite and expand collaborative efforts in education and trade between China and other countries on the Silk Road route.  Attracting more international students from Southeast Asia not only gives students an incredible learning opportunity; it also allows them to be a part of a new collaboration between China and the rest of the region.   

Currently, about 68,000 students from Southeast Asia study in China.  The Chinese government would like to increase that number to at least 100,000 within the year.  Yang commented, “We want to see more exchange students from ASEAN countries in China.” 

This initiative reflects a larger trend in Chinese higher education.  Last year was a record year for the numbers of international students in China.  Why?  China’s outward international strategy for 2020 focuses on making China a global study destination, not just in Southeast Asia.    Some of the countries with the largest numbers of students studying in China?  You guessed it: ASEAN members Thailand and Indonesia, among other global players. 

Learn more about studying in China

 

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Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

,[text] =>

Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

Plans Underway

In speaking of plans to build a new university dedicated to arts and sciences in Myanmar’s Pobbathiri township, Nay Pyi Taw Council member U Tun Tin said that a plot of land was already chosen as a likely site for the campus. Additionally, insiders revealed, the state counselor had agreed to a construction proposal with a five-year timeline. 

The new university will join several others in Nay Pyi Taw, and is expected to significantly expand the region’s offerings in the arts and sciences.

Good News for Students and Parents

While the project is applauded by many stakeholders, parents and students in the capital have special cause to celebrate the possibility of bachelor’s studies closer to home.

Said one resident and parent, “Students who want to study arts or sciences at university currently have to go to Mandalay or Kyaukse. Once the new university is built, we will be able to watch over our children more easily.”

Higher educated citizens are viewed by many as a critical part of helping the country achieve its full potential during Myanmar’s transition to democracy. Perhaps Myanmar Nobel Prize winner and National League for Democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi’s words from more than a quarter-century ago best reflect the country’s outlook today: “A country’s international standard cannot be measured in terms of the number of hotels and bridges; it has to be measured in terms of education. A country of inferior education won’t be able to catch up with the world.”

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Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

,[db_lead] =>

Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

,[text] =>

Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

Plans Underway

In speaking of plans to build a new university dedicated to arts and sciences in Myanmar’s Pobbathiri township, Nay Pyi Taw Council member U Tun Tin said that a plot of land was already chosen as a likely site for the campus. Additionally, insiders revealed, the state counselor had agreed to a construction proposal with a five-year timeline. 

The new university will join several others in Nay Pyi Taw, and is expected to significantly expand the region’s offerings in the arts and sciences.

Good News for Students and Parents

While the project is applauded by many stakeholders, parents and students in the capital have special cause to celebrate the possibility of bachelor’s studies closer to home.

Said one resident and parent, “Students who want to study arts or sciences at university currently have to go to Mandalay or Kyaukse. Once the new university is built, we will be able to watch over our children more easily.”

Higher educated citizens are viewed by many as a critical part of helping the country achieve its full potential during Myanmar’s transition to democracy. Perhaps Myanmar Nobel Prize winner and National League for Democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi’s words from more than a quarter-century ago best reflect the country’s outlook today: “A country’s international standard cannot be measured in terms of the number of hotels and bridges; it has to be measured in terms of education. A country of inferior education won’t be able to catch up with the world.”

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Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

,[text] =>

Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

 

1. You’ll increase your earning potential.

While many teaching jobs require master’s degrees, others may call for just a bachelor’s degree. In this case, getting the bare minimum can hurt you in several different ways. Not only does it lower your chances of getting hired when you’re up again more qualified applicants, but it also means you’ll likely end up collecting a higher starting salary.

According to The Houston Chronicle, most school districts offer teachers with master’s degrees across the elementary, middle, and high school levels supplemental pay in the form of a “bonus” or “bump.” According to analysis by the Center for American Progress this averages between an extra $3,000 and $10,000 a year! And while the cost of getting a master’s degree can seem prohibitive, the degree can pay for itself in just a few years. Not only that, but most school districts require continuing education credits -- doesn’t it make sense to put those credits toward a degree?

 

2. You’ll enjoy greater career mobility.

While a bachelor’s degree may qualify you to be a classroom teacher, many other school jobs  require advanced credentials. If career advancement is important to you, a master’s degree is a must-have. Whether you’re looking to work as a school administrator, curriculum director, content/subject area specialist, or school counselor, you’ll likely need a master’s degree or more.

Additionally, a master’s degree can also open up new possibilities outside of the school system entirely. From textbook authors and community college teachers to educational consultants and educational researchers, these sought-after, well-paid professionals almost always have upper-level qualifications.

In addition to helping you move up the latter, a bachelor’s degree can lead to broader career prospects, which can be an effective defense against teacher burnout -- a pervasive phenomenon among today’s hard-working teaching professionals.

 

3. You’ll be a better teacher.

A master’s degree isn’t merely a means to an end. Rather, it’s an opportunity for true growth and development. Your time in graduate school will benefit you in numerous ways, from understanding of your options as a teacher by exploring what truly interest you to acquiring tools which will enrich what you offer your students.

While your undergraduate degree might have bestowed knowledge in a certain field of study, a master’s in education places the focus on transitioning that and new knowledge to the classroom. Says Teach.com, “These degrees focus on teaching somebody how to be a teacher, with heavy emphasis on pedagogy, teaching methods, philosophy of education, and educational technology.”

According to one Reddit commenter, “It was a TON of work, and took a while, but it definitely made me a better teacher, both in increasing my knowledge and also making me more sympathetic to my students. Its interesting watching another person teach after you have been teaching all day, and seeing what you can do and what you shouldn't do.”

One caveat worth keeping in mind? As with all advanced studies, you get out of a master’s degree what you put into it. On the flip side, however, if you’re pursuing your graduate coursework part-time while maintaining a teaching job, you’ll have immediate opportunities to start making change. Another Reddit poster shared, “I love teaching while going to school because I can implement strategies I learn in class the next day.”

 

4. You can make change at a higher level.

Teachers help nurture the growth and development of kids in classroom every day. If you’re interested in making change at a higher level, however, a master’s degree can help prepare you for a role in research, assessment or policy.

From regional school districts to local, state, and federal agencies, many organizations exist aimed at improving how teachers, schools and educational systems at large do what they do. They’re all looking for people with the knowledge, experience and insights to help guide them.

One of the most compelling reasons prompting people to enter the teaching profession is the chance to make a difference in society. A master’s degree will not only position you to achieve this goal, but it can also help you improve the quality of education at large while bettering your own life in the process.

 

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Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

,[db_lead] =>

Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

,[text] =>

Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

 

1. You’ll increase your earning potential.

While many teaching jobs require master’s degrees, others may call for just a bachelor’s degree. In this case, getting the bare minimum can hurt you in several different ways. Not only does it lower your chances of getting hired when you’re up again more qualified applicants, but it also means you’ll likely end up collecting a higher starting salary.

According to The Houston Chronicle, most school districts offer teachers with master’s degrees across the elementary, middle, and high school levels supplemental pay in the form of a “bonus” or “bump.” According to analysis by the Center for American Progress this averages between an extra $3,000 and $10,000 a year! And while the cost of getting a master’s degree can seem prohibitive, the degree can pay for itself in just a few years. Not only that, but most school districts require continuing education credits -- doesn’t it make sense to put those credits toward a degree?

 

2. You’ll enjoy greater career mobility.

While a bachelor’s degree may qualify you to be a classroom teacher, many other school jobs  require advanced credentials. If career advancement is important to you, a master’s degree is a must-have. Whether you’re looking to work as a school administrator, curriculum director, content/subject area specialist, or school counselor, you’ll likely need a master’s degree or more.

Additionally, a master’s degree can also open up new possibilities outside of the school system entirely. From textbook authors and community college teachers to educational consultants and educational researchers, these sought-after, well-paid professionals almost always have upper-level qualifications.

In addition to helping you move up the latter, a bachelor’s degree can lead to broader career prospects, which can be an effective defense against teacher burnout -- a pervasive phenomenon among today’s hard-working teaching professionals.

 

3. You’ll be a better teacher.

A master’s degree isn’t merely a means to an end. Rather, it’s an opportunity for true growth and development. Your time in graduate school will benefit you in numerous ways, from understanding of your options as a teacher by exploring what truly interest you to acquiring tools which will enrich what you offer your students.

While your undergraduate degree might have bestowed knowledge in a certain field of study, a master’s in education places the focus on transitioning that and new knowledge to the classroom. Says Teach.com, “These degrees focus on teaching somebody how to be a teacher, with heavy emphasis on pedagogy, teaching methods, philosophy of education, and educational technology.”

According to one Reddit commenter, “It was a TON of work, and took a while, but it definitely made me a better teacher, both in increasing my knowledge and also making me more sympathetic to my students. Its interesting watching another person teach after you have been teaching all day, and seeing what you can do and what you shouldn't do.”

One caveat worth keeping in mind? As with all advanced studies, you get out of a master’s degree what you put into it. On the flip side, however, if you’re pursuing your graduate coursework part-time while maintaining a teaching job, you’ll have immediate opportunities to start making change. Another Reddit poster shared, “I love teaching while going to school because I can implement strategies I learn in class the next day.”

 

4. You can make change at a higher level.

Teachers help nurture the growth and development of kids in classroom every day. If you’re interested in making change at a higher level, however, a master’s degree can help prepare you for a role in research, assessment or policy.

From regional school districts to local, state, and federal agencies, many organizations exist aimed at improving how teachers, schools and educational systems at large do what they do. They’re all looking for people with the knowledge, experience and insights to help guide them.

One of the most compelling reasons prompting people to enter the teaching profession is the chance to make a difference in society. A master’s degree will not only position you to achieve this goal, but it can also help you improve the quality of education at large while bettering your own life in the process.

 

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Thinking about business analytics?  The Rady School of Management at the University of California San Diego offers graduate students the chance to wrestle with real-world business problems—and their solutions—using cutting edge business analytics.  Let’s take a closer look.

,[text] =>

Data matters. “Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted,” attributed to Albert Einstein, explains the purpose of business analytics perfectly.  We live in an age of bigger and bigger data—and businesses need ways to sift through it all, to figure out which combinations of data count—and which ones don’t.  The success of business in today’s global economy depends on it.  The Rady School of Management at UC San Diego offers a forward-thinking Master of Science in Business Analytics that teaches its students how to grapple with the reality of big data using business analytics. 

 

What is Business Analytics?

Professor Vincent Nijs, co-director with Professor Terrence August of the Master of Science in Business Analytics program at the Rady School of Management at UC San Diego, describes the field this way, “I think of business analytics as the field focused on how to use data and models to make better business decisions.  Data Science uses many similar tools (e.g. machine learning) but the set of questions they seek to answer are often different.  You can think of business analytics as ‘data science for business.’”

 

The Amount of Data That Companies Collect Gets Bigger and Bigger…

Just how big is big data?  Really big, and getting bigger all the time.  The EMC Digital Universe Study predicts that by the year 2020, 1.7 megabytes of new data will be created every second for every human on the planet.  What does that mean?  There will be 44 trillion gigabytes (44 zettabytes) of data in the digital universe.  Where does the data come from?  Just about everywhere—1.2 trillion searches per year on Google alone, over 1 billion people using Facebook every day, trillions of photos taken, and billions shared.  By 2020, there will be over 6.1 billion smartphone users, and at least 1/3 of all data will be transmitted through the cloud. We haven’t even talked about online banking, business, movies, television, music, and games.

 

…But Businesses Don’t Always Know How to Use the Data

The Rady School‘s Professor Nijs states, “Companies are collecting more and more data but often lack the people to use it effectively.” He referenced a quote from a well-known report by the McKinsey Global Institute (2013): “Big data promises big things—but only if organizations have the right people in place who know what to do with it. A recurring theme among senior leadership across all sectors is a shortage of professionals trained and experienced at the intersection of disciplines necessary to capture, analyze, and generate meaningful business insights from big data. In addition to deep analytics talent, organizations need management with the right balance of business judgment and statistical skills to translate analysis into action.”

 

A Company’s Future Relies on Its Business Analytics

The need for effective, efficient business analytics is stronger than ever.  Businesses need to know what they want to learn from business analytics—and then how they’re going to use that data to inform their decisions across the board.

Businesses need to be able to determine what data they need and then identify the data sources for gleaning that information.  The final piece?  Distilling that information into actionable insights using the tools of business analytics. Once businesses have a plan for capturing the desired data, organizing it, and analyzing it, they are in a position to develop plans to stay competitive.

 

Business Analytics Has Excellent Job Prospects…

According to a McKinsey Global Report, the US alone has a shortage of about 190,000 data scientists and 1.5 million business analysts.  Globally and in the US, companies need experts in business analytics.  High demand means higher salaries, and a variety of options.  Graduates in Business Analytics work at large companies, start their own businesses, work in banks or FinTech, web-based businesses, retail and food companies, media companies, and marketing companies.

 

…Especially When You Study at a Forward-Thinking School Like Rady

The Rady School’s  new Master of Science in Business Analytics (MSBA) puts students at the forefront of the field. The program focuses on the problems big data poses to businesses—and how to solve them using models, statistics, and machine learning – in classes such as customer analytics, business intelligence, and supply chain analytics.  The school’s bottom line?  To graduate students who know how to use analytics to make a positive impact on business performance—and sustain it. 

Professor Nijs says that “After graduation, our students should expect to work extensively with data, use statistics and machine learning, write code, and develop tools to enhance business decision-making.  After gaining some experience, we expect them to be well-suited to lead an analytics team.” 

First steps for prospective students?  Those interested in studying in this program should have an undergraduate degree in a “quantitative discipline,” says Nijs, like “mathematics, statistics, economics, or physics.”  They should also have some programming experience. 

As data continues to get bigger, the global business world will rely more heavily on business analytics to succeed.  Want to make a difference in the business world?  Earn your MSBA in the field that businesses will indisputably need for success and sustainability. 

Learn more about The Rady School of Management.

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Thinking about business analytics?  The Rady School of Management at the University of California San Diego offers graduate students the chance to wrestle with real-world business problems—and their solutions—using cutting edge business analytics.  Let’s take a closer look.

,[db_lead] =>

Thinking about business analytics?  The Rady School of Management at the University of California San Diego offers graduate students the chance to wrestle with real-world business problems—and their solutions—using cutting edge business analytics.  Let’s take a closer look.

,[text] =>

Data matters. “Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted,” attributed to Albert Einstein, explains the purpose of business analytics perfectly.  We live in an age of bigger and bigger data—and businesses need ways to sift through it all, to figure out which combinations of data count—and which ones don’t.  The success of business in today’s global economy depends on it.  The Rady School of Management at UC San Diego offers a forward-thinking Master of Science in Business Analytics that teaches its students how to grapple with the reality of big data using business analytics. 

 

What is Business Analytics?

Professor Vincent Nijs, co-director with Professor Terrence August of the Master of Science in Business Analytics program at the Rady School of Management at UC San Diego, describes the field this way, “I think of business analytics as the field focused on how to use data and models to make better business decisions.  Data Science uses many similar tools (e.g. machine learning) but the set of questions they seek to answer are often different.  You can think of business analytics as ‘data science for business.’”

 

The Amount of Data That Companies Collect Gets Bigger and Bigger…

Just how big is big data?  Really big, and getting bigger all the time.  The EMC Digital Universe Study predicts that by the year 2020, 1.7 megabytes of new data will be created every second for every human on the planet.  What does that mean?  There will be 44 trillion gigabytes (44 zettabytes) of data in the digital universe.  Where does the data come from?  Just about everywhere—1.2 trillion searches per year on Google alone, over 1 billion people using Facebook every day, trillions of photos taken, and billions shared.  By 2020, there will be over 6.1 billion smartphone users, and at least 1/3 of all data will be transmitted through the cloud. We haven’t even talked about online banking, business, movies, television, music, and games.

 

…But Businesses Don’t Always Know How to Use the Data

The Rady School‘s Professor Nijs states, “Companies are collecting more and more data but often lack the people to use it effectively.” He referenced a quote from a well-known report by the McKinsey Global Institute (2013): “Big data promises big things—but only if organizations have the right people in place who know what to do with it. A recurring theme among senior leadership across all sectors is a shortage of professionals trained and experienced at the intersection of disciplines necessary to capture, analyze, and generate meaningful business insights from big data. In addition to deep analytics talent, organizations need management with the right balance of business judgment and statistical skills to translate analysis into action.”

 

A Company’s Future Relies on Its Business Analytics

The need for effective, efficient business analytics is stronger than ever.  Businesses need to know what they want to learn from business analytics—and then how they’re going to use that data to inform their decisions across the board.

Businesses need to be able to determine what data they need and then identify the data sources for gleaning that information.  The final piece?  Distilling that information into actionable insights using the tools of business analytics. Once businesses have a plan for capturing the desired data, organizing it, and analyzing it, they are in a position to develop plans to stay competitive.

 

Business Analytics Has Excellent Job Prospects…

According to a McKinsey Global Report, the US alone has a shortage of about 190,000 data scientists and 1.5 million business analysts.  Globally and in the US, companies need experts in business analytics.  High demand means higher salaries, and a variety of options.  Graduates in Business Analytics work at large companies, start their own businesses, work in banks or FinTech, web-based businesses, retail and food companies, media companies, and marketing companies.

 

…Especially When You Study at a Forward-Thinking School Like Rady

The Rady School’s  new Master of Science in Business Analytics (MSBA) puts students at the forefront of the field. The program focuses on the problems big data poses to businesses—and how to solve them using models, statistics, and machine learning – in classes such as customer analytics, business intelligence, and supply chain analytics.  The school’s bottom line?  To graduate students who know how to use analytics to make a positive impact on business performance—and sustain it. 

Professor Nijs says that “After graduation, our students should expect to work extensively with data, use statistics and machine learning, write code, and develop tools to enhance business decision-making.  After gaining some experience, we expect them to be well-suited to lead an analytics team.” 

First steps for prospective students?  Those interested in studying in this program should have an undergraduate degree in a “quantitative discipline,” says Nijs, like “mathematics, statistics, economics, or physics.”  They should also have some programming experience. 

As data continues to get bigger, the global business world will rely more heavily on business analytics to succeed.  Want to make a difference in the business world?  Earn your MSBA in the field that businesses will indisputably need for success and sustainability. 

Learn more about The Rady School of Management.

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Thanksgiving, that quintessential American holiday, is here.  Thinking about what to do?  We have four fantastic options for you.  Let’s take a closer look. 

,[text] =>

Giving thanks.  Embracing friendship.  Sharing a thoughtful meal.  Telling stories.  Thanksgiving conjures images of extended families and friends gathered around a beautiful table, sharing a delicious meal, and expressing gratitude for what they have.  International students studying in the US during the holidays have a multitude of way to celebrate this quintessential American holiday.  We’ve put together four fantastic options for you to consider as many US students return “home for the holidays.”

 

1. If an American friend invites you, accept the invitation

Thanksgiving is about, well, being thankful for what you have.  This includes being thankful for new friendships.  An American friend invites you?  Accept.  It’s an invitation to be a part of the family, to share the tradition, to take a break from school, and maybe even to participate in the day after Thanksgiving—Black Friday—the day that many retail shops offer sales and discounts in preparation for December’s holidays.  How’d “Black Friday” get its name?  It’s the day that many retailers’ ledgers assure that they will end their fiscal year “in the black,” or showing a profit for the year.

 

2. Consider on-campus opportunities

Feel like staying on-campus during the Thanksgiving break?  Look for campus traditions at your school.  Some schools offer their own Thanksgiving celebrations for any students and faculty who opt to stay on campus, or who may not have options to travel.  Kansas’s Hesston College hosts an annual Thanksgiving weekend, with a dinner and a bevy of other activities, including art exhibits, concerts, talent shows, basketball tournaments, a benefit fun run, and other special events. At Ohio State University, any students, faculty, and staff who are not planning to head home are invited to attend an annual Thanksgiving feast—this year, the University expects over 1,600 attendees.  At Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, PA, students and faculty spend the entire month of November learning about spirituality.  Several faculty at the University host international students at their homes on Thanksgiving Day—as an expression of gratitude for sharing their learning. 

Credit: nbcwashington.com

3. Attend a parade

What’s Thanksgiving without a parade?  The most famous, of course, is the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City, with over 3 million in-person spectators and upwards of 40 million television viewers.  Several major cities besides New York also hold parades where you can enjoy the holiday spirit of gratitude.  Check out the Dunkin’ Donuts Thanksgiving Day Parade in the City of Brotherly Love, Philadelphia.  Motor City has another option—check out America’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in Detroit, Michigan for floats, bands, music, and a glimpse at the history of the US auto industry.  Also in the Midwest is Chicago’s McDonald’s Thanksgiving Parade, which began in the 1930’s in an effort to raise the spirits of Depression-era residents.  Charlotte, North Carolina, Houston, Texas, and Seattle, Washington offer additional possibilities for big parades.  If you don’t live near a city, don’t fret!  Check your local paper for smaller, regional events.  Watching a parade also gives you a chance either to travel to a new place, or to learn something new and interesting about your university town. 

 

4. Take a break

Not interested in all of the hullabaloo?  Not feeling the need for turkey, Black Friday, parades, or big get-togethers?  Relax.  Enjoy the quiet.  Go for a walk.  Read that book you’ve been wanting to read.  Do some sightseeing—explore the city or town where you’ve decided to study.  If you really feel like it, get caught up—or work ahead—in one of your classes.  Take some time for yourself and recharge. 


Regardless of what you choose to do this Thanksgiving season, remember to be grateful for who you are, what you have, and the positive people in your life.  Cheers!

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Thanksgiving, that quintessential American holiday, is here.  Thinking about what to do?  We have four fantastic options for you.  Let’s take a closer look. 

,[db_lead] =>

Thanksgiving, that quintessential American holiday, is here.  Thinking about what to do?  We have four fantastic options for you.  Let’s take a closer look. 

,[text] =>

Giving thanks.  Embracing friendship.  Sharing a thoughtful meal.  Telling stories.  Thanksgiving conjures images of extended families and friends gathered around a beautiful table, sharing a delicious meal, and expressing gratitude for what they have.  International students studying in the US during the holidays have a multitude of way to celebrate this quintessential American holiday.  We’ve put together four fantastic options for you to consider as many US students return “home for the holidays.”

 

1. If an American friend invites you, accept the invitation

Thanksgiving is about, well, being thankful for what you have.  This includes being thankful for new friendships.  An American friend invites you?  Accept.  It’s an invitation to be a part of the family, to share the tradition, to take a break from school, and maybe even to participate in the day after Thanksgiving—Black Friday—the day that many retail shops offer sales and discounts in preparation for December’s holidays.  How’d “Black Friday” get its name?  It’s the day that many retailers’ ledgers assure that they will end their fiscal year “in the black,” or showing a profit for the year.

 

2. Consider on-campus opportunities

Feel like staying on-campus during the Thanksgiving break?  Look for campus traditions at your school.  Some schools offer their own Thanksgiving celebrations for any students and faculty who opt to stay on campus, or who may not have options to travel.  Kansas’s Hesston College hosts an annual Thanksgiving weekend, with a dinner and a bevy of other activities, including art exhibits, concerts, talent shows, basketball tournaments, a benefit fun run, and other special events. At Ohio State University, any students, faculty, and staff who are not planning to head home are invited to attend an annual Thanksgiving feast—this year, the University expects over 1,600 attendees.  At Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, PA, students and faculty spend the entire month of November learning about spirituality.  Several faculty at the University host international students at their homes on Thanksgiving Day—as an expression of gratitude for sharing their learning. 

Credit: nbcwashington.com

3. Attend a parade

What’s Thanksgiving without a parade?  The most famous, of course, is the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City, with over 3 million in-person spectators and upwards of 40 million television viewers.  Several major cities besides New York also hold parades where you can enjoy the holiday spirit of gratitude.  Check out the Dunkin’ Donuts Thanksgiving Day Parade in the City of Brotherly Love, Philadelphia.  Motor City has another option—check out America’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in Detroit, Michigan for floats, bands, music, and a glimpse at the history of the US auto industry.  Also in the Midwest is Chicago’s McDonald’s Thanksgiving Parade, which began in the 1930’s in an effort to raise the spirits of Depression-era residents.  Charlotte, North Carolina, Houston, Texas, and Seattle, Washington offer additional possibilities for big parades.  If you don’t live near a city, don’t fret!  Check your local paper for smaller, regional events.  Watching a parade also gives you a chance either to travel to a new place, or to learn something new and interesting about your university town. 

 

4. Take a break

Not interested in all of the hullabaloo?  Not feeling the need for turkey, Black Friday, parades, or big get-togethers?  Relax.  Enjoy the quiet.  Go for a walk.  Read that book you’ve been wanting to read.  Do some sightseeing—explore the city or town where you’ve decided to study.  If you really feel like it, get caught up—or work ahead—in one of your classes.  Take some time for yourself and recharge. 


Regardless of what you choose to do this Thanksgiving season, remember to be grateful for who you are, what you have, and the positive people in your life.  Cheers!

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Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

,[text] =>

Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

Investing in Education

In conjunction with the Group of Eight Committee (Go8), CASE first debuted its Charitable Giving to Universities in Australia and New Zealand Survey in 2012. Its aim? To provide accurate data for the countries’ development officers, alumni staff, and institutional leaders.

The most recent news is, indeed, promising. In 2015, universities in Australia and New Zealand received 26 percent more in new funds and 25 percent more in cash income than in the previous year. Concluded Tim Dolan, Chair of Go8’s Committee of Chief Advancement Officers, “This is not just a matter of anecdote and impression. With the survey of charitable giving now in its fourth year, we are accumulating real evidence and can begin to see helpful trends in the data collected.”

Even more tellingly, according to Dolan?  “This growth has continued notwithstanding an economy that was less confident than in recent years and despite political uncertainty over funding structures and deregulation. We can see that the right fundraising behaviour, consistently and professionally followed, produces satisfying results.”

Other areas of growth include total number of donors and alumni donors as well as participation by universities -- particularly Australian institutions.

Progress Ahead...With a Catch

While the increased generosity of donors bodes well for a boost to world-class research and university at the region’s higher education institutions, insiders warn of the dangers of complacency. Said Dolan, “One reason for this is the ongoing frustration generated by the shortage of appropriate fundraising professionals. We have all found that the right people are hard to find and difficult to keep. If we could double our fundraising teams, the resulting impact would be phenomenal.” Conversely, failure to find these professionals could stunt university growth.

The takeaway for students looking for an exciting and in-demand career path? A master’s in fundraising management or other fundraising-related topic may be the fast-track to success. 

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Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

,[db_lead] =>

Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

,[text] =>

Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

Investing in Education

In conjunction with the Group of Eight Committee (Go8), CASE first debuted its Charitable Giving to Universities in Australia and New Zealand Survey in 2012. Its aim? To provide accurate data for the countries’ development officers, alumni staff, and institutional leaders.

The most recent news is, indeed, promising. In 2015, universities in Australia and New Zealand received 26 percent more in new funds and 25 percent more in cash income than in the previous year. Concluded Tim Dolan, Chair of Go8’s Committee of Chief Advancement Officers, “This is not just a matter of anecdote and impression. With the survey of charitable giving now in its fourth year, we are accumulating real evidence and can begin to see helpful trends in the data collected.”

Even more tellingly, according to Dolan?  “This growth has continued notwithstanding an economy that was less confident than in recent years and despite political uncertainty over funding structures and deregulation. We can see that the right fundraising behaviour, consistently and professionally followed, produces satisfying results.”

Other areas of growth include total number of donors and alumni donors as well as participation by universities -- particularly Australian institutions.

Progress Ahead...With a Catch

While the increased generosity of donors bodes well for a boost to world-class research and university at the region’s higher education institutions, insiders warn of the dangers of complacency. Said Dolan, “One reason for this is the ongoing frustration generated by the shortage of appropriate fundraising professionals. We have all found that the right people are hard to find and difficult to keep. If we could double our fundraising teams, the resulting impact would be phenomenal.” Conversely, failure to find these professionals could stunt university growth.

The takeaway for students looking for an exciting and in-demand career path? A master’s in fundraising management or other fundraising-related topic may be the fast-track to success. 

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The Chinese government recently announced a plan attract more international students from Southeast Asian countries.  Find out why and learn more about higher education initiatives in China. 

,[text] =>

ASEAN-China Center Secretary General Yang Xiuping recently announced that China would like to improve collaboration in education and culture with ASEAN countries.  He said, “Foreign students from Southeast Asian countries are the bridge and future of the relationship between ASEAN [countries] and China.”

Why the push? This push comes partly from the 21st Century Maritime Silk Road.  The Chinese government recently initiated this development strategy and framework to both unite and expand collaborative efforts in education and trade between China and other countries on the Silk Road route.  Attracting more international students from Southeast Asia not only gives students an incredible learning opportunity; it also allows them to be a part of a new collaboration between China and the rest of the region.   

Currently, about 68,000 students from Southeast Asia study in China.  The Chinese government would like to increase that number to at least 100,000 within the year.  Yang commented, “We want to see more exchange students from ASEAN countries in China.” 

This initiative reflects a larger trend in Chinese higher education.  Last year was a record year for the numbers of international students in China.  Why?  China’s outward international strategy for 2020 focuses on making China a global study destination, not just in Southeast Asia.    Some of the countries with the largest numbers of students studying in China?  You guessed it: ASEAN members Thailand and Indonesia, among other global players. 

Learn more about studying in China

 

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The Chinese government recently announced a plan attract more international students from Southeast Asian countries.  Find out why and learn more about higher education initiatives in China. 

,[db_lead] =>

The Chinese government recently announced a plan attract more international students from Southeast Asian countries.  Find out why and learn more about higher education initiatives in China. 

,[text] =>

ASEAN-China Center Secretary General Yang Xiuping recently announced that China would like to improve collaboration in education and culture with ASEAN countries.  He said, “Foreign students from Southeast Asian countries are the bridge and future of the relationship between ASEAN [countries] and China.”

Why the push? This push comes partly from the 21st Century Maritime Silk Road.  The Chinese government recently initiated this development strategy and framework to both unite and expand collaborative efforts in education and trade between China and other countries on the Silk Road route.  Attracting more international students from Southeast Asia not only gives students an incredible learning opportunity; it also allows them to be a part of a new collaboration between China and the rest of the region.   

Currently, about 68,000 students from Southeast Asia study in China.  The Chinese government would like to increase that number to at least 100,000 within the year.  Yang commented, “We want to see more exchange students from ASEAN countries in China.” 

This initiative reflects a larger trend in Chinese higher education.  Last year was a record year for the numbers of international students in China.  Why?  China’s outward international strategy for 2020 focuses on making China a global study destination, not just in Southeast Asia.    Some of the countries with the largest numbers of students studying in China?  You guessed it: ASEAN members Thailand and Indonesia, among other global players. 

Learn more about studying in China

 

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Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

,[text] =>

Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

Plans Underway

In speaking of plans to build a new university dedicated to arts and sciences in Myanmar’s Pobbathiri township, Nay Pyi Taw Council member U Tun Tin said that a plot of land was already chosen as a likely site for the campus. Additionally, insiders revealed, the state counselor had agreed to a construction proposal with a five-year timeline. 

The new university will join several others in Nay Pyi Taw, and is expected to significantly expand the region’s offerings in the arts and sciences.

Good News for Students and Parents

While the project is applauded by many stakeholders, parents and students in the capital have special cause to celebrate the possibility of bachelor’s studies closer to home.

Said one resident and parent, “Students who want to study arts or sciences at university currently have to go to Mandalay or Kyaukse. Once the new university is built, we will be able to watch over our children more easily.”

Higher educated citizens are viewed by many as a critical part of helping the country achieve its full potential during Myanmar’s transition to democracy. Perhaps Myanmar Nobel Prize winner and National League for Democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi’s words from more than a quarter-century ago best reflect the country’s outlook today: “A country’s international standard cannot be measured in terms of the number of hotels and bridges; it has to be measured in terms of education. A country of inferior education won’t be able to catch up with the world.”

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Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

,[db_lead] =>

Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

,[text] =>

Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

Plans Underway

In speaking of plans to build a new university dedicated to arts and sciences in Myanmar’s Pobbathiri township, Nay Pyi Taw Council member U Tun Tin said that a plot of land was already chosen as a likely site for the campus. Additionally, insiders revealed, the state counselor had agreed to a construction proposal with a five-year timeline. 

The new university will join several others in Nay Pyi Taw, and is expected to significantly expand the region’s offerings in the arts and sciences.

Good News for Students and Parents

While the project is applauded by many stakeholders, parents and students in the capital have special cause to celebrate the possibility of bachelor’s studies closer to home.

Said one resident and parent, “Students who want to study arts or sciences at university currently have to go to Mandalay or Kyaukse. Once the new university is built, we will be able to watch over our children more easily.”

Higher educated citizens are viewed by many as a critical part of helping the country achieve its full potential during Myanmar’s transition to democracy. Perhaps Myanmar Nobel Prize winner and National League for Democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi’s words from more than a quarter-century ago best reflect the country’s outlook today: “A country’s international standard cannot be measured in terms of the number of hotels and bridges; it has to be measured in terms of education. A country of inferior education won’t be able to catch up with the world.”

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Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

,[text] =>

Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

 

1. You’ll increase your earning potential.

While many teaching jobs require master’s degrees, others may call for just a bachelor’s degree. In this case, getting the bare minimum can hurt you in several different ways. Not only does it lower your chances of getting hired when you’re up again more qualified applicants, but it also means you’ll likely end up collecting a higher starting salary.

According to The Houston Chronicle, most school districts offer teachers with master’s degrees across the elementary, middle, and high school levels supplemental pay in the form of a “bonus” or “bump.” According to analysis by the Center for American Progress this averages between an extra $3,000 and $10,000 a year! And while the cost of getting a master’s degree can seem prohibitive, the degree can pay for itself in just a few years. Not only that, but most school districts require continuing education credits -- doesn’t it make sense to put those credits toward a degree?

 

2. You’ll enjoy greater career mobility.

While a bachelor’s degree may qualify you to be a classroom teacher, many other school jobs  require advanced credentials. If career advancement is important to you, a master’s degree is a must-have. Whether you’re looking to work as a school administrator, curriculum director, content/subject area specialist, or school counselor, you’ll likely need a master’s degree or more.

Additionally, a master’s degree can also open up new possibilities outside of the school system entirely. From textbook authors and community college teachers to educational consultants and educational researchers, these sought-after, well-paid professionals almost always have upper-level qualifications.

In addition to helping you move up the latter, a bachelor’s degree can lead to broader career prospects, which can be an effective defense against teacher burnout -- a pervasive phenomenon among today’s hard-working teaching professionals.

 

3. You’ll be a better teacher.

A master’s degree isn’t merely a means to an end. Rather, it’s an opportunity for true growth and development. Your time in graduate school will benefit you in numerous ways, from understanding of your options as a teacher by exploring what truly interest you to acquiring tools which will enrich what you offer your students.

While your undergraduate degree might have bestowed knowledge in a certain field of study, a master’s in education places the focus on transitioning that and new knowledge to the classroom. Says Teach.com, “These degrees focus on teaching somebody how to be a teacher, with heavy emphasis on pedagogy, teaching methods, philosophy of education, and educational technology.”

According to one Reddit commenter, “It was a TON of work, and took a while, but it definitely made me a better teacher, both in increasing my knowledge and also making me more sympathetic to my students. Its interesting watching another person teach after you have been teaching all day, and seeing what you can do and what you shouldn't do.”

One caveat worth keeping in mind? As with all advanced studies, you get out of a master’s degree what you put into it. On the flip side, however, if you’re pursuing your graduate coursework part-time while maintaining a teaching job, you’ll have immediate opportunities to start making change. Another Reddit poster shared, “I love teaching while going to school because I can implement strategies I learn in class the next day.”

 

4. You can make change at a higher level.

Teachers help nurture the growth and development of kids in classroom every day. If you’re interested in making change at a higher level, however, a master’s degree can help prepare you for a role in research, assessment or policy.

From regional school districts to local, state, and federal agencies, many organizations exist aimed at improving how teachers, schools and educational systems at large do what they do. They’re all looking for people with the knowledge, experience and insights to help guide them.

One of the most compelling reasons prompting people to enter the teaching profession is the chance to make a difference in society. A master’s degree will not only position you to achieve this goal, but it can also help you improve the quality of education at large while bettering your own life in the process.

 

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Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

,[db_lead] =>

Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

,[text] =>

Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

 

1. You’ll increase your earning potential.

While many teaching jobs require master’s degrees, others may call for just a bachelor’s degree. In this case, getting the bare minimum can hurt you in several different ways. Not only does it lower your chances of getting hired when you’re up again more qualified applicants, but it also means you’ll likely end up collecting a higher starting salary.

According to The Houston Chronicle, most school districts offer teachers with master’s degrees across the elementary, middle, and high school levels supplemental pay in the form of a “bonus” or “bump.” According to analysis by the Center for American Progress this averages between an extra $3,000 and $10,000 a year! And while the cost of getting a master’s degree can seem prohibitive, the degree can pay for itself in just a few years. Not only that, but most school districts require continuing education credits -- doesn’t it make sense to put those credits toward a degree?

 

2. You’ll enjoy greater career mobility.

While a bachelor’s degree may qualify you to be a classroom teacher, many other school jobs  require advanced credentials. If career advancement is important to you, a master’s degree is a must-have. Whether you’re looking to work as a school administrator, curriculum director, content/subject area specialist, or school counselor, you’ll likely need a master’s degree or more.

Additionally, a master’s degree can also open up new possibilities outside of the school system entirely. From textbook authors and community college teachers to educational consultants and educational researchers, these sought-after, well-paid professionals almost always have upper-level qualifications.

In addition to helping you move up the latter, a bachelor’s degree can lead to broader career prospects, which can be an effective defense against teacher burnout -- a pervasive phenomenon among today’s hard-working teaching professionals.

 

3. You’ll be a better teacher.

A master’s degree isn’t merely a means to an end. Rather, it’s an opportunity for true growth and development. Your time in graduate school will benefit you in numerous ways, from understanding of your options as a teacher by exploring what truly interest you to acquiring tools which will enrich what you offer your students.

While your undergraduate degree might have bestowed knowledge in a certain field of study, a master’s in education places the focus on transitioning that and new knowledge to the classroom. Says Teach.com, “These degrees focus on teaching somebody how to be a teacher, with heavy emphasis on pedagogy, teaching methods, philosophy of education, and educational technology.”

According to one Reddit commenter, “It was a TON of work, and took a while, but it definitely made me a better teacher, both in increasing my knowledge and also making me more sympathetic to my students. Its interesting watching another person teach after you have been teaching all day, and seeing what you can do and what you shouldn't do.”

One caveat worth keeping in mind? As with all advanced studies, you get out of a master’s degree what you put into it. On the flip side, however, if you’re pursuing your graduate coursework part-time while maintaining a teaching job, you’ll have immediate opportunities to start making change. Another Reddit poster shared, “I love teaching while going to school because I can implement strategies I learn in class the next day.”

 

4. You can make change at a higher level.

Teachers help nurture the growth and development of kids in classroom every day. If you’re interested in making change at a higher level, however, a master’s degree can help prepare you for a role in research, assessment or policy.

From regional school districts to local, state, and federal agencies, many organizations exist aimed at improving how teachers, schools and educational systems at large do what they do. They’re all looking for people with the knowledge, experience and insights to help guide them.

One of the most compelling reasons prompting people to enter the teaching profession is the chance to make a difference in society. A master’s degree will not only position you to achieve this goal, but it can also help you improve the quality of education at large while bettering your own life in the process.

 

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Thinking about business analytics?  The Rady School of Management at the University of California San Diego offers graduate students the chance to wrestle with real-world business problems—and their solutions—using cutting edge business analytics.  Let’s take a closer look.

,[text] =>

Data matters. “Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted,” attributed to Albert Einstein, explains the purpose of business analytics perfectly.  We live in an age of bigger and bigger data—and businesses need ways to sift through it all, to figure out which combinations of data count—and which ones don’t.  The success of business in today’s global economy depends on it.  The Rady School of Management at UC San Diego offers a forward-thinking Master of Science in Business Analytics that teaches its students how to grapple with the reality of big data using business analytics. 

 

What is Business Analytics?

Professor Vincent Nijs, co-director with Professor Terrence August of the Master of Science in Business Analytics program at the Rady School of Management at UC San Diego, describes the field this way, “I think of business analytics as the field focused on how to use data and models to make better business decisions.  Data Science uses many similar tools (e.g. machine learning) but the set of questions they seek to answer are often different.  You can think of business analytics as ‘data science for business.’”

 

The Amount of Data That Companies Collect Gets Bigger and Bigger…

Just how big is big data?  Really big, and getting bigger all the time.  The EMC Digital Universe Study predicts that by the year 2020, 1.7 megabytes of new data will be created every second for every human on the planet.  What does that mean?  There will be 44 trillion gigabytes (44 zettabytes) of data in the digital universe.  Where does the data come from?  Just about everywhere—1.2 trillion searches per year on Google alone, over 1 billion people using Facebook every day, trillions of photos taken, and billions shared.  By 2020, there will be over 6.1 billion smartphone users, and at least 1/3 of all data will be transmitted through the cloud. We haven’t even talked about online banking, business, movies, television, music, and games.

 

…But Businesses Don’t Always Know How to Use the Data

The Rady School‘s Professor Nijs states, “Companies are collecting more and more data but often lack the people to use it effectively.” He referenced a quote from a well-known report by the McKinsey Global Institute (2013): “Big data promises big things—but only if organizations have the right people in place who know what to do with it. A recurring theme among senior leadership across all sectors is a shortage of professionals trained and experienced at the intersection of disciplines necessary to capture, analyze, and generate meaningful business insights from big data. In addition to deep analytics talent, organizations need management with the right balance of business judgment and statistical skills to translate analysis into action.”

 

A Company’s Future Relies on Its Business Analytics

The need for effective, efficient business analytics is stronger than ever.  Businesses need to know what they want to learn from business analytics—and then how they’re going to use that data to inform their decisions across the board.

Businesses need to be able to determine what data they need and then identify the data sources for gleaning that information.  The final piece?  Distilling that information into actionable insights using the tools of business analytics. Once businesses have a plan for capturing the desired data, organizing it, and analyzing it, they are in a position to develop plans to stay competitive.

 

Business Analytics Has Excellent Job Prospects…

According to a McKinsey Global Report, the US alone has a shortage of about 190,000 data scientists and 1.5 million business analysts.  Globally and in the US, companies need experts in business analytics.  High demand means higher salaries, and a variety of options.  Graduates in Business Analytics work at large companies, start their own businesses, work in banks or FinTech, web-based businesses, retail and food companies, media companies, and marketing companies.

 

…Especially When You Study at a Forward-Thinking School Like Rady

The Rady School’s  new Master of Science in Business Analytics (MSBA) puts students at the forefront of the field. The program focuses on the problems big data poses to businesses—and how to solve them using models, statistics, and machine learning – in classes such as customer analytics, business intelligence, and supply chain analytics.  The school’s bottom line?  To graduate students who know how to use analytics to make a positive impact on business performance—and sustain it. 

Professor Nijs says that “After graduation, our students should expect to work extensively with data, use statistics and machine learning, write code, and develop tools to enhance business decision-making.  After gaining some experience, we expect them to be well-suited to lead an analytics team.” 

First steps for prospective students?  Those interested in studying in this program should have an undergraduate degree in a “quantitative discipline,” says Nijs, like “mathematics, statistics, economics, or physics.”  They should also have some programming experience. 

As data continues to get bigger, the global business world will rely more heavily on business analytics to succeed.  Want to make a difference in the business world?  Earn your MSBA in the field that businesses will indisputably need for success and sustainability. 

Learn more about The Rady School of Management.

,[link_description] => ,[meta_description] => ,[meta_keywords] => Rady,[aproved_enum] => NO,[published_at] => 2016-11-30 16:09:46,[editingSource_enum] => MasterStudies),[] => ,[cover_photo] => ,[idType] => 51,[idProvider] => 0,[ntype] => ,[news_type] => article,[head_title] => ,[lead] =>

Thinking about business analytics?  The Rady School of Management at the University of California San Diego offers graduate students the chance to wrestle with real-world business problems—and their solutions—using cutting edge business analytics.  Let’s take a closer look.

,[db_lead] =>

Thinking about business analytics?  The Rady School of Management at the University of California San Diego offers graduate students the chance to wrestle with real-world business problems—and their solutions—using cutting edge business analytics.  Let’s take a closer look.

,[text] =>

Data matters. “Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted,” attributed to Albert Einstein, explains the purpose of business analytics perfectly.  We live in an age of bigger and bigger data—and businesses need ways to sift through it all, to figure out which combinations of data count—and which ones don’t.  The success of business in today’s global economy depends on it.  The Rady School of Management at UC San Diego offers a forward-thinking Master of Science in Business Analytics that teaches its students how to grapple with the reality of big data using business analytics. 

 

What is Business Analytics?

Professor Vincent Nijs, co-director with Professor Terrence August of the Master of Science in Business Analytics program at the Rady School of Management at UC San Diego, describes the field this way, “I think of business analytics as the field focused on how to use data and models to make better business decisions.  Data Science uses many similar tools (e.g. machine learning) but the set of questions they seek to answer are often different.  You can think of business analytics as ‘data science for business.’”

 

The Amount of Data That Companies Collect Gets Bigger and Bigger…

Just how big is big data?  Really big, and getting bigger all the time.  The EMC Digital Universe Study predicts that by the year 2020, 1.7 megabytes of new data will be created every second for every human on the planet.  What does that mean?  There will be 44 trillion gigabytes (44 zettabytes) of data in the digital universe.  Where does the data come from?  Just about everywhere—1.2 trillion searches per year on Google alone, over 1 billion people using Facebook every day, trillions of photos taken, and billions shared.  By 2020, there will be over 6.1 billion smartphone users, and at least 1/3 of all data will be transmitted through the cloud. We haven’t even talked about online banking, business, movies, television, music, and games.

 

…But Businesses Don’t Always Know How to Use the Data

The Rady School‘s Professor Nijs states, “Companies are collecting more and more data but often lack the people to use it effectively.” He referenced a quote from a well-known report by the McKinsey Global Institute (2013): “Big data promises big things—but only if organizations have the right people in place who know what to do with it. A recurring theme among senior leadership across all sectors is a shortage of professionals trained and experienced at the intersection of disciplines necessary to capture, analyze, and generate meaningful business insights from big data. In addition to deep analytics talent, organizations need management with the right balance of business judgment and statistical skills to translate analysis into action.”

 

A Company’s Future Relies on Its Business Analytics

The need for effective, efficient business analytics is stronger than ever.  Businesses need to know what they want to learn from business analytics—and then how they’re going to use that data to inform their decisions across the board.

Businesses need to be able to determine what data they need and then identify the data sources for gleaning that information.  The final piece?  Distilling that information into actionable insights using the tools of business analytics. Once businesses have a plan for capturing the desired data, organizing it, and analyzing it, they are in a position to develop plans to stay competitive.

 

Business Analytics Has Excellent Job Prospects…

According to a McKinsey Global Report, the US alone has a shortage of about 190,000 data scientists and 1.5 million business analysts.  Globally and in the US, companies need experts in business analytics.  High demand means higher salaries, and a variety of options.  Graduates in Business Analytics work at large companies, start their own businesses, work in banks or FinTech, web-based businesses, retail and food companies, media companies, and marketing companies.

 

…Especially When You Study at a Forward-Thinking School Like Rady

The Rady School’s  new Master of Science in Business Analytics (MSBA) puts students at the forefront of the field. The program focuses on the problems big data poses to businesses—and how to solve them using models, statistics, and machine learning – in classes such as customer analytics, business intelligence, and supply chain analytics.  The school’s bottom line?  To graduate students who know how to use analytics to make a positive impact on business performance—and sustain it. 

Professor Nijs says that “After graduation, our students should expect to work extensively with data, use statistics and machine learning, write code, and develop tools to enhance business decision-making.  After gaining some experience, we expect them to be well-suited to lead an analytics team.” 

First steps for prospective students?  Those interested in studying in this program should have an undergraduate degree in a “quantitative discipline,” says Nijs, like “mathematics, statistics, economics, or physics.”  They should also have some programming experience. 

As data continues to get bigger, the global business world will rely more heavily on business analytics to succeed.  Want to make a difference in the business world?  Earn your MSBA in the field that businesses will indisputably need for success and sustainability. 

Learn more about The Rady School of Management.

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Thanksgiving, that quintessential American holiday, is here.  Thinking about what to do?  We have four fantastic options for you.  Let’s take a closer look. 

,[text] =>

Giving thanks.  Embracing friendship.  Sharing a thoughtful meal.  Telling stories.  Thanksgiving conjures images of extended families and friends gathered around a beautiful table, sharing a delicious meal, and expressing gratitude for what they have.  International students studying in the US during the holidays have a multitude of way to celebrate this quintessential American holiday.  We’ve put together four fantastic options for you to consider as many US students return “home for the holidays.”

 

1. If an American friend invites you, accept the invitation

Thanksgiving is about, well, being thankful for what you have.  This includes being thankful for new friendships.  An American friend invites you?  Accept.  It’s an invitation to be a part of the family, to share the tradition, to take a break from school, and maybe even to participate in the day after Thanksgiving—Black Friday—the day that many retail shops offer sales and discounts in preparation for December’s holidays.  How’d “Black Friday” get its name?  It’s the day that many retailers’ ledgers assure that they will end their fiscal year “in the black,” or showing a profit for the year.

 

2. Consider on-campus opportunities

Feel like staying on-campus during the Thanksgiving break?  Look for campus traditions at your school.  Some schools offer their own Thanksgiving celebrations for any students and faculty who opt to stay on campus, or who may not have options to travel.  Kansas’s Hesston College hosts an annual Thanksgiving weekend, with a dinner and a bevy of other activities, including art exhibits, concerts, talent shows, basketball tournaments, a benefit fun run, and other special events. At Ohio State University, any students, faculty, and staff who are not planning to head home are invited to attend an annual Thanksgiving feast—this year, the University expects over 1,600 attendees.  At Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, PA, students and faculty spend the entire month of November learning about spirituality.  Several faculty at the University host international students at their homes on Thanksgiving Day—as an expression of gratitude for sharing their learning. 

Credit: nbcwashington.com

3. Attend a parade

What’s Thanksgiving without a parade?  The most famous, of course, is the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City, with over 3 million in-person spectators and upwards of 40 million television viewers.  Several major cities besides New York also hold parades where you can enjoy the holiday spirit of gratitude.  Check out the Dunkin’ Donuts Thanksgiving Day Parade in the City of Brotherly Love, Philadelphia.  Motor City has another option—check out America’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in Detroit, Michigan for floats, bands, music, and a glimpse at the history of the US auto industry.  Also in the Midwest is Chicago’s McDonald’s Thanksgiving Parade, which began in the 1930’s in an effort to raise the spirits of Depression-era residents.  Charlotte, North Carolina, Houston, Texas, and Seattle, Washington offer additional possibilities for big parades.  If you don’t live near a city, don’t fret!  Check your local paper for smaller, regional events.  Watching a parade also gives you a chance either to travel to a new place, or to learn something new and interesting about your university town. 

 

4. Take a break

Not interested in all of the hullabaloo?  Not feeling the need for turkey, Black Friday, parades, or big get-togethers?  Relax.  Enjoy the quiet.  Go for a walk.  Read that book you’ve been wanting to read.  Do some sightseeing—explore the city or town where you’ve decided to study.  If you really feel like it, get caught up—or work ahead—in one of your classes.  Take some time for yourself and recharge. 


Regardless of what you choose to do this Thanksgiving season, remember to be grateful for who you are, what you have, and the positive people in your life.  Cheers!

,[link_description] => ,[meta_description] => ,[meta_keywords] => Thanksgiving,[aproved_enum] => NO,[published_at] => 2016-11-24 11:15:18,[editingSource_enum] => MasterStudies),[] => ,[cover_photo] => ,[idType] => 51,[idProvider] => 0,[ntype] => ,[news_type] => article,[head_title] => ,[lead] =>

Thanksgiving, that quintessential American holiday, is here.  Thinking about what to do?  We have four fantastic options for you.  Let’s take a closer look. 

,[db_lead] =>

Thanksgiving, that quintessential American holiday, is here.  Thinking about what to do?  We have four fantastic options for you.  Let’s take a closer look. 

,[text] =>

Giving thanks.  Embracing friendship.  Sharing a thoughtful meal.  Telling stories.  Thanksgiving conjures images of extended families and friends gathered around a beautiful table, sharing a delicious meal, and expressing gratitude for what they have.  International students studying in the US during the holidays have a multitude of way to celebrate this quintessential American holiday.  We’ve put together four fantastic options for you to consider as many US students return “home for the holidays.”

 

1. If an American friend invites you, accept the invitation

Thanksgiving is about, well, being thankful for what you have.  This includes being thankful for new friendships.  An American friend invites you?  Accept.  It’s an invitation to be a part of the family, to share the tradition, to take a break from school, and maybe even to participate in the day after Thanksgiving—Black Friday—the day that many retail shops offer sales and discounts in preparation for December’s holidays.  How’d “Black Friday” get its name?  It’s the day that many retailers’ ledgers assure that they will end their fiscal year “in the black,” or showing a profit for the year.

 

2. Consider on-campus opportunities

Feel like staying on-campus during the Thanksgiving break?  Look for campus traditions at your school.  Some schools offer their own Thanksgiving celebrations for any students and faculty who opt to stay on campus, or who may not have options to travel.  Kansas’s Hesston College hosts an annual Thanksgiving weekend, with a dinner and a bevy of other activities, including art exhibits, concerts, talent shows, basketball tournaments, a benefit fun run, and other special events. At Ohio State University, any students, faculty, and staff who are not planning to head home are invited to attend an annual Thanksgiving feast—this year, the University expects over 1,600 attendees.  At Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, PA, students and faculty spend the entire month of November learning about spirituality.  Several faculty at the University host international students at their homes on Thanksgiving Day—as an expression of gratitude for sharing their learning. 

Credit: nbcwashington.com

3. Attend a parade

What’s Thanksgiving without a parade?  The most famous, of course, is the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City, with over 3 million in-person spectators and upwards of 40 million television viewers.  Several major cities besides New York also hold parades where you can enjoy the holiday spirit of gratitude.  Check out the Dunkin’ Donuts Thanksgiving Day Parade in the City of Brotherly Love, Philadelphia.  Motor City has another option—check out America’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in Detroit, Michigan for floats, bands, music, and a glimpse at the history of the US auto industry.  Also in the Midwest is Chicago’s McDonald’s Thanksgiving Parade, which began in the 1930’s in an effort to raise the spirits of Depression-era residents.  Charlotte, North Carolina, Houston, Texas, and Seattle, Washington offer additional possibilities for big parades.  If you don’t live near a city, don’t fret!  Check your local paper for smaller, regional events.  Watching a parade also gives you a chance either to travel to a new place, or to learn something new and interesting about your university town. 

 

4. Take a break

Not interested in all of the hullabaloo?  Not feeling the need for turkey, Black Friday, parades, or big get-togethers?  Relax.  Enjoy the quiet.  Go for a walk.  Read that book you’ve been wanting to read.  Do some sightseeing—explore the city or town where you’ve decided to study.  If you really feel like it, get caught up—or work ahead—in one of your classes.  Take some time for yourself and recharge. 


Regardless of what you choose to do this Thanksgiving season, remember to be grateful for who you are, what you have, and the positive people in your life.  Cheers!

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Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

,[text] =>

Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

Investing in Education

In conjunction with the Group of Eight Committee (Go8), CASE first debuted its Charitable Giving to Universities in Australia and New Zealand Survey in 2012. Its aim? To provide accurate data for the countries’ development officers, alumni staff, and institutional leaders.

The most recent news is, indeed, promising. In 2015, universities in Australia and New Zealand received 26 percent more in new funds and 25 percent more in cash income than in the previous year. Concluded Tim Dolan, Chair of Go8’s Committee of Chief Advancement Officers, “This is not just a matter of anecdote and impression. With the survey of charitable giving now in its fourth year, we are accumulating real evidence and can begin to see helpful trends in the data collected.”

Even more tellingly, according to Dolan?  “This growth has continued notwithstanding an economy that was less confident than in recent years and despite political uncertainty over funding structures and deregulation. We can see that the right fundraising behaviour, consistently and professionally followed, produces satisfying results.”

Other areas of growth include total number of donors and alumni donors as well as participation by universities -- particularly Australian institutions.

Progress Ahead...With a Catch

While the increased generosity of donors bodes well for a boost to world-class research and university at the region’s higher education institutions, insiders warn of the dangers of complacency. Said Dolan, “One reason for this is the ongoing frustration generated by the shortage of appropriate fundraising professionals. We have all found that the right people are hard to find and difficult to keep. If we could double our fundraising teams, the resulting impact would be phenomenal.” Conversely, failure to find these professionals could stunt university growth.

The takeaway for students looking for an exciting and in-demand career path? A master’s in fundraising management or other fundraising-related topic may be the fast-track to success. 

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Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

,[db_lead] =>

Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

,[text] =>

Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

Investing in Education

In conjunction with the Group of Eight Committee (Go8), CASE first debuted its Charitable Giving to Universities in Australia and New Zealand Survey in 2012. Its aim? To provide accurate data for the countries’ development officers, alumni staff, and institutional leaders.

The most recent news is, indeed, promising. In 2015, universities in Australia and New Zealand received 26 percent more in new funds and 25 percent more in cash income than in the previous year. Concluded Tim Dolan, Chair of Go8’s Committee of Chief Advancement Officers, “This is not just a matter of anecdote and impression. With the survey of charitable giving now in its fourth year, we are accumulating real evidence and can begin to see helpful trends in the data collected.”

Even more tellingly, according to Dolan?  “This growth has continued notwithstanding an economy that was less confident than in recent years and despite political uncertainty over funding structures and deregulation. We can see that the right fundraising behaviour, consistently and professionally followed, produces satisfying results.”

Other areas of growth include total number of donors and alumni donors as well as participation by universities -- particularly Australian institutions.

Progress Ahead...With a Catch

While the increased generosity of donors bodes well for a boost to world-class research and university at the region’s higher education institutions, insiders warn of the dangers of complacency. Said Dolan, “One reason for this is the ongoing frustration generated by the shortage of appropriate fundraising professionals. We have all found that the right people are hard to find and difficult to keep. If we could double our fundraising teams, the resulting impact would be phenomenal.” Conversely, failure to find these professionals could stunt university growth.

The takeaway for students looking for an exciting and in-demand career path? A master’s in fundraising management or other fundraising-related topic may be the fast-track to success. 

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The Chinese government recently announced a plan attract more international students from Southeast Asian countries.  Find out why and learn more about higher education initiatives in China. 

,[text] =>

ASEAN-China Center Secretary General Yang Xiuping recently announced that China would like to improve collaboration in education and culture with ASEAN countries.  He said, “Foreign students from Southeast Asian countries are the bridge and future of the relationship between ASEAN [countries] and China.”

Why the push? This push comes partly from the 21st Century Maritime Silk Road.  The Chinese government recently initiated this development strategy and framework to both unite and expand collaborative efforts in education and trade between China and other countries on the Silk Road route.  Attracting more international students from Southeast Asia not only gives students an incredible learning opportunity; it also allows them to be a part of a new collaboration between China and the rest of the region.   

Currently, about 68,000 students from Southeast Asia study in China.  The Chinese government would like to increase that number to at least 100,000 within the year.  Yang commented, “We want to see more exchange students from ASEAN countries in China.” 

This initiative reflects a larger trend in Chinese higher education.  Last year was a record year for the numbers of international students in China.  Why?  China’s outward international strategy for 2020 focuses on making China a global study destination, not just in Southeast Asia.    Some of the countries with the largest numbers of students studying in China?  You guessed it: ASEAN members Thailand and Indonesia, among other global players. 

Learn more about studying in China

 

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The Chinese government recently announced a plan attract more international students from Southeast Asian countries.  Find out why and learn more about higher education initiatives in China. 

,[db_lead] =>

The Chinese government recently announced a plan attract more international students from Southeast Asian countries.  Find out why and learn more about higher education initiatives in China. 

,[text] =>

ASEAN-China Center Secretary General Yang Xiuping recently announced that China would like to improve collaboration in education and culture with ASEAN countries.  He said, “Foreign students from Southeast Asian countries are the bridge and future of the relationship between ASEAN [countries] and China.”

Why the push? This push comes partly from the 21st Century Maritime Silk Road.  The Chinese government recently initiated this development strategy and framework to both unite and expand collaborative efforts in education and trade between China and other countries on the Silk Road route.  Attracting more international students from Southeast Asia not only gives students an incredible learning opportunity; it also allows them to be a part of a new collaboration between China and the rest of the region.   

Currently, about 68,000 students from Southeast Asia study in China.  The Chinese government would like to increase that number to at least 100,000 within the year.  Yang commented, “We want to see more exchange students from ASEAN countries in China.” 

This initiative reflects a larger trend in Chinese higher education.  Last year was a record year for the numbers of international students in China.  Why?  China’s outward international strategy for 2020 focuses on making China a global study destination, not just in Southeast Asia.    Some of the countries with the largest numbers of students studying in China?  You guessed it: ASEAN members Thailand and Indonesia, among other global players. 

Learn more about studying in China

 

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Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

,[text] =>

Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

Plans Underway

In speaking of plans to build a new university dedicated to arts and sciences in Myanmar’s Pobbathiri township, Nay Pyi Taw Council member U Tun Tin said that a plot of land was already chosen as a likely site for the campus. Additionally, insiders revealed, the state counselor had agreed to a construction proposal with a five-year timeline. 

The new university will join several others in Nay Pyi Taw, and is expected to significantly expand the region’s offerings in the arts and sciences.

Good News for Students and Parents

While the project is applauded by many stakeholders, parents and students in the capital have special cause to celebrate the possibility of bachelor’s studies closer to home.

Said one resident and parent, “Students who want to study arts or sciences at university currently have to go to Mandalay or Kyaukse. Once the new university is built, we will be able to watch over our children more easily.”

Higher educated citizens are viewed by many as a critical part of helping the country achieve its full potential during Myanmar’s transition to democracy. Perhaps Myanmar Nobel Prize winner and National League for Democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi’s words from more than a quarter-century ago best reflect the country’s outlook today: “A country’s international standard cannot be measured in terms of the number of hotels and bridges; it has to be measured in terms of education. A country of inferior education won’t be able to catch up with the world.”

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Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

,[db_lead] =>

Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

,[text] =>

Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

Plans Underway

In speaking of plans to build a new university dedicated to arts and sciences in Myanmar’s Pobbathiri township, Nay Pyi Taw Council member U Tun Tin said that a plot of land was already chosen as a likely site for the campus. Additionally, insiders revealed, the state counselor had agreed to a construction proposal with a five-year timeline. 

The new university will join several others in Nay Pyi Taw, and is expected to significantly expand the region’s offerings in the arts and sciences.

Good News for Students and Parents

While the project is applauded by many stakeholders, parents and students in the capital have special cause to celebrate the possibility of bachelor’s studies closer to home.

Said one resident and parent, “Students who want to study arts or sciences at university currently have to go to Mandalay or Kyaukse. Once the new university is built, we will be able to watch over our children more easily.”

Higher educated citizens are viewed by many as a critical part of helping the country achieve its full potential during Myanmar’s transition to democracy. Perhaps Myanmar Nobel Prize winner and National League for Democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi’s words from more than a quarter-century ago best reflect the country’s outlook today: “A country’s international standard cannot be measured in terms of the number of hotels and bridges; it has to be measured in terms of education. A country of inferior education won’t be able to catch up with the world.”

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Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

,[text] =>

Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

 

1. You’ll increase your earning potential.

While many teaching jobs require master’s degrees, others may call for just a bachelor’s degree. In this case, getting the bare minimum can hurt you in several different ways. Not only does it lower your chances of getting hired when you’re up again more qualified applicants, but it also means you’ll likely end up collecting a higher starting salary.

According to The Houston Chronicle, most school districts offer teachers with master’s degrees across the elementary, middle, and high school levels supplemental pay in the form of a “bonus” or “bump.” According to analysis by the Center for American Progress this averages between an extra $3,000 and $10,000 a year! And while the cost of getting a master’s degree can seem prohibitive, the degree can pay for itself in just a few years. Not only that, but most school districts require continuing education credits -- doesn’t it make sense to put those credits toward a degree?

 

2. You’ll enjoy greater career mobility.

While a bachelor’s degree may qualify you to be a classroom teacher, many other school jobs  require advanced credentials. If career advancement is important to you, a master’s degree is a must-have. Whether you’re looking to work as a school administrator, curriculum director, content/subject area specialist, or school counselor, you’ll likely need a master’s degree or more.

Additionally, a master’s degree can also open up new possibilities outside of the school system entirely. From textbook authors and community college teachers to educational consultants and educational researchers, these sought-after, well-paid professionals almost always have upper-level qualifications.

In addition to helping you move up the latter, a bachelor’s degree can lead to broader career prospects, which can be an effective defense against teacher burnout -- a pervasive phenomenon among today’s hard-working teaching professionals.

 

3. You’ll be a better teacher.

A master’s degree isn’t merely a means to an end. Rather, it’s an opportunity for true growth and development. Your time in graduate school will benefit you in numerous ways, from understanding of your options as a teacher by exploring what truly interest you to acquiring tools which will enrich what you offer your students.

While your undergraduate degree might have bestowed knowledge in a certain field of study, a master’s in education places the focus on transitioning that and new knowledge to the classroom. Says Teach.com, “These degrees focus on teaching somebody how to be a teacher, with heavy emphasis on pedagogy, teaching methods, philosophy of education, and educational technology.”

According to one Reddit commenter, “It was a TON of work, and took a while, but it definitely made me a better teacher, both in increasing my knowledge and also making me more sympathetic to my students. Its interesting watching another person teach after you have been teaching all day, and seeing what you can do and what you shouldn't do.”

One caveat worth keeping in mind? As with all advanced studies, you get out of a master’s degree what you put into it. On the flip side, however, if you’re pursuing your graduate coursework part-time while maintaining a teaching job, you’ll have immediate opportunities to start making change. Another Reddit poster shared, “I love teaching while going to school because I can implement strategies I learn in class the next day.”

 

4. You can make change at a higher level.

Teachers help nurture the growth and development of kids in classroom every day. If you’re interested in making change at a higher level, however, a master’s degree can help prepare you for a role in research, assessment or policy.

From regional school districts to local, state, and federal agencies, many organizations exist aimed at improving how teachers, schools and educational systems at large do what they do. They’re all looking for people with the knowledge, experience and insights to help guide them.

One of the most compelling reasons prompting people to enter the teaching profession is the chance to make a difference in society. A master’s degree will not only position you to achieve this goal, but it can also help you improve the quality of education at large while bettering your own life in the process.

 

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Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

,[db_lead] =>

Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

,[text] =>

Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

 

1. You’ll increase your earning potential.

While many teaching jobs require master’s degrees, others may call for just a bachelor’s degree. In this case, getting the bare minimum can hurt you in several different ways. Not only does it lower your chances of getting hired when you’re up again more qualified applicants, but it also means you’ll likely end up collecting a higher starting salary.

According to The Houston Chronicle, most school districts offer teachers with master’s degrees across the elementary, middle, and high school levels supplemental pay in the form of a “bonus” or “bump.” According to analysis by the Center for American Progress this averages between an extra $3,000 and $10,000 a year! And while the cost of getting a master’s degree can seem prohibitive, the degree can pay for itself in just a few years. Not only that, but most school districts require continuing education credits -- doesn’t it make sense to put those credits toward a degree?

 

2. You’ll enjoy greater career mobility.

While a bachelor’s degree may qualify you to be a classroom teacher, many other school jobs  require advanced credentials. If career advancement is important to you, a master’s degree is a must-have. Whether you’re looking to work as a school administrator, curriculum director, content/subject area specialist, or school counselor, you’ll likely need a master’s degree or more.

Additionally, a master’s degree can also open up new possibilities outside of the school system entirely. From textbook authors and community college teachers to educational consultants and educational researchers, these sought-after, well-paid professionals almost always have upper-level qualifications.

In addition to helping you move up the latter, a bachelor’s degree can lead to broader career prospects, which can be an effective defense against teacher burnout -- a pervasive phenomenon among today’s hard-working teaching professionals.

 

3. You’ll be a better teacher.

A master’s degree isn’t merely a means to an end. Rather, it’s an opportunity for true growth and development. Your time in graduate school will benefit you in numerous ways, from understanding of your options as a teacher by exploring what truly interest you to acquiring tools which will enrich what you offer your students.

While your undergraduate degree might have bestowed knowledge in a certain field of study, a master’s in education places the focus on transitioning that and new knowledge to the classroom. Says Teach.com, “These degrees focus on teaching somebody how to be a teacher, with heavy emphasis on pedagogy, teaching methods, philosophy of education, and educational technology.”

According to one Reddit commenter, “It was a TON of work, and took a while, but it definitely made me a better teacher, both in increasing my knowledge and also making me more sympathetic to my students. Its interesting watching another person teach after you have been teaching all day, and seeing what you can do and what you shouldn't do.”

One caveat worth keeping in mind? As with all advanced studies, you get out of a master’s degree what you put into it. On the flip side, however, if you’re pursuing your graduate coursework part-time while maintaining a teaching job, you’ll have immediate opportunities to start making change. Another Reddit poster shared, “I love teaching while going to school because I can implement strategies I learn in class the next day.”

 

4. You can make change at a higher level.

Teachers help nurture the growth and development of kids in classroom every day. If you’re interested in making change at a higher level, however, a master’s degree can help prepare you for a role in research, assessment or policy.

From regional school districts to local, state, and federal agencies, many organizations exist aimed at improving how teachers, schools and educational systems at large do what they do. They’re all looking for people with the knowledge, experience and insights to help guide them.

One of the most compelling reasons prompting people to enter the teaching profession is the chance to make a difference in society. A master’s degree will not only position you to achieve this goal, but it can also help you improve the quality of education at large while bettering your own life in the process.

 

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Thinking about business analytics?  The Rady School of Management at the University of California San Diego offers graduate students the chance to wrestle with real-world business problems—and their solutions—using cutting edge business analytics.  Let’s take a closer look.

,[text] =>

Data matters. “Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted,” attributed to Albert Einstein, explains the purpose of business analytics perfectly.  We live in an age of bigger and bigger data—and businesses need ways to sift through it all, to figure out which combinations of data count—and which ones don’t.  The success of business in today’s global economy depends on it.  The Rady School of Management at UC San Diego offers a forward-thinking Master of Science in Business Analytics that teaches its students how to grapple with the reality of big data using business analytics. 

 

What is Business Analytics?

Professor Vincent Nijs, co-director with Professor Terrence August of the Master of Science in Business Analytics program at the Rady School of Management at UC San Diego, describes the field this way, “I think of business analytics as the field focused on how to use data and models to make better business decisions.  Data Science uses many similar tools (e.g. machine learning) but the set of questions they seek to answer are often different.  You can think of business analytics as ‘data science for business.’”

 

The Amount of Data That Companies Collect Gets Bigger and Bigger…

Just how big is big data?  Really big, and getting bigger all the time.  The EMC Digital Universe Study predicts that by the year 2020, 1.7 megabytes of new data will be created every second for every human on the planet.  What does that mean?  There will be 44 trillion gigabytes (44 zettabytes) of data in the digital universe.  Where does the data come from?  Just about everywhere—1.2 trillion searches per year on Google alone, over 1 billion people using Facebook every day, trillions of photos taken, and billions shared.  By 2020, there will be over 6.1 billion smartphone users, and at least 1/3 of all data will be transmitted through the cloud. We haven’t even talked about online banking, business, movies, television, music, and games.

 

…But Businesses Don’t Always Know How to Use the Data

The Rady School‘s Professor Nijs states, “Companies are collecting more and more data but often lack the people to use it effectively.” He referenced a quote from a well-known report by the McKinsey Global Institute (2013): “Big data promises big things—but only if organizations have the right people in place who know what to do with it. A recurring theme among senior leadership across all sectors is a shortage of professionals trained and experienced at the intersection of disciplines necessary to capture, analyze, and generate meaningful business insights from big data. In addition to deep analytics talent, organizations need management with the right balance of business judgment and statistical skills to translate analysis into action.”

 

A Company’s Future Relies on Its Business Analytics

The need for effective, efficient business analytics is stronger than ever.  Businesses need to know what they want to learn from business analytics—and then how they’re going to use that data to inform their decisions across the board.

Businesses need to be able to determine what data they need and then identify the data sources for gleaning that information.  The final piece?  Distilling that information into actionable insights using the tools of business analytics. Once businesses have a plan for capturing the desired data, organizing it, and analyzing it, they are in a position to develop plans to stay competitive.

 

Business Analytics Has Excellent Job Prospects…

According to a McKinsey Global Report, the US alone has a shortage of about 190,000 data scientists and 1.5 million business analysts.  Globally and in the US, companies need experts in business analytics.  High demand means higher salaries, and a variety of options.  Graduates in Business Analytics work at large companies, start their own businesses, work in banks or FinTech, web-based businesses, retail and food companies, media companies, and marketing companies.

 

…Especially When You Study at a Forward-Thinking School Like Rady

The Rady School’s  new Master of Science in Business Analytics (MSBA) puts students at the forefront of the field. The program focuses on the problems big data poses to businesses—and how to solve them using models, statistics, and machine learning – in classes such as customer analytics, business intelligence, and supply chain analytics.  The school’s bottom line?  To graduate students who know how to use analytics to make a positive impact on business performance—and sustain it. 

Professor Nijs says that “After graduation, our students should expect to work extensively with data, use statistics and machine learning, write code, and develop tools to enhance business decision-making.  After gaining some experience, we expect them to be well-suited to lead an analytics team.” 

First steps for prospective students?  Those interested in studying in this program should have an undergraduate degree in a “quantitative discipline,” says Nijs, like “mathematics, statistics, economics, or physics.”  They should also have some programming experience. 

As data continues to get bigger, the global business world will rely more heavily on business analytics to succeed.  Want to make a difference in the business world?  Earn your MSBA in the field that businesses will indisputably need for success and sustainability. 

Learn more about The Rady School of Management.

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Thinking about business analytics?  The Rady School of Management at the University of California San Diego offers graduate students the chance to wrestle with real-world business problems—and their solutions—using cutting edge business analytics.  Let’s take a closer look.

,[db_lead] =>

Thinking about business analytics?  The Rady School of Management at the University of California San Diego offers graduate students the chance to wrestle with real-world business problems—and their solutions—using cutting edge business analytics.  Let’s take a closer look.

,[text] =>

Data matters. “Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted,” attributed to Albert Einstein, explains the purpose of business analytics perfectly.  We live in an age of bigger and bigger data—and businesses need ways to sift through it all, to figure out which combinations of data count—and which ones don’t.  The success of business in today’s global economy depends on it.  The Rady School of Management at UC San Diego offers a forward-thinking Master of Science in Business Analytics that teaches its students how to grapple with the reality of big data using business analytics. 

 

What is Business Analytics?

Professor Vincent Nijs, co-director with Professor Terrence August of the Master of Science in Business Analytics program at the Rady School of Management at UC San Diego, describes the field this way, “I think of business analytics as the field focused on how to use data and models to make better business decisions.  Data Science uses many similar tools (e.g. machine learning) but the set of questions they seek to answer are often different.  You can think of business analytics as ‘data science for business.’”

 

The Amount of Data That Companies Collect Gets Bigger and Bigger…

Just how big is big data?  Really big, and getting bigger all the time.  The EMC Digital Universe Study predicts that by the year 2020, 1.7 megabytes of new data will be created every second for every human on the planet.  What does that mean?  There will be 44 trillion gigabytes (44 zettabytes) of data in the digital universe.  Where does the data come from?  Just about everywhere—1.2 trillion searches per year on Google alone, over 1 billion people using Facebook every day, trillions of photos taken, and billions shared.  By 2020, there will be over 6.1 billion smartphone users, and at least 1/3 of all data will be transmitted through the cloud. We haven’t even talked about online banking, business, movies, television, music, and games.

 

…But Businesses Don’t Always Know How to Use the Data

The Rady School‘s Professor Nijs states, “Companies are collecting more and more data but often lack the people to use it effectively.” He referenced a quote from a well-known report by the McKinsey Global Institute (2013): “Big data promises big things—but only if organizations have the right people in place who know what to do with it. A recurring theme among senior leadership across all sectors is a shortage of professionals trained and experienced at the intersection of disciplines necessary to capture, analyze, and generate meaningful business insights from big data. In addition to deep analytics talent, organizations need management with the right balance of business judgment and statistical skills to translate analysis into action.”

 

A Company’s Future Relies on Its Business Analytics

The need for effective, efficient business analytics is stronger than ever.  Businesses need to know what they want to learn from business analytics—and then how they’re going to use that data to inform their decisions across the board.

Businesses need to be able to determine what data they need and then identify the data sources for gleaning that information.  The final piece?  Distilling that information into actionable insights using the tools of business analytics. Once businesses have a plan for capturing the desired data, organizing it, and analyzing it, they are in a position to develop plans to stay competitive.

 

Business Analytics Has Excellent Job Prospects…

According to a McKinsey Global Report, the US alone has a shortage of about 190,000 data scientists and 1.5 million business analysts.  Globally and in the US, companies need experts in business analytics.  High demand means higher salaries, and a variety of options.  Graduates in Business Analytics work at large companies, start their own businesses, work in banks or FinTech, web-based businesses, retail and food companies, media companies, and marketing companies.

 

…Especially When You Study at a Forward-Thinking School Like Rady

The Rady School’s  new Master of Science in Business Analytics (MSBA) puts students at the forefront of the field. The program focuses on the problems big data poses to businesses—and how to solve them using models, statistics, and machine learning – in classes such as customer analytics, business intelligence, and supply chain analytics.  The school’s bottom line?  To graduate students who know how to use analytics to make a positive impact on business performance—and sustain it. 

Professor Nijs says that “After graduation, our students should expect to work extensively with data, use statistics and machine learning, write code, and develop tools to enhance business decision-making.  After gaining some experience, we expect them to be well-suited to lead an analytics team.” 

First steps for prospective students?  Those interested in studying in this program should have an undergraduate degree in a “quantitative discipline,” says Nijs, like “mathematics, statistics, economics, or physics.”  They should also have some programming experience. 

As data continues to get bigger, the global business world will rely more heavily on business analytics to succeed.  Want to make a difference in the business world?  Earn your MSBA in the field that businesses will indisputably need for success and sustainability. 

Learn more about The Rady School of Management.

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Thanksgiving, that quintessential American holiday, is here.  Thinking about what to do?  We have four fantastic options for you.  Let’s take a closer look. 

,[text] =>

Giving thanks.  Embracing friendship.  Sharing a thoughtful meal.  Telling stories.  Thanksgiving conjures images of extended families and friends gathered around a beautiful table, sharing a delicious meal, and expressing gratitude for what they have.  International students studying in the US during the holidays have a multitude of way to celebrate this quintessential American holiday.  We’ve put together four fantastic options for you to consider as many US students return “home for the holidays.”

 

1. If an American friend invites you, accept the invitation

Thanksgiving is about, well, being thankful for what you have.  This includes being thankful for new friendships.  An American friend invites you?  Accept.  It’s an invitation to be a part of the family, to share the tradition, to take a break from school, and maybe even to participate in the day after Thanksgiving—Black Friday—the day that many retail shops offer sales and discounts in preparation for December’s holidays.  How’d “Black Friday” get its name?  It’s the day that many retailers’ ledgers assure that they will end their fiscal year “in the black,” or showing a profit for the year.

 

2. Consider on-campus opportunities

Feel like staying on-campus during the Thanksgiving break?  Look for campus traditions at your school.  Some schools offer their own Thanksgiving celebrations for any students and faculty who opt to stay on campus, or who may not have options to travel.  Kansas’s Hesston College hosts an annual Thanksgiving weekend, with a dinner and a bevy of other activities, including art exhibits, concerts, talent shows, basketball tournaments, a benefit fun run, and other special events. At Ohio State University, any students, faculty, and staff who are not planning to head home are invited to attend an annual Thanksgiving feast—this year, the University expects over 1,600 attendees.  At Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, PA, students and faculty spend the entire month of November learning about spirituality.  Several faculty at the University host international students at their homes on Thanksgiving Day—as an expression of gratitude for sharing their learning. 

Credit: nbcwashington.com

3. Attend a parade

What’s Thanksgiving without a parade?  The most famous, of course, is the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City, with over 3 million in-person spectators and upwards of 40 million television viewers.  Several major cities besides New York also hold parades where you can enjoy the holiday spirit of gratitude.  Check out the Dunkin’ Donuts Thanksgiving Day Parade in the City of Brotherly Love, Philadelphia.  Motor City has another option—check out America’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in Detroit, Michigan for floats, bands, music, and a glimpse at the history of the US auto industry.  Also in the Midwest is Chicago’s McDonald’s Thanksgiving Parade, which began in the 1930’s in an effort to raise the spirits of Depression-era residents.  Charlotte, North Carolina, Houston, Texas, and Seattle, Washington offer additional possibilities for big parades.  If you don’t live near a city, don’t fret!  Check your local paper for smaller, regional events.  Watching a parade also gives you a chance either to travel to a new place, or to learn something new and interesting about your university town. 

 

4. Take a break

Not interested in all of the hullabaloo?  Not feeling the need for turkey, Black Friday, parades, or big get-togethers?  Relax.  Enjoy the quiet.  Go for a walk.  Read that book you’ve been wanting to read.  Do some sightseeing—explore the city or town where you’ve decided to study.  If you really feel like it, get caught up—or work ahead—in one of your classes.  Take some time for yourself and recharge. 


Regardless of what you choose to do this Thanksgiving season, remember to be grateful for who you are, what you have, and the positive people in your life.  Cheers!

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Thanksgiving, that quintessential American holiday, is here.  Thinking about what to do?  We have four fantastic options for you.  Let’s take a closer look. 

,[db_lead] =>

Thanksgiving, that quintessential American holiday, is here.  Thinking about what to do?  We have four fantastic options for you.  Let’s take a closer look. 

,[text] =>

Giving thanks.  Embracing friendship.  Sharing a thoughtful meal.  Telling stories.  Thanksgiving conjures images of extended families and friends gathered around a beautiful table, sharing a delicious meal, and expressing gratitude for what they have.  International students studying in the US during the holidays have a multitude of way to celebrate this quintessential American holiday.  We’ve put together four fantastic options for you to consider as many US students return “home for the holidays.”

 

1. If an American friend invites you, accept the invitation

Thanksgiving is about, well, being thankful for what you have.  This includes being thankful for new friendships.  An American friend invites you?  Accept.  It’s an invitation to be a part of the family, to share the tradition, to take a break from school, and maybe even to participate in the day after Thanksgiving—Black Friday—the day that many retail shops offer sales and discounts in preparation for December’s holidays.  How’d “Black Friday” get its name?  It’s the day that many retailers’ ledgers assure that they will end their fiscal year “in the black,” or showing a profit for the year.

 

2. Consider on-campus opportunities

Feel like staying on-campus during the Thanksgiving break?  Look for campus traditions at your school.  Some schools offer their own Thanksgiving celebrations for any students and faculty who opt to stay on campus, or who may not have options to travel.  Kansas’s Hesston College hosts an annual Thanksgiving weekend, with a dinner and a bevy of other activities, including art exhibits, concerts, talent shows, basketball tournaments, a benefit fun run, and other special events. At Ohio State University, any students, faculty, and staff who are not planning to head home are invited to attend an annual Thanksgiving feast—this year, the University expects over 1,600 attendees.  At Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, PA, students and faculty spend the entire month of November learning about spirituality.  Several faculty at the University host international students at their homes on Thanksgiving Day—as an expression of gratitude for sharing their learning. 

Credit: nbcwashington.com

3. Attend a parade

What’s Thanksgiving without a parade?  The most famous, of course, is the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City, with over 3 million in-person spectators and upwards of 40 million television viewers.  Several major cities besides New York also hold parades where you can enjoy the holiday spirit of gratitude.  Check out the Dunkin’ Donuts Thanksgiving Day Parade in the City of Brotherly Love, Philadelphia.  Motor City has another option—check out America’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in Detroit, Michigan for floats, bands, music, and a glimpse at the history of the US auto industry.  Also in the Midwest is Chicago’s McDonald’s Thanksgiving Parade, which began in the 1930’s in an effort to raise the spirits of Depression-era residents.  Charlotte, North Carolina, Houston, Texas, and Seattle, Washington offer additional possibilities for big parades.  If you don’t live near a city, don’t fret!  Check your local paper for smaller, regional events.  Watching a parade also gives you a chance either to travel to a new place, or to learn something new and interesting about your university town. 

 

4. Take a break

Not interested in all of the hullabaloo?  Not feeling the need for turkey, Black Friday, parades, or big get-togethers?  Relax.  Enjoy the quiet.  Go for a walk.  Read that book you’ve been wanting to read.  Do some sightseeing—explore the city or town where you’ve decided to study.  If you really feel like it, get caught up—or work ahead—in one of your classes.  Take some time for yourself and recharge. 


Regardless of what you choose to do this Thanksgiving season, remember to be grateful for who you are, what you have, and the positive people in your life.  Cheers!

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Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

,[text] =>

Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

Investing in Education

In conjunction with the Group of Eight Committee (Go8), CASE first debuted its Charitable Giving to Universities in Australia and New Zealand Survey in 2012. Its aim? To provide accurate data for the countries’ development officers, alumni staff, and institutional leaders.

The most recent news is, indeed, promising. In 2015, universities in Australia and New Zealand received 26 percent more in new funds and 25 percent more in cash income than in the previous year. Concluded Tim Dolan, Chair of Go8’s Committee of Chief Advancement Officers, “This is not just a matter of anecdote and impression. With the survey of charitable giving now in its fourth year, we are accumulating real evidence and can begin to see helpful trends in the data collected.”

Even more tellingly, according to Dolan?  “This growth has continued notwithstanding an economy that was less confident than in recent years and despite political uncertainty over funding structures and deregulation. We can see that the right fundraising behaviour, consistently and professionally followed, produces satisfying results.”

Other areas of growth include total number of donors and alumni donors as well as participation by universities -- particularly Australian institutions.

Progress Ahead...With a Catch

While the increased generosity of donors bodes well for a boost to world-class research and university at the region’s higher education institutions, insiders warn of the dangers of complacency. Said Dolan, “One reason for this is the ongoing frustration generated by the shortage of appropriate fundraising professionals. We have all found that the right people are hard to find and difficult to keep. If we could double our fundraising teams, the resulting impact would be phenomenal.” Conversely, failure to find these professionals could stunt university growth.

The takeaway for students looking for an exciting and in-demand career path? A master’s in fundraising management or other fundraising-related topic may be the fast-track to success. 

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Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

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Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

,[text] =>

Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

Investing in Education

In conjunction with the Group of Eight Committee (Go8), CASE first debuted its Charitable Giving to Universities in Australia and New Zealand Survey in 2012. Its aim? To provide accurate data for the countries’ development officers, alumni staff, and institutional leaders.

The most recent news is, indeed, promising. In 2015, universities in Australia and New Zealand received 26 percent more in new funds and 25 percent more in cash income than in the previous year. Concluded Tim Dolan, Chair of Go8’s Committee of Chief Advancement Officers, “This is not just a matter of anecdote and impression. With the survey of charitable giving now in its fourth year, we are accumulating real evidence and can begin to see helpful trends in the data collected.”

Even more tellingly, according to Dolan?  “This growth has continued notwithstanding an economy that was less confident than in recent years and despite political uncertainty over funding structures and deregulation. We can see that the right fundraising behaviour, consistently and professionally followed, produces satisfying results.”

Other areas of growth include total number of donors and alumni donors as well as participation by universities -- particularly Australian institutions.

Progress Ahead...With a Catch

While the increased generosity of donors bodes well for a boost to world-class research and university at the region’s higher education institutions, insiders warn of the dangers of complacency. Said Dolan, “One reason for this is the ongoing frustration generated by the shortage of appropriate fundraising professionals. We have all found that the right people are hard to find and difficult to keep. If we could double our fundraising teams, the resulting impact would be phenomenal.” Conversely, failure to find these professionals could stunt university growth.

The takeaway for students looking for an exciting and in-demand career path? A master’s in fundraising management or other fundraising-related topic may be the fast-track to success. 

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The Chinese government recently announced a plan attract more international students from Southeast Asian countries.  Find out why and learn more about higher education initiatives in China. 

,[text] =>

ASEAN-China Center Secretary General Yang Xiuping recently announced that China would like to improve collaboration in education and culture with ASEAN countries.  He said, “Foreign students from Southeast Asian countries are the bridge and future of the relationship between ASEAN [countries] and China.”

Why the push? This push comes partly from the 21st Century Maritime Silk Road.  The Chinese government recently initiated this development strategy and framework to both unite and expand collaborative efforts in education and trade between China and other countries on the Silk Road route.  Attracting more international students from Southeast Asia not only gives students an incredible learning opportunity; it also allows them to be a part of a new collaboration between China and the rest of the region.   

Currently, about 68,000 students from Southeast Asia study in China.  The Chinese government would like to increase that number to at least 100,000 within the year.  Yang commented, “We want to see more exchange students from ASEAN countries in China.” 

This initiative reflects a larger trend in Chinese higher education.  Last year was a record year for the numbers of international students in China.  Why?  China’s outward international strategy for 2020 focuses on making China a global study destination, not just in Southeast Asia.    Some of the countries with the largest numbers of students studying in China?  You guessed it: ASEAN members Thailand and Indonesia, among other global players. 

Learn more about studying in China

 

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The Chinese government recently announced a plan attract more international students from Southeast Asian countries.  Find out why and learn more about higher education initiatives in China. 

,[db_lead] =>

The Chinese government recently announced a plan attract more international students from Southeast Asian countries.  Find out why and learn more about higher education initiatives in China. 

,[text] =>

ASEAN-China Center Secretary General Yang Xiuping recently announced that China would like to improve collaboration in education and culture with ASEAN countries.  He said, “Foreign students from Southeast Asian countries are the bridge and future of the relationship between ASEAN [countries] and China.”

Why the push? This push comes partly from the 21st Century Maritime Silk Road.  The Chinese government recently initiated this development strategy and framework to both unite and expand collaborative efforts in education and trade between China and other countries on the Silk Road route.  Attracting more international students from Southeast Asia not only gives students an incredible learning opportunity; it also allows them to be a part of a new collaboration between China and the rest of the region.   

Currently, about 68,000 students from Southeast Asia study in China.  The Chinese government would like to increase that number to at least 100,000 within the year.  Yang commented, “We want to see more exchange students from ASEAN countries in China.” 

This initiative reflects a larger trend in Chinese higher education.  Last year was a record year for the numbers of international students in China.  Why?  China’s outward international strategy for 2020 focuses on making China a global study destination, not just in Southeast Asia.    Some of the countries with the largest numbers of students studying in China?  You guessed it: ASEAN members Thailand and Indonesia, among other global players. 

Learn more about studying in China

 

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Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

,[text] =>

Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

Plans Underway

In speaking of plans to build a new university dedicated to arts and sciences in Myanmar’s Pobbathiri township, Nay Pyi Taw Council member U Tun Tin said that a plot of land was already chosen as a likely site for the campus. Additionally, insiders revealed, the state counselor had agreed to a construction proposal with a five-year timeline. 

The new university will join several others in Nay Pyi Taw, and is expected to significantly expand the region’s offerings in the arts and sciences.

Good News for Students and Parents

While the project is applauded by many stakeholders, parents and students in the capital have special cause to celebrate the possibility of bachelor’s studies closer to home.

Said one resident and parent, “Students who want to study arts or sciences at university currently have to go to Mandalay or Kyaukse. Once the new university is built, we will be able to watch over our children more easily.”

Higher educated citizens are viewed by many as a critical part of helping the country achieve its full potential during Myanmar’s transition to democracy. Perhaps Myanmar Nobel Prize winner and National League for Democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi’s words from more than a quarter-century ago best reflect the country’s outlook today: “A country’s international standard cannot be measured in terms of the number of hotels and bridges; it has to be measured in terms of education. A country of inferior education won’t be able to catch up with the world.”

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Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

,[db_lead] =>

Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

,[text] =>

Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

Plans Underway

In speaking of plans to build a new university dedicated to arts and sciences in Myanmar’s Pobbathiri township, Nay Pyi Taw Council member U Tun Tin said that a plot of land was already chosen as a likely site for the campus. Additionally, insiders revealed, the state counselor had agreed to a construction proposal with a five-year timeline. 

The new university will join several others in Nay Pyi Taw, and is expected to significantly expand the region’s offerings in the arts and sciences.

Good News for Students and Parents

While the project is applauded by many stakeholders, parents and students in the capital have special cause to celebrate the possibility of bachelor’s studies closer to home.

Said one resident and parent, “Students who want to study arts or sciences at university currently have to go to Mandalay or Kyaukse. Once the new university is built, we will be able to watch over our children more easily.”

Higher educated citizens are viewed by many as a critical part of helping the country achieve its full potential during Myanmar’s transition to democracy. Perhaps Myanmar Nobel Prize winner and National League for Democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi’s words from more than a quarter-century ago best reflect the country’s outlook today: “A country’s international standard cannot be measured in terms of the number of hotels and bridges; it has to be measured in terms of education. A country of inferior education won’t be able to catch up with the world.”

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Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

,[text] =>

Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

 

1. You’ll increase your earning potential.

While many teaching jobs require master’s degrees, others may call for just a bachelor’s degree. In this case, getting the bare minimum can hurt you in several different ways. Not only does it lower your chances of getting hired when you’re up again more qualified applicants, but it also means you’ll likely end up collecting a higher starting salary.

According to The Houston Chronicle, most school districts offer teachers with master’s degrees across the elementary, middle, and high school levels supplemental pay in the form of a “bonus” or “bump.” According to analysis by the Center for American Progress this averages between an extra $3,000 and $10,000 a year! And while the cost of getting a master’s degree can seem prohibitive, the degree can pay for itself in just a few years. Not only that, but most school districts require continuing education credits -- doesn’t it make sense to put those credits toward a degree?

 

2. You’ll enjoy greater career mobility.

While a bachelor’s degree may qualify you to be a classroom teacher, many other school jobs  require advanced credentials. If career advancement is important to you, a master’s degree is a must-have. Whether you’re looking to work as a school administrator, curriculum director, content/subject area specialist, or school counselor, you’ll likely need a master’s degree or more.

Additionally, a master’s degree can also open up new possibilities outside of the school system entirely. From textbook authors and community college teachers to educational consultants and educational researchers, these sought-after, well-paid professionals almost always have upper-level qualifications.

In addition to helping you move up the latter, a bachelor’s degree can lead to broader career prospects, which can be an effective defense against teacher burnout -- a pervasive phenomenon among today’s hard-working teaching professionals.

 

3. You’ll be a better teacher.

A master’s degree isn’t merely a means to an end. Rather, it’s an opportunity for true growth and development. Your time in graduate school will benefit you in numerous ways, from understanding of your options as a teacher by exploring what truly interest you to acquiring tools which will enrich what you offer your students.

While your undergraduate degree might have bestowed knowledge in a certain field of study, a master’s in education places the focus on transitioning that and new knowledge to the classroom. Says Teach.com, “These degrees focus on teaching somebody how to be a teacher, with heavy emphasis on pedagogy, teaching methods, philosophy of education, and educational technology.”

According to one Reddit commenter, “It was a TON of work, and took a while, but it definitely made me a better teacher, both in increasing my knowledge and also making me more sympathetic to my students. Its interesting watching another person teach after you have been teaching all day, and seeing what you can do and what you shouldn't do.”

One caveat worth keeping in mind? As with all advanced studies, you get out of a master’s degree what you put into it. On the flip side, however, if you’re pursuing your graduate coursework part-time while maintaining a teaching job, you’ll have immediate opportunities to start making change. Another Reddit poster shared, “I love teaching while going to school because I can implement strategies I learn in class the next day.”

 

4. You can make change at a higher level.

Teachers help nurture the growth and development of kids in classroom every day. If you’re interested in making change at a higher level, however, a master’s degree can help prepare you for a role in research, assessment or policy.

From regional school districts to local, state, and federal agencies, many organizations exist aimed at improving how teachers, schools and educational systems at large do what they do. They’re all looking for people with the knowledge, experience and insights to help guide them.

One of the most compelling reasons prompting people to enter the teaching profession is the chance to make a difference in society. A master’s degree will not only position you to achieve this goal, but it can also help you improve the quality of education at large while bettering your own life in the process.

 

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Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

,[db_lead] =>

Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

,[text] =>

Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

 

1. You’ll increase your earning potential.

While many teaching jobs require master’s degrees, others may call for just a bachelor’s degree. In this case, getting the bare minimum can hurt you in several different ways. Not only does it lower your chances of getting hired when you’re up again more qualified applicants, but it also means you’ll likely end up collecting a higher starting salary.

According to The Houston Chronicle, most school districts offer teachers with master’s degrees across the elementary, middle, and high school levels supplemental pay in the form of a “bonus” or “bump.” According to analysis by the Center for American Progress this averages between an extra $3,000 and $10,000 a year! And while the cost of getting a master’s degree can seem prohibitive, the degree can pay for itself in just a few years. Not only that, but most school districts require continuing education credits -- doesn’t it make sense to put those credits toward a degree?

 

2. You’ll enjoy greater career mobility.

While a bachelor’s degree may qualify you to be a classroom teacher, many other school jobs  require advanced credentials. If career advancement is important to you, a master’s degree is a must-have. Whether you’re looking to work as a school administrator, curriculum director, content/subject area specialist, or school counselor, you’ll likely need a master’s degree or more.

Additionally, a master’s degree can also open up new possibilities outside of the school system entirely. From textbook authors and community college teachers to educational consultants and educational researchers, these sought-after, well-paid professionals almost always have upper-level qualifications.

In addition to helping you move up the latter, a bachelor’s degree can lead to broader career prospects, which can be an effective defense against teacher burnout -- a pervasive phenomenon among today’s hard-working teaching professionals.

 

3. You’ll be a better teacher.

A master’s degree isn’t merely a means to an end. Rather, it’s an opportunity for true growth and development. Your time in graduate school will benefit you in numerous ways, from understanding of your options as a teacher by exploring what truly interest you to acquiring tools which will enrich what you offer your students.

While your undergraduate degree might have bestowed knowledge in a certain field of study, a master’s in education places the focus on transitioning that and new knowledge to the classroom. Says Teach.com, “These degrees focus on teaching somebody how to be a teacher, with heavy emphasis on pedagogy, teaching methods, philosophy of education, and educational technology.”

According to one Reddit commenter, “It was a TON of work, and took a while, but it definitely made me a better teacher, both in increasing my knowledge and also making me more sympathetic to my students. Its interesting watching another person teach after you have been teaching all day, and seeing what you can do and what you shouldn't do.”

One caveat worth keeping in mind? As with all advanced studies, you get out of a master’s degree what you put into it. On the flip side, however, if you’re pursuing your graduate coursework part-time while maintaining a teaching job, you’ll have immediate opportunities to start making change. Another Reddit poster shared, “I love teaching while going to school because I can implement strategies I learn in class the next day.”

 

4. You can make change at a higher level.

Teachers help nurture the growth and development of kids in classroom every day. If you’re interested in making change at a higher level, however, a master’s degree can help prepare you for a role in research, assessment or policy.

From regional school districts to local, state, and federal agencies, many organizations exist aimed at improving how teachers, schools and educational systems at large do what they do. They’re all looking for people with the knowledge, experience and insights to help guide them.

One of the most compelling reasons prompting people to enter the teaching profession is the chance to make a difference in society. A master’s degree will not only position you to achieve this goal, but it can also help you improve the quality of education at large while bettering your own life in the process.

 

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Thinking about business analytics?  The Rady School of Management at the University of California San Diego offers graduate students the chance to wrestle with real-world business problems—and their solutions—using cutting edge business analytics.  Let’s take a closer look.

,[text] =>

Data matters. “Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted,” attributed to Albert Einstein, explains the purpose of business analytics perfectly.  We live in an age of bigger and bigger data—and businesses need ways to sift through it all, to figure out which combinations of data count—and which ones don’t.  The success of business in today’s global economy depends on it.  The Rady School of Management at UC San Diego offers a forward-thinking Master of Science in Business Analytics that teaches its students how to grapple with the reality of big data using business analytics. 

 

What is Business Analytics?

Professor Vincent Nijs, co-director with Professor Terrence August of the Master of Science in Business Analytics program at the Rady School of Management at UC San Diego, describes the field this way, “I think of business analytics as the field focused on how to use data and models to make better business decisions.  Data Science uses many similar tools (e.g. machine learning) but the set of questions they seek to answer are often different.  You can think of business analytics as ‘data science for business.’”

 

The Amount of Data That Companies Collect Gets Bigger and Bigger…

Just how big is big data?  Really big, and getting bigger all the time.  The EMC Digital Universe Study predicts that by the year 2020, 1.7 megabytes of new data will be created every second for every human on the planet.  What does that mean?  There will be 44 trillion gigabytes (44 zettabytes) of data in the digital universe.  Where does the data come from?  Just about everywhere—1.2 trillion searches per year on Google alone, over 1 billion people using Facebook every day, trillions of photos taken, and billions shared.  By 2020, there will be over 6.1 billion smartphone users, and at least 1/3 of all data will be transmitted through the cloud. We haven’t even talked about online banking, business, movies, television, music, and games.

 

…But Businesses Don’t Always Know How to Use the Data

The Rady School‘s Professor Nijs states, “Companies are collecting more and more data but often lack the people to use it effectively.” He referenced a quote from a well-known report by the McKinsey Global Institute (2013): “Big data promises big things—but only if organizations have the right people in place who know what to do with it. A recurring theme among senior leadership across all sectors is a shortage of professionals trained and experienced at the intersection of disciplines necessary to capture, analyze, and generate meaningful business insights from big data. In addition to deep analytics talent, organizations need management with the right balance of business judgment and statistical skills to translate analysis into action.”

 

A Company’s Future Relies on Its Business Analytics

The need for effective, efficient business analytics is stronger than ever.  Businesses need to know what they want to learn from business analytics—and then how they’re going to use that data to inform their decisions across the board.

Businesses need to be able to determine what data they need and then identify the data sources for gleaning that information.  The final piece?  Distilling that information into actionable insights using the tools of business analytics. Once businesses have a plan for capturing the desired data, organizing it, and analyzing it, they are in a position to develop plans to stay competitive.

 

Business Analytics Has Excellent Job Prospects…

According to a McKinsey Global Report, the US alone has a shortage of about 190,000 data scientists and 1.5 million business analysts.  Globally and in the US, companies need experts in business analytics.  High demand means higher salaries, and a variety of options.  Graduates in Business Analytics work at large companies, start their own businesses, work in banks or FinTech, web-based businesses, retail and food companies, media companies, and marketing companies.

 

…Especially When You Study at a Forward-Thinking School Like Rady

The Rady School’s  new Master of Science in Business Analytics (MSBA) puts students at the forefront of the field. The program focuses on the problems big data poses to businesses—and how to solve them using models, statistics, and machine learning – in classes such as customer analytics, business intelligence, and supply chain analytics.  The school’s bottom line?  To graduate students who know how to use analytics to make a positive impact on business performance—and sustain it. 

Professor Nijs says that “After graduation, our students should expect to work extensively with data, use statistics and machine learning, write code, and develop tools to enhance business decision-making.  After gaining some experience, we expect them to be well-suited to lead an analytics team.” 

First steps for prospective students?  Those interested in studying in this program should have an undergraduate degree in a “quantitative discipline,” says Nijs, like “mathematics, statistics, economics, or physics.”  They should also have some programming experience. 

As data continues to get bigger, the global business world will rely more heavily on business analytics to succeed.  Want to make a difference in the business world?  Earn your MSBA in the field that businesses will indisputably need for success and sustainability. 

Learn more about The Rady School of Management.

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Thinking about business analytics?  The Rady School of Management at the University of California San Diego offers graduate students the chance to wrestle with real-world business problems—and their solutions—using cutting edge business analytics.  Let’s take a closer look.

,[db_lead] =>

Thinking about business analytics?  The Rady School of Management at the University of California San Diego offers graduate students the chance to wrestle with real-world business problems—and their solutions—using cutting edge business analytics.  Let’s take a closer look.

,[text] =>

Data matters. “Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted,” attributed to Albert Einstein, explains the purpose of business analytics perfectly.  We live in an age of bigger and bigger data—and businesses need ways to sift through it all, to figure out which combinations of data count—and which ones don’t.  The success of business in today’s global economy depends on it.  The Rady School of Management at UC San Diego offers a forward-thinking Master of Science in Business Analytics that teaches its students how to grapple with the reality of big data using business analytics. 

 

What is Business Analytics?

Professor Vincent Nijs, co-director with Professor Terrence August of the Master of Science in Business Analytics program at the Rady School of Management at UC San Diego, describes the field this way, “I think of business analytics as the field focused on how to use data and models to make better business decisions.  Data Science uses many similar tools (e.g. machine learning) but the set of questions they seek to answer are often different.  You can think of business analytics as ‘data science for business.’”

 

The Amount of Data That Companies Collect Gets Bigger and Bigger…

Just how big is big data?  Really big, and getting bigger all the time.  The EMC Digital Universe Study predicts that by the year 2020, 1.7 megabytes of new data will be created every second for every human on the planet.  What does that mean?  There will be 44 trillion gigabytes (44 zettabytes) of data in the digital universe.  Where does the data come from?  Just about everywhere—1.2 trillion searches per year on Google alone, over 1 billion people using Facebook every day, trillions of photos taken, and billions shared.  By 2020, there will be over 6.1 billion smartphone users, and at least 1/3 of all data will be transmitted through the cloud. We haven’t even talked about online banking, business, movies, television, music, and games.

 

…But Businesses Don’t Always Know How to Use the Data

The Rady School‘s Professor Nijs states, “Companies are collecting more and more data but often lack the people to use it effectively.” He referenced a quote from a well-known report by the McKinsey Global Institute (2013): “Big data promises big things—but only if organizations have the right people in place who know what to do with it. A recurring theme among senior leadership across all sectors is a shortage of professionals trained and experienced at the intersection of disciplines necessary to capture, analyze, and generate meaningful business insights from big data. In addition to deep analytics talent, organizations need management with the right balance of business judgment and statistical skills to translate analysis into action.”

 

A Company’s Future Relies on Its Business Analytics

The need for effective, efficient business analytics is stronger than ever.  Businesses need to know what they want to learn from business analytics—and then how they’re going to use that data to inform their decisions across the board.

Businesses need to be able to determine what data they need and then identify the data sources for gleaning that information.  The final piece?  Distilling that information into actionable insights using the tools of business analytics. Once businesses have a plan for capturing the desired data, organizing it, and analyzing it, they are in a position to develop plans to stay competitive.

 

Business Analytics Has Excellent Job Prospects…

According to a McKinsey Global Report, the US alone has a shortage of about 190,000 data scientists and 1.5 million business analysts.  Globally and in the US, companies need experts in business analytics.  High demand means higher salaries, and a variety of options.  Graduates in Business Analytics work at large companies, start their own businesses, work in banks or FinTech, web-based businesses, retail and food companies, media companies, and marketing companies.

 

…Especially When You Study at a Forward-Thinking School Like Rady

The Rady School’s  new Master of Science in Business Analytics (MSBA) puts students at the forefront of the field. The program focuses on the problems big data poses to businesses—and how to solve them using models, statistics, and machine learning – in classes such as customer analytics, business intelligence, and supply chain analytics.  The school’s bottom line?  To graduate students who know how to use analytics to make a positive impact on business performance—and sustain it. 

Professor Nijs says that “After graduation, our students should expect to work extensively with data, use statistics and machine learning, write code, and develop tools to enhance business decision-making.  After gaining some experience, we expect them to be well-suited to lead an analytics team.” 

First steps for prospective students?  Those interested in studying in this program should have an undergraduate degree in a “quantitative discipline,” says Nijs, like “mathematics, statistics, economics, or physics.”  They should also have some programming experience. 

As data continues to get bigger, the global business world will rely more heavily on business analytics to succeed.  Want to make a difference in the business world?  Earn your MSBA in the field that businesses will indisputably need for success and sustainability. 

Learn more about The Rady School of Management.

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Thanksgiving, that quintessential American holiday, is here.  Thinking about what to do?  We have four fantastic options for you.  Let’s take a closer look. 

,[text] =>

Giving thanks.  Embracing friendship.  Sharing a thoughtful meal.  Telling stories.  Thanksgiving conjures images of extended families and friends gathered around a beautiful table, sharing a delicious meal, and expressing gratitude for what they have.  International students studying in the US during the holidays have a multitude of way to celebrate this quintessential American holiday.  We’ve put together four fantastic options for you to consider as many US students return “home for the holidays.”

 

1. If an American friend invites you, accept the invitation

Thanksgiving is about, well, being thankful for what you have.  This includes being thankful for new friendships.  An American friend invites you?  Accept.  It’s an invitation to be a part of the family, to share the tradition, to take a break from school, and maybe even to participate in the day after Thanksgiving—Black Friday—the day that many retail shops offer sales and discounts in preparation for December’s holidays.  How’d “Black Friday” get its name?  It’s the day that many retailers’ ledgers assure that they will end their fiscal year “in the black,” or showing a profit for the year.

 

2. Consider on-campus opportunities

Feel like staying on-campus during the Thanksgiving break?  Look for campus traditions at your school.  Some schools offer their own Thanksgiving celebrations for any students and faculty who opt to stay on campus, or who may not have options to travel.  Kansas’s Hesston College hosts an annual Thanksgiving weekend, with a dinner and a bevy of other activities, including art exhibits, concerts, talent shows, basketball tournaments, a benefit fun run, and other special events. At Ohio State University, any students, faculty, and staff who are not planning to head home are invited to attend an annual Thanksgiving feast—this year, the University expects over 1,600 attendees.  At Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, PA, students and faculty spend the entire month of November learning about spirituality.  Several faculty at the University host international students at their homes on Thanksgiving Day—as an expression of gratitude for sharing their learning. 

Credit: nbcwashington.com

3. Attend a parade

What’s Thanksgiving without a parade?  The most famous, of course, is the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City, with over 3 million in-person spectators and upwards of 40 million television viewers.  Several major cities besides New York also hold parades where you can enjoy the holiday spirit of gratitude.  Check out the Dunkin’ Donuts Thanksgiving Day Parade in the City of Brotherly Love, Philadelphia.  Motor City has another option—check out America’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in Detroit, Michigan for floats, bands, music, and a glimpse at the history of the US auto industry.  Also in the Midwest is Chicago’s McDonald’s Thanksgiving Parade, which began in the 1930’s in an effort to raise the spirits of Depression-era residents.  Charlotte, North Carolina, Houston, Texas, and Seattle, Washington offer additional possibilities for big parades.  If you don’t live near a city, don’t fret!  Check your local paper for smaller, regional events.  Watching a parade also gives you a chance either to travel to a new place, or to learn something new and interesting about your university town. 

 

4. Take a break

Not interested in all of the hullabaloo?  Not feeling the need for turkey, Black Friday, parades, or big get-togethers?  Relax.  Enjoy the quiet.  Go for a walk.  Read that book you’ve been wanting to read.  Do some sightseeing—explore the city or town where you’ve decided to study.  If you really feel like it, get caught up—or work ahead—in one of your classes.  Take some time for yourself and recharge. 


Regardless of what you choose to do this Thanksgiving season, remember to be grateful for who you are, what you have, and the positive people in your life.  Cheers!

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Thanksgiving, that quintessential American holiday, is here.  Thinking about what to do?  We have four fantastic options for you.  Let’s take a closer look. 

,[db_lead] =>

Thanksgiving, that quintessential American holiday, is here.  Thinking about what to do?  We have four fantastic options for you.  Let’s take a closer look. 

,[text] =>

Giving thanks.  Embracing friendship.  Sharing a thoughtful meal.  Telling stories.  Thanksgiving conjures images of extended families and friends gathered around a beautiful table, sharing a delicious meal, and expressing gratitude for what they have.  International students studying in the US during the holidays have a multitude of way to celebrate this quintessential American holiday.  We’ve put together four fantastic options for you to consider as many US students return “home for the holidays.”

 

1. If an American friend invites you, accept the invitation

Thanksgiving is about, well, being thankful for what you have.  This includes being thankful for new friendships.  An American friend invites you?  Accept.  It’s an invitation to be a part of the family, to share the tradition, to take a break from school, and maybe even to participate in the day after Thanksgiving—Black Friday—the day that many retail shops offer sales and discounts in preparation for December’s holidays.  How’d “Black Friday” get its name?  It’s the day that many retailers’ ledgers assure that they will end their fiscal year “in the black,” or showing a profit for the year.

 

2. Consider on-campus opportunities

Feel like staying on-campus during the Thanksgiving break?  Look for campus traditions at your school.  Some schools offer their own Thanksgiving celebrations for any students and faculty who opt to stay on campus, or who may not have options to travel.  Kansas’s Hesston College hosts an annual Thanksgiving weekend, with a dinner and a bevy of other activities, including art exhibits, concerts, talent shows, basketball tournaments, a benefit fun run, and other special events. At Ohio State University, any students, faculty, and staff who are not planning to head home are invited to attend an annual Thanksgiving feast—this year, the University expects over 1,600 attendees.  At Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, PA, students and faculty spend the entire month of November learning about spirituality.  Several faculty at the University host international students at their homes on Thanksgiving Day—as an expression of gratitude for sharing their learning. 

Credit: nbcwashington.com

3. Attend a parade

What’s Thanksgiving without a parade?  The most famous, of course, is the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City, with over 3 million in-person spectators and upwards of 40 million television viewers.  Several major cities besides New York also hold parades where you can enjoy the holiday spirit of gratitude.  Check out the Dunkin’ Donuts Thanksgiving Day Parade in the City of Brotherly Love, Philadelphia.  Motor City has another option—check out America’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in Detroit, Michigan for floats, bands, music, and a glimpse at the history of the US auto industry.  Also in the Midwest is Chicago’s McDonald’s Thanksgiving Parade, which began in the 1930’s in an effort to raise the spirits of Depression-era residents.  Charlotte, North Carolina, Houston, Texas, and Seattle, Washington offer additional possibilities for big parades.  If you don’t live near a city, don’t fret!  Check your local paper for smaller, regional events.  Watching a parade also gives you a chance either to travel to a new place, or to learn something new and interesting about your university town. 

 

4. Take a break

Not interested in all of the hullabaloo?  Not feeling the need for turkey, Black Friday, parades, or big get-togethers?  Relax.  Enjoy the quiet.  Go for a walk.  Read that book you’ve been wanting to read.  Do some sightseeing—explore the city or town where you’ve decided to study.  If you really feel like it, get caught up—or work ahead—in one of your classes.  Take some time for yourself and recharge. 


Regardless of what you choose to do this Thanksgiving season, remember to be grateful for who you are, what you have, and the positive people in your life.  Cheers!

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Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

,[text] =>

Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

Investing in Education

In conjunction with the Group of Eight Committee (Go8), CASE first debuted its Charitable Giving to Universities in Australia and New Zealand Survey in 2012. Its aim? To provide accurate data for the countries’ development officers, alumni staff, and institutional leaders.

The most recent news is, indeed, promising. In 2015, universities in Australia and New Zealand received 26 percent more in new funds and 25 percent more in cash income than in the previous year. Concluded Tim Dolan, Chair of Go8’s Committee of Chief Advancement Officers, “This is not just a matter of anecdote and impression. With the survey of charitable giving now in its fourth year, we are accumulating real evidence and can begin to see helpful trends in the data collected.”

Even more tellingly, according to Dolan?  “This growth has continued notwithstanding an economy that was less confident than in recent years and despite political uncertainty over funding structures and deregulation. We can see that the right fundraising behaviour, consistently and professionally followed, produces satisfying results.”

Other areas of growth include total number of donors and alumni donors as well as participation by universities -- particularly Australian institutions.

Progress Ahead...With a Catch

While the increased generosity of donors bodes well for a boost to world-class research and university at the region’s higher education institutions, insiders warn of the dangers of complacency. Said Dolan, “One reason for this is the ongoing frustration generated by the shortage of appropriate fundraising professionals. We have all found that the right people are hard to find and difficult to keep. If we could double our fundraising teams, the resulting impact would be phenomenal.” Conversely, failure to find these professionals could stunt university growth.

The takeaway for students looking for an exciting and in-demand career path? A master’s in fundraising management or other fundraising-related topic may be the fast-track to success. 

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Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

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Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

,[text] =>

Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

Investing in Education

In conjunction with the Group of Eight Committee (Go8), CASE first debuted its Charitable Giving to Universities in Australia and New Zealand Survey in 2012. Its aim? To provide accurate data for the countries’ development officers, alumni staff, and institutional leaders.

The most recent news is, indeed, promising. In 2015, universities in Australia and New Zealand received 26 percent more in new funds and 25 percent more in cash income than in the previous year. Concluded Tim Dolan, Chair of Go8’s Committee of Chief Advancement Officers, “This is not just a matter of anecdote and impression. With the survey of charitable giving now in its fourth year, we are accumulating real evidence and can begin to see helpful trends in the data collected.”

Even more tellingly, according to Dolan?  “This growth has continued notwithstanding an economy that was less confident than in recent years and despite political uncertainty over funding structures and deregulation. We can see that the right fundraising behaviour, consistently and professionally followed, produces satisfying results.”

Other areas of growth include total number of donors and alumni donors as well as participation by universities -- particularly Australian institutions.

Progress Ahead...With a Catch

While the increased generosity of donors bodes well for a boost to world-class research and university at the region’s higher education institutions, insiders warn of the dangers of complacency. Said Dolan, “One reason for this is the ongoing frustration generated by the shortage of appropriate fundraising professionals. We have all found that the right people are hard to find and difficult to keep. If we could double our fundraising teams, the resulting impact would be phenomenal.” Conversely, failure to find these professionals could stunt university growth.

The takeaway for students looking for an exciting and in-demand career path? A master’s in fundraising management or other fundraising-related topic may be the fast-track to success. 

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The Chinese government recently announced a plan attract more international students from Southeast Asian countries.  Find out why and learn more about higher education initiatives in China. 

,[text] =>

ASEAN-China Center Secretary General Yang Xiuping recently announced that China would like to improve collaboration in education and culture with ASEAN countries.  He said, “Foreign students from Southeast Asian countries are the bridge and future of the relationship between ASEAN [countries] and China.”

Why the push? This push comes partly from the 21st Century Maritime Silk Road.  The Chinese government recently initiated this development strategy and framework to both unite and expand collaborative efforts in education and trade between China and other countries on the Silk Road route.  Attracting more international students from Southeast Asia not only gives students an incredible learning opportunity; it also allows them to be a part of a new collaboration between China and the rest of the region.   

Currently, about 68,000 students from Southeast Asia study in China.  The Chinese government would like to increase that number to at least 100,000 within the year.  Yang commented, “We want to see more exchange students from ASEAN countries in China.” 

This initiative reflects a larger trend in Chinese higher education.  Last year was a record year for the numbers of international students in China.  Why?  China’s outward international strategy for 2020 focuses on making China a global study destination, not just in Southeast Asia.    Some of the countries with the largest numbers of students studying in China?  You guessed it: ASEAN members Thailand and Indonesia, among other global players. 

Learn more about studying in China

 

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The Chinese government recently announced a plan attract more international students from Southeast Asian countries.  Find out why and learn more about higher education initiatives in China. 

,[db_lead] =>

The Chinese government recently announced a plan attract more international students from Southeast Asian countries.  Find out why and learn more about higher education initiatives in China. 

,[text] =>

ASEAN-China Center Secretary General Yang Xiuping recently announced that China would like to improve collaboration in education and culture with ASEAN countries.  He said, “Foreign students from Southeast Asian countries are the bridge and future of the relationship between ASEAN [countries] and China.”

Why the push? This push comes partly from the 21st Century Maritime Silk Road.  The Chinese government recently initiated this development strategy and framework to both unite and expand collaborative efforts in education and trade between China and other countries on the Silk Road route.  Attracting more international students from Southeast Asia not only gives students an incredible learning opportunity; it also allows them to be a part of a new collaboration between China and the rest of the region.   

Currently, about 68,000 students from Southeast Asia study in China.  The Chinese government would like to increase that number to at least 100,000 within the year.  Yang commented, “We want to see more exchange students from ASEAN countries in China.” 

This initiative reflects a larger trend in Chinese higher education.  Last year was a record year for the numbers of international students in China.  Why?  China’s outward international strategy for 2020 focuses on making China a global study destination, not just in Southeast Asia.    Some of the countries with the largest numbers of students studying in China?  You guessed it: ASEAN members Thailand and Indonesia, among other global players. 

Learn more about studying in China

 

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Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

,[text] =>

Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

Plans Underway

In speaking of plans to build a new university dedicated to arts and sciences in Myanmar’s Pobbathiri township, Nay Pyi Taw Council member U Tun Tin said that a plot of land was already chosen as a likely site for the campus. Additionally, insiders revealed, the state counselor had agreed to a construction proposal with a five-year timeline. 

The new university will join several others in Nay Pyi Taw, and is expected to significantly expand the region’s offerings in the arts and sciences.

Good News for Students and Parents

While the project is applauded by many stakeholders, parents and students in the capital have special cause to celebrate the possibility of bachelor’s studies closer to home.

Said one resident and parent, “Students who want to study arts or sciences at university currently have to go to Mandalay or Kyaukse. Once the new university is built, we will be able to watch over our children more easily.”

Higher educated citizens are viewed by many as a critical part of helping the country achieve its full potential during Myanmar’s transition to democracy. Perhaps Myanmar Nobel Prize winner and National League for Democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi’s words from more than a quarter-century ago best reflect the country’s outlook today: “A country’s international standard cannot be measured in terms of the number of hotels and bridges; it has to be measured in terms of education. A country of inferior education won’t be able to catch up with the world.”

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Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

,[db_lead] =>

Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

,[text] =>

Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

Plans Underway

In speaking of plans to build a new university dedicated to arts and sciences in Myanmar’s Pobbathiri township, Nay Pyi Taw Council member U Tun Tin said that a plot of land was already chosen as a likely site for the campus. Additionally, insiders revealed, the state counselor had agreed to a construction proposal with a five-year timeline. 

The new university will join several others in Nay Pyi Taw, and is expected to significantly expand the region’s offerings in the arts and sciences.

Good News for Students and Parents

While the project is applauded by many stakeholders, parents and students in the capital have special cause to celebrate the possibility of bachelor’s studies closer to home.

Said one resident and parent, “Students who want to study arts or sciences at university currently have to go to Mandalay or Kyaukse. Once the new university is built, we will be able to watch over our children more easily.”

Higher educated citizens are viewed by many as a critical part of helping the country achieve its full potential during Myanmar’s transition to democracy. Perhaps Myanmar Nobel Prize winner and National League for Democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi’s words from more than a quarter-century ago best reflect the country’s outlook today: “A country’s international standard cannot be measured in terms of the number of hotels and bridges; it has to be measured in terms of education. A country of inferior education won’t be able to catch up with the world.”

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Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

,[text] =>

Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

 

1. You’ll increase your earning potential.

While many teaching jobs require master’s degrees, others may call for just a bachelor’s degree. In this case, getting the bare minimum can hurt you in several different ways. Not only does it lower your chances of getting hired when you’re up again more qualified applicants, but it also means you’ll likely end up collecting a higher starting salary.

According to The Houston Chronicle, most school districts offer teachers with master’s degrees across the elementary, middle, and high school levels supplemental pay in the form of a “bonus” or “bump.” According to analysis by the Center for American Progress this averages between an extra $3,000 and $10,000 a year! And while the cost of getting a master’s degree can seem prohibitive, the degree can pay for itself in just a few years. Not only that, but most school districts require continuing education credits -- doesn’t it make sense to put those credits toward a degree?

 

2. You’ll enjoy greater career mobility.

While a bachelor’s degree may qualify you to be a classroom teacher, many other school jobs  require advanced credentials. If career advancement is important to you, a master’s degree is a must-have. Whether you’re looking to work as a school administrator, curriculum director, content/subject area specialist, or school counselor, you’ll likely need a master’s degree or more.

Additionally, a master’s degree can also open up new possibilities outside of the school system entirely. From textbook authors and community college teachers to educational consultants and educational researchers, these sought-after, well-paid professionals almost always have upper-level qualifications.

In addition to helping you move up the latter, a bachelor’s degree can lead to broader career prospects, which can be an effective defense against teacher burnout -- a pervasive phenomenon among today’s hard-working teaching professionals.

 

3. You’ll be a better teacher.

A master’s degree isn’t merely a means to an end. Rather, it’s an opportunity for true growth and development. Your time in graduate school will benefit you in numerous ways, from understanding of your options as a teacher by exploring what truly interest you to acquiring tools which will enrich what you offer your students.

While your undergraduate degree might have bestowed knowledge in a certain field of study, a master’s in education places the focus on transitioning that and new knowledge to the classroom. Says Teach.com, “These degrees focus on teaching somebody how to be a teacher, with heavy emphasis on pedagogy, teaching methods, philosophy of education, and educational technology.”

According to one Reddit commenter, “It was a TON of work, and took a while, but it definitely made me a better teacher, both in increasing my knowledge and also making me more sympathetic to my students. Its interesting watching another person teach after you have been teaching all day, and seeing what you can do and what you shouldn't do.”

One caveat worth keeping in mind? As with all advanced studies, you get out of a master’s degree what you put into it. On the flip side, however, if you’re pursuing your graduate coursework part-time while maintaining a teaching job, you’ll have immediate opportunities to start making change. Another Reddit poster shared, “I love teaching while going to school because I can implement strategies I learn in class the next day.”

 

4. You can make change at a higher level.

Teachers help nurture the growth and development of kids in classroom every day. If you’re interested in making change at a higher level, however, a master’s degree can help prepare you for a role in research, assessment or policy.

From regional school districts to local, state, and federal agencies, many organizations exist aimed at improving how teachers, schools and educational systems at large do what they do. They’re all looking for people with the knowledge, experience and insights to help guide them.

One of the most compelling reasons prompting people to enter the teaching profession is the chance to make a difference in society. A master’s degree will not only position you to achieve this goal, but it can also help you improve the quality of education at large while bettering your own life in the process.

 

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Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

,[db_lead] =>

Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

,[text] =>

Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

 

1. You’ll increase your earning potential.

While many teaching jobs require master’s degrees, others may call for just a bachelor’s degree. In this case, getting the bare minimum can hurt you in several different ways. Not only does it lower your chances of getting hired when you’re up again more qualified applicants, but it also means you’ll likely end up collecting a higher starting salary.

According to The Houston Chronicle, most school districts offer teachers with master’s degrees across the elementary, middle, and high school levels supplemental pay in the form of a “bonus” or “bump.” According to analysis by the Center for American Progress this averages between an extra $3,000 and $10,000 a year! And while the cost of getting a master’s degree can seem prohibitive, the degree can pay for itself in just a few years. Not only that, but most school districts require continuing education credits -- doesn’t it make sense to put those credits toward a degree?

 

2. You’ll enjoy greater career mobility.

While a bachelor’s degree may qualify you to be a classroom teacher, many other school jobs  require advanced credentials. If career advancement is important to you, a master’s degree is a must-have. Whether you’re looking to work as a school administrator, curriculum director, content/subject area specialist, or school counselor, you’ll likely need a master’s degree or more.

Additionally, a master’s degree can also open up new possibilities outside of the school system entirely. From textbook authors and community college teachers to educational consultants and educational researchers, these sought-after, well-paid professionals almost always have upper-level qualifications.

In addition to helping you move up the latter, a bachelor’s degree can lead to broader career prospects, which can be an effective defense against teacher burnout -- a pervasive phenomenon among today’s hard-working teaching professionals.

 

3. You’ll be a better teacher.

A master’s degree isn’t merely a means to an end. Rather, it’s an opportunity for true growth and development. Your time in graduate school will benefit you in numerous ways, from understanding of your options as a teacher by exploring what truly interest you to acquiring tools which will enrich what you offer your students.

While your undergraduate degree might have bestowed knowledge in a certain field of study, a master’s in education places the focus on transitioning that and new knowledge to the classroom. Says Teach.com, “These degrees focus on teaching somebody how to be a teacher, with heavy emphasis on pedagogy, teaching methods, philosophy of education, and educational technology.”

According to one Reddit commenter, “It was a TON of work, and took a while, but it definitely made me a better teacher, both in increasing my knowledge and also making me more sympathetic to my students. Its interesting watching another person teach after you have been teaching all day, and seeing what you can do and what you shouldn't do.”

One caveat worth keeping in mind? As with all advanced studies, you get out of a master’s degree what you put into it. On the flip side, however, if you’re pursuing your graduate coursework part-time while maintaining a teaching job, you’ll have immediate opportunities to start making change. Another Reddit poster shared, “I love teaching while going to school because I can implement strategies I learn in class the next day.”

 

4. You can make change at a higher level.

Teachers help nurture the growth and development of kids in classroom every day. If you’re interested in making change at a higher level, however, a master’s degree can help prepare you for a role in research, assessment or policy.

From regional school districts to local, state, and federal agencies, many organizations exist aimed at improving how teachers, schools and educational systems at large do what they do. They’re all looking for people with the knowledge, experience and insights to help guide them.

One of the most compelling reasons prompting people to enter the teaching profession is the chance to make a difference in society. A master’s degree will not only position you to achieve this goal, but it can also help you improve the quality of education at large while bettering your own life in the process.

 

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Thinking about business analytics?  The Rady School of Management at the University of California San Diego offers graduate students the chance to wrestle with real-world business problems—and their solutions—using cutting edge business analytics.  Let’s take a closer look.

,[text] =>

Data matters. “Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted,” attributed to Albert Einstein, explains the purpose of business analytics perfectly.  We live in an age of bigger and bigger data—and businesses need ways to sift through it all, to figure out which combinations of data count—and which ones don’t.  The success of business in today’s global economy depends on it.  The Rady School of Management at UC San Diego offers a forward-thinking Master of Science in Business Analytics that teaches its students how to grapple with the reality of big data using business analytics. 

 

What is Business Analytics?

Professor Vincent Nijs, co-director with Professor Terrence August of the Master of Science in Business Analytics program at the Rady School of Management at UC San Diego, describes the field this way, “I think of business analytics as the field focused on how to use data and models to make better business decisions.  Data Science uses many similar tools (e.g. machine learning) but the set of questions they seek to answer are often different.  You can think of business analytics as ‘data science for business.’”

 

The Amount of Data That Companies Collect Gets Bigger and Bigger…

Just how big is big data?  Really big, and getting bigger all the time.  The EMC Digital Universe Study predicts that by the year 2020, 1.7 megabytes of new data will be created every second for every human on the planet.  What does that mean?  There will be 44 trillion gigabytes (44 zettabytes) of data in the digital universe.  Where does the data come from?  Just about everywhere—1.2 trillion searches per year on Google alone, over 1 billion people using Facebook every day, trillions of photos taken, and billions shared.  By 2020, there will be over 6.1 billion smartphone users, and at least 1/3 of all data will be transmitted through the cloud. We haven’t even talked about online banking, business, movies, television, music, and games.

 

…But Businesses Don’t Always Know How to Use the Data

The Rady School‘s Professor Nijs states, “Companies are collecting more and more data but often lack the people to use it effectively.” He referenced a quote from a well-known report by the McKinsey Global Institute (2013): “Big data promises big things—but only if organizations have the right people in place who know what to do with it. A recurring theme among senior leadership across all sectors is a shortage of professionals trained and experienced at the intersection of disciplines necessary to capture, analyze, and generate meaningful business insights from big data. In addition to deep analytics talent, organizations need management with the right balance of business judgment and statistical skills to translate analysis into action.”

 

A Company’s Future Relies on Its Business Analytics

The need for effective, efficient business analytics is stronger than ever.  Businesses need to know what they want to learn from business analytics—and then how they’re going to use that data to inform their decisions across the board.

Businesses need to be able to determine what data they need and then identify the data sources for gleaning that information.  The final piece?  Distilling that information into actionable insights using the tools of business analytics. Once businesses have a plan for capturing the desired data, organizing it, and analyzing it, they are in a position to develop plans to stay competitive.

 

Business Analytics Has Excellent Job Prospects…

According to a McKinsey Global Report, the US alone has a shortage of about 190,000 data scientists and 1.5 million business analysts.  Globally and in the US, companies need experts in business analytics.  High demand means higher salaries, and a variety of options.  Graduates in Business Analytics work at large companies, start their own businesses, work in banks or FinTech, web-based businesses, retail and food companies, media companies, and marketing companies.

 

…Especially When You Study at a Forward-Thinking School Like Rady

The Rady School’s  new Master of Science in Business Analytics (MSBA) puts students at the forefront of the field. The program focuses on the problems big data poses to businesses—and how to solve them using models, statistics, and machine learning – in classes such as customer analytics, business intelligence, and supply chain analytics.  The school’s bottom line?  To graduate students who know how to use analytics to make a positive impact on business performance—and sustain it. 

Professor Nijs says that “After graduation, our students should expect to work extensively with data, use statistics and machine learning, write code, and develop tools to enhance business decision-making.  After gaining some experience, we expect them to be well-suited to lead an analytics team.” 

First steps for prospective students?  Those interested in studying in this program should have an undergraduate degree in a “quantitative discipline,” says Nijs, like “mathematics, statistics, economics, or physics.”  They should also have some programming experience. 

As data continues to get bigger, the global business world will rely more heavily on business analytics to succeed.  Want to make a difference in the business world?  Earn your MSBA in the field that businesses will indisputably need for success and sustainability. 

Learn more about The Rady School of Management.

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Thinking about business analytics?  The Rady School of Management at the University of California San Diego offers graduate students the chance to wrestle with real-world business problems—and their solutions—using cutting edge business analytics.  Let’s take a closer look.

,[db_lead] =>

Thinking about business analytics?  The Rady School of Management at the University of California San Diego offers graduate students the chance to wrestle with real-world business problems—and their solutions—using cutting edge business analytics.  Let’s take a closer look.

,[text] =>

Data matters. “Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted,” attributed to Albert Einstein, explains the purpose of business analytics perfectly.  We live in an age of bigger and bigger data—and businesses need ways to sift through it all, to figure out which combinations of data count—and which ones don’t.  The success of business in today’s global economy depends on it.  The Rady School of Management at UC San Diego offers a forward-thinking Master of Science in Business Analytics that teaches its students how to grapple with the reality of big data using business analytics. 

 

What is Business Analytics?

Professor Vincent Nijs, co-director with Professor Terrence August of the Master of Science in Business Analytics program at the Rady School of Management at UC San Diego, describes the field this way, “I think of business analytics as the field focused on how to use data and models to make better business decisions.  Data Science uses many similar tools (e.g. machine learning) but the set of questions they seek to answer are often different.  You can think of business analytics as ‘data science for business.’”

 

The Amount of Data That Companies Collect Gets Bigger and Bigger…

Just how big is big data?  Really big, and getting bigger all the time.  The EMC Digital Universe Study predicts that by the year 2020, 1.7 megabytes of new data will be created every second for every human on the planet.  What does that mean?  There will be 44 trillion gigabytes (44 zettabytes) of data in the digital universe.  Where does the data come from?  Just about everywhere—1.2 trillion searches per year on Google alone, over 1 billion people using Facebook every day, trillions of photos taken, and billions shared.  By 2020, there will be over 6.1 billion smartphone users, and at least 1/3 of all data will be transmitted through the cloud. We haven’t even talked about online banking, business, movies, television, music, and games.

 

…But Businesses Don’t Always Know How to Use the Data

The Rady School‘s Professor Nijs states, “Companies are collecting more and more data but often lack the people to use it effectively.” He referenced a quote from a well-known report by the McKinsey Global Institute (2013): “Big data promises big things—but only if organizations have the right people in place who know what to do with it. A recurring theme among senior leadership across all sectors is a shortage of professionals trained and experienced at the intersection of disciplines necessary to capture, analyze, and generate meaningful business insights from big data. In addition to deep analytics talent, organizations need management with the right balance of business judgment and statistical skills to translate analysis into action.”

 

A Company’s Future Relies on Its Business Analytics

The need for effective, efficient business analytics is stronger than ever.  Businesses need to know what they want to learn from business analytics—and then how they’re going to use that data to inform their decisions across the board.

Businesses need to be able to determine what data they need and then identify the data sources for gleaning that information.  The final piece?  Distilling that information into actionable insights using the tools of business analytics. Once businesses have a plan for capturing the desired data, organizing it, and analyzing it, they are in a position to develop plans to stay competitive.

 

Business Analytics Has Excellent Job Prospects…

According to a McKinsey Global Report, the US alone has a shortage of about 190,000 data scientists and 1.5 million business analysts.  Globally and in the US, companies need experts in business analytics.  High demand means higher salaries, and a variety of options.  Graduates in Business Analytics work at large companies, start their own businesses, work in banks or FinTech, web-based businesses, retail and food companies, media companies, and marketing companies.

 

…Especially When You Study at a Forward-Thinking School Like Rady

The Rady School’s  new Master of Science in Business Analytics (MSBA) puts students at the forefront of the field. The program focuses on the problems big data poses to businesses—and how to solve them using models, statistics, and machine learning – in classes such as customer analytics, business intelligence, and supply chain analytics.  The school’s bottom line?  To graduate students who know how to use analytics to make a positive impact on business performance—and sustain it. 

Professor Nijs says that “After graduation, our students should expect to work extensively with data, use statistics and machine learning, write code, and develop tools to enhance business decision-making.  After gaining some experience, we expect them to be well-suited to lead an analytics team.” 

First steps for prospective students?  Those interested in studying in this program should have an undergraduate degree in a “quantitative discipline,” says Nijs, like “mathematics, statistics, economics, or physics.”  They should also have some programming experience. 

As data continues to get bigger, the global business world will rely more heavily on business analytics to succeed.  Want to make a difference in the business world?  Earn your MSBA in the field that businesses will indisputably need for success and sustainability. 

Learn more about The Rady School of Management.

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Thanksgiving, that quintessential American holiday, is here.  Thinking about what to do?  We have four fantastic options for you.  Let’s take a closer look. 

,[text] =>

Giving thanks.  Embracing friendship.  Sharing a thoughtful meal.  Telling stories.  Thanksgiving conjures images of extended families and friends gathered around a beautiful table, sharing a delicious meal, and expressing gratitude for what they have.  International students studying in the US during the holidays have a multitude of way to celebrate this quintessential American holiday.  We’ve put together four fantastic options for you to consider as many US students return “home for the holidays.”

 

1. If an American friend invites you, accept the invitation

Thanksgiving is about, well, being thankful for what you have.  This includes being thankful for new friendships.  An American friend invites you?  Accept.  It’s an invitation to be a part of the family, to share the tradition, to take a break from school, and maybe even to participate in the day after Thanksgiving—Black Friday—the day that many retail shops offer sales and discounts in preparation for December’s holidays.  How’d “Black Friday” get its name?  It’s the day that many retailers’ ledgers assure that they will end their fiscal year “in the black,” or showing a profit for the year.

 

2. Consider on-campus opportunities

Feel like staying on-campus during the Thanksgiving break?  Look for campus traditions at your school.  Some schools offer their own Thanksgiving celebrations for any students and faculty who opt to stay on campus, or who may not have options to travel.  Kansas’s Hesston College hosts an annual Thanksgiving weekend, with a dinner and a bevy of other activities, including art exhibits, concerts, talent shows, basketball tournaments, a benefit fun run, and other special events. At Ohio State University, any students, faculty, and staff who are not planning to head home are invited to attend an annual Thanksgiving feast—this year, the University expects over 1,600 attendees.  At Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, PA, students and faculty spend the entire month of November learning about spirituality.  Several faculty at the University host international students at their homes on Thanksgiving Day—as an expression of gratitude for sharing their learning. 

Credit: nbcwashington.com

3. Attend a parade

What’s Thanksgiving without a parade?  The most famous, of course, is the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City, with over 3 million in-person spectators and upwards of 40 million television viewers.  Several major cities besides New York also hold parades where you can enjoy the holiday spirit of gratitude.  Check out the Dunkin’ Donuts Thanksgiving Day Parade in the City of Brotherly Love, Philadelphia.  Motor City has another option—check out America’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in Detroit, Michigan for floats, bands, music, and a glimpse at the history of the US auto industry.  Also in the Midwest is Chicago’s McDonald’s Thanksgiving Parade, which began in the 1930’s in an effort to raise the spirits of Depression-era residents.  Charlotte, North Carolina, Houston, Texas, and Seattle, Washington offer additional possibilities for big parades.  If you don’t live near a city, don’t fret!  Check your local paper for smaller, regional events.  Watching a parade also gives you a chance either to travel to a new place, or to learn something new and interesting about your university town. 

 

4. Take a break

Not interested in all of the hullabaloo?  Not feeling the need for turkey, Black Friday, parades, or big get-togethers?  Relax.  Enjoy the quiet.  Go for a walk.  Read that book you’ve been wanting to read.  Do some sightseeing—explore the city or town where you’ve decided to study.  If you really feel like it, get caught up—or work ahead—in one of your classes.  Take some time for yourself and recharge. 


Regardless of what you choose to do this Thanksgiving season, remember to be grateful for who you are, what you have, and the positive people in your life.  Cheers!

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Thanksgiving, that quintessential American holiday, is here.  Thinking about what to do?  We have four fantastic options for you.  Let’s take a closer look. 

,[db_lead] =>

Thanksgiving, that quintessential American holiday, is here.  Thinking about what to do?  We have four fantastic options for you.  Let’s take a closer look. 

,[text] =>

Giving thanks.  Embracing friendship.  Sharing a thoughtful meal.  Telling stories.  Thanksgiving conjures images of extended families and friends gathered around a beautiful table, sharing a delicious meal, and expressing gratitude for what they have.  International students studying in the US during the holidays have a multitude of way to celebrate this quintessential American holiday.  We’ve put together four fantastic options for you to consider as many US students return “home for the holidays.”

 

1. If an American friend invites you, accept the invitation

Thanksgiving is about, well, being thankful for what you have.  This includes being thankful for new friendships.  An American friend invites you?  Accept.  It’s an invitation to be a part of the family, to share the tradition, to take a break from school, and maybe even to participate in the day after Thanksgiving—Black Friday—the day that many retail shops offer sales and discounts in preparation for December’s holidays.  How’d “Black Friday” get its name?  It’s the day that many retailers’ ledgers assure that they will end their fiscal year “in the black,” or showing a profit for the year.

 

2. Consider on-campus opportunities

Feel like staying on-campus during the Thanksgiving break?  Look for campus traditions at your school.  Some schools offer their own Thanksgiving celebrations for any students and faculty who opt to stay on campus, or who may not have options to travel.  Kansas’s Hesston College hosts an annual Thanksgiving weekend, with a dinner and a bevy of other activities, including art exhibits, concerts, talent shows, basketball tournaments, a benefit fun run, and other special events. At Ohio State University, any students, faculty, and staff who are not planning to head home are invited to attend an annual Thanksgiving feast—this year, the University expects over 1,600 attendees.  At Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, PA, students and faculty spend the entire month of November learning about spirituality.  Several faculty at the University host international students at their homes on Thanksgiving Day—as an expression of gratitude for sharing their learning. 

Credit: nbcwashington.com

3. Attend a parade

What’s Thanksgiving without a parade?  The most famous, of course, is the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City, with over 3 million in-person spectators and upwards of 40 million television viewers.  Several major cities besides New York also hold parades where you can enjoy the holiday spirit of gratitude.  Check out the Dunkin’ Donuts Thanksgiving Day Parade in the City of Brotherly Love, Philadelphia.  Motor City has another option—check out America’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in Detroit, Michigan for floats, bands, music, and a glimpse at the history of the US auto industry.  Also in the Midwest is Chicago’s McDonald’s Thanksgiving Parade, which began in the 1930’s in an effort to raise the spirits of Depression-era residents.  Charlotte, North Carolina, Houston, Texas, and Seattle, Washington offer additional possibilities for big parades.  If you don’t live near a city, don’t fret!  Check your local paper for smaller, regional events.  Watching a parade also gives you a chance either to travel to a new place, or to learn something new and interesting about your university town. 

 

4. Take a break

Not interested in all of the hullabaloo?  Not feeling the need for turkey, Black Friday, parades, or big get-togethers?  Relax.  Enjoy the quiet.  Go for a walk.  Read that book you’ve been wanting to read.  Do some sightseeing—explore the city or town where you’ve decided to study.  If you really feel like it, get caught up—or work ahead—in one of your classes.  Take some time for yourself and recharge. 


Regardless of what you choose to do this Thanksgiving season, remember to be grateful for who you are, what you have, and the positive people in your life.  Cheers!

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Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

,[text] =>

Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

Investing in Education

In conjunction with the Group of Eight Committee (Go8), CASE first debuted its Charitable Giving to Universities in Australia and New Zealand Survey in 2012. Its aim? To provide accurate data for the countries’ development officers, alumni staff, and institutional leaders.

The most recent news is, indeed, promising. In 2015, universities in Australia and New Zealand received 26 percent more in new funds and 25 percent more in cash income than in the previous year. Concluded Tim Dolan, Chair of Go8’s Committee of Chief Advancement Officers, “This is not just a matter of anecdote and impression. With the survey of charitable giving now in its fourth year, we are accumulating real evidence and can begin to see helpful trends in the data collected.”

Even more tellingly, according to Dolan?  “This growth has continued notwithstanding an economy that was less confident than in recent years and despite political uncertainty over funding structures and deregulation. We can see that the right fundraising behaviour, consistently and professionally followed, produces satisfying results.”

Other areas of growth include total number of donors and alumni donors as well as participation by universities -- particularly Australian institutions.

Progress Ahead...With a Catch

While the increased generosity of donors bodes well for a boost to world-class research and university at the region’s higher education institutions, insiders warn of the dangers of complacency. Said Dolan, “One reason for this is the ongoing frustration generated by the shortage of appropriate fundraising professionals. We have all found that the right people are hard to find and difficult to keep. If we could double our fundraising teams, the resulting impact would be phenomenal.” Conversely, failure to find these professionals could stunt university growth.

The takeaway for students looking for an exciting and in-demand career path? A master’s in fundraising management or other fundraising-related topic may be the fast-track to success. 

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Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

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Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

,[text] =>

Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

Investing in Education

In conjunction with the Group of Eight Committee (Go8), CASE first debuted its Charitable Giving to Universities in Australia and New Zealand Survey in 2012. Its aim? To provide accurate data for the countries’ development officers, alumni staff, and institutional leaders.

The most recent news is, indeed, promising. In 2015, universities in Australia and New Zealand received 26 percent more in new funds and 25 percent more in cash income than in the previous year. Concluded Tim Dolan, Chair of Go8’s Committee of Chief Advancement Officers, “This is not just a matter of anecdote and impression. With the survey of charitable giving now in its fourth year, we are accumulating real evidence and can begin to see helpful trends in the data collected.”

Even more tellingly, according to Dolan?  “This growth has continued notwithstanding an economy that was less confident than in recent years and despite political uncertainty over funding structures and deregulation. We can see that the right fundraising behaviour, consistently and professionally followed, produces satisfying results.”

Other areas of growth include total number of donors and alumni donors as well as participation by universities -- particularly Australian institutions.

Progress Ahead...With a Catch

While the increased generosity of donors bodes well for a boost to world-class research and university at the region’s higher education institutions, insiders warn of the dangers of complacency. Said Dolan, “One reason for this is the ongoing frustration generated by the shortage of appropriate fundraising professionals. We have all found that the right people are hard to find and difficult to keep. If we could double our fundraising teams, the resulting impact would be phenomenal.” Conversely, failure to find these professionals could stunt university growth.

The takeaway for students looking for an exciting and in-demand career path? A master’s in fundraising management or other fundraising-related topic may be the fast-track to success. 

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The Chinese government recently announced a plan attract more international students from Southeast Asian countries.  Find out why and learn more about higher education initiatives in China. 

,[text] =>

ASEAN-China Center Secretary General Yang Xiuping recently announced that China would like to improve collaboration in education and culture with ASEAN countries.  He said, “Foreign students from Southeast Asian countries are the bridge and future of the relationship between ASEAN [countries] and China.”

Why the push? This push comes partly from the 21st Century Maritime Silk Road.  The Chinese government recently initiated this development strategy and framework to both unite and expand collaborative efforts in education and trade between China and other countries on the Silk Road route.  Attracting more international students from Southeast Asia not only gives students an incredible learning opportunity; it also allows them to be a part of a new collaboration between China and the rest of the region.   

Currently, about 68,000 students from Southeast Asia study in China.  The Chinese government would like to increase that number to at least 100,000 within the year.  Yang commented, “We want to see more exchange students from ASEAN countries in China.” 

This initiative reflects a larger trend in Chinese higher education.  Last year was a record year for the numbers of international students in China.  Why?  China’s outward international strategy for 2020 focuses on making China a global study destination, not just in Southeast Asia.    Some of the countries with the largest numbers of students studying in China?  You guessed it: ASEAN members Thailand and Indonesia, among other global players. 

Learn more about studying in China

 

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The Chinese government recently announced a plan attract more international students from Southeast Asian countries.  Find out why and learn more about higher education initiatives in China. 

,[db_lead] =>

The Chinese government recently announced a plan attract more international students from Southeast Asian countries.  Find out why and learn more about higher education initiatives in China. 

,[text] =>

ASEAN-China Center Secretary General Yang Xiuping recently announced that China would like to improve collaboration in education and culture with ASEAN countries.  He said, “Foreign students from Southeast Asian countries are the bridge and future of the relationship between ASEAN [countries] and China.”

Why the push? This push comes partly from the 21st Century Maritime Silk Road.  The Chinese government recently initiated this development strategy and framework to both unite and expand collaborative efforts in education and trade between China and other countries on the Silk Road route.  Attracting more international students from Southeast Asia not only gives students an incredible learning opportunity; it also allows them to be a part of a new collaboration between China and the rest of the region.   

Currently, about 68,000 students from Southeast Asia study in China.  The Chinese government would like to increase that number to at least 100,000 within the year.  Yang commented, “We want to see more exchange students from ASEAN countries in China.” 

This initiative reflects a larger trend in Chinese higher education.  Last year was a record year for the numbers of international students in China.  Why?  China’s outward international strategy for 2020 focuses on making China a global study destination, not just in Southeast Asia.    Some of the countries with the largest numbers of students studying in China?  You guessed it: ASEAN members Thailand and Indonesia, among other global players. 

Learn more about studying in China

 

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Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

,[text] =>

Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

Plans Underway

In speaking of plans to build a new university dedicated to arts and sciences in Myanmar’s Pobbathiri township, Nay Pyi Taw Council member U Tun Tin said that a plot of land was already chosen as a likely site for the campus. Additionally, insiders revealed, the state counselor had agreed to a construction proposal with a five-year timeline. 

The new university will join several others in Nay Pyi Taw, and is expected to significantly expand the region’s offerings in the arts and sciences.

Good News for Students and Parents

While the project is applauded by many stakeholders, parents and students in the capital have special cause to celebrate the possibility of bachelor’s studies closer to home.

Said one resident and parent, “Students who want to study arts or sciences at university currently have to go to Mandalay or Kyaukse. Once the new university is built, we will be able to watch over our children more easily.”

Higher educated citizens are viewed by many as a critical part of helping the country achieve its full potential during Myanmar’s transition to democracy. Perhaps Myanmar Nobel Prize winner and National League for Democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi’s words from more than a quarter-century ago best reflect the country’s outlook today: “A country’s international standard cannot be measured in terms of the number of hotels and bridges; it has to be measured in terms of education. A country of inferior education won’t be able to catch up with the world.”

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Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

,[db_lead] =>

Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

,[text] =>

Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

Plans Underway

In speaking of plans to build a new university dedicated to arts and sciences in Myanmar’s Pobbathiri township, Nay Pyi Taw Council member U Tun Tin said that a plot of land was already chosen as a likely site for the campus. Additionally, insiders revealed, the state counselor had agreed to a construction proposal with a five-year timeline. 

The new university will join several others in Nay Pyi Taw, and is expected to significantly expand the region’s offerings in the arts and sciences.

Good News for Students and Parents

While the project is applauded by many stakeholders, parents and students in the capital have special cause to celebrate the possibility of bachelor’s studies closer to home.

Said one resident and parent, “Students who want to study arts or sciences at university currently have to go to Mandalay or Kyaukse. Once the new university is built, we will be able to watch over our children more easily.”

Higher educated citizens are viewed by many as a critical part of helping the country achieve its full potential during Myanmar’s transition to democracy. Perhaps Myanmar Nobel Prize winner and National League for Democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi’s words from more than a quarter-century ago best reflect the country’s outlook today: “A country’s international standard cannot be measured in terms of the number of hotels and bridges; it has to be measured in terms of education. A country of inferior education won’t be able to catch up with the world.”

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Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

,[text] =>

Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

 

1. You’ll increase your earning potential.

While many teaching jobs require master’s degrees, others may call for just a bachelor’s degree. In this case, getting the bare minimum can hurt you in several different ways. Not only does it lower your chances of getting hired when you’re up again more qualified applicants, but it also means you’ll likely end up collecting a higher starting salary.

According to The Houston Chronicle, most school districts offer teachers with master’s degrees across the elementary, middle, and high school levels supplemental pay in the form of a “bonus” or “bump.” According to analysis by the Center for American Progress this averages between an extra $3,000 and $10,000 a year! And while the cost of getting a master’s degree can seem prohibitive, the degree can pay for itself in just a few years. Not only that, but most school districts require continuing education credits -- doesn’t it make sense to put those credits toward a degree?

 

2. You’ll enjoy greater career mobility.

While a bachelor’s degree may qualify you to be a classroom teacher, many other school jobs  require advanced credentials. If career advancement is important to you, a master’s degree is a must-have. Whether you’re looking to work as a school administrator, curriculum director, content/subject area specialist, or school counselor, you’ll likely need a master’s degree or more.

Additionally, a master’s degree can also open up new possibilities outside of the school system entirely. From textbook authors and community college teachers to educational consultants and educational researchers, these sought-after, well-paid professionals almost always have upper-level qualifications.

In addition to helping you move up the latter, a bachelor’s degree can lead to broader career prospects, which can be an effective defense against teacher burnout -- a pervasive phenomenon among today’s hard-working teaching professionals.

 

3. You’ll be a better teacher.

A master’s degree isn’t merely a means to an end. Rather, it’s an opportunity for true growth and development. Your time in graduate school will benefit you in numerous ways, from understanding of your options as a teacher by exploring what truly interest you to acquiring tools which will enrich what you offer your students.

While your undergraduate degree might have bestowed knowledge in a certain field of study, a master’s in education places the focus on transitioning that and new knowledge to the classroom. Says Teach.com, “These degrees focus on teaching somebody how to be a teacher, with heavy emphasis on pedagogy, teaching methods, philosophy of education, and educational technology.”

According to one Reddit commenter, “It was a TON of work, and took a while, but it definitely made me a better teacher, both in increasing my knowledge and also making me more sympathetic to my students. Its interesting watching another person teach after you have been teaching all day, and seeing what you can do and what you shouldn't do.”

One caveat worth keeping in mind? As with all advanced studies, you get out of a master’s degree what you put into it. On the flip side, however, if you’re pursuing your graduate coursework part-time while maintaining a teaching job, you’ll have immediate opportunities to start making change. Another Reddit poster shared, “I love teaching while going to school because I can implement strategies I learn in class the next day.”

 

4. You can make change at a higher level.

Teachers help nurture the growth and development of kids in classroom every day. If you’re interested in making change at a higher level, however, a master’s degree can help prepare you for a role in research, assessment or policy.

From regional school districts to local, state, and federal agencies, many organizations exist aimed at improving how teachers, schools and educational systems at large do what they do. They’re all looking for people with the knowledge, experience and insights to help guide them.

One of the most compelling reasons prompting people to enter the teaching profession is the chance to make a difference in society. A master’s degree will not only position you to achieve this goal, but it can also help you improve the quality of education at large while bettering your own life in the process.

 

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Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

,[db_lead] =>

Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

,[text] =>

Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

 

1. You’ll increase your earning potential.

While many teaching jobs require master’s degrees, others may call for just a bachelor’s degree. In this case, getting the bare minimum can hurt you in several different ways. Not only does it lower your chances of getting hired when you’re up again more qualified applicants, but it also means you’ll likely end up collecting a higher starting salary.

According to The Houston Chronicle, most school districts offer teachers with master’s degrees across the elementary, middle, and high school levels supplemental pay in the form of a “bonus” or “bump.” According to analysis by the Center for American Progress this averages between an extra $3,000 and $10,000 a year! And while the cost of getting a master’s degree can seem prohibitive, the degree can pay for itself in just a few years. Not only that, but most school districts require continuing education credits -- doesn’t it make sense to put those credits toward a degree?

 

2. You’ll enjoy greater career mobility.

While a bachelor’s degree may qualify you to be a classroom teacher, many other school jobs  require advanced credentials. If career advancement is important to you, a master’s degree is a must-have. Whether you’re looking to work as a school administrator, curriculum director, content/subject area specialist, or school counselor, you’ll likely need a master’s degree or more.

Additionally, a master’s degree can also open up new possibilities outside of the school system entirely. From textbook authors and community college teachers to educational consultants and educational researchers, these sought-after, well-paid professionals almost always have upper-level qualifications.

In addition to helping you move up the latter, a bachelor’s degree can lead to broader career prospects, which can be an effective defense against teacher burnout -- a pervasive phenomenon among today’s hard-working teaching professionals.

 

3. You’ll be a better teacher.

A master’s degree isn’t merely a means to an end. Rather, it’s an opportunity for true growth and development. Your time in graduate school will benefit you in numerous ways, from understanding of your options as a teacher by exploring what truly interest you to acquiring tools which will enrich what you offer your students.

While your undergraduate degree might have bestowed knowledge in a certain field of study, a master’s in education places the focus on transitioning that and new knowledge to the classroom. Says Teach.com, “These degrees focus on teaching somebody how to be a teacher, with heavy emphasis on pedagogy, teaching methods, philosophy of education, and educational technology.”

According to one Reddit commenter, “It was a TON of work, and took a while, but it definitely made me a better teacher, both in increasing my knowledge and also making me more sympathetic to my students. Its interesting watching another person teach after you have been teaching all day, and seeing what you can do and what you shouldn't do.”

One caveat worth keeping in mind? As with all advanced studies, you get out of a master’s degree what you put into it. On the flip side, however, if you’re pursuing your graduate coursework part-time while maintaining a teaching job, you’ll have immediate opportunities to start making change. Another Reddit poster shared, “I love teaching while going to school because I can implement strategies I learn in class the next day.”

 

4. You can make change at a higher level.

Teachers help nurture the growth and development of kids in classroom every day. If you’re interested in making change at a higher level, however, a master’s degree can help prepare you for a role in research, assessment or policy.

From regional school districts to local, state, and federal agencies, many organizations exist aimed at improving how teachers, schools and educational systems at large do what they do. They’re all looking for people with the knowledge, experience and insights to help guide them.

One of the most compelling reasons prompting people to enter the teaching profession is the chance to make a difference in society. A master’s degree will not only position you to achieve this goal, but it can also help you improve the quality of education at large while bettering your own life in the process.

 

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Thinking about business analytics?  The Rady School of Management at the University of California San Diego offers graduate students the chance to wrestle with real-world business problems—and their solutions—using cutting edge business analytics.  Let’s take a closer look.

,[text] =>

Data matters. “Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted,” attributed to Albert Einstein, explains the purpose of business analytics perfectly.  We live in an age of bigger and bigger data—and businesses need ways to sift through it all, to figure out which combinations of data count—and which ones don’t.  The success of business in today’s global economy depends on it.  The Rady School of Management at UC San Diego offers a forward-thinking Master of Science in Business Analytics that teaches its students how to grapple with the reality of big data using business analytics. 

 

What is Business Analytics?

Professor Vincent Nijs, co-director with Professor Terrence August of the Master of Science in Business Analytics program at the Rady School of Management at UC San Diego, describes the field this way, “I think of business analytics as the field focused on how to use data and models to make better business decisions.  Data Science uses many similar tools (e.g. machine learning) but the set of questions they seek to answer are often different.  You can think of business analytics as ‘data science for business.’”

 

The Amount of Data That Companies Collect Gets Bigger and Bigger…

Just how big is big data?  Really big, and getting bigger all the time.  The EMC Digital Universe Study predicts that by the year 2020, 1.7 megabytes of new data will be created every second for every human on the planet.  What does that mean?  There will be 44 trillion gigabytes (44 zettabytes) of data in the digital universe.  Where does the data come from?  Just about everywhere—1.2 trillion searches per year on Google alone, over 1 billion people using Facebook every day, trillions of photos taken, and billions shared.  By 2020, there will be over 6.1 billion smartphone users, and at least 1/3 of all data will be transmitted through the cloud. We haven’t even talked about online banking, business, movies, television, music, and games.

 

…But Businesses Don’t Always Know How to Use the Data

The Rady School‘s Professor Nijs states, “Companies are collecting more and more data but often lack the people to use it effectively.” He referenced a quote from a well-known report by the McKinsey Global Institute (2013): “Big data promises big things—but only if organizations have the right people in place who know what to do with it. A recurring theme among senior leadership across all sectors is a shortage of professionals trained and experienced at the intersection of disciplines necessary to capture, analyze, and generate meaningful business insights from big data. In addition to deep analytics talent, organizations need management with the right balance of business judgment and statistical skills to translate analysis into action.”

 

A Company’s Future Relies on Its Business Analytics

The need for effective, efficient business analytics is stronger than ever.  Businesses need to know what they want to learn from business analytics—and then how they’re going to use that data to inform their decisions across the board.

Businesses need to be able to determine what data they need and then identify the data sources for gleaning that information.  The final piece?  Distilling that information into actionable insights using the tools of business analytics. Once businesses have a plan for capturing the desired data, organizing it, and analyzing it, they are in a position to develop plans to stay competitive.

 

Business Analytics Has Excellent Job Prospects…

According to a McKinsey Global Report, the US alone has a shortage of about 190,000 data scientists and 1.5 million business analysts.  Globally and in the US, companies need experts in business analytics.  High demand means higher salaries, and a variety of options.  Graduates in Business Analytics work at large companies, start their own businesses, work in banks or FinTech, web-based businesses, retail and food companies, media companies, and marketing companies.

 

…Especially When You Study at a Forward-Thinking School Like Rady

The Rady School’s  new Master of Science in Business Analytics (MSBA) puts students at the forefront of the field. The program focuses on the problems big data poses to businesses—and how to solve them using models, statistics, and machine learning – in classes such as customer analytics, business intelligence, and supply chain analytics.  The school’s bottom line?  To graduate students who know how to use analytics to make a positive impact on business performance—and sustain it. 

Professor Nijs says that “After graduation, our students should expect to work extensively with data, use statistics and machine learning, write code, and develop tools to enhance business decision-making.  After gaining some experience, we expect them to be well-suited to lead an analytics team.” 

First steps for prospective students?  Those interested in studying in this program should have an undergraduate degree in a “quantitative discipline,” says Nijs, like “mathematics, statistics, economics, or physics.”  They should also have some programming experience. 

As data continues to get bigger, the global business world will rely more heavily on business analytics to succeed.  Want to make a difference in the business world?  Earn your MSBA in the field that businesses will indisputably need for success and sustainability. 

Learn more about The Rady School of Management.

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Thinking about business analytics?  The Rady School of Management at the University of California San Diego offers graduate students the chance to wrestle with real-world business problems—and their solutions—using cutting edge business analytics.  Let’s take a closer look.

,[db_lead] =>

Thinking about business analytics?  The Rady School of Management at the University of California San Diego offers graduate students the chance to wrestle with real-world business problems—and their solutions—using cutting edge business analytics.  Let’s take a closer look.

,[text] =>

Data matters. “Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted,” attributed to Albert Einstein, explains the purpose of business analytics perfectly.  We live in an age of bigger and bigger data—and businesses need ways to sift through it all, to figure out which combinations of data count—and which ones don’t.  The success of business in today’s global economy depends on it.  The Rady School of Management at UC San Diego offers a forward-thinking Master of Science in Business Analytics that teaches its students how to grapple with the reality of big data using business analytics. 

 

What is Business Analytics?

Professor Vincent Nijs, co-director with Professor Terrence August of the Master of Science in Business Analytics program at the Rady School of Management at UC San Diego, describes the field this way, “I think of business analytics as the field focused on how to use data and models to make better business decisions.  Data Science uses many similar tools (e.g. machine learning) but the set of questions they seek to answer are often different.  You can think of business analytics as ‘data science for business.’”

 

The Amount of Data That Companies Collect Gets Bigger and Bigger…

Just how big is big data?  Really big, and getting bigger all the time.  The EMC Digital Universe Study predicts that by the year 2020, 1.7 megabytes of new data will be created every second for every human on the planet.  What does that mean?  There will be 44 trillion gigabytes (44 zettabytes) of data in the digital universe.  Where does the data come from?  Just about everywhere—1.2 trillion searches per year on Google alone, over 1 billion people using Facebook every day, trillions of photos taken, and billions shared.  By 2020, there will be over 6.1 billion smartphone users, and at least 1/3 of all data will be transmitted through the cloud. We haven’t even talked about online banking, business, movies, television, music, and games.

 

…But Businesses Don’t Always Know How to Use the Data

The Rady School‘s Professor Nijs states, “Companies are collecting more and more data but often lack the people to use it effectively.” He referenced a quote from a well-known report by the McKinsey Global Institute (2013): “Big data promises big things—but only if organizations have the right people in place who know what to do with it. A recurring theme among senior leadership across all sectors is a shortage of professionals trained and experienced at the intersection of disciplines necessary to capture, analyze, and generate meaningful business insights from big data. In addition to deep analytics talent, organizations need management with the right balance of business judgment and statistical skills to translate analysis into action.”

 

A Company’s Future Relies on Its Business Analytics

The need for effective, efficient business analytics is stronger than ever.  Businesses need to know what they want to learn from business analytics—and then how they’re going to use that data to inform their decisions across the board.

Businesses need to be able to determine what data they need and then identify the data sources for gleaning that information.  The final piece?  Distilling that information into actionable insights using the tools of business analytics. Once businesses have a plan for capturing the desired data, organizing it, and analyzing it, they are in a position to develop plans to stay competitive.

 

Business Analytics Has Excellent Job Prospects…

According to a McKinsey Global Report, the US alone has a shortage of about 190,000 data scientists and 1.5 million business analysts.  Globally and in the US, companies need experts in business analytics.  High demand means higher salaries, and a variety of options.  Graduates in Business Analytics work at large companies, start their own businesses, work in banks or FinTech, web-based businesses, retail and food companies, media companies, and marketing companies.

 

…Especially When You Study at a Forward-Thinking School Like Rady

The Rady School’s  new Master of Science in Business Analytics (MSBA) puts students at the forefront of the field. The program focuses on the problems big data poses to businesses—and how to solve them using models, statistics, and machine learning – in classes such as customer analytics, business intelligence, and supply chain analytics.  The school’s bottom line?  To graduate students who know how to use analytics to make a positive impact on business performance—and sustain it. 

Professor Nijs says that “After graduation, our students should expect to work extensively with data, use statistics and machine learning, write code, and develop tools to enhance business decision-making.  After gaining some experience, we expect them to be well-suited to lead an analytics team.” 

First steps for prospective students?  Those interested in studying in this program should have an undergraduate degree in a “quantitative discipline,” says Nijs, like “mathematics, statistics, economics, or physics.”  They should also have some programming experience. 

As data continues to get bigger, the global business world will rely more heavily on business analytics to succeed.  Want to make a difference in the business world?  Earn your MSBA in the field that businesses will indisputably need for success and sustainability. 

Learn more about The Rady School of Management.

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Thanksgiving, that quintessential American holiday, is here.  Thinking about what to do?  We have four fantastic options for you.  Let’s take a closer look. 

,[text] =>

Giving thanks.  Embracing friendship.  Sharing a thoughtful meal.  Telling stories.  Thanksgiving conjures images of extended families and friends gathered around a beautiful table, sharing a delicious meal, and expressing gratitude for what they have.  International students studying in the US during the holidays have a multitude of way to celebrate this quintessential American holiday.  We’ve put together four fantastic options for you to consider as many US students return “home for the holidays.”

 

1. If an American friend invites you, accept the invitation

Thanksgiving is about, well, being thankful for what you have.  This includes being thankful for new friendships.  An American friend invites you?  Accept.  It’s an invitation to be a part of the family, to share the tradition, to take a break from school, and maybe even to participate in the day after Thanksgiving—Black Friday—the day that many retail shops offer sales and discounts in preparation for December’s holidays.  How’d “Black Friday” get its name?  It’s the day that many retailers’ ledgers assure that they will end their fiscal year “in the black,” or showing a profit for the year.

 

2. Consider on-campus opportunities

Feel like staying on-campus during the Thanksgiving break?  Look for campus traditions at your school.  Some schools offer their own Thanksgiving celebrations for any students and faculty who opt to stay on campus, or who may not have options to travel.  Kansas’s Hesston College hosts an annual Thanksgiving weekend, with a dinner and a bevy of other activities, including art exhibits, concerts, talent shows, basketball tournaments, a benefit fun run, and other special events. At Ohio State University, any students, faculty, and staff who are not planning to head home are invited to attend an annual Thanksgiving feast—this year, the University expects over 1,600 attendees.  At Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, PA, students and faculty spend the entire month of November learning about spirituality.  Several faculty at the University host international students at their homes on Thanksgiving Day—as an expression of gratitude for sharing their learning. 

Credit: nbcwashington.com

3. Attend a parade

What’s Thanksgiving without a parade?  The most famous, of course, is the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City, with over 3 million in-person spectators and upwards of 40 million television viewers.  Several major cities besides New York also hold parades where you can enjoy the holiday spirit of gratitude.  Check out the Dunkin’ Donuts Thanksgiving Day Parade in the City of Brotherly Love, Philadelphia.  Motor City has another option—check out America’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in Detroit, Michigan for floats, bands, music, and a glimpse at the history of the US auto industry.  Also in the Midwest is Chicago’s McDonald’s Thanksgiving Parade, which began in the 1930’s in an effort to raise the spirits of Depression-era residents.  Charlotte, North Carolina, Houston, Texas, and Seattle, Washington offer additional possibilities for big parades.  If you don’t live near a city, don’t fret!  Check your local paper for smaller, regional events.  Watching a parade also gives you a chance either to travel to a new place, or to learn something new and interesting about your university town. 

 

4. Take a break

Not interested in all of the hullabaloo?  Not feeling the need for turkey, Black Friday, parades, or big get-togethers?  Relax.  Enjoy the quiet.  Go for a walk.  Read that book you’ve been wanting to read.  Do some sightseeing—explore the city or town where you’ve decided to study.  If you really feel like it, get caught up—or work ahead—in one of your classes.  Take some time for yourself and recharge. 


Regardless of what you choose to do this Thanksgiving season, remember to be grateful for who you are, what you have, and the positive people in your life.  Cheers!

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Thanksgiving, that quintessential American holiday, is here.  Thinking about what to do?  We have four fantastic options for you.  Let’s take a closer look. 

,[db_lead] =>

Thanksgiving, that quintessential American holiday, is here.  Thinking about what to do?  We have four fantastic options for you.  Let’s take a closer look. 

,[text] =>

Giving thanks.  Embracing friendship.  Sharing a thoughtful meal.  Telling stories.  Thanksgiving conjures images of extended families and friends gathered around a beautiful table, sharing a delicious meal, and expressing gratitude for what they have.  International students studying in the US during the holidays have a multitude of way to celebrate this quintessential American holiday.  We’ve put together four fantastic options for you to consider as many US students return “home for the holidays.”

 

1. If an American friend invites you, accept the invitation

Thanksgiving is about, well, being thankful for what you have.  This includes being thankful for new friendships.  An American friend invites you?  Accept.  It’s an invitation to be a part of the family, to share the tradition, to take a break from school, and maybe even to participate in the day after Thanksgiving—Black Friday—the day that many retail shops offer sales and discounts in preparation for December’s holidays.  How’d “Black Friday” get its name?  It’s the day that many retailers’ ledgers assure that they will end their fiscal year “in the black,” or showing a profit for the year.

 

2. Consider on-campus opportunities

Feel like staying on-campus during the Thanksgiving break?  Look for campus traditions at your school.  Some schools offer their own Thanksgiving celebrations for any students and faculty who opt to stay on campus, or who may not have options to travel.  Kansas’s Hesston College hosts an annual Thanksgiving weekend, with a dinner and a bevy of other activities, including art exhibits, concerts, talent shows, basketball tournaments, a benefit fun run, and other special events. At Ohio State University, any students, faculty, and staff who are not planning to head home are invited to attend an annual Thanksgiving feast—this year, the University expects over 1,600 attendees.  At Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, PA, students and faculty spend the entire month of November learning about spirituality.  Several faculty at the University host international students at their homes on Thanksgiving Day—as an expression of gratitude for sharing their learning. 

Credit: nbcwashington.com

3. Attend a parade

What’s Thanksgiving without a parade?  The most famous, of course, is the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City, with over 3 million in-person spectators and upwards of 40 million television viewers.  Several major cities besides New York also hold parades where you can enjoy the holiday spirit of gratitude.  Check out the Dunkin’ Donuts Thanksgiving Day Parade in the City of Brotherly Love, Philadelphia.  Motor City has another option—check out America’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in Detroit, Michigan for floats, bands, music, and a glimpse at the history of the US auto industry.  Also in the Midwest is Chicago’s McDonald’s Thanksgiving Parade, which began in the 1930’s in an effort to raise the spirits of Depression-era residents.  Charlotte, North Carolina, Houston, Texas, and Seattle, Washington offer additional possibilities for big parades.  If you don’t live near a city, don’t fret!  Check your local paper for smaller, regional events.  Watching a parade also gives you a chance either to travel to a new place, or to learn something new and interesting about your university town. 

 

4. Take a break

Not interested in all of the hullabaloo?  Not feeling the need for turkey, Black Friday, parades, or big get-togethers?  Relax.  Enjoy the quiet.  Go for a walk.  Read that book you’ve been wanting to read.  Do some sightseeing—explore the city or town where you’ve decided to study.  If you really feel like it, get caught up—or work ahead—in one of your classes.  Take some time for yourself and recharge. 


Regardless of what you choose to do this Thanksgiving season, remember to be grateful for who you are, what you have, and the positive people in your life.  Cheers!

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Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

,[text] =>

Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

Investing in Education

In conjunction with the Group of Eight Committee (Go8), CASE first debuted its Charitable Giving to Universities in Australia and New Zealand Survey in 2012. Its aim? To provide accurate data for the countries’ development officers, alumni staff, and institutional leaders.

The most recent news is, indeed, promising. In 2015, universities in Australia and New Zealand received 26 percent more in new funds and 25 percent more in cash income than in the previous year. Concluded Tim Dolan, Chair of Go8’s Committee of Chief Advancement Officers, “This is not just a matter of anecdote and impression. With the survey of charitable giving now in its fourth year, we are accumulating real evidence and can begin to see helpful trends in the data collected.”

Even more tellingly, according to Dolan?  “This growth has continued notwithstanding an economy that was less confident than in recent years and despite political uncertainty over funding structures and deregulation. We can see that the right fundraising behaviour, consistently and professionally followed, produces satisfying results.”

Other areas of growth include total number of donors and alumni donors as well as participation by universities -- particularly Australian institutions.

Progress Ahead...With a Catch

While the increased generosity of donors bodes well for a boost to world-class research and university at the region’s higher education institutions, insiders warn of the dangers of complacency. Said Dolan, “One reason for this is the ongoing frustration generated by the shortage of appropriate fundraising professionals. We have all found that the right people are hard to find and difficult to keep. If we could double our fundraising teams, the resulting impact would be phenomenal.” Conversely, failure to find these professionals could stunt university growth.

The takeaway for students looking for an exciting and in-demand career path? A master’s in fundraising management or other fundraising-related topic may be the fast-track to success. 

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Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

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Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

,[text] =>

Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

Investing in Education

In conjunction with the Group of Eight Committee (Go8), CASE first debuted its Charitable Giving to Universities in Australia and New Zealand Survey in 2012. Its aim? To provide accurate data for the countries’ development officers, alumni staff, and institutional leaders.

The most recent news is, indeed, promising. In 2015, universities in Australia and New Zealand received 26 percent more in new funds and 25 percent more in cash income than in the previous year. Concluded Tim Dolan, Chair of Go8’s Committee of Chief Advancement Officers, “This is not just a matter of anecdote and impression. With the survey of charitable giving now in its fourth year, we are accumulating real evidence and can begin to see helpful trends in the data collected.”

Even more tellingly, according to Dolan?  “This growth has continued notwithstanding an economy that was less confident than in recent years and despite political uncertainty over funding structures and deregulation. We can see that the right fundraising behaviour, consistently and professionally followed, produces satisfying results.”

Other areas of growth include total number of donors and alumni donors as well as participation by universities -- particularly Australian institutions.

Progress Ahead...With a Catch

While the increased generosity of donors bodes well for a boost to world-class research and university at the region’s higher education institutions, insiders warn of the dangers of complacency. Said Dolan, “One reason for this is the ongoing frustration generated by the shortage of appropriate fundraising professionals. We have all found that the right people are hard to find and difficult to keep. If we could double our fundraising teams, the resulting impact would be phenomenal.” Conversely, failure to find these professionals could stunt university growth.

The takeaway for students looking for an exciting and in-demand career path? A master’s in fundraising management or other fundraising-related topic may be the fast-track to success. 

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The Chinese government recently announced a plan attract more international students from Southeast Asian countries.  Find out why and learn more about higher education initiatives in China. 

,[text] =>

ASEAN-China Center Secretary General Yang Xiuping recently announced that China would like to improve collaboration in education and culture with ASEAN countries.  He said, “Foreign students from Southeast Asian countries are the bridge and future of the relationship between ASEAN [countries] and China.”

Why the push? This push comes partly from the 21st Century Maritime Silk Road.  The Chinese government recently initiated this development strategy and framework to both unite and expand collaborative efforts in education and trade between China and other countries on the Silk Road route.  Attracting more international students from Southeast Asia not only gives students an incredible learning opportunity; it also allows them to be a part of a new collaboration between China and the rest of the region.   

Currently, about 68,000 students from Southeast Asia study in China.  The Chinese government would like to increase that number to at least 100,000 within the year.  Yang commented, “We want to see more exchange students from ASEAN countries in China.” 

This initiative reflects a larger trend in Chinese higher education.  Last year was a record year for the numbers of international students in China.  Why?  China’s outward international strategy for 2020 focuses on making China a global study destination, not just in Southeast Asia.    Some of the countries with the largest numbers of students studying in China?  You guessed it: ASEAN members Thailand and Indonesia, among other global players. 

Learn more about studying in China

 

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The Chinese government recently announced a plan attract more international students from Southeast Asian countries.  Find out why and learn more about higher education initiatives in China. 

,[db_lead] =>

The Chinese government recently announced a plan attract more international students from Southeast Asian countries.  Find out why and learn more about higher education initiatives in China. 

,[text] =>

ASEAN-China Center Secretary General Yang Xiuping recently announced that China would like to improve collaboration in education and culture with ASEAN countries.  He said, “Foreign students from Southeast Asian countries are the bridge and future of the relationship between ASEAN [countries] and China.”

Why the push? This push comes partly from the 21st Century Maritime Silk Road.  The Chinese government recently initiated this development strategy and framework to both unite and expand collaborative efforts in education and trade between China and other countries on the Silk Road route.  Attracting more international students from Southeast Asia not only gives students an incredible learning opportunity; it also allows them to be a part of a new collaboration between China and the rest of the region.   

Currently, about 68,000 students from Southeast Asia study in China.  The Chinese government would like to increase that number to at least 100,000 within the year.  Yang commented, “We want to see more exchange students from ASEAN countries in China.” 

This initiative reflects a larger trend in Chinese higher education.  Last year was a record year for the numbers of international students in China.  Why?  China’s outward international strategy for 2020 focuses on making China a global study destination, not just in Southeast Asia.    Some of the countries with the largest numbers of students studying in China?  You guessed it: ASEAN members Thailand and Indonesia, among other global players. 

Learn more about studying in China

 

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Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

,[text] =>

Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

Plans Underway

In speaking of plans to build a new university dedicated to arts and sciences in Myanmar’s Pobbathiri township, Nay Pyi Taw Council member U Tun Tin said that a plot of land was already chosen as a likely site for the campus. Additionally, insiders revealed, the state counselor had agreed to a construction proposal with a five-year timeline. 

The new university will join several others in Nay Pyi Taw, and is expected to significantly expand the region’s offerings in the arts and sciences.

Good News for Students and Parents

While the project is applauded by many stakeholders, parents and students in the capital have special cause to celebrate the possibility of bachelor’s studies closer to home.

Said one resident and parent, “Students who want to study arts or sciences at university currently have to go to Mandalay or Kyaukse. Once the new university is built, we will be able to watch over our children more easily.”

Higher educated citizens are viewed by many as a critical part of helping the country achieve its full potential during Myanmar’s transition to democracy. Perhaps Myanmar Nobel Prize winner and National League for Democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi’s words from more than a quarter-century ago best reflect the country’s outlook today: “A country’s international standard cannot be measured in terms of the number of hotels and bridges; it has to be measured in terms of education. A country of inferior education won’t be able to catch up with the world.”

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Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

,[db_lead] =>

Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

,[text] =>

Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

Plans Underway

In speaking of plans to build a new university dedicated to arts and sciences in Myanmar’s Pobbathiri township, Nay Pyi Taw Council member U Tun Tin said that a plot of land was already chosen as a likely site for the campus. Additionally, insiders revealed, the state counselor had agreed to a construction proposal with a five-year timeline. 

The new university will join several others in Nay Pyi Taw, and is expected to significantly expand the region’s offerings in the arts and sciences.

Good News for Students and Parents

While the project is applauded by many stakeholders, parents and students in the capital have special cause to celebrate the possibility of bachelor’s studies closer to home.

Said one resident and parent, “Students who want to study arts or sciences at university currently have to go to Mandalay or Kyaukse. Once the new university is built, we will be able to watch over our children more easily.”

Higher educated citizens are viewed by many as a critical part of helping the country achieve its full potential during Myanmar’s transition to democracy. Perhaps Myanmar Nobel Prize winner and National League for Democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi’s words from more than a quarter-century ago best reflect the country’s outlook today: “A country’s international standard cannot be measured in terms of the number of hotels and bridges; it has to be measured in terms of education. A country of inferior education won’t be able to catch up with the world.”

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Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

,[text] =>

Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

 

1. You’ll increase your earning potential.

While many teaching jobs require master’s degrees, others may call for just a bachelor’s degree. In this case, getting the bare minimum can hurt you in several different ways. Not only does it lower your chances of getting hired when you’re up again more qualified applicants, but it also means you’ll likely end up collecting a higher starting salary.

According to The Houston Chronicle, most school districts offer teachers with master’s degrees across the elementary, middle, and high school levels supplemental pay in the form of a “bonus” or “bump.” According to analysis by the Center for American Progress this averages between an extra $3,000 and $10,000 a year! And while the cost of getting a master’s degree can seem prohibitive, the degree can pay for itself in just a few years. Not only that, but most school districts require continuing education credits -- doesn’t it make sense to put those credits toward a degree?

 

2. You’ll enjoy greater career mobility.

While a bachelor’s degree may qualify you to be a classroom teacher, many other school jobs  require advanced credentials. If career advancement is important to you, a master’s degree is a must-have. Whether you’re looking to work as a school administrator, curriculum director, content/subject area specialist, or school counselor, you’ll likely need a master’s degree or more.

Additionally, a master’s degree can also open up new possibilities outside of the school system entirely. From textbook authors and community college teachers to educational consultants and educational researchers, these sought-after, well-paid professionals almost always have upper-level qualifications.

In addition to helping you move up the latter, a bachelor’s degree can lead to broader career prospects, which can be an effective defense against teacher burnout -- a pervasive phenomenon among today’s hard-working teaching professionals.

 

3. You’ll be a better teacher.

A master’s degree isn’t merely a means to an end. Rather, it’s an opportunity for true growth and development. Your time in graduate school will benefit you in numerous ways, from understanding of your options as a teacher by exploring what truly interest you to acquiring tools which will enrich what you offer your students.

While your undergraduate degree might have bestowed knowledge in a certain field of study, a master’s in education places the focus on transitioning that and new knowledge to the classroom. Says Teach.com, “These degrees focus on teaching somebody how to be a teacher, with heavy emphasis on pedagogy, teaching methods, philosophy of education, and educational technology.”

According to one Reddit commenter, “It was a TON of work, and took a while, but it definitely made me a better teacher, both in increasing my knowledge and also making me more sympathetic to my students. Its interesting watching another person teach after you have been teaching all day, and seeing what you can do and what you shouldn't do.”

One caveat worth keeping in mind? As with all advanced studies, you get out of a master’s degree what you put into it. On the flip side, however, if you’re pursuing your graduate coursework part-time while maintaining a teaching job, you’ll have immediate opportunities to start making change. Another Reddit poster shared, “I love teaching while going to school because I can implement strategies I learn in class the next day.”

 

4. You can make change at a higher level.

Teachers help nurture the growth and development of kids in classroom every day. If you’re interested in making change at a higher level, however, a master’s degree can help prepare you for a role in research, assessment or policy.

From regional school districts to local, state, and federal agencies, many organizations exist aimed at improving how teachers, schools and educational systems at large do what they do. They’re all looking for people with the knowledge, experience and insights to help guide them.

One of the most compelling reasons prompting people to enter the teaching profession is the chance to make a difference in society. A master’s degree will not only position you to achieve this goal, but it can also help you improve the quality of education at large while bettering your own life in the process.

 

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Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

,[db_lead] =>

Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

,[text] =>

Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

 

1. You’ll increase your earning potential.

While many teaching jobs require master’s degrees, others may call for just a bachelor’s degree. In this case, getting the bare minimum can hurt you in several different ways. Not only does it lower your chances of getting hired when you’re up again more qualified applicants, but it also means you’ll likely end up collecting a higher starting salary.

According to The Houston Chronicle, most school districts offer teachers with master’s degrees across the elementary, middle, and high school levels supplemental pay in the form of a “bonus” or “bump.” According to analysis by the Center for American Progress this averages between an extra $3,000 and $10,000 a year! And while the cost of getting a master’s degree can seem prohibitive, the degree can pay for itself in just a few years. Not only that, but most school districts require continuing education credits -- doesn’t it make sense to put those credits toward a degree?

 

2. You’ll enjoy greater career mobility.

While a bachelor’s degree may qualify you to be a classroom teacher, many other school jobs  require advanced credentials. If career advancement is important to you, a master’s degree is a must-have. Whether you’re looking to work as a school administrator, curriculum director, content/subject area specialist, or school counselor, you’ll likely need a master’s degree or more.

Additionally, a master’s degree can also open up new possibilities outside of the school system entirely. From textbook authors and community college teachers to educational consultants and educational researchers, these sought-after, well-paid professionals almost always have upper-level qualifications.

In addition to helping you move up the latter, a bachelor’s degree can lead to broader career prospects, which can be an effective defense against teacher burnout -- a pervasive phenomenon among today’s hard-working teaching professionals.

 

3. You’ll be a better teacher.

A master’s degree isn’t merely a means to an end. Rather, it’s an opportunity for true growth and development. Your time in graduate school will benefit you in numerous ways, from understanding of your options as a teacher by exploring what truly interest you to acquiring tools which will enrich what you offer your students.

While your undergraduate degree might have bestowed knowledge in a certain field of study, a master’s in education places the focus on transitioning that and new knowledge to the classroom. Says Teach.com, “These degrees focus on teaching somebody how to be a teacher, with heavy emphasis on pedagogy, teaching methods, philosophy of education, and educational technology.”

According to one Reddit commenter, “It was a TON of work, and took a while, but it definitely made me a better teacher, both in increasing my knowledge and also making me more sympathetic to my students. Its interesting watching another person teach after you have been teaching all day, and seeing what you can do and what you shouldn't do.”

One caveat worth keeping in mind? As with all advanced studies, you get out of a master’s degree what you put into it. On the flip side, however, if you’re pursuing your graduate coursework part-time while maintaining a teaching job, you’ll have immediate opportunities to start making change. Another Reddit poster shared, “I love teaching while going to school because I can implement strategies I learn in class the next day.”

 

4. You can make change at a higher level.

Teachers help nurture the growth and development of kids in classroom every day. If you’re interested in making change at a higher level, however, a master’s degree can help prepare you for a role in research, assessment or policy.

From regional school districts to local, state, and federal agencies, many organizations exist aimed at improving how teachers, schools and educational systems at large do what they do. They’re all looking for people with the knowledge, experience and insights to help guide them.

One of the most compelling reasons prompting people to enter the teaching profession is the chance to make a difference in society. A master’s degree will not only position you to achieve this goal, but it can also help you improve the quality of education at large while bettering your own life in the process.

 

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Thinking about business analytics?  The Rady School of Management at the University of California San Diego offers graduate students the chance to wrestle with real-world business problems—and their solutions—using cutting edge business analytics.  Let’s take a closer look.

,[text] =>

Data matters. “Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted,” attributed to Albert Einstein, explains the purpose of business analytics perfectly.  We live in an age of bigger and bigger data—and businesses need ways to sift through it all, to figure out which combinations of data count—and which ones don’t.  The success of business in today’s global economy depends on it.  The Rady School of Management at UC San Diego offers a forward-thinking Master of Science in Business Analytics that teaches its students how to grapple with the reality of big data using business analytics. 

 

What is Business Analytics?

Professor Vincent Nijs, co-director with Professor Terrence August of the Master of Science in Business Analytics program at the Rady School of Management at UC San Diego, describes the field this way, “I think of business analytics as the field focused on how to use data and models to make better business decisions.  Data Science uses many similar tools (e.g. machine learning) but the set of questions they seek to answer are often different.  You can think of business analytics as ‘data science for business.’”

 

The Amount of Data That Companies Collect Gets Bigger and Bigger…

Just how big is big data?  Really big, and getting bigger all the time.  The EMC Digital Universe Study predicts that by the year 2020, 1.7 megabytes of new data will be created every second for every human on the planet.  What does that mean?  There will be 44 trillion gigabytes (44 zettabytes) of data in the digital universe.  Where does the data come from?  Just about everywhere—1.2 trillion searches per year on Google alone, over 1 billion people using Facebook every day, trillions of photos taken, and billions shared.  By 2020, there will be over 6.1 billion smartphone users, and at least 1/3 of all data will be transmitted through the cloud. We haven’t even talked about online banking, business, movies, television, music, and games.

 

…But Businesses Don’t Always Know How to Use the Data

The Rady School‘s Professor Nijs states, “Companies are collecting more and more data but often lack the people to use it effectively.” He referenced a quote from a well-known report by the McKinsey Global Institute (2013): “Big data promises big things—but only if organizations have the right people in place who know what to do with it. A recurring theme among senior leadership across all sectors is a shortage of professionals trained and experienced at the intersection of disciplines necessary to capture, analyze, and generate meaningful business insights from big data. In addition to deep analytics talent, organizations need management with the right balance of business judgment and statistical skills to translate analysis into action.”

 

A Company’s Future Relies on Its Business Analytics

The need for effective, efficient business analytics is stronger than ever.  Businesses need to know what they want to learn from business analytics—and then how they’re going to use that data to inform their decisions across the board.

Businesses need to be able to determine what data they need and then identify the data sources for gleaning that information.  The final piece?  Distilling that information into actionable insights using the tools of business analytics. Once businesses have a plan for capturing the desired data, organizing it, and analyzing it, they are in a position to develop plans to stay competitive.

 

Business Analytics Has Excellent Job Prospects…

According to a McKinsey Global Report, the US alone has a shortage of about 190,000 data scientists and 1.5 million business analysts.  Globally and in the US, companies need experts in business analytics.  High demand means higher salaries, and a variety of options.  Graduates in Business Analytics work at large companies, start their own businesses, work in banks or FinTech, web-based businesses, retail and food companies, media companies, and marketing companies.

 

…Especially When You Study at a Forward-Thinking School Like Rady

The Rady School’s  new Master of Science in Business Analytics (MSBA) puts students at the forefront of the field. The program focuses on the problems big data poses to businesses—and how to solve them using models, statistics, and machine learning – in classes such as customer analytics, business intelligence, and supply chain analytics.  The school’s bottom line?  To graduate students who know how to use analytics to make a positive impact on business performance—and sustain it. 

Professor Nijs says that “After graduation, our students should expect to work extensively with data, use statistics and machine learning, write code, and develop tools to enhance business decision-making.  After gaining some experience, we expect them to be well-suited to lead an analytics team.” 

First steps for prospective students?  Those interested in studying in this program should have an undergraduate degree in a “quantitative discipline,” says Nijs, like “mathematics, statistics, economics, or physics.”  They should also have some programming experience. 

As data continues to get bigger, the global business world will rely more heavily on business analytics to succeed.  Want to make a difference in the business world?  Earn your MSBA in the field that businesses will indisputably need for success and sustainability. 

Learn more about The Rady School of Management.

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Thinking about business analytics?  The Rady School of Management at the University of California San Diego offers graduate students the chance to wrestle with real-world business problems—and their solutions—using cutting edge business analytics.  Let’s take a closer look.

,[db_lead] =>

Thinking about business analytics?  The Rady School of Management at the University of California San Diego offers graduate students the chance to wrestle with real-world business problems—and their solutions—using cutting edge business analytics.  Let’s take a closer look.

,[text] =>

Data matters. “Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted,” attributed to Albert Einstein, explains the purpose of business analytics perfectly.  We live in an age of bigger and bigger data—and businesses need ways to sift through it all, to figure out which combinations of data count—and which ones don’t.  The success of business in today’s global economy depends on it.  The Rady School of Management at UC San Diego offers a forward-thinking Master of Science in Business Analytics that teaches its students how to grapple with the reality of big data using business analytics. 

 

What is Business Analytics?

Professor Vincent Nijs, co-director with Professor Terrence August of the Master of Science in Business Analytics program at the Rady School of Management at UC San Diego, describes the field this way, “I think of business analytics as the field focused on how to use data and models to make better business decisions.  Data Science uses many similar tools (e.g. machine learning) but the set of questions they seek to answer are often different.  You can think of business analytics as ‘data science for business.’”

 

The Amount of Data That Companies Collect Gets Bigger and Bigger…

Just how big is big data?  Really big, and getting bigger all the time.  The EMC Digital Universe Study predicts that by the year 2020, 1.7 megabytes of new data will be created every second for every human on the planet.  What does that mean?  There will be 44 trillion gigabytes (44 zettabytes) of data in the digital universe.  Where does the data come from?  Just about everywhere—1.2 trillion searches per year on Google alone, over 1 billion people using Facebook every day, trillions of photos taken, and billions shared.  By 2020, there will be over 6.1 billion smartphone users, and at least 1/3 of all data will be transmitted through the cloud. We haven’t even talked about online banking, business, movies, television, music, and games.

 

…But Businesses Don’t Always Know How to Use the Data

The Rady School‘s Professor Nijs states, “Companies are collecting more and more data but often lack the people to use it effectively.” He referenced a quote from a well-known report by the McKinsey Global Institute (2013): “Big data promises big things—but only if organizations have the right people in place who know what to do with it. A recurring theme among senior leadership across all sectors is a shortage of professionals trained and experienced at the intersection of disciplines necessary to capture, analyze, and generate meaningful business insights from big data. In addition to deep analytics talent, organizations need management with the right balance of business judgment and statistical skills to translate analysis into action.”

 

A Company’s Future Relies on Its Business Analytics

The need for effective, efficient business analytics is stronger than ever.  Businesses need to know what they want to learn from business analytics—and then how they’re going to use that data to inform their decisions across the board.

Businesses need to be able to determine what data they need and then identify the data sources for gleaning that information.  The final piece?  Distilling that information into actionable insights using the tools of business analytics. Once businesses have a plan for capturing the desired data, organizing it, and analyzing it, they are in a position to develop plans to stay competitive.

 

Business Analytics Has Excellent Job Prospects…

According to a McKinsey Global Report, the US alone has a shortage of about 190,000 data scientists and 1.5 million business analysts.  Globally and in the US, companies need experts in business analytics.  High demand means higher salaries, and a variety of options.  Graduates in Business Analytics work at large companies, start their own businesses, work in banks or FinTech, web-based businesses, retail and food companies, media companies, and marketing companies.

 

…Especially When You Study at a Forward-Thinking School Like Rady

The Rady School’s  new Master of Science in Business Analytics (MSBA) puts students at the forefront of the field. The program focuses on the problems big data poses to businesses—and how to solve them using models, statistics, and machine learning – in classes such as customer analytics, business intelligence, and supply chain analytics.  The school’s bottom line?  To graduate students who know how to use analytics to make a positive impact on business performance—and sustain it. 

Professor Nijs says that “After graduation, our students should expect to work extensively with data, use statistics and machine learning, write code, and develop tools to enhance business decision-making.  After gaining some experience, we expect them to be well-suited to lead an analytics team.” 

First steps for prospective students?  Those interested in studying in this program should have an undergraduate degree in a “quantitative discipline,” says Nijs, like “mathematics, statistics, economics, or physics.”  They should also have some programming experience. 

As data continues to get bigger, the global business world will rely more heavily on business analytics to succeed.  Want to make a difference in the business world?  Earn your MSBA in the field that businesses will indisputably need for success and sustainability. 

Learn more about The Rady School of Management.

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Thanksgiving, that quintessential American holiday, is here.  Thinking about what to do?  We have four fantastic options for you.  Let’s take a closer look. 

,[text] =>

Giving thanks.  Embracing friendship.  Sharing a thoughtful meal.  Telling stories.  Thanksgiving conjures images of extended families and friends gathered around a beautiful table, sharing a delicious meal, and expressing gratitude for what they have.  International students studying in the US during the holidays have a multitude of way to celebrate this quintessential American holiday.  We’ve put together four fantastic options for you to consider as many US students return “home for the holidays.”

 

1. If an American friend invites you, accept the invitation

Thanksgiving is about, well, being thankful for what you have.  This includes being thankful for new friendships.  An American friend invites you?  Accept.  It’s an invitation to be a part of the family, to share the tradition, to take a break from school, and maybe even to participate in the day after Thanksgiving—Black Friday—the day that many retail shops offer sales and discounts in preparation for December’s holidays.  How’d “Black Friday” get its name?  It’s the day that many retailers’ ledgers assure that they will end their fiscal year “in the black,” or showing a profit for the year.

 

2. Consider on-campus opportunities

Feel like staying on-campus during the Thanksgiving break?  Look for campus traditions at your school.  Some schools offer their own Thanksgiving celebrations for any students and faculty who opt to stay on campus, or who may not have options to travel.  Kansas’s Hesston College hosts an annual Thanksgiving weekend, with a dinner and a bevy of other activities, including art exhibits, concerts, talent shows, basketball tournaments, a benefit fun run, and other special events. At Ohio State University, any students, faculty, and staff who are not planning to head home are invited to attend an annual Thanksgiving feast—this year, the University expects over 1,600 attendees.  At Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, PA, students and faculty spend the entire month of November learning about spirituality.  Several faculty at the University host international students at their homes on Thanksgiving Day—as an expression of gratitude for sharing their learning. 

Credit: nbcwashington.com

3. Attend a parade

What’s Thanksgiving without a parade?  The most famous, of course, is the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City, with over 3 million in-person spectators and upwards of 40 million television viewers.  Several major cities besides New York also hold parades where you can enjoy the holiday spirit of gratitude.  Check out the Dunkin’ Donuts Thanksgiving Day Parade in the City of Brotherly Love, Philadelphia.  Motor City has another option—check out America’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in Detroit, Michigan for floats, bands, music, and a glimpse at the history of the US auto industry.  Also in the Midwest is Chicago’s McDonald’s Thanksgiving Parade, which began in the 1930’s in an effort to raise the spirits of Depression-era residents.  Charlotte, North Carolina, Houston, Texas, and Seattle, Washington offer additional possibilities for big parades.  If you don’t live near a city, don’t fret!  Check your local paper for smaller, regional events.  Watching a parade also gives you a chance either to travel to a new place, or to learn something new and interesting about your university town. 

 

4. Take a break

Not interested in all of the hullabaloo?  Not feeling the need for turkey, Black Friday, parades, or big get-togethers?  Relax.  Enjoy the quiet.  Go for a walk.  Read that book you’ve been wanting to read.  Do some sightseeing—explore the city or town where you’ve decided to study.  If you really feel like it, get caught up—or work ahead—in one of your classes.  Take some time for yourself and recharge. 


Regardless of what you choose to do this Thanksgiving season, remember to be grateful for who you are, what you have, and the positive people in your life.  Cheers!

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Thanksgiving, that quintessential American holiday, is here.  Thinking about what to do?  We have four fantastic options for you.  Let’s take a closer look. 

,[db_lead] =>

Thanksgiving, that quintessential American holiday, is here.  Thinking about what to do?  We have four fantastic options for you.  Let’s take a closer look. 

,[text] =>

Giving thanks.  Embracing friendship.  Sharing a thoughtful meal.  Telling stories.  Thanksgiving conjures images of extended families and friends gathered around a beautiful table, sharing a delicious meal, and expressing gratitude for what they have.  International students studying in the US during the holidays have a multitude of way to celebrate this quintessential American holiday.  We’ve put together four fantastic options for you to consider as many US students return “home for the holidays.”

 

1. If an American friend invites you, accept the invitation

Thanksgiving is about, well, being thankful for what you have.  This includes being thankful for new friendships.  An American friend invites you?  Accept.  It’s an invitation to be a part of the family, to share the tradition, to take a break from school, and maybe even to participate in the day after Thanksgiving—Black Friday—the day that many retail shops offer sales and discounts in preparation for December’s holidays.  How’d “Black Friday” get its name?  It’s the day that many retailers’ ledgers assure that they will end their fiscal year “in the black,” or showing a profit for the year.

 

2. Consider on-campus opportunities

Feel like staying on-campus during the Thanksgiving break?  Look for campus traditions at your school.  Some schools offer their own Thanksgiving celebrations for any students and faculty who opt to stay on campus, or who may not have options to travel.  Kansas’s Hesston College hosts an annual Thanksgiving weekend, with a dinner and a bevy of other activities, including art exhibits, concerts, talent shows, basketball tournaments, a benefit fun run, and other special events. At Ohio State University, any students, faculty, and staff who are not planning to head home are invited to attend an annual Thanksgiving feast—this year, the University expects over 1,600 attendees.  At Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, PA, students and faculty spend the entire month of November learning about spirituality.  Several faculty at the University host international students at their homes on Thanksgiving Day—as an expression of gratitude for sharing their learning. 

Credit: nbcwashington.com

3. Attend a parade

What’s Thanksgiving without a parade?  The most famous, of course, is the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City, with over 3 million in-person spectators and upwards of 40 million television viewers.  Several major cities besides New York also hold parades where you can enjoy the holiday spirit of gratitude.  Check out the Dunkin’ Donuts Thanksgiving Day Parade in the City of Brotherly Love, Philadelphia.  Motor City has another option—check out America’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in Detroit, Michigan for floats, bands, music, and a glimpse at the history of the US auto industry.  Also in the Midwest is Chicago’s McDonald’s Thanksgiving Parade, which began in the 1930’s in an effort to raise the spirits of Depression-era residents.  Charlotte, North Carolina, Houston, Texas, and Seattle, Washington offer additional possibilities for big parades.  If you don’t live near a city, don’t fret!  Check your local paper for smaller, regional events.  Watching a parade also gives you a chance either to travel to a new place, or to learn something new and interesting about your university town. 

 

4. Take a break

Not interested in all of the hullabaloo?  Not feeling the need for turkey, Black Friday, parades, or big get-togethers?  Relax.  Enjoy the quiet.  Go for a walk.  Read that book you’ve been wanting to read.  Do some sightseeing—explore the city or town where you’ve decided to study.  If you really feel like it, get caught up—or work ahead—in one of your classes.  Take some time for yourself and recharge. 


Regardless of what you choose to do this Thanksgiving season, remember to be grateful for who you are, what you have, and the positive people in your life.  Cheers!

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Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

,[text] =>

Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

Investing in Education

In conjunction with the Group of Eight Committee (Go8), CASE first debuted its Charitable Giving to Universities in Australia and New Zealand Survey in 2012. Its aim? To provide accurate data for the countries’ development officers, alumni staff, and institutional leaders.

The most recent news is, indeed, promising. In 2015, universities in Australia and New Zealand received 26 percent more in new funds and 25 percent more in cash income than in the previous year. Concluded Tim Dolan, Chair of Go8’s Committee of Chief Advancement Officers, “This is not just a matter of anecdote and impression. With the survey of charitable giving now in its fourth year, we are accumulating real evidence and can begin to see helpful trends in the data collected.”

Even more tellingly, according to Dolan?  “This growth has continued notwithstanding an economy that was less confident than in recent years and despite political uncertainty over funding structures and deregulation. We can see that the right fundraising behaviour, consistently and professionally followed, produces satisfying results.”

Other areas of growth include total number of donors and alumni donors as well as participation by universities -- particularly Australian institutions.

Progress Ahead...With a Catch

While the increased generosity of donors bodes well for a boost to world-class research and university at the region’s higher education institutions, insiders warn of the dangers of complacency. Said Dolan, “One reason for this is the ongoing frustration generated by the shortage of appropriate fundraising professionals. We have all found that the right people are hard to find and difficult to keep. If we could double our fundraising teams, the resulting impact would be phenomenal.” Conversely, failure to find these professionals could stunt university growth.

The takeaway for students looking for an exciting and in-demand career path? A master’s in fundraising management or other fundraising-related topic may be the fast-track to success. 

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Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

,[db_lead] =>

Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

,[text] =>

Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

Investing in Education

In conjunction with the Group of Eight Committee (Go8), CASE first debuted its Charitable Giving to Universities in Australia and New Zealand Survey in 2012. Its aim? To provide accurate data for the countries’ development officers, alumni staff, and institutional leaders.

The most recent news is, indeed, promising. In 2015, universities in Australia and New Zealand received 26 percent more in new funds and 25 percent more in cash income than in the previous year. Concluded Tim Dolan, Chair of Go8’s Committee of Chief Advancement Officers, “This is not just a matter of anecdote and impression. With the survey of charitable giving now in its fourth year, we are accumulating real evidence and can begin to see helpful trends in the data collected.”

Even more tellingly, according to Dolan?  “This growth has continued notwithstanding an economy that was less confident than in recent years and despite political uncertainty over funding structures and deregulation. We can see that the right fundraising behaviour, consistently and professionally followed, produces satisfying results.”

Other areas of growth include total number of donors and alumni donors as well as participation by universities -- particularly Australian institutions.

Progress Ahead...With a Catch

While the increased generosity of donors bodes well for a boost to world-class research and university at the region’s higher education institutions, insiders warn of the dangers of complacency. Said Dolan, “One reason for this is the ongoing frustration generated by the shortage of appropriate fundraising professionals. We have all found that the right people are hard to find and difficult to keep. If we could double our fundraising teams, the resulting impact would be phenomenal.” Conversely, failure to find these professionals could stunt university growth.

The takeaway for students looking for an exciting and in-demand career path? A master’s in fundraising management or other fundraising-related topic may be the fast-track to success. 

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The Chinese government recently announced a plan attract more international students from Southeast Asian countries.  Find out why and learn more about higher education initiatives in China. 

,[text] =>

ASEAN-China Center Secretary General Yang Xiuping recently announced that China would like to improve collaboration in education and culture with ASEAN countries.  He said, “Foreign students from Southeast Asian countries are the bridge and future of the relationship between ASEAN [countries] and China.”

Why the push? This push comes partly from the 21st Century Maritime Silk Road.  The Chinese government recently initiated this development strategy and framework to both unite and expand collaborative efforts in education and trade between China and other countries on the Silk Road route.  Attracting more international students from Southeast Asia not only gives students an incredible learning opportunity; it also allows them to be a part of a new collaboration between China and the rest of the region.   

Currently, about 68,000 students from Southeast Asia study in China.  The Chinese government would like to increase that number to at least 100,000 within the year.  Yang commented, “We want to see more exchange students from ASEAN countries in China.” 

This initiative reflects a larger trend in Chinese higher education.  Last year was a record year for the numbers of international students in China.  Why?  China’s outward international strategy for 2020 focuses on making China a global study destination, not just in Southeast Asia.    Some of the countries with the largest numbers of students studying in China?  You guessed it: ASEAN members Thailand and Indonesia, among other global players. 

Learn more about studying in China

 

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The Chinese government recently announced a plan attract more international students from Southeast Asian countries.  Find out why and learn more about higher education initiatives in China. 

,[db_lead] =>

The Chinese government recently announced a plan attract more international students from Southeast Asian countries.  Find out why and learn more about higher education initiatives in China. 

,[text] =>

ASEAN-China Center Secretary General Yang Xiuping recently announced that China would like to improve collaboration in education and culture with ASEAN countries.  He said, “Foreign students from Southeast Asian countries are the bridge and future of the relationship between ASEAN [countries] and China.”

Why the push? This push comes partly from the 21st Century Maritime Silk Road.  The Chinese government recently initiated this development strategy and framework to both unite and expand collaborative efforts in education and trade between China and other countries on the Silk Road route.  Attracting more international students from Southeast Asia not only gives students an incredible learning opportunity; it also allows them to be a part of a new collaboration between China and the rest of the region.   

Currently, about 68,000 students from Southeast Asia study in China.  The Chinese government would like to increase that number to at least 100,000 within the year.  Yang commented, “We want to see more exchange students from ASEAN countries in China.” 

This initiative reflects a larger trend in Chinese higher education.  Last year was a record year for the numbers of international students in China.  Why?  China’s outward international strategy for 2020 focuses on making China a global study destination, not just in Southeast Asia.    Some of the countries with the largest numbers of students studying in China?  You guessed it: ASEAN members Thailand and Indonesia, among other global players. 

Learn more about studying in China

 

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Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

,[text] =>

Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

Plans Underway

In speaking of plans to build a new university dedicated to arts and sciences in Myanmar’s Pobbathiri township, Nay Pyi Taw Council member U Tun Tin said that a plot of land was already chosen as a likely site for the campus. Additionally, insiders revealed, the state counselor had agreed to a construction proposal with a five-year timeline. 

The new university will join several others in Nay Pyi Taw, and is expected to significantly expand the region’s offerings in the arts and sciences.

Good News for Students and Parents

While the project is applauded by many stakeholders, parents and students in the capital have special cause to celebrate the possibility of bachelor’s studies closer to home.

Said one resident and parent, “Students who want to study arts or sciences at university currently have to go to Mandalay or Kyaukse. Once the new university is built, we will be able to watch over our children more easily.”

Higher educated citizens are viewed by many as a critical part of helping the country achieve its full potential during Myanmar’s transition to democracy. Perhaps Myanmar Nobel Prize winner and National League for Democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi’s words from more than a quarter-century ago best reflect the country’s outlook today: “A country’s international standard cannot be measured in terms of the number of hotels and bridges; it has to be measured in terms of education. A country of inferior education won’t be able to catch up with the world.”

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Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

,[db_lead] =>

Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

,[text] =>

Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

Plans Underway

In speaking of plans to build a new university dedicated to arts and sciences in Myanmar’s Pobbathiri township, Nay Pyi Taw Council member U Tun Tin said that a plot of land was already chosen as a likely site for the campus. Additionally, insiders revealed, the state counselor had agreed to a construction proposal with a five-year timeline. 

The new university will join several others in Nay Pyi Taw, and is expected to significantly expand the region’s offerings in the arts and sciences.

Good News for Students and Parents

While the project is applauded by many stakeholders, parents and students in the capital have special cause to celebrate the possibility of bachelor’s studies closer to home.

Said one resident and parent, “Students who want to study arts or sciences at university currently have to go to Mandalay or Kyaukse. Once the new university is built, we will be able to watch over our children more easily.”

Higher educated citizens are viewed by many as a critical part of helping the country achieve its full potential during Myanmar’s transition to democracy. Perhaps Myanmar Nobel Prize winner and National League for Democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi’s words from more than a quarter-century ago best reflect the country’s outlook today: “A country’s international standard cannot be measured in terms of the number of hotels and bridges; it has to be measured in terms of education. A country of inferior education won’t be able to catch up with the world.”

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Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

,[text] =>

Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

 

1. You’ll increase your earning potential.

While many teaching jobs require master’s degrees, others may call for just a bachelor’s degree. In this case, getting the bare minimum can hurt you in several different ways. Not only does it lower your chances of getting hired when you’re up again more qualified applicants, but it also means you’ll likely end up collecting a higher starting salary.

According to The Houston Chronicle, most school districts offer teachers with master’s degrees across the elementary, middle, and high school levels supplemental pay in the form of a “bonus” or “bump.” According to analysis by the Center for American Progress this averages between an extra $3,000 and $10,000 a year! And while the cost of getting a master’s degree can seem prohibitive, the degree can pay for itself in just a few years. Not only that, but most school districts require continuing education credits -- doesn’t it make sense to put those credits toward a degree?

 

2. You’ll enjoy greater career mobility.

While a bachelor’s degree may qualify you to be a classroom teacher, many other school jobs  require advanced credentials. If career advancement is important to you, a master’s degree is a must-have. Whether you’re looking to work as a school administrator, curriculum director, content/subject area specialist, or school counselor, you’ll likely need a master’s degree or more.

Additionally, a master’s degree can also open up new possibilities outside of the school system entirely. From textbook authors and community college teachers to educational consultants and educational researchers, these sought-after, well-paid professionals almost always have upper-level qualifications.

In addition to helping you move up the latter, a bachelor’s degree can lead to broader career prospects, which can be an effective defense against teacher burnout -- a pervasive phenomenon among today’s hard-working teaching professionals.

 

3. You’ll be a better teacher.

A master’s degree isn’t merely a means to an end. Rather, it’s an opportunity for true growth and development. Your time in graduate school will benefit you in numerous ways, from understanding of your options as a teacher by exploring what truly interest you to acquiring tools which will enrich what you offer your students.

While your undergraduate degree might have bestowed knowledge in a certain field of study, a master’s in education places the focus on transitioning that and new knowledge to the classroom. Says Teach.com, “These degrees focus on teaching somebody how to be a teacher, with heavy emphasis on pedagogy, teaching methods, philosophy of education, and educational technology.”

According to one Reddit commenter, “It was a TON of work, and took a while, but it definitely made me a better teacher, both in increasing my knowledge and also making me more sympathetic to my students. Its interesting watching another person teach after you have been teaching all day, and seeing what you can do and what you shouldn't do.”

One caveat worth keeping in mind? As with all advanced studies, you get out of a master’s degree what you put into it. On the flip side, however, if you’re pursuing your graduate coursework part-time while maintaining a teaching job, you’ll have immediate opportunities to start making change. Another Reddit poster shared, “I love teaching while going to school because I can implement strategies I learn in class the next day.”

 

4. You can make change at a higher level.

Teachers help nurture the growth and development of kids in classroom every day. If you’re interested in making change at a higher level, however, a master’s degree can help prepare you for a role in research, assessment or policy.

From regional school districts to local, state, and federal agencies, many organizations exist aimed at improving how teachers, schools and educational systems at large do what they do. They’re all looking for people with the knowledge, experience and insights to help guide them.

One of the most compelling reasons prompting people to enter the teaching profession is the chance to make a difference in society. A master’s degree will not only position you to achieve this goal, but it can also help you improve the quality of education at large while bettering your own life in the process.

 

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Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

,[db_lead] =>

Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

,[text] =>

Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

 

1. You’ll increase your earning potential.

While many teaching jobs require master’s degrees, others may call for just a bachelor’s degree. In this case, getting the bare minimum can hurt you in several different ways. Not only does it lower your chances of getting hired when you’re up again more qualified applicants, but it also means you’ll likely end up collecting a higher starting salary.

According to The Houston Chronicle, most school districts offer teachers with master’s degrees across the elementary, middle, and high school levels supplemental pay in the form of a “bonus” or “bump.” According to analysis by the Center for American Progress this averages between an extra $3,000 and $10,000 a year! And while the cost of getting a master’s degree can seem prohibitive, the degree can pay for itself in just a few years. Not only that, but most school districts require continuing education credits -- doesn’t it make sense to put those credits toward a degree?

 

2. You’ll enjoy greater career mobility.

While a bachelor’s degree may qualify you to be a classroom teacher, many other school jobs  require advanced credentials. If career advancement is important to you, a master’s degree is a must-have. Whether you’re looking to work as a school administrator, curriculum director, content/subject area specialist, or school counselor, you’ll likely need a master’s degree or more.

Additionally, a master’s degree can also open up new possibilities outside of the school system entirely. From textbook authors and community college teachers to educational consultants and educational researchers, these sought-after, well-paid professionals almost always have upper-level qualifications.

In addition to helping you move up the latter, a bachelor’s degree can lead to broader career prospects, which can be an effective defense against teacher burnout -- a pervasive phenomenon among today’s hard-working teaching professionals.

 

3. You’ll be a better teacher.

A master’s degree isn’t merely a means to an end. Rather, it’s an opportunity for true growth and development. Your time in graduate school will benefit you in numerous ways, from understanding of your options as a teacher by exploring what truly interest you to acquiring tools which will enrich what you offer your students.

While your undergraduate degree might have bestowed knowledge in a certain field of study, a master’s in education places the focus on transitioning that and new knowledge to the classroom. Says Teach.com, “These degrees focus on teaching somebody how to be a teacher, with heavy emphasis on pedagogy, teaching methods, philosophy of education, and educational technology.”

According to one Reddit commenter, “It was a TON of work, and took a while, but it definitely made me a better teacher, both in increasing my knowledge and also making me more sympathetic to my students. Its interesting watching another person teach after you have been teaching all day, and seeing what you can do and what you shouldn't do.”

One caveat worth keeping in mind? As with all advanced studies, you get out of a master’s degree what you put into it. On the flip side, however, if you’re pursuing your graduate coursework part-time while maintaining a teaching job, you’ll have immediate opportunities to start making change. Another Reddit poster shared, “I love teaching while going to school because I can implement strategies I learn in class the next day.”

 

4. You can make change at a higher level.

Teachers help nurture the growth and development of kids in classroom every day. If you’re interested in making change at a higher level, however, a master’s degree can help prepare you for a role in research, assessment or policy.

From regional school districts to local, state, and federal agencies, many organizations exist aimed at improving how teachers, schools and educational systems at large do what they do. They’re all looking for people with the knowledge, experience and insights to help guide them.

One of the most compelling reasons prompting people to enter the teaching profession is the chance to make a difference in society. A master’s degree will not only position you to achieve this goal, but it can also help you improve the quality of education at large while bettering your own life in the process.

 

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Thinking about business analytics?  The Rady School of Management at the University of California San Diego offers graduate students the chance to wrestle with real-world business problems—and their solutions—using cutting edge business analytics.  Let’s take a closer look.

,[text] =>

Data matters. “Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted,” attributed to Albert Einstein, explains the purpose of business analytics perfectly.  We live in an age of bigger and bigger data—and businesses need ways to sift through it all, to figure out which combinations of data count—and which ones don’t.  The success of business in today’s global economy depends on it.  The Rady School of Management at UC San Diego offers a forward-thinking Master of Science in Business Analytics that teaches its students how to grapple with the reality of big data using business analytics. 

 

What is Business Analytics?

Professor Vincent Nijs, co-director with Professor Terrence August of the Master of Science in Business Analytics program at the Rady School of Management at UC San Diego, describes the field this way, “I think of business analytics as the field focused on how to use data and models to make better business decisions.  Data Science uses many similar tools (e.g. machine learning) but the set of questions they seek to answer are often different.  You can think of business analytics as ‘data science for business.’”

 

The Amount of Data That Companies Collect Gets Bigger and Bigger…

Just how big is big data?  Really big, and getting bigger all the time.  The EMC Digital Universe Study predicts that by the year 2020, 1.7 megabytes of new data will be created every second for every human on the planet.  What does that mean?  There will be 44 trillion gigabytes (44 zettabytes) of data in the digital universe.  Where does the data come from?  Just about everywhere—1.2 trillion searches per year on Google alone, over 1 billion people using Facebook every day, trillions of photos taken, and billions shared.  By 2020, there will be over 6.1 billion smartphone users, and at least 1/3 of all data will be transmitted through the cloud. We haven’t even talked about online banking, business, movies, television, music, and games.

 

…But Businesses Don’t Always Know How to Use the Data

The Rady School‘s Professor Nijs states, “Companies are collecting more and more data but often lack the people to use it effectively.” He referenced a quote from a well-known report by the McKinsey Global Institute (2013): “Big data promises big things—but only if organizations have the right people in place who know what to do with it. A recurring theme among senior leadership across all sectors is a shortage of professionals trained and experienced at the intersection of disciplines necessary to capture, analyze, and generate meaningful business insights from big data. In addition to deep analytics talent, organizations need management with the right balance of business judgment and statistical skills to translate analysis into action.”

 

A Company’s Future Relies on Its Business Analytics

The need for effective, efficient business analytics is stronger than ever.  Businesses need to know what they want to learn from business analytics—and then how they’re going to use that data to inform their decisions across the board.

Businesses need to be able to determine what data they need and then identify the data sources for gleaning that information.  The final piece?  Distilling that information into actionable insights using the tools of business analytics. Once businesses have a plan for capturing the desired data, organizing it, and analyzing it, they are in a position to develop plans to stay competitive.

 

Business Analytics Has Excellent Job Prospects…

According to a McKinsey Global Report, the US alone has a shortage of about 190,000 data scientists and 1.5 million business analysts.  Globally and in the US, companies need experts in business analytics.  High demand means higher salaries, and a variety of options.  Graduates in Business Analytics work at large companies, start their own businesses, work in banks or FinTech, web-based businesses, retail and food companies, media companies, and marketing companies.

 

…Especially When You Study at a Forward-Thinking School Like Rady

The Rady School’s  new Master of Science in Business Analytics (MSBA) puts students at the forefront of the field. The program focuses on the problems big data poses to businesses—and how to solve them using models, statistics, and machine learning – in classes such as customer analytics, business intelligence, and supply chain analytics.  The school’s bottom line?  To graduate students who know how to use analytics to make a positive impact on business performance—and sustain it. 

Professor Nijs says that “After graduation, our students should expect to work extensively with data, use statistics and machine learning, write code, and develop tools to enhance business decision-making.  After gaining some experience, we expect them to be well-suited to lead an analytics team.” 

First steps for prospective students?  Those interested in studying in this program should have an undergraduate degree in a “quantitative discipline,” says Nijs, like “mathematics, statistics, economics, or physics.”  They should also have some programming experience. 

As data continues to get bigger, the global business world will rely more heavily on business analytics to succeed.  Want to make a difference in the business world?  Earn your MSBA in the field that businesses will indisputably need for success and sustainability. 

Learn more about The Rady School of Management.

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Thinking about business analytics?  The Rady School of Management at the University of California San Diego offers graduate students the chance to wrestle with real-world business problems—and their solutions—using cutting edge business analytics.  Let’s take a closer look.

,[db_lead] =>

Thinking about business analytics?  The Rady School of Management at the University of California San Diego offers graduate students the chance to wrestle with real-world business problems—and their solutions—using cutting edge business analytics.  Let’s take a closer look.

,[text] =>

Data matters. “Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted,” attributed to Albert Einstein, explains the purpose of business analytics perfectly.  We live in an age of bigger and bigger data—and businesses need ways to sift through it all, to figure out which combinations of data count—and which ones don’t.  The success of business in today’s global economy depends on it.  The Rady School of Management at UC San Diego offers a forward-thinking Master of Science in Business Analytics that teaches its students how to grapple with the reality of big data using business analytics. 

 

What is Business Analytics?

Professor Vincent Nijs, co-director with Professor Terrence August of the Master of Science in Business Analytics program at the Rady School of Management at UC San Diego, describes the field this way, “I think of business analytics as the field focused on how to use data and models to make better business decisions.  Data Science uses many similar tools (e.g. machine learning) but the set of questions they seek to answer are often different.  You can think of business analytics as ‘data science for business.’”

 

The Amount of Data That Companies Collect Gets Bigger and Bigger…

Just how big is big data?  Really big, and getting bigger all the time.  The EMC Digital Universe Study predicts that by the year 2020, 1.7 megabytes of new data will be created every second for every human on the planet.  What does that mean?  There will be 44 trillion gigabytes (44 zettabytes) of data in the digital universe.  Where does the data come from?  Just about everywhere—1.2 trillion searches per year on Google alone, over 1 billion people using Facebook every day, trillions of photos taken, and billions shared.  By 2020, there will be over 6.1 billion smartphone users, and at least 1/3 of all data will be transmitted through the cloud. We haven’t even talked about online banking, business, movies, television, music, and games.

 

…But Businesses Don’t Always Know How to Use the Data

The Rady School‘s Professor Nijs states, “Companies are collecting more and more data but often lack the people to use it effectively.” He referenced a quote from a well-known report by the McKinsey Global Institute (2013): “Big data promises big things—but only if organizations have the right people in place who know what to do with it. A recurring theme among senior leadership across all sectors is a shortage of professionals trained and experienced at the intersection of disciplines necessary to capture, analyze, and generate meaningful business insights from big data. In addition to deep analytics talent, organizations need management with the right balance of business judgment and statistical skills to translate analysis into action.”

 

A Company’s Future Relies on Its Business Analytics

The need for effective, efficient business analytics is stronger than ever.  Businesses need to know what they want to learn from business analytics—and then how they’re going to use that data to inform their decisions across the board.

Businesses need to be able to determine what data they need and then identify the data sources for gleaning that information.  The final piece?  Distilling that information into actionable insights using the tools of business analytics. Once businesses have a plan for capturing the desired data, organizing it, and analyzing it, they are in a position to develop plans to stay competitive.

 

Business Analytics Has Excellent Job Prospects…

According to a McKinsey Global Report, the US alone has a shortage of about 190,000 data scientists and 1.5 million business analysts.  Globally and in the US, companies need experts in business analytics.  High demand means higher salaries, and a variety of options.  Graduates in Business Analytics work at large companies, start their own businesses, work in banks or FinTech, web-based businesses, retail and food companies, media companies, and marketing companies.

 

…Especially When You Study at a Forward-Thinking School Like Rady

The Rady School’s  new Master of Science in Business Analytics (MSBA) puts students at the forefront of the field. The program focuses on the problems big data poses to businesses—and how to solve them using models, statistics, and machine learning – in classes such as customer analytics, business intelligence, and supply chain analytics.  The school’s bottom line?  To graduate students who know how to use analytics to make a positive impact on business performance—and sustain it. 

Professor Nijs says that “After graduation, our students should expect to work extensively with data, use statistics and machine learning, write code, and develop tools to enhance business decision-making.  After gaining some experience, we expect them to be well-suited to lead an analytics team.” 

First steps for prospective students?  Those interested in studying in this program should have an undergraduate degree in a “quantitative discipline,” says Nijs, like “mathematics, statistics, economics, or physics.”  They should also have some programming experience. 

As data continues to get bigger, the global business world will rely more heavily on business analytics to succeed.  Want to make a difference in the business world?  Earn your MSBA in the field that businesses will indisputably need for success and sustainability. 

Learn more about The Rady School of Management.

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Thanksgiving, that quintessential American holiday, is here.  Thinking about what to do?  We have four fantastic options for you.  Let’s take a closer look. 

,[text] =>

Giving thanks.  Embracing friendship.  Sharing a thoughtful meal.  Telling stories.  Thanksgiving conjures images of extended families and friends gathered around a beautiful table, sharing a delicious meal, and expressing gratitude for what they have.  International students studying in the US during the holidays have a multitude of way to celebrate this quintessential American holiday.  We’ve put together four fantastic options for you to consider as many US students return “home for the holidays.”

 

1. If an American friend invites you, accept the invitation

Thanksgiving is about, well, being thankful for what you have.  This includes being thankful for new friendships.  An American friend invites you?  Accept.  It’s an invitation to be a part of the family, to share the tradition, to take a break from school, and maybe even to participate in the day after Thanksgiving—Black Friday—the day that many retail shops offer sales and discounts in preparation for December’s holidays.  How’d “Black Friday” get its name?  It’s the day that many retailers’ ledgers assure that they will end their fiscal year “in the black,” or showing a profit for the year.

 

2. Consider on-campus opportunities

Feel like staying on-campus during the Thanksgiving break?  Look for campus traditions at your school.  Some schools offer their own Thanksgiving celebrations for any students and faculty who opt to stay on campus, or who may not have options to travel.  Kansas’s Hesston College hosts an annual Thanksgiving weekend, with a dinner and a bevy of other activities, including art exhibits, concerts, talent shows, basketball tournaments, a benefit fun run, and other special events. At Ohio State University, any students, faculty, and staff who are not planning to head home are invited to attend an annual Thanksgiving feast—this year, the University expects over 1,600 attendees.  At Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, PA, students and faculty spend the entire month of November learning about spirituality.  Several faculty at the University host international students at their homes on Thanksgiving Day—as an expression of gratitude for sharing their learning. 

Credit: nbcwashington.com

3. Attend a parade

What’s Thanksgiving without a parade?  The most famous, of course, is the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City, with over 3 million in-person spectators and upwards of 40 million television viewers.  Several major cities besides New York also hold parades where you can enjoy the holiday spirit of gratitude.  Check out the Dunkin’ Donuts Thanksgiving Day Parade in the City of Brotherly Love, Philadelphia.  Motor City has another option—check out America’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in Detroit, Michigan for floats, bands, music, and a glimpse at the history of the US auto industry.  Also in the Midwest is Chicago’s McDonald’s Thanksgiving Parade, which began in the 1930’s in an effort to raise the spirits of Depression-era residents.  Charlotte, North Carolina, Houston, Texas, and Seattle, Washington offer additional possibilities for big parades.  If you don’t live near a city, don’t fret!  Check your local paper for smaller, regional events.  Watching a parade also gives you a chance either to travel to a new place, or to learn something new and interesting about your university town. 

 

4. Take a break

Not interested in all of the hullabaloo?  Not feeling the need for turkey, Black Friday, parades, or big get-togethers?  Relax.  Enjoy the quiet.  Go for a walk.  Read that book you’ve been wanting to read.  Do some sightseeing—explore the city or town where you’ve decided to study.  If you really feel like it, get caught up—or work ahead—in one of your classes.  Take some time for yourself and recharge. 


Regardless of what you choose to do this Thanksgiving season, remember to be grateful for who you are, what you have, and the positive people in your life.  Cheers!

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Thanksgiving, that quintessential American holiday, is here.  Thinking about what to do?  We have four fantastic options for you.  Let’s take a closer look. 

,[db_lead] =>

Thanksgiving, that quintessential American holiday, is here.  Thinking about what to do?  We have four fantastic options for you.  Let’s take a closer look. 

,[text] =>

Giving thanks.  Embracing friendship.  Sharing a thoughtful meal.  Telling stories.  Thanksgiving conjures images of extended families and friends gathered around a beautiful table, sharing a delicious meal, and expressing gratitude for what they have.  International students studying in the US during the holidays have a multitude of way to celebrate this quintessential American holiday.  We’ve put together four fantastic options for you to consider as many US students return “home for the holidays.”

 

1. If an American friend invites you, accept the invitation

Thanksgiving is about, well, being thankful for what you have.  This includes being thankful for new friendships.  An American friend invites you?  Accept.  It’s an invitation to be a part of the family, to share the tradition, to take a break from school, and maybe even to participate in the day after Thanksgiving—Black Friday—the day that many retail shops offer sales and discounts in preparation for December’s holidays.  How’d “Black Friday” get its name?  It’s the day that many retailers’ ledgers assure that they will end their fiscal year “in the black,” or showing a profit for the year.

 

2. Consider on-campus opportunities

Feel like staying on-campus during the Thanksgiving break?  Look for campus traditions at your school.  Some schools offer their own Thanksgiving celebrations for any students and faculty who opt to stay on campus, or who may not have options to travel.  Kansas’s Hesston College hosts an annual Thanksgiving weekend, with a dinner and a bevy of other activities, including art exhibits, concerts, talent shows, basketball tournaments, a benefit fun run, and other special events. At Ohio State University, any students, faculty, and staff who are not planning to head home are invited to attend an annual Thanksgiving feast—this year, the University expects over 1,600 attendees.  At Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, PA, students and faculty spend the entire month of November learning about spirituality.  Several faculty at the University host international students at their homes on Thanksgiving Day—as an expression of gratitude for sharing their learning. 

Credit: nbcwashington.com

3. Attend a parade

What’s Thanksgiving without a parade?  The most famous, of course, is the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City, with over 3 million in-person spectators and upwards of 40 million television viewers.  Several major cities besides New York also hold parades where you can enjoy the holiday spirit of gratitude.  Check out the Dunkin’ Donuts Thanksgiving Day Parade in the City of Brotherly Love, Philadelphia.  Motor City has another option—check out America’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in Detroit, Michigan for floats, bands, music, and a glimpse at the history of the US auto industry.  Also in the Midwest is Chicago’s McDonald’s Thanksgiving Parade, which began in the 1930’s in an effort to raise the spirits of Depression-era residents.  Charlotte, North Carolina, Houston, Texas, and Seattle, Washington offer additional possibilities for big parades.  If you don’t live near a city, don’t fret!  Check your local paper for smaller, regional events.  Watching a parade also gives you a chance either to travel to a new place, or to learn something new and interesting about your university town. 

 

4. Take a break

Not interested in all of the hullabaloo?  Not feeling the need for turkey, Black Friday, parades, or big get-togethers?  Relax.  Enjoy the quiet.  Go for a walk.  Read that book you’ve been wanting to read.  Do some sightseeing—explore the city or town where you’ve decided to study.  If you really feel like it, get caught up—or work ahead—in one of your classes.  Take some time for yourself and recharge. 


Regardless of what you choose to do this Thanksgiving season, remember to be grateful for who you are, what you have, and the positive people in your life.  Cheers!

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Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

,[text] =>

Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

Investing in Education

In conjunction with the Group of Eight Committee (Go8), CASE first debuted its Charitable Giving to Universities in Australia and New Zealand Survey in 2012. Its aim? To provide accurate data for the countries’ development officers, alumni staff, and institutional leaders.

The most recent news is, indeed, promising. In 2015, universities in Australia and New Zealand received 26 percent more in new funds and 25 percent more in cash income than in the previous year. Concluded Tim Dolan, Chair of Go8’s Committee of Chief Advancement Officers, “This is not just a matter of anecdote and impression. With the survey of charitable giving now in its fourth year, we are accumulating real evidence and can begin to see helpful trends in the data collected.”

Even more tellingly, according to Dolan?  “This growth has continued notwithstanding an economy that was less confident than in recent years and despite political uncertainty over funding structures and deregulation. We can see that the right fundraising behaviour, consistently and professionally followed, produces satisfying results.”

Other areas of growth include total number of donors and alumni donors as well as participation by universities -- particularly Australian institutions.

Progress Ahead...With a Catch

While the increased generosity of donors bodes well for a boost to world-class research and university at the region’s higher education institutions, insiders warn of the dangers of complacency. Said Dolan, “One reason for this is the ongoing frustration generated by the shortage of appropriate fundraising professionals. We have all found that the right people are hard to find and difficult to keep. If we could double our fundraising teams, the resulting impact would be phenomenal.” Conversely, failure to find these professionals could stunt university growth.

The takeaway for students looking for an exciting and in-demand career path? A master’s in fundraising management or other fundraising-related topic may be the fast-track to success. 

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Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

,[db_lead] =>

Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

,[text] =>

Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

Investing in Education

In conjunction with the Group of Eight Committee (Go8), CASE first debuted its Charitable Giving to Universities in Australia and New Zealand Survey in 2012. Its aim? To provide accurate data for the countries’ development officers, alumni staff, and institutional leaders.

The most recent news is, indeed, promising. In 2015, universities in Australia and New Zealand received 26 percent more in new funds and 25 percent more in cash income than in the previous year. Concluded Tim Dolan, Chair of Go8’s Committee of Chief Advancement Officers, “This is not just a matter of anecdote and impression. With the survey of charitable giving now in its fourth year, we are accumulating real evidence and can begin to see helpful trends in the data collected.”

Even more tellingly, according to Dolan?  “This growth has continued notwithstanding an economy that was less confident than in recent years and despite political uncertainty over funding structures and deregulation. We can see that the right fundraising behaviour, consistently and professionally followed, produces satisfying results.”

Other areas of growth include total number of donors and alumni donors as well as participation by universities -- particularly Australian institutions.

Progress Ahead...With a Catch

While the increased generosity of donors bodes well for a boost to world-class research and university at the region’s higher education institutions, insiders warn of the dangers of complacency. Said Dolan, “One reason for this is the ongoing frustration generated by the shortage of appropriate fundraising professionals. We have all found that the right people are hard to find and difficult to keep. If we could double our fundraising teams, the resulting impact would be phenomenal.” Conversely, failure to find these professionals could stunt university growth.

The takeaway for students looking for an exciting and in-demand career path? A master’s in fundraising management or other fundraising-related topic may be the fast-track to success. 

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The Chinese government recently announced a plan attract more international students from Southeast Asian countries.  Find out why and learn more about higher education initiatives in China. 

,[text] =>

ASEAN-China Center Secretary General Yang Xiuping recently announced that China would like to improve collaboration in education and culture with ASEAN countries.  He said, “Foreign students from Southeast Asian countries are the bridge and future of the relationship between ASEAN [countries] and China.”

Why the push? This push comes partly from the 21st Century Maritime Silk Road.  The Chinese government recently initiated this development strategy and framework to both unite and expand collaborative efforts in education and trade between China and other countries on the Silk Road route.  Attracting more international students from Southeast Asia not only gives students an incredible learning opportunity; it also allows them to be a part of a new collaboration between China and the rest of the region.   

Currently, about 68,000 students from Southeast Asia study in China.  The Chinese government would like to increase that number to at least 100,000 within the year.  Yang commented, “We want to see more exchange students from ASEAN countries in China.” 

This initiative reflects a larger trend in Chinese higher education.  Last year was a record year for the numbers of international students in China.  Why?  China’s outward international strategy for 2020 focuses on making China a global study destination, not just in Southeast Asia.    Some of the countries with the largest numbers of students studying in China?  You guessed it: ASEAN members Thailand and Indonesia, among other global players. 

Learn more about studying in China

 

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The Chinese government recently announced a plan attract more international students from Southeast Asian countries.  Find out why and learn more about higher education initiatives in China. 

,[db_lead] =>

The Chinese government recently announced a plan attract more international students from Southeast Asian countries.  Find out why and learn more about higher education initiatives in China. 

,[text] =>

ASEAN-China Center Secretary General Yang Xiuping recently announced that China would like to improve collaboration in education and culture with ASEAN countries.  He said, “Foreign students from Southeast Asian countries are the bridge and future of the relationship between ASEAN [countries] and China.”

Why the push? This push comes partly from the 21st Century Maritime Silk Road.  The Chinese government recently initiated this development strategy and framework to both unite and expand collaborative efforts in education and trade between China and other countries on the Silk Road route.  Attracting more international students from Southeast Asia not only gives students an incredible learning opportunity; it also allows them to be a part of a new collaboration between China and the rest of the region.   

Currently, about 68,000 students from Southeast Asia study in China.  The Chinese government would like to increase that number to at least 100,000 within the year.  Yang commented, “We want to see more exchange students from ASEAN countries in China.” 

This initiative reflects a larger trend in Chinese higher education.  Last year was a record year for the numbers of international students in China.  Why?  China’s outward international strategy for 2020 focuses on making China a global study destination, not just in Southeast Asia.    Some of the countries with the largest numbers of students studying in China?  You guessed it: ASEAN members Thailand and Indonesia, among other global players. 

Learn more about studying in China

 

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Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

,[text] =>

Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

Plans Underway

In speaking of plans to build a new university dedicated to arts and sciences in Myanmar’s Pobbathiri township, Nay Pyi Taw Council member U Tun Tin said that a plot of land was already chosen as a likely site for the campus. Additionally, insiders revealed, the state counselor had agreed to a construction proposal with a five-year timeline. 

The new university will join several others in Nay Pyi Taw, and is expected to significantly expand the region’s offerings in the arts and sciences.

Good News for Students and Parents

While the project is applauded by many stakeholders, parents and students in the capital have special cause to celebrate the possibility of bachelor’s studies closer to home.

Said one resident and parent, “Students who want to study arts or sciences at university currently have to go to Mandalay or Kyaukse. Once the new university is built, we will be able to watch over our children more easily.”

Higher educated citizens are viewed by many as a critical part of helping the country achieve its full potential during Myanmar’s transition to democracy. Perhaps Myanmar Nobel Prize winner and National League for Democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi’s words from more than a quarter-century ago best reflect the country’s outlook today: “A country’s international standard cannot be measured in terms of the number of hotels and bridges; it has to be measured in terms of education. A country of inferior education won’t be able to catch up with the world.”

,[link_description] => ,[meta_description] => ,[meta_keywords] => Myanmar,[aproved_enum] => NO,[published_at] => 2016-11-24 17:15:58,[editingSource_enum] => MasterStudies),[] => ,[cover_photo] => ,[idType] => 51,[idProvider] => 0,[ntype] => 1,[news_type] => news,[head_title] => ,[lead] =>

Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

,[db_lead] =>

Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

,[text] =>

Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

Plans Underway

In speaking of plans to build a new university dedicated to arts and sciences in Myanmar’s Pobbathiri township, Nay Pyi Taw Council member U Tun Tin said that a plot of land was already chosen as a likely site for the campus. Additionally, insiders revealed, the state counselor had agreed to a construction proposal with a five-year timeline. 

The new university will join several others in Nay Pyi Taw, and is expected to significantly expand the region’s offerings in the arts and sciences.

Good News for Students and Parents

While the project is applauded by many stakeholders, parents and students in the capital have special cause to celebrate the possibility of bachelor’s studies closer to home.

Said one resident and parent, “Students who want to study arts or sciences at university currently have to go to Mandalay or Kyaukse. Once the new university is built, we will be able to watch over our children more easily.”

Higher educated citizens are viewed by many as a critical part of helping the country achieve its full potential during Myanmar’s transition to democracy. Perhaps Myanmar Nobel Prize winner and National League for Democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi’s words from more than a quarter-century ago best reflect the country’s outlook today: “A country’s international standard cannot be measured in terms of the number of hotels and bridges; it has to be measured in terms of education. A country of inferior education won’t be able to catch up with the world.”

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Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

,[text] =>

Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

 

1. You’ll increase your earning potential.

While many teaching jobs require master’s degrees, others may call for just a bachelor’s degree. In this case, getting the bare minimum can hurt you in several different ways. Not only does it lower your chances of getting hired when you’re up again more qualified applicants, but it also means you’ll likely end up collecting a higher starting salary.

According to The Houston Chronicle, most school districts offer teachers with master’s degrees across the elementary, middle, and high school levels supplemental pay in the form of a “bonus” or “bump.” According to analysis by the Center for American Progress this averages between an extra $3,000 and $10,000 a year! And while the cost of getting a master’s degree can seem prohibitive, the degree can pay for itself in just a few years. Not only that, but most school districts require continuing education credits -- doesn’t it make sense to put those credits toward a degree?

 

2. You’ll enjoy greater career mobility.

While a bachelor’s degree may qualify you to be a classroom teacher, many other school jobs  require advanced credentials. If career advancement is important to you, a master’s degree is a must-have. Whether you’re looking to work as a school administrator, curriculum director, content/subject area specialist, or school counselor, you’ll likely need a master’s degree or more.

Additionally, a master’s degree can also open up new possibilities outside of the school system entirely. From textbook authors and community college teachers to educational consultants and educational researchers, these sought-after, well-paid professionals almost always have upper-level qualifications.

In addition to helping you move up the latter, a bachelor’s degree can lead to broader career prospects, which can be an effective defense against teacher burnout -- a pervasive phenomenon among today’s hard-working teaching professionals.

 

3. You’ll be a better teacher.

A master’s degree isn’t merely a means to an end. Rather, it’s an opportunity for true growth and development. Your time in graduate school will benefit you in numerous ways, from understanding of your options as a teacher by exploring what truly interest you to acquiring tools which will enrich what you offer your students.

While your undergraduate degree might have bestowed knowledge in a certain field of study, a master’s in education places the focus on transitioning that and new knowledge to the classroom. Says Teach.com, “These degrees focus on teaching somebody how to be a teacher, with heavy emphasis on pedagogy, teaching methods, philosophy of education, and educational technology.”

According to one Reddit commenter, “It was a TON of work, and took a while, but it definitely made me a better teacher, both in increasing my knowledge and also making me more sympathetic to my students. Its interesting watching another person teach after you have been teaching all day, and seeing what you can do and what you shouldn't do.”

One caveat worth keeping in mind? As with all advanced studies, you get out of a master’s degree what you put into it. On the flip side, however, if you’re pursuing your graduate coursework part-time while maintaining a teaching job, you’ll have immediate opportunities to start making change. Another Reddit poster shared, “I love teaching while going to school because I can implement strategies I learn in class the next day.”

 

4. You can make change at a higher level.

Teachers help nurture the growth and development of kids in classroom every day. If you’re interested in making change at a higher level, however, a master’s degree can help prepare you for a role in research, assessment or policy.

From regional school districts to local, state, and federal agencies, many organizations exist aimed at improving how teachers, schools and educational systems at large do what they do. They’re all looking for people with the knowledge, experience and insights to help guide them.

One of the most compelling reasons prompting people to enter the teaching profession is the chance to make a difference in society. A master’s degree will not only position you to achieve this goal, but it can also help you improve the quality of education at large while bettering your own life in the process.

 

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Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

,[db_lead] =>

Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

,[text] =>

Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

 

1. You’ll increase your earning potential.

While many teaching jobs require master’s degrees, others may call for just a bachelor’s degree. In this case, getting the bare minimum can hurt you in several different ways. Not only does it lower your chances of getting hired when you’re up again more qualified applicants, but it also means you’ll likely end up collecting a higher starting salary.

According to The Houston Chronicle, most school districts offer teachers with master’s degrees across the elementary, middle, and high school levels supplemental pay in the form of a “bonus” or “bump.” According to analysis by the Center for American Progress this averages between an extra $3,000 and $10,000 a year! And while the cost of getting a master’s degree can seem prohibitive, the degree can pay for itself in just a few years. Not only that, but most school districts require continuing education credits -- doesn’t it make sense to put those credits toward a degree?

 

2. You’ll enjoy greater career mobility.

While a bachelor’s degree may qualify you to be a classroom teacher, many other school jobs  require advanced credentials. If career advancement is important to you, a master’s degree is a must-have. Whether you’re looking to work as a school administrator, curriculum director, content/subject area specialist, or school counselor, you’ll likely need a master’s degree or more.

Additionally, a master’s degree can also open up new possibilities outside of the school system entirely. From textbook authors and community college teachers to educational consultants and educational researchers, these sought-after, well-paid professionals almost always have upper-level qualifications.

In addition to helping you move up the latter, a bachelor’s degree can lead to broader career prospects, which can be an effective defense against teacher burnout -- a pervasive phenomenon among today’s hard-working teaching professionals.

 

3. You’ll be a better teacher.

A master’s degree isn’t merely a means to an end. Rather, it’s an opportunity for true growth and development. Your time in graduate school will benefit you in numerous ways, from understanding of your options as a teacher by exploring what truly interest you to acquiring tools which will enrich what you offer your students.

While your undergraduate degree might have bestowed knowledge in a certain field of study, a master’s in education places the focus on transitioning that and new knowledge to the classroom. Says Teach.com, “These degrees focus on teaching somebody how to be a teacher, with heavy emphasis on pedagogy, teaching methods, philosophy of education, and educational technology.”

According to one Reddit commenter, “It was a TON of work, and took a while, but it definitely made me a better teacher, both in increasing my knowledge and also making me more sympathetic to my students. Its interesting watching another person teach after you have been teaching all day, and seeing what you can do and what you shouldn't do.”

One caveat worth keeping in mind? As with all advanced studies, you get out of a master’s degree what you put into it. On the flip side, however, if you’re pursuing your graduate coursework part-time while maintaining a teaching job, you’ll have immediate opportunities to start making change. Another Reddit poster shared, “I love teaching while going to school because I can implement strategies I learn in class the next day.”

 

4. You can make change at a higher level.

Teachers help nurture the growth and development of kids in classroom every day. If you’re interested in making change at a higher level, however, a master’s degree can help prepare you for a role in research, assessment or policy.

From regional school districts to local, state, and federal agencies, many organizations exist aimed at improving how teachers, schools and educational systems at large do what they do. They’re all looking for people with the knowledge, experience and insights to help guide them.

One of the most compelling reasons prompting people to enter the teaching profession is the chance to make a difference in society. A master’s degree will not only position you to achieve this goal, but it can also help you improve the quality of education at large while bettering your own life in the process.

 

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Thinking about business analytics?  The Rady School of Management at the University of California San Diego offers graduate students the chance to wrestle with real-world business problems—and their solutions—using cutting edge business analytics.  Let’s take a closer look.

,[text] =>

Data matters. “Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted,” attributed to Albert Einstein, explains the purpose of business analytics perfectly.  We live in an age of bigger and bigger data—and businesses need ways to sift through it all, to figure out which combinations of data count—and which ones don’t.  The success of business in today’s global economy depends on it.  The Rady School of Management at UC San Diego offers a forward-thinking Master of Science in Business Analytics that teaches its students how to grapple with the reality of big data using business analytics. 

 

What is Business Analytics?

Professor Vincent Nijs, co-director with Professor Terrence August of the Master of Science in Business Analytics program at the Rady School of Management at UC San Diego, describes the field this way, “I think of business analytics as the field focused on how to use data and models to make better business decisions.  Data Science uses many similar tools (e.g. machine learning) but the set of questions they seek to answer are often different.  You can think of business analytics as ‘data science for business.’”

 

The Amount of Data That Companies Collect Gets Bigger and Bigger…

Just how big is big data?  Really big, and getting bigger all the time.  The EMC Digital Universe Study predicts that by the year 2020, 1.7 megabytes of new data will be created every second for every human on the planet.  What does that mean?  There will be 44 trillion gigabytes (44 zettabytes) of data in the digital universe.  Where does the data come from?  Just about everywhere—1.2 trillion searches per year on Google alone, over 1 billion people using Facebook every day, trillions of photos taken, and billions shared.  By 2020, there will be over 6.1 billion smartphone users, and at least 1/3 of all data will be transmitted through the cloud. We haven’t even talked about online banking, business, movies, television, music, and games.

 

…But Businesses Don’t Always Know How to Use the Data

The Rady School‘s Professor Nijs states, “Companies are collecting more and more data but often lack the people to use it effectively.” He referenced a quote from a well-known report by the McKinsey Global Institute (2013): “Big data promises big things—but only if organizations have the right people in place who know what to do with it. A recurring theme among senior leadership across all sectors is a shortage of professionals trained and experienced at the intersection of disciplines necessary to capture, analyze, and generate meaningful business insights from big data. In addition to deep analytics talent, organizations need management with the right balance of business judgment and statistical skills to translate analysis into action.”

 

A Company’s Future Relies on Its Business Analytics

The need for effective, efficient business analytics is stronger than ever.  Businesses need to know what they want to learn from business analytics—and then how they’re going to use that data to inform their decisions across the board.

Businesses need to be able to determine what data they need and then identify the data sources for gleaning that information.  The final piece?  Distilling that information into actionable insights using the tools of business analytics. Once businesses have a plan for capturing the desired data, organizing it, and analyzing it, they are in a position to develop plans to stay competitive.

 

Business Analytics Has Excellent Job Prospects…

According to a McKinsey Global Report, the US alone has a shortage of about 190,000 data scientists and 1.5 million business analysts.  Globally and in the US, companies need experts in business analytics.  High demand means higher salaries, and a variety of options.  Graduates in Business Analytics work at large companies, start their own businesses, work in banks or FinTech, web-based businesses, retail and food companies, media companies, and marketing companies.

 

…Especially When You Study at a Forward-Thinking School Like Rady

The Rady School’s  new Master of Science in Business Analytics (MSBA) puts students at the forefront of the field. The program focuses on the problems big data poses to businesses—and how to solve them using models, statistics, and machine learning – in classes such as customer analytics, business intelligence, and supply chain analytics.  The school’s bottom line?  To graduate students who know how to use analytics to make a positive impact on business performance—and sustain it. 

Professor Nijs says that “After graduation, our students should expect to work extensively with data, use statistics and machine learning, write code, and develop tools to enhance business decision-making.  After gaining some experience, we expect them to be well-suited to lead an analytics team.” 

First steps for prospective students?  Those interested in studying in this program should have an undergraduate degree in a “quantitative discipline,” says Nijs, like “mathematics, statistics, economics, or physics.”  They should also have some programming experience. 

As data continues to get bigger, the global business world will rely more heavily on business analytics to succeed.  Want to make a difference in the business world?  Earn your MSBA in the field that businesses will indisputably need for success and sustainability. 

Learn more about The Rady School of Management.

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Thinking about business analytics?  The Rady School of Management at the University of California San Diego offers graduate students the chance to wrestle with real-world business problems—and their solutions—using cutting edge business analytics.  Let’s take a closer look.

,[db_lead] =>

Thinking about business analytics?  The Rady School of Management at the University of California San Diego offers graduate students the chance to wrestle with real-world business problems—and their solutions—using cutting edge business analytics.  Let’s take a closer look.

,[text] =>

Data matters. “Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted,” attributed to Albert Einstein, explains the purpose of business analytics perfectly.  We live in an age of bigger and bigger data—and businesses need ways to sift through it all, to figure out which combinations of data count—and which ones don’t.  The success of business in today’s global economy depends on it.  The Rady School of Management at UC San Diego offers a forward-thinking Master of Science in Business Analytics that teaches its students how to grapple with the reality of big data using business analytics. 

 

What is Business Analytics?

Professor Vincent Nijs, co-director with Professor Terrence August of the Master of Science in Business Analytics program at the Rady School of Management at UC San Diego, describes the field this way, “I think of business analytics as the field focused on how to use data and models to make better business decisions.  Data Science uses many similar tools (e.g. machine learning) but the set of questions they seek to answer are often different.  You can think of business analytics as ‘data science for business.’”

 

The Amount of Data That Companies Collect Gets Bigger and Bigger…

Just how big is big data?  Really big, and getting bigger all the time.  The EMC Digital Universe Study predicts that by the year 2020, 1.7 megabytes of new data will be created every second for every human on the planet.  What does that mean?  There will be 44 trillion gigabytes (44 zettabytes) of data in the digital universe.  Where does the data come from?  Just about everywhere—1.2 trillion searches per year on Google alone, over 1 billion people using Facebook every day, trillions of photos taken, and billions shared.  By 2020, there will be over 6.1 billion smartphone users, and at least 1/3 of all data will be transmitted through the cloud. We haven’t even talked about online banking, business, movies, television, music, and games.

 

…But Businesses Don’t Always Know How to Use the Data

The Rady School‘s Professor Nijs states, “Companies are collecting more and more data but often lack the people to use it effectively.” He referenced a quote from a well-known report by the McKinsey Global Institute (2013): “Big data promises big things—but only if organizations have the right people in place who know what to do with it. A recurring theme among senior leadership across all sectors is a shortage of professionals trained and experienced at the intersection of disciplines necessary to capture, analyze, and generate meaningful business insights from big data. In addition to deep analytics talent, organizations need management with the right balance of business judgment and statistical skills to translate analysis into action.”

 

A Company’s Future Relies on Its Business Analytics

The need for effective, efficient business analytics is stronger than ever.  Businesses need to know what they want to learn from business analytics—and then how they’re going to use that data to inform their decisions across the board.

Businesses need to be able to determine what data they need and then identify the data sources for gleaning that information.  The final piece?  Distilling that information into actionable insights using the tools of business analytics. Once businesses have a plan for capturing the desired data, organizing it, and analyzing it, they are in a position to develop plans to stay competitive.

 

Business Analytics Has Excellent Job Prospects…

According to a McKinsey Global Report, the US alone has a shortage of about 190,000 data scientists and 1.5 million business analysts.  Globally and in the US, companies need experts in business analytics.  High demand means higher salaries, and a variety of options.  Graduates in Business Analytics work at large companies, start their own businesses, work in banks or FinTech, web-based businesses, retail and food companies, media companies, and marketing companies.

 

…Especially When You Study at a Forward-Thinking School Like Rady

The Rady School’s  new Master of Science in Business Analytics (MSBA) puts students at the forefront of the field. The program focuses on the problems big data poses to businesses—and how to solve them using models, statistics, and machine learning – in classes such as customer analytics, business intelligence, and supply chain analytics.  The school’s bottom line?  To graduate students who know how to use analytics to make a positive impact on business performance—and sustain it. 

Professor Nijs says that “After graduation, our students should expect to work extensively with data, use statistics and machine learning, write code, and develop tools to enhance business decision-making.  After gaining some experience, we expect them to be well-suited to lead an analytics team.” 

First steps for prospective students?  Those interested in studying in this program should have an undergraduate degree in a “quantitative discipline,” says Nijs, like “mathematics, statistics, economics, or physics.”  They should also have some programming experience. 

As data continues to get bigger, the global business world will rely more heavily on business analytics to succeed.  Want to make a difference in the business world?  Earn your MSBA in the field that businesses will indisputably need for success and sustainability. 

Learn more about The Rady School of Management.

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Thanksgiving, that quintessential American holiday, is here.  Thinking about what to do?  We have four fantastic options for you.  Let’s take a closer look. 

,[text] =>

Giving thanks.  Embracing friendship.  Sharing a thoughtful meal.  Telling stories.  Thanksgiving conjures images of extended families and friends gathered around a beautiful table, sharing a delicious meal, and expressing gratitude for what they have.  International students studying in the US during the holidays have a multitude of way to celebrate this quintessential American holiday.  We’ve put together four fantastic options for you to consider as many US students return “home for the holidays.”

 

1. If an American friend invites you, accept the invitation

Thanksgiving is about, well, being thankful for what you have.  This includes being thankful for new friendships.  An American friend invites you?  Accept.  It’s an invitation to be a part of the family, to share the tradition, to take a break from school, and maybe even to participate in the day after Thanksgiving—Black Friday—the day that many retail shops offer sales and discounts in preparation for December’s holidays.  How’d “Black Friday” get its name?  It’s the day that many retailers’ ledgers assure that they will end their fiscal year “in the black,” or showing a profit for the year.

 

2. Consider on-campus opportunities

Feel like staying on-campus during the Thanksgiving break?  Look for campus traditions at your school.  Some schools offer their own Thanksgiving celebrations for any students and faculty who opt to stay on campus, or who may not have options to travel.  Kansas’s Hesston College hosts an annual Thanksgiving weekend, with a dinner and a bevy of other activities, including art exhibits, concerts, talent shows, basketball tournaments, a benefit fun run, and other special events. At Ohio State University, any students, faculty, and staff who are not planning to head home are invited to attend an annual Thanksgiving feast—this year, the University expects over 1,600 attendees.  At Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, PA, students and faculty spend the entire month of November learning about spirituality.  Several faculty at the University host international students at their homes on Thanksgiving Day—as an expression of gratitude for sharing their learning. 

Credit: nbcwashington.com

3. Attend a parade

What’s Thanksgiving without a parade?  The most famous, of course, is the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City, with over 3 million in-person spectators and upwards of 40 million television viewers.  Several major cities besides New York also hold parades where you can enjoy the holiday spirit of gratitude.  Check out the Dunkin’ Donuts Thanksgiving Day Parade in the City of Brotherly Love, Philadelphia.  Motor City has another option—check out America’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in Detroit, Michigan for floats, bands, music, and a glimpse at the history of the US auto industry.  Also in the Midwest is Chicago’s McDonald’s Thanksgiving Parade, which began in the 1930’s in an effort to raise the spirits of Depression-era residents.  Charlotte, North Carolina, Houston, Texas, and Seattle, Washington offer additional possibilities for big parades.  If you don’t live near a city, don’t fret!  Check your local paper for smaller, regional events.  Watching a parade also gives you a chance either to travel to a new place, or to learn something new and interesting about your university town. 

 

4. Take a break

Not interested in all of the hullabaloo?  Not feeling the need for turkey, Black Friday, parades, or big get-togethers?  Relax.  Enjoy the quiet.  Go for a walk.  Read that book you’ve been wanting to read.  Do some sightseeing—explore the city or town where you’ve decided to study.  If you really feel like it, get caught up—or work ahead—in one of your classes.  Take some time for yourself and recharge. 


Regardless of what you choose to do this Thanksgiving season, remember to be grateful for who you are, what you have, and the positive people in your life.  Cheers!

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Thanksgiving, that quintessential American holiday, is here.  Thinking about what to do?  We have four fantastic options for you.  Let’s take a closer look. 

,[db_lead] =>

Thanksgiving, that quintessential American holiday, is here.  Thinking about what to do?  We have four fantastic options for you.  Let’s take a closer look. 

,[text] =>

Giving thanks.  Embracing friendship.  Sharing a thoughtful meal.  Telling stories.  Thanksgiving conjures images of extended families and friends gathered around a beautiful table, sharing a delicious meal, and expressing gratitude for what they have.  International students studying in the US during the holidays have a multitude of way to celebrate this quintessential American holiday.  We’ve put together four fantastic options for you to consider as many US students return “home for the holidays.”

 

1. If an American friend invites you, accept the invitation

Thanksgiving is about, well, being thankful for what you have.  This includes being thankful for new friendships.  An American friend invites you?  Accept.  It’s an invitation to be a part of the family, to share the tradition, to take a break from school, and maybe even to participate in the day after Thanksgiving—Black Friday—the day that many retail shops offer sales and discounts in preparation for December’s holidays.  How’d “Black Friday” get its name?  It’s the day that many retailers’ ledgers assure that they will end their fiscal year “in the black,” or showing a profit for the year.

 

2. Consider on-campus opportunities

Feel like staying on-campus during the Thanksgiving break?  Look for campus traditions at your school.  Some schools offer their own Thanksgiving celebrations for any students and faculty who opt to stay on campus, or who may not have options to travel.  Kansas’s Hesston College hosts an annual Thanksgiving weekend, with a dinner and a bevy of other activities, including art exhibits, concerts, talent shows, basketball tournaments, a benefit fun run, and other special events. At Ohio State University, any students, faculty, and staff who are not planning to head home are invited to attend an annual Thanksgiving feast—this year, the University expects over 1,600 attendees.  At Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, PA, students and faculty spend the entire month of November learning about spirituality.  Several faculty at the University host international students at their homes on Thanksgiving Day—as an expression of gratitude for sharing their learning. 

Credit: nbcwashington.com

3. Attend a parade

What’s Thanksgiving without a parade?  The most famous, of course, is the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City, with over 3 million in-person spectators and upwards of 40 million television viewers.  Several major cities besides New York also hold parades where you can enjoy the holiday spirit of gratitude.  Check out the Dunkin’ Donuts Thanksgiving Day Parade in the City of Brotherly Love, Philadelphia.  Motor City has another option—check out America’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in Detroit, Michigan for floats, bands, music, and a glimpse at the history of the US auto industry.  Also in the Midwest is Chicago’s McDonald’s Thanksgiving Parade, which began in the 1930’s in an effort to raise the spirits of Depression-era residents.  Charlotte, North Carolina, Houston, Texas, and Seattle, Washington offer additional possibilities for big parades.  If you don’t live near a city, don’t fret!  Check your local paper for smaller, regional events.  Watching a parade also gives you a chance either to travel to a new place, or to learn something new and interesting about your university town. 

 

4. Take a break

Not interested in all of the hullabaloo?  Not feeling the need for turkey, Black Friday, parades, or big get-togethers?  Relax.  Enjoy the quiet.  Go for a walk.  Read that book you’ve been wanting to read.  Do some sightseeing—explore the city or town where you’ve decided to study.  If you really feel like it, get caught up—or work ahead—in one of your classes.  Take some time for yourself and recharge. 


Regardless of what you choose to do this Thanksgiving season, remember to be grateful for who you are, what you have, and the positive people in your life.  Cheers!

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Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

,[text] =>

Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

Investing in Education

In conjunction with the Group of Eight Committee (Go8), CASE first debuted its Charitable Giving to Universities in Australia and New Zealand Survey in 2012. Its aim? To provide accurate data for the countries’ development officers, alumni staff, and institutional leaders.

The most recent news is, indeed, promising. In 2015, universities in Australia and New Zealand received 26 percent more in new funds and 25 percent more in cash income than in the previous year. Concluded Tim Dolan, Chair of Go8’s Committee of Chief Advancement Officers, “This is not just a matter of anecdote and impression. With the survey of charitable giving now in its fourth year, we are accumulating real evidence and can begin to see helpful trends in the data collected.”

Even more tellingly, according to Dolan?  “This growth has continued notwithstanding an economy that was less confident than in recent years and despite political uncertainty over funding structures and deregulation. We can see that the right fundraising behaviour, consistently and professionally followed, produces satisfying results.”

Other areas of growth include total number of donors and alumni donors as well as participation by universities -- particularly Australian institutions.

Progress Ahead...With a Catch

While the increased generosity of donors bodes well for a boost to world-class research and university at the region’s higher education institutions, insiders warn of the dangers of complacency. Said Dolan, “One reason for this is the ongoing frustration generated by the shortage of appropriate fundraising professionals. We have all found that the right people are hard to find and difficult to keep. If we could double our fundraising teams, the resulting impact would be phenomenal.” Conversely, failure to find these professionals could stunt university growth.

The takeaway for students looking for an exciting and in-demand career path? A master’s in fundraising management or other fundraising-related topic may be the fast-track to success. 

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Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

,[db_lead] =>

Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

,[text] =>

Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

Investing in Education

In conjunction with the Group of Eight Committee (Go8), CASE first debuted its Charitable Giving to Universities in Australia and New Zealand Survey in 2012. Its aim? To provide accurate data for the countries’ development officers, alumni staff, and institutional leaders.

The most recent news is, indeed, promising. In 2015, universities in Australia and New Zealand received 26 percent more in new funds and 25 percent more in cash income than in the previous year. Concluded Tim Dolan, Chair of Go8’s Committee of Chief Advancement Officers, “This is not just a matter of anecdote and impression. With the survey of charitable giving now in its fourth year, we are accumulating real evidence and can begin to see helpful trends in the data collected.”

Even more tellingly, according to Dolan?  “This growth has continued notwithstanding an economy that was less confident than in recent years and despite political uncertainty over funding structures and deregulation. We can see that the right fundraising behaviour, consistently and professionally followed, produces satisfying results.”

Other areas of growth include total number of donors and alumni donors as well as participation by universities -- particularly Australian institutions.

Progress Ahead...With a Catch

While the increased generosity of donors bodes well for a boost to world-class research and university at the region’s higher education institutions, insiders warn of the dangers of complacency. Said Dolan, “One reason for this is the ongoing frustration generated by the shortage of appropriate fundraising professionals. We have all found that the right people are hard to find and difficult to keep. If we could double our fundraising teams, the resulting impact would be phenomenal.” Conversely, failure to find these professionals could stunt university growth.

The takeaway for students looking for an exciting and in-demand career path? A master’s in fundraising management or other fundraising-related topic may be the fast-track to success. 

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The Chinese government recently announced a plan attract more international students from Southeast Asian countries.  Find out why and learn more about higher education initiatives in China. 

,[text] =>

ASEAN-China Center Secretary General Yang Xiuping recently announced that China would like to improve collaboration in education and culture with ASEAN countries.  He said, “Foreign students from Southeast Asian countries are the bridge and future of the relationship between ASEAN [countries] and China.”

Why the push? This push comes partly from the 21st Century Maritime Silk Road.  The Chinese government recently initiated this development strategy and framework to both unite and expand collaborative efforts in education and trade between China and other countries on the Silk Road route.  Attracting more international students from Southeast Asia not only gives students an incredible learning opportunity; it also allows them to be a part of a new collaboration between China and the rest of the region.   

Currently, about 68,000 students from Southeast Asia study in China.  The Chinese government would like to increase that number to at least 100,000 within the year.  Yang commented, “We want to see more exchange students from ASEAN countries in China.” 

This initiative reflects a larger trend in Chinese higher education.  Last year was a record year for the numbers of international students in China.  Why?  China’s outward international strategy for 2020 focuses on making China a global study destination, not just in Southeast Asia.    Some of the countries with the largest numbers of students studying in China?  You guessed it: ASEAN members Thailand and Indonesia, among other global players. 

Learn more about studying in China

 

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The Chinese government recently announced a plan attract more international students from Southeast Asian countries.  Find out why and learn more about higher education initiatives in China. 

,[db_lead] =>

The Chinese government recently announced a plan attract more international students from Southeast Asian countries.  Find out why and learn more about higher education initiatives in China. 

,[text] =>

ASEAN-China Center Secretary General Yang Xiuping recently announced that China would like to improve collaboration in education and culture with ASEAN countries.  He said, “Foreign students from Southeast Asian countries are the bridge and future of the relationship between ASEAN [countries] and China.”

Why the push? This push comes partly from the 21st Century Maritime Silk Road.  The Chinese government recently initiated this development strategy and framework to both unite and expand collaborative efforts in education and trade between China and other countries on the Silk Road route.  Attracting more international students from Southeast Asia not only gives students an incredible learning opportunity; it also allows them to be a part of a new collaboration between China and the rest of the region.   

Currently, about 68,000 students from Southeast Asia study in China.  The Chinese government would like to increase that number to at least 100,000 within the year.  Yang commented, “We want to see more exchange students from ASEAN countries in China.” 

This initiative reflects a larger trend in Chinese higher education.  Last year was a record year for the numbers of international students in China.  Why?  China’s outward international strategy for 2020 focuses on making China a global study destination, not just in Southeast Asia.    Some of the countries with the largest numbers of students studying in China?  You guessed it: ASEAN members Thailand and Indonesia, among other global players. 

Learn more about studying in China

 

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Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

,[text] =>

Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

Plans Underway

In speaking of plans to build a new university dedicated to arts and sciences in Myanmar’s Pobbathiri township, Nay Pyi Taw Council member U Tun Tin said that a plot of land was already chosen as a likely site for the campus. Additionally, insiders revealed, the state counselor had agreed to a construction proposal with a five-year timeline. 

The new university will join several others in Nay Pyi Taw, and is expected to significantly expand the region’s offerings in the arts and sciences.

Good News for Students and Parents

While the project is applauded by many stakeholders, parents and students in the capital have special cause to celebrate the possibility of bachelor’s studies closer to home.

Said one resident and parent, “Students who want to study arts or sciences at university currently have to go to Mandalay or Kyaukse. Once the new university is built, we will be able to watch over our children more easily.”

Higher educated citizens are viewed by many as a critical part of helping the country achieve its full potential during Myanmar’s transition to democracy. Perhaps Myanmar Nobel Prize winner and National League for Democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi’s words from more than a quarter-century ago best reflect the country’s outlook today: “A country’s international standard cannot be measured in terms of the number of hotels and bridges; it has to be measured in terms of education. A country of inferior education won’t be able to catch up with the world.”

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Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

,[db_lead] =>

Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

,[text] =>

Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

Plans Underway

In speaking of plans to build a new university dedicated to arts and sciences in Myanmar’s Pobbathiri township, Nay Pyi Taw Council member U Tun Tin said that a plot of land was already chosen as a likely site for the campus. Additionally, insiders revealed, the state counselor had agreed to a construction proposal with a five-year timeline. 

The new university will join several others in Nay Pyi Taw, and is expected to significantly expand the region’s offerings in the arts and sciences.

Good News for Students and Parents

While the project is applauded by many stakeholders, parents and students in the capital have special cause to celebrate the possibility of bachelor’s studies closer to home.

Said one resident and parent, “Students who want to study arts or sciences at university currently have to go to Mandalay or Kyaukse. Once the new university is built, we will be able to watch over our children more easily.”

Higher educated citizens are viewed by many as a critical part of helping the country achieve its full potential during Myanmar’s transition to democracy. Perhaps Myanmar Nobel Prize winner and National League for Democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi’s words from more than a quarter-century ago best reflect the country’s outlook today: “A country’s international standard cannot be measured in terms of the number of hotels and bridges; it has to be measured in terms of education. A country of inferior education won’t be able to catch up with the world.”

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Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

,[text] =>

Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

 

1. You’ll increase your earning potential.

While many teaching jobs require master’s degrees, others may call for just a bachelor’s degree. In this case, getting the bare minimum can hurt you in several different ways. Not only does it lower your chances of getting hired when you’re up again more qualified applicants, but it also means you’ll likely end up collecting a higher starting salary.

According to The Houston Chronicle, most school districts offer teachers with master’s degrees across the elementary, middle, and high school levels supplemental pay in the form of a “bonus” or “bump.” According to analysis by the Center for American Progress this averages between an extra $3,000 and $10,000 a year! And while the cost of getting a master’s degree can seem prohibitive, the degree can pay for itself in just a few years. Not only that, but most school districts require continuing education credits -- doesn’t it make sense to put those credits toward a degree?

 

2. You’ll enjoy greater career mobility.

While a bachelor’s degree may qualify you to be a classroom teacher, many other school jobs  require advanced credentials. If career advancement is important to you, a master’s degree is a must-have. Whether you’re looking to work as a school administrator, curriculum director, content/subject area specialist, or school counselor, you’ll likely need a master’s degree or more.

Additionally, a master’s degree can also open up new possibilities outside of the school system entirely. From textbook authors and community college teachers to educational consultants and educational researchers, these sought-after, well-paid professionals almost always have upper-level qualifications.

In addition to helping you move up the latter, a bachelor’s degree can lead to broader career prospects, which can be an effective defense against teacher burnout -- a pervasive phenomenon among today’s hard-working teaching professionals.

 

3. You’ll be a better teacher.

A master’s degree isn’t merely a means to an end. Rather, it’s an opportunity for true growth and development. Your time in graduate school will benefit you in numerous ways, from understanding of your options as a teacher by exploring what truly interest you to acquiring tools which will enrich what you offer your students.

While your undergraduate degree might have bestowed knowledge in a certain field of study, a master’s in education places the focus on transitioning that and new knowledge to the classroom. Says Teach.com, “These degrees focus on teaching somebody how to be a teacher, with heavy emphasis on pedagogy, teaching methods, philosophy of education, and educational technology.”

According to one Reddit commenter, “It was a TON of work, and took a while, but it definitely made me a better teacher, both in increasing my knowledge and also making me more sympathetic to my students. Its interesting watching another person teach after you have been teaching all day, and seeing what you can do and what you shouldn't do.”

One caveat worth keeping in mind? As with all advanced studies, you get out of a master’s degree what you put into it. On the flip side, however, if you’re pursuing your graduate coursework part-time while maintaining a teaching job, you’ll have immediate opportunities to start making change. Another Reddit poster shared, “I love teaching while going to school because I can implement strategies I learn in class the next day.”

 

4. You can make change at a higher level.

Teachers help nurture the growth and development of kids in classroom every day. If you’re interested in making change at a higher level, however, a master’s degree can help prepare you for a role in research, assessment or policy.

From regional school districts to local, state, and federal agencies, many organizations exist aimed at improving how teachers, schools and educational systems at large do what they do. They’re all looking for people with the knowledge, experience and insights to help guide them.

One of the most compelling reasons prompting people to enter the teaching profession is the chance to make a difference in society. A master’s degree will not only position you to achieve this goal, but it can also help you improve the quality of education at large while bettering your own life in the process.

 

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Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

,[db_lead] =>

Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

,[text] =>

Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

 

1. You’ll increase your earning potential.

While many teaching jobs require master’s degrees, others may call for just a bachelor’s degree. In this case, getting the bare minimum can hurt you in several different ways. Not only does it lower your chances of getting hired when you’re up again more qualified applicants, but it also means you’ll likely end up collecting a higher starting salary.

According to The Houston Chronicle, most school districts offer teachers with master’s degrees across the elementary, middle, and high school levels supplemental pay in the form of a “bonus” or “bump.” According to analysis by the Center for American Progress this averages between an extra $3,000 and $10,000 a year! And while the cost of getting a master’s degree can seem prohibitive, the degree can pay for itself in just a few years. Not only that, but most school districts require continuing education credits -- doesn’t it make sense to put those credits toward a degree?

 

2. You’ll enjoy greater career mobility.

While a bachelor’s degree may qualify you to be a classroom teacher, many other school jobs  require advanced credentials. If career advancement is important to you, a master’s degree is a must-have. Whether you’re looking to work as a school administrator, curriculum director, content/subject area specialist, or school counselor, you’ll likely need a master’s degree or more.

Additionally, a master’s degree can also open up new possibilities outside of the school system entirely. From textbook authors and community college teachers to educational consultants and educational researchers, these sought-after, well-paid professionals almost always have upper-level qualifications.

In addition to helping you move up the latter, a bachelor’s degree can lead to broader career prospects, which can be an effective defense against teacher burnout -- a pervasive phenomenon among today’s hard-working teaching professionals.

 

3. You’ll be a better teacher.

A master’s degree isn’t merely a means to an end. Rather, it’s an opportunity for true growth and development. Your time in graduate school will benefit you in numerous ways, from understanding of your options as a teacher by exploring what truly interest you to acquiring tools which will enrich what you offer your students.

While your undergraduate degree might have bestowed knowledge in a certain field of study, a master’s in education places the focus on transitioning that and new knowledge to the classroom. Says Teach.com, “These degrees focus on teaching somebody how to be a teacher, with heavy emphasis on pedagogy, teaching methods, philosophy of education, and educational technology.”

According to one Reddit commenter, “It was a TON of work, and took a while, but it definitely made me a better teacher, both in increasing my knowledge and also making me more sympathetic to my students. Its interesting watching another person teach after you have been teaching all day, and seeing what you can do and what you shouldn't do.”

One caveat worth keeping in mind? As with all advanced studies, you get out of a master’s degree what you put into it. On the flip side, however, if you’re pursuing your graduate coursework part-time while maintaining a teaching job, you’ll have immediate opportunities to start making change. Another Reddit poster shared, “I love teaching while going to school because I can implement strategies I learn in class the next day.”

 

4. You can make change at a higher level.

Teachers help nurture the growth and development of kids in classroom every day. If you’re interested in making change at a higher level, however, a master’s degree can help prepare you for a role in research, assessment or policy.

From regional school districts to local, state, and federal agencies, many organizations exist aimed at improving how teachers, schools and educational systems at large do what they do. They’re all looking for people with the knowledge, experience and insights to help guide them.

One of the most compelling reasons prompting people to enter the teaching profession is the chance to make a difference in society. A master’s degree will not only position you to achieve this goal, but it can also help you improve the quality of education at large while bettering your own life in the process.

 

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Thinking about business analytics?  The Rady School of Management at the University of California San Diego offers graduate students the chance to wrestle with real-world business problems—and their solutions—using cutting edge business analytics.  Let’s take a closer look.

,[text] =>

Data matters. “Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted,” attributed to Albert Einstein, explains the purpose of business analytics perfectly.  We live in an age of bigger and bigger data—and businesses need ways to sift through it all, to figure out which combinations of data count—and which ones don’t.  The success of business in today’s global economy depends on it.  The Rady School of Management at UC San Diego offers a forward-thinking Master of Science in Business Analytics that teaches its students how to grapple with the reality of big data using business analytics. 

 

What is Business Analytics?

Professor Vincent Nijs, co-director with Professor Terrence August of the Master of Science in Business Analytics program at the Rady School of Management at UC San Diego, describes the field this way, “I think of business analytics as the field focused on how to use data and models to make better business decisions.  Data Science uses many similar tools (e.g. machine learning) but the set of questions they seek to answer are often different.  You can think of business analytics as ‘data science for business.’”

 

The Amount of Data That Companies Collect Gets Bigger and Bigger…

Just how big is big data?  Really big, and getting bigger all the time.  The EMC Digital Universe Study predicts that by the year 2020, 1.7 megabytes of new data will be created every second for every human on the planet.  What does that mean?  There will be 44 trillion gigabytes (44 zettabytes) of data in the digital universe.  Where does the data come from?  Just about everywhere—1.2 trillion searches per year on Google alone, over 1 billion people using Facebook every day, trillions of photos taken, and billions shared.  By 2020, there will be over 6.1 billion smartphone users, and at least 1/3 of all data will be transmitted through the cloud. We haven’t even talked about online banking, business, movies, television, music, and games.

 

…But Businesses Don’t Always Know How to Use the Data

The Rady School‘s Professor Nijs states, “Companies are collecting more and more data but often lack the people to use it effectively.” He referenced a quote from a well-known report by the McKinsey Global Institute (2013): “Big data promises big things—but only if organizations have the right people in place who know what to do with it. A recurring theme among senior leadership across all sectors is a shortage of professionals trained and experienced at the intersection of disciplines necessary to capture, analyze, and generate meaningful business insights from big data. In addition to deep analytics talent, organizations need management with the right balance of business judgment and statistical skills to translate analysis into action.”

 

A Company’s Future Relies on Its Business Analytics

The need for effective, efficient business analytics is stronger than ever.  Businesses need to know what they want to learn from business analytics—and then how they’re going to use that data to inform their decisions across the board.

Businesses need to be able to determine what data they need and then identify the data sources for gleaning that information.  The final piece?  Distilling that information into actionable insights using the tools of business analytics. Once businesses have a plan for capturing the desired data, organizing it, and analyzing it, they are in a position to develop plans to stay competitive.

 

Business Analytics Has Excellent Job Prospects…

According to a McKinsey Global Report, the US alone has a shortage of about 190,000 data scientists and 1.5 million business analysts.  Globally and in the US, companies need experts in business analytics.  High demand means higher salaries, and a variety of options.  Graduates in Business Analytics work at large companies, start their own businesses, work in banks or FinTech, web-based businesses, retail and food companies, media companies, and marketing companies.

 

…Especially When You Study at a Forward-Thinking School Like Rady

The Rady School’s  new Master of Science in Business Analytics (MSBA) puts students at the forefront of the field. The program focuses on the problems big data poses to businesses—and how to solve them using models, statistics, and machine learning – in classes such as customer analytics, business intelligence, and supply chain analytics.  The school’s bottom line?  To graduate students who know how to use analytics to make a positive impact on business performance—and sustain it. 

Professor Nijs says that “After graduation, our students should expect to work extensively with data, use statistics and machine learning, write code, and develop tools to enhance business decision-making.  After gaining some experience, we expect them to be well-suited to lead an analytics team.” 

First steps for prospective students?  Those interested in studying in this program should have an undergraduate degree in a “quantitative discipline,” says Nijs, like “mathematics, statistics, economics, or physics.”  They should also have some programming experience. 

As data continues to get bigger, the global business world will rely more heavily on business analytics to succeed.  Want to make a difference in the business world?  Earn your MSBA in the field that businesses will indisputably need for success and sustainability. 

Learn more about The Rady School of Management.

,[link_description] => ,[meta_description] => ,[meta_keywords] => Rady,[aproved_enum] => NO,[published_at] => 2016-11-30 16:09:46,[editingSource_enum] => MasterStudies),[] => ,[cover_photo] => ,[idType] => 51,[idProvider] => 0,[ntype] => ,[news_type] => article,[head_title] => ,[lead] =>

Thinking about business analytics?  The Rady School of Management at the University of California San Diego offers graduate students the chance to wrestle with real-world business problems—and their solutions—using cutting edge business analytics.  Let’s take a closer look.

,[db_lead] =>

Thinking about business analytics?  The Rady School of Management at the University of California San Diego offers graduate students the chance to wrestle with real-world business problems—and their solutions—using cutting edge business analytics.  Let’s take a closer look.

,[text] =>

Data matters. “Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted,” attributed to Albert Einstein, explains the purpose of business analytics perfectly.  We live in an age of bigger and bigger data—and businesses need ways to sift through it all, to figure out which combinations of data count—and which ones don’t.  The success of business in today’s global economy depends on it.  The Rady School of Management at UC San Diego offers a forward-thinking Master of Science in Business Analytics that teaches its students how to grapple with the reality of big data using business analytics. 

 

What is Business Analytics?

Professor Vincent Nijs, co-director with Professor Terrence August of the Master of Science in Business Analytics program at the Rady School of Management at UC San Diego, describes the field this way, “I think of business analytics as the field focused on how to use data and models to make better business decisions.  Data Science uses many similar tools (e.g. machine learning) but the set of questions they seek to answer are often different.  You can think of business analytics as ‘data science for business.’”

 

The Amount of Data That Companies Collect Gets Bigger and Bigger…

Just how big is big data?  Really big, and getting bigger all the time.  The EMC Digital Universe Study predicts that by the year 2020, 1.7 megabytes of new data will be created every second for every human on the planet.  What does that mean?  There will be 44 trillion gigabytes (44 zettabytes) of data in the digital universe.  Where does the data come from?  Just about everywhere—1.2 trillion searches per year on Google alone, over 1 billion people using Facebook every day, trillions of photos taken, and billions shared.  By 2020, there will be over 6.1 billion smartphone users, and at least 1/3 of all data will be transmitted through the cloud. We haven’t even talked about online banking, business, movies, television, music, and games.

 

…But Businesses Don’t Always Know How to Use the Data

The Rady School‘s Professor Nijs states, “Companies are collecting more and more data but often lack the people to use it effectively.” He referenced a quote from a well-known report by the McKinsey Global Institute (2013): “Big data promises big things—but only if organizations have the right people in place who know what to do with it. A recurring theme among senior leadership across all sectors is a shortage of professionals trained and experienced at the intersection of disciplines necessary to capture, analyze, and generate meaningful business insights from big data. In addition to deep analytics talent, organizations need management with the right balance of business judgment and statistical skills to translate analysis into action.”

 

A Company’s Future Relies on Its Business Analytics

The need for effective, efficient business analytics is stronger than ever.  Businesses need to know what they want to learn from business analytics—and then how they’re going to use that data to inform their decisions across the board.

Businesses need to be able to determine what data they need and then identify the data sources for gleaning that information.  The final piece?  Distilling that information into actionable insights using the tools of business analytics. Once businesses have a plan for capturing the desired data, organizing it, and analyzing it, they are in a position to develop plans to stay competitive.

 

Business Analytics Has Excellent Job Prospects…

According to a McKinsey Global Report, the US alone has a shortage of about 190,000 data scientists and 1.5 million business analysts.  Globally and in the US, companies need experts in business analytics.  High demand means higher salaries, and a variety of options.  Graduates in Business Analytics work at large companies, start their own businesses, work in banks or FinTech, web-based businesses, retail and food companies, media companies, and marketing companies.

 

…Especially When You Study at a Forward-Thinking School Like Rady

The Rady School’s  new Master of Science in Business Analytics (MSBA) puts students at the forefront of the field. The program focuses on the problems big data poses to businesses—and how to solve them using models, statistics, and machine learning – in classes such as customer analytics, business intelligence, and supply chain analytics.  The school’s bottom line?  To graduate students who know how to use analytics to make a positive impact on business performance—and sustain it. 

Professor Nijs says that “After graduation, our students should expect to work extensively with data, use statistics and machine learning, write code, and develop tools to enhance business decision-making.  After gaining some experience, we expect them to be well-suited to lead an analytics team.” 

First steps for prospective students?  Those interested in studying in this program should have an undergraduate degree in a “quantitative discipline,” says Nijs, like “mathematics, statistics, economics, or physics.”  They should also have some programming experience. 

As data continues to get bigger, the global business world will rely more heavily on business analytics to succeed.  Want to make a difference in the business world?  Earn your MSBA in the field that businesses will indisputably need for success and sustainability. 

Learn more about The Rady School of Management.

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Thanksgiving, that quintessential American holiday, is here.  Thinking about what to do?  We have four fantastic options for you.  Let’s take a closer look. 

,[text] =>

Giving thanks.  Embracing friendship.  Sharing a thoughtful meal.  Telling stories.  Thanksgiving conjures images of extended families and friends gathered around a beautiful table, sharing a delicious meal, and expressing gratitude for what they have.  International students studying in the US during the holidays have a multitude of way to celebrate this quintessential American holiday.  We’ve put together four fantastic options for you to consider as many US students return “home for the holidays.”

 

1. If an American friend invites you, accept the invitation

Thanksgiving is about, well, being thankful for what you have.  This includes being thankful for new friendships.  An American friend invites you?  Accept.  It’s an invitation to be a part of the family, to share the tradition, to take a break from school, and maybe even to participate in the day after Thanksgiving—Black Friday—the day that many retail shops offer sales and discounts in preparation for December’s holidays.  How’d “Black Friday” get its name?  It’s the day that many retailers’ ledgers assure that they will end their fiscal year “in the black,” or showing a profit for the year.

 

2. Consider on-campus opportunities

Feel like staying on-campus during the Thanksgiving break?  Look for campus traditions at your school.  Some schools offer their own Thanksgiving celebrations for any students and faculty who opt to stay on campus, or who may not have options to travel.  Kansas’s Hesston College hosts an annual Thanksgiving weekend, with a dinner and a bevy of other activities, including art exhibits, concerts, talent shows, basketball tournaments, a benefit fun run, and other special events. At Ohio State University, any students, faculty, and staff who are not planning to head home are invited to attend an annual Thanksgiving feast—this year, the University expects over 1,600 attendees.  At Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, PA, students and faculty spend the entire month of November learning about spirituality.  Several faculty at the University host international students at their homes on Thanksgiving Day—as an expression of gratitude for sharing their learning. 

Credit: nbcwashington.com

3. Attend a parade

What’s Thanksgiving without a parade?  The most famous, of course, is the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City, with over 3 million in-person spectators and upwards of 40 million television viewers.  Several major cities besides New York also hold parades where you can enjoy the holiday spirit of gratitude.  Check out the Dunkin’ Donuts Thanksgiving Day Parade in the City of Brotherly Love, Philadelphia.  Motor City has another option—check out America’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in Detroit, Michigan for floats, bands, music, and a glimpse at the history of the US auto industry.  Also in the Midwest is Chicago’s McDonald’s Thanksgiving Parade, which began in the 1930’s in an effort to raise the spirits of Depression-era residents.  Charlotte, North Carolina, Houston, Texas, and Seattle, Washington offer additional possibilities for big parades.  If you don’t live near a city, don’t fret!  Check your local paper for smaller, regional events.  Watching a parade also gives you a chance either to travel to a new place, or to learn something new and interesting about your university town. 

 

4. Take a break

Not interested in all of the hullabaloo?  Not feeling the need for turkey, Black Friday, parades, or big get-togethers?  Relax.  Enjoy the quiet.  Go for a walk.  Read that book you’ve been wanting to read.  Do some sightseeing—explore the city or town where you’ve decided to study.  If you really feel like it, get caught up—or work ahead—in one of your classes.  Take some time for yourself and recharge. 


Regardless of what you choose to do this Thanksgiving season, remember to be grateful for who you are, what you have, and the positive people in your life.  Cheers!

,[link_description] => ,[meta_description] => ,[meta_keywords] => Thanksgiving,[aproved_enum] => NO,[published_at] => 2016-11-24 11:15:18,[editingSource_enum] => MasterStudies),[] => ,[cover_photo] => ,[idType] => 51,[idProvider] => 0,[ntype] => ,[news_type] => article,[head_title] => ,[lead] =>

Thanksgiving, that quintessential American holiday, is here.  Thinking about what to do?  We have four fantastic options for you.  Let’s take a closer look. 

,[db_lead] =>

Thanksgiving, that quintessential American holiday, is here.  Thinking about what to do?  We have four fantastic options for you.  Let’s take a closer look. 

,[text] =>

Giving thanks.  Embracing friendship.  Sharing a thoughtful meal.  Telling stories.  Thanksgiving conjures images of extended families and friends gathered around a beautiful table, sharing a delicious meal, and expressing gratitude for what they have.  International students studying in the US during the holidays have a multitude of way to celebrate this quintessential American holiday.  We’ve put together four fantastic options for you to consider as many US students return “home for the holidays.”

 

1. If an American friend invites you, accept the invitation

Thanksgiving is about, well, being thankful for what you have.  This includes being thankful for new friendships.  An American friend invites you?  Accept.  It’s an invitation to be a part of the family, to share the tradition, to take a break from school, and maybe even to participate in the day after Thanksgiving—Black Friday—the day that many retail shops offer sales and discounts in preparation for December’s holidays.  How’d “Black Friday” get its name?  It’s the day that many retailers’ ledgers assure that they will end their fiscal year “in the black,” or showing a profit for the year.

 

2. Consider on-campus opportunities

Feel like staying on-campus during the Thanksgiving break?  Look for campus traditions at your school.  Some schools offer their own Thanksgiving celebrations for any students and faculty who opt to stay on campus, or who may not have options to travel.  Kansas’s Hesston College hosts an annual Thanksgiving weekend, with a dinner and a bevy of other activities, including art exhibits, concerts, talent shows, basketball tournaments, a benefit fun run, and other special events. At Ohio State University, any students, faculty, and staff who are not planning to head home are invited to attend an annual Thanksgiving feast—this year, the University expects over 1,600 attendees.  At Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, PA, students and faculty spend the entire month of November learning about spirituality.  Several faculty at the University host international students at their homes on Thanksgiving Day—as an expression of gratitude for sharing their learning. 

Credit: nbcwashington.com

3. Attend a parade

What’s Thanksgiving without a parade?  The most famous, of course, is the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City, with over 3 million in-person spectators and upwards of 40 million television viewers.  Several major cities besides New York also hold parades where you can enjoy the holiday spirit of gratitude.  Check out the Dunkin’ Donuts Thanksgiving Day Parade in the City of Brotherly Love, Philadelphia.  Motor City has another option—check out America’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in Detroit, Michigan for floats, bands, music, and a glimpse at the history of the US auto industry.  Also in the Midwest is Chicago’s McDonald’s Thanksgiving Parade, which began in the 1930’s in an effort to raise the spirits of Depression-era residents.  Charlotte, North Carolina, Houston, Texas, and Seattle, Washington offer additional possibilities for big parades.  If you don’t live near a city, don’t fret!  Check your local paper for smaller, regional events.  Watching a parade also gives you a chance either to travel to a new place, or to learn something new and interesting about your university town. 

 

4. Take a break

Not interested in all of the hullabaloo?  Not feeling the need for turkey, Black Friday, parades, or big get-togethers?  Relax.  Enjoy the quiet.  Go for a walk.  Read that book you’ve been wanting to read.  Do some sightseeing—explore the city or town where you’ve decided to study.  If you really feel like it, get caught up—or work ahead—in one of your classes.  Take some time for yourself and recharge. 


Regardless of what you choose to do this Thanksgiving season, remember to be grateful for who you are, what you have, and the positive people in your life.  Cheers!

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Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

,[text] =>

Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

Investing in Education

In conjunction with the Group of Eight Committee (Go8), CASE first debuted its Charitable Giving to Universities in Australia and New Zealand Survey in 2012. Its aim? To provide accurate data for the countries’ development officers, alumni staff, and institutional leaders.

The most recent news is, indeed, promising. In 2015, universities in Australia and New Zealand received 26 percent more in new funds and 25 percent more in cash income than in the previous year. Concluded Tim Dolan, Chair of Go8’s Committee of Chief Advancement Officers, “This is not just a matter of anecdote and impression. With the survey of charitable giving now in its fourth year, we are accumulating real evidence and can begin to see helpful trends in the data collected.”

Even more tellingly, according to Dolan?  “This growth has continued notwithstanding an economy that was less confident than in recent years and despite political uncertainty over funding structures and deregulation. We can see that the right fundraising behaviour, consistently and professionally followed, produces satisfying results.”

Other areas of growth include total number of donors and alumni donors as well as participation by universities -- particularly Australian institutions.

Progress Ahead...With a Catch

While the increased generosity of donors bodes well for a boost to world-class research and university at the region’s higher education institutions, insiders warn of the dangers of complacency. Said Dolan, “One reason for this is the ongoing frustration generated by the shortage of appropriate fundraising professionals. We have all found that the right people are hard to find and difficult to keep. If we could double our fundraising teams, the resulting impact would be phenomenal.” Conversely, failure to find these professionals could stunt university growth.

The takeaway for students looking for an exciting and in-demand career path? A master’s in fundraising management or other fundraising-related topic may be the fast-track to success. 

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Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

,[db_lead] =>

Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

,[text] =>

Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

Investing in Education

In conjunction with the Group of Eight Committee (Go8), CASE first debuted its Charitable Giving to Universities in Australia and New Zealand Survey in 2012. Its aim? To provide accurate data for the countries’ development officers, alumni staff, and institutional leaders.

The most recent news is, indeed, promising. In 2015, universities in Australia and New Zealand received 26 percent more in new funds and 25 percent more in cash income than in the previous year. Concluded Tim Dolan, Chair of Go8’s Committee of Chief Advancement Officers, “This is not just a matter of anecdote and impression. With the survey of charitable giving now in its fourth year, we are accumulating real evidence and can begin to see helpful trends in the data collected.”

Even more tellingly, according to Dolan?  “This growth has continued notwithstanding an economy that was less confident than in recent years and despite political uncertainty over funding structures and deregulation. We can see that the right fundraising behaviour, consistently and professionally followed, produces satisfying results.”

Other areas of growth include total number of donors and alumni donors as well as participation by universities -- particularly Australian institutions.

Progress Ahead...With a Catch

While the increased generosity of donors bodes well for a boost to world-class research and university at the region’s higher education institutions, insiders warn of the dangers of complacency. Said Dolan, “One reason for this is the ongoing frustration generated by the shortage of appropriate fundraising professionals. We have all found that the right people are hard to find and difficult to keep. If we could double our fundraising teams, the resulting impact would be phenomenal.” Conversely, failure to find these professionals could stunt university growth.

The takeaway for students looking for an exciting and in-demand career path? A master’s in fundraising management or other fundraising-related topic may be the fast-track to success. 

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The Chinese government recently announced a plan attract more international students from Southeast Asian countries.  Find out why and learn more about higher education initiatives in China. 

,[text] =>

ASEAN-China Center Secretary General Yang Xiuping recently announced that China would like to improve collaboration in education and culture with ASEAN countries.  He said, “Foreign students from Southeast Asian countries are the bridge and future of the relationship between ASEAN [countries] and China.”

Why the push? This push comes partly from the 21st Century Maritime Silk Road.  The Chinese government recently initiated this development strategy and framework to both unite and expand collaborative efforts in education and trade between China and other countries on the Silk Road route.  Attracting more international students from Southeast Asia not only gives students an incredible learning opportunity; it also allows them to be a part of a new collaboration between China and the rest of the region.   

Currently, about 68,000 students from Southeast Asia study in China.  The Chinese government would like to increase that number to at least 100,000 within the year.  Yang commented, “We want to see more exchange students from ASEAN countries in China.” 

This initiative reflects a larger trend in Chinese higher education.  Last year was a record year for the numbers of international students in China.  Why?  China’s outward international strategy for 2020 focuses on making China a global study destination, not just in Southeast Asia.    Some of the countries with the largest numbers of students studying in China?  You guessed it: ASEAN members Thailand and Indonesia, among other global players. 

Learn more about studying in China

 

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The Chinese government recently announced a plan attract more international students from Southeast Asian countries.  Find out why and learn more about higher education initiatives in China. 

,[db_lead] =>

The Chinese government recently announced a plan attract more international students from Southeast Asian countries.  Find out why and learn more about higher education initiatives in China. 

,[text] =>

ASEAN-China Center Secretary General Yang Xiuping recently announced that China would like to improve collaboration in education and culture with ASEAN countries.  He said, “Foreign students from Southeast Asian countries are the bridge and future of the relationship between ASEAN [countries] and China.”

Why the push? This push comes partly from the 21st Century Maritime Silk Road.  The Chinese government recently initiated this development strategy and framework to both unite and expand collaborative efforts in education and trade between China and other countries on the Silk Road route.  Attracting more international students from Southeast Asia not only gives students an incredible learning opportunity; it also allows them to be a part of a new collaboration between China and the rest of the region.   

Currently, about 68,000 students from Southeast Asia study in China.  The Chinese government would like to increase that number to at least 100,000 within the year.  Yang commented, “We want to see more exchange students from ASEAN countries in China.” 

This initiative reflects a larger trend in Chinese higher education.  Last year was a record year for the numbers of international students in China.  Why?  China’s outward international strategy for 2020 focuses on making China a global study destination, not just in Southeast Asia.    Some of the countries with the largest numbers of students studying in China?  You guessed it: ASEAN members Thailand and Indonesia, among other global players. 

Learn more about studying in China

 

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Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

,[text] =>

Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

Plans Underway

In speaking of plans to build a new university dedicated to arts and sciences in Myanmar’s Pobbathiri township, Nay Pyi Taw Council member U Tun Tin said that a plot of land was already chosen as a likely site for the campus. Additionally, insiders revealed, the state counselor had agreed to a construction proposal with a five-year timeline. 

The new university will join several others in Nay Pyi Taw, and is expected to significantly expand the region’s offerings in the arts and sciences.

Good News for Students and Parents

While the project is applauded by many stakeholders, parents and students in the capital have special cause to celebrate the possibility of bachelor’s studies closer to home.

Said one resident and parent, “Students who want to study arts or sciences at university currently have to go to Mandalay or Kyaukse. Once the new university is built, we will be able to watch over our children more easily.”

Higher educated citizens are viewed by many as a critical part of helping the country achieve its full potential during Myanmar’s transition to democracy. Perhaps Myanmar Nobel Prize winner and National League for Democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi’s words from more than a quarter-century ago best reflect the country’s outlook today: “A country’s international standard cannot be measured in terms of the number of hotels and bridges; it has to be measured in terms of education. A country of inferior education won’t be able to catch up with the world.”

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Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

,[db_lead] =>

Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

,[text] =>

Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

Plans Underway

In speaking of plans to build a new university dedicated to arts and sciences in Myanmar’s Pobbathiri township, Nay Pyi Taw Council member U Tun Tin said that a plot of land was already chosen as a likely site for the campus. Additionally, insiders revealed, the state counselor had agreed to a construction proposal with a five-year timeline. 

The new university will join several others in Nay Pyi Taw, and is expected to significantly expand the region’s offerings in the arts and sciences.

Good News for Students and Parents

While the project is applauded by many stakeholders, parents and students in the capital have special cause to celebrate the possibility of bachelor’s studies closer to home.

Said one resident and parent, “Students who want to study arts or sciences at university currently have to go to Mandalay or Kyaukse. Once the new university is built, we will be able to watch over our children more easily.”

Higher educated citizens are viewed by many as a critical part of helping the country achieve its full potential during Myanmar’s transition to democracy. Perhaps Myanmar Nobel Prize winner and National League for Democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi’s words from more than a quarter-century ago best reflect the country’s outlook today: “A country’s international standard cannot be measured in terms of the number of hotels and bridges; it has to be measured in terms of education. A country of inferior education won’t be able to catch up with the world.”

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Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

,[text] =>

Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

 

1. You’ll increase your earning potential.

While many teaching jobs require master’s degrees, others may call for just a bachelor’s degree. In this case, getting the bare minimum can hurt you in several different ways. Not only does it lower your chances of getting hired when you’re up again more qualified applicants, but it also means you’ll likely end up collecting a higher starting salary.

According to The Houston Chronicle, most school districts offer teachers with master’s degrees across the elementary, middle, and high school levels supplemental pay in the form of a “bonus” or “bump.” According to analysis by the Center for American Progress this averages between an extra $3,000 and $10,000 a year! And while the cost of getting a master’s degree can seem prohibitive, the degree can pay for itself in just a few years. Not only that, but most school districts require continuing education credits -- doesn’t it make sense to put those credits toward a degree?

 

2. You’ll enjoy greater career mobility.

While a bachelor’s degree may qualify you to be a classroom teacher, many other school jobs  require advanced credentials. If career advancement is important to you, a master’s degree is a must-have. Whether you’re looking to work as a school administrator, curriculum director, content/subject area specialist, or school counselor, you’ll likely need a master’s degree or more.

Additionally, a master’s degree can also open up new possibilities outside of the school system entirely. From textbook authors and community college teachers to educational consultants and educational researchers, these sought-after, well-paid professionals almost always have upper-level qualifications.

In addition to helping you move up the latter, a bachelor’s degree can lead to broader career prospects, which can be an effective defense against teacher burnout -- a pervasive phenomenon among today’s hard-working teaching professionals.

 

3. You’ll be a better teacher.

A master’s degree isn’t merely a means to an end. Rather, it’s an opportunity for true growth and development. Your time in graduate school will benefit you in numerous ways, from understanding of your options as a teacher by exploring what truly interest you to acquiring tools which will enrich what you offer your students.

While your undergraduate degree might have bestowed knowledge in a certain field of study, a master’s in education places the focus on transitioning that and new knowledge to the classroom. Says Teach.com, “These degrees focus on teaching somebody how to be a teacher, with heavy emphasis on pedagogy, teaching methods, philosophy of education, and educational technology.”

According to one Reddit commenter, “It was a TON of work, and took a while, but it definitely made me a better teacher, both in increasing my knowledge and also making me more sympathetic to my students. Its interesting watching another person teach after you have been teaching all day, and seeing what you can do and what you shouldn't do.”

One caveat worth keeping in mind? As with all advanced studies, you get out of a master’s degree what you put into it. On the flip side, however, if you’re pursuing your graduate coursework part-time while maintaining a teaching job, you’ll have immediate opportunities to start making change. Another Reddit poster shared, “I love teaching while going to school because I can implement strategies I learn in class the next day.”

 

4. You can make change at a higher level.

Teachers help nurture the growth and development of kids in classroom every day. If you’re interested in making change at a higher level, however, a master’s degree can help prepare you for a role in research, assessment or policy.

From regional school districts to local, state, and federal agencies, many organizations exist aimed at improving how teachers, schools and educational systems at large do what they do. They’re all looking for people with the knowledge, experience and insights to help guide them.

One of the most compelling reasons prompting people to enter the teaching profession is the chance to make a difference in society. A master’s degree will not only position you to achieve this goal, but it can also help you improve the quality of education at large while bettering your own life in the process.

 

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Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

,[db_lead] =>

Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

,[text] =>

Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

 

1. You’ll increase your earning potential.

While many teaching jobs require master’s degrees, others may call for just a bachelor’s degree. In this case, getting the bare minimum can hurt you in several different ways. Not only does it lower your chances of getting hired when you’re up again more qualified applicants, but it also means you’ll likely end up collecting a higher starting salary.

According to The Houston Chronicle, most school districts offer teachers with master’s degrees across the elementary, middle, and high school levels supplemental pay in the form of a “bonus” or “bump.” According to analysis by the Center for American Progress this averages between an extra $3,000 and $10,000 a year! And while the cost of getting a master’s degree can seem prohibitive, the degree can pay for itself in just a few years. Not only that, but most school districts require continuing education credits -- doesn’t it make sense to put those credits toward a degree?

 

2. You’ll enjoy greater career mobility.

While a bachelor’s degree may qualify you to be a classroom teacher, many other school jobs  require advanced credentials. If career advancement is important to you, a master’s degree is a must-have. Whether you’re looking to work as a school administrator, curriculum director, content/subject area specialist, or school counselor, you’ll likely need a master’s degree or more.

Additionally, a master’s degree can also open up new possibilities outside of the school system entirely. From textbook authors and community college teachers to educational consultants and educational researchers, these sought-after, well-paid professionals almost always have upper-level qualifications.

In addition to helping you move up the latter, a bachelor’s degree can lead to broader career prospects, which can be an effective defense against teacher burnout -- a pervasive phenomenon among today’s hard-working teaching professionals.

 

3. You’ll be a better teacher.

A master’s degree isn’t merely a means to an end. Rather, it’s an opportunity for true growth and development. Your time in graduate school will benefit you in numerous ways, from understanding of your options as a teacher by exploring what truly interest you to acquiring tools which will enrich what you offer your students.

While your undergraduate degree might have bestowed knowledge in a certain field of study, a master’s in education places the focus on transitioning that and new knowledge to the classroom. Says Teach.com, “These degrees focus on teaching somebody how to be a teacher, with heavy emphasis on pedagogy, teaching methods, philosophy of education, and educational technology.”

According to one Reddit commenter, “It was a TON of work, and took a while, but it definitely made me a better teacher, both in increasing my knowledge and also making me more sympathetic to my students. Its interesting watching another person teach after you have been teaching all day, and seeing what you can do and what you shouldn't do.”

One caveat worth keeping in mind? As with all advanced studies, you get out of a master’s degree what you put into it. On the flip side, however, if you’re pursuing your graduate coursework part-time while maintaining a teaching job, you’ll have immediate opportunities to start making change. Another Reddit poster shared, “I love teaching while going to school because I can implement strategies I learn in class the next day.”

 

4. You can make change at a higher level.

Teachers help nurture the growth and development of kids in classroom every day. If you’re interested in making change at a higher level, however, a master’s degree can help prepare you for a role in research, assessment or policy.

From regional school districts to local, state, and federal agencies, many organizations exist aimed at improving how teachers, schools and educational systems at large do what they do. They’re all looking for people with the knowledge, experience and insights to help guide them.

One of the most compelling reasons prompting people to enter the teaching profession is the chance to make a difference in society. A master’s degree will not only position you to achieve this goal, but it can also help you improve the quality of education at large while bettering your own life in the process.

 

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Thinking about business analytics?  The Rady School of Management at the University of California San Diego offers graduate students the chance to wrestle with real-world business problems—and their solutions—using cutting edge business analytics.  Let’s take a closer look.

,[text] =>

Data matters. “Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted,” attributed to Albert Einstein, explains the purpose of business analytics perfectly.  We live in an age of bigger and bigger data—and businesses need ways to sift through it all, to figure out which combinations of data count—and which ones don’t.  The success of business in today’s global economy depends on it.  The Rady School of Management at UC San Diego offers a forward-thinking Master of Science in Business Analytics that teaches its students how to grapple with the reality of big data using business analytics. 

 

What is Business Analytics?

Professor Vincent Nijs, co-director with Professor Terrence August of the Master of Science in Business Analytics program at the Rady School of Management at UC San Diego, describes the field this way, “I think of business analytics as the field focused on how to use data and models to make better business decisions.  Data Science uses many similar tools (e.g. machine learning) but the set of questions they seek to answer are often different.  You can think of business analytics as ‘data science for business.’”

 

The Amount of Data That Companies Collect Gets Bigger and Bigger…

Just how big is big data?  Really big, and getting bigger all the time.  The EMC Digital Universe Study predicts that by the year 2020, 1.7 megabytes of new data will be created every second for every human on the planet.  What does that mean?  There will be 44 trillion gigabytes (44 zettabytes) of data in the digital universe.  Where does the data come from?  Just about everywhere—1.2 trillion searches per year on Google alone, over 1 billion people using Facebook every day, trillions of photos taken, and billions shared.  By 2020, there will be over 6.1 billion smartphone users, and at least 1/3 of all data will be transmitted through the cloud. We haven’t even talked about online banking, business, movies, television, music, and games.

 

…But Businesses Don’t Always Know How to Use the Data

The Rady School‘s Professor Nijs states, “Companies are collecting more and more data but often lack the people to use it effectively.” He referenced a quote from a well-known report by the McKinsey Global Institute (2013): “Big data promises big things—but only if organizations have the right people in place who know what to do with it. A recurring theme among senior leadership across all sectors is a shortage of professionals trained and experienced at the intersection of disciplines necessary to capture, analyze, and generate meaningful business insights from big data. In addition to deep analytics talent, organizations need management with the right balance of business judgment and statistical skills to translate analysis into action.”

 

A Company’s Future Relies on Its Business Analytics

The need for effective, efficient business analytics is stronger than ever.  Businesses need to know what they want to learn from business analytics—and then how they’re going to use that data to inform their decisions across the board.

Businesses need to be able to determine what data they need and then identify the data sources for gleaning that information.  The final piece?  Distilling that information into actionable insights using the tools of business analytics. Once businesses have a plan for capturing the desired data, organizing it, and analyzing it, they are in a position to develop plans to stay competitive.

 

Business Analytics Has Excellent Job Prospects…

According to a McKinsey Global Report, the US alone has a shortage of about 190,000 data scientists and 1.5 million business analysts.  Globally and in the US, companies need experts in business analytics.  High demand means higher salaries, and a variety of options.  Graduates in Business Analytics work at large companies, start their own businesses, work in banks or FinTech, web-based businesses, retail and food companies, media companies, and marketing companies.

 

…Especially When You Study at a Forward-Thinking School Like Rady

The Rady School’s  new Master of Science in Business Analytics (MSBA) puts students at the forefront of the field. The program focuses on the problems big data poses to businesses—and how to solve them using models, statistics, and machine learning – in classes such as customer analytics, business intelligence, and supply chain analytics.  The school’s bottom line?  To graduate students who know how to use analytics to make a positive impact on business performance—and sustain it. 

Professor Nijs says that “After graduation, our students should expect to work extensively with data, use statistics and machine learning, write code, and develop tools to enhance business decision-making.  After gaining some experience, we expect them to be well-suited to lead an analytics team.” 

First steps for prospective students?  Those interested in studying in this program should have an undergraduate degree in a “quantitative discipline,” says Nijs, like “mathematics, statistics, economics, or physics.”  They should also have some programming experience. 

As data continues to get bigger, the global business world will rely more heavily on business analytics to succeed.  Want to make a difference in the business world?  Earn your MSBA in the field that businesses will indisputably need for success and sustainability. 

Learn more about The Rady School of Management.

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Thinking about business analytics?  The Rady School of Management at the University of California San Diego offers graduate students the chance to wrestle with real-world business problems—and their solutions—using cutting edge business analytics.  Let’s take a closer look.

,[db_lead] =>

Thinking about business analytics?  The Rady School of Management at the University of California San Diego offers graduate students the chance to wrestle with real-world business problems—and their solutions—using cutting edge business analytics.  Let’s take a closer look.

,[text] =>

Data matters. “Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted,” attributed to Albert Einstein, explains the purpose of business analytics perfectly.  We live in an age of bigger and bigger data—and businesses need ways to sift through it all, to figure out which combinations of data count—and which ones don’t.  The success of business in today’s global economy depends on it.  The Rady School of Management at UC San Diego offers a forward-thinking Master of Science in Business Analytics that teaches its students how to grapple with the reality of big data using business analytics. 

 

What is Business Analytics?

Professor Vincent Nijs, co-director with Professor Terrence August of the Master of Science in Business Analytics program at the Rady School of Management at UC San Diego, describes the field this way, “I think of business analytics as the field focused on how to use data and models to make better business decisions.  Data Science uses many similar tools (e.g. machine learning) but the set of questions they seek to answer are often different.  You can think of business analytics as ‘data science for business.’”

 

The Amount of Data That Companies Collect Gets Bigger and Bigger…

Just how big is big data?  Really big, and getting bigger all the time.  The EMC Digital Universe Study predicts that by the year 2020, 1.7 megabytes of new data will be created every second for every human on the planet.  What does that mean?  There will be 44 trillion gigabytes (44 zettabytes) of data in the digital universe.  Where does the data come from?  Just about everywhere—1.2 trillion searches per year on Google alone, over 1 billion people using Facebook every day, trillions of photos taken, and billions shared.  By 2020, there will be over 6.1 billion smartphone users, and at least 1/3 of all data will be transmitted through the cloud. We haven’t even talked about online banking, business, movies, television, music, and games.

 

…But Businesses Don’t Always Know How to Use the Data

The Rady School‘s Professor Nijs states, “Companies are collecting more and more data but often lack the people to use it effectively.” He referenced a quote from a well-known report by the McKinsey Global Institute (2013): “Big data promises big things—but only if organizations have the right people in place who know what to do with it. A recurring theme among senior leadership across all sectors is a shortage of professionals trained and experienced at the intersection of disciplines necessary to capture, analyze, and generate meaningful business insights from big data. In addition to deep analytics talent, organizations need management with the right balance of business judgment and statistical skills to translate analysis into action.”

 

A Company’s Future Relies on Its Business Analytics

The need for effective, efficient business analytics is stronger than ever.  Businesses need to know what they want to learn from business analytics—and then how they’re going to use that data to inform their decisions across the board.

Businesses need to be able to determine what data they need and then identify the data sources for gleaning that information.  The final piece?  Distilling that information into actionable insights using the tools of business analytics. Once businesses have a plan for capturing the desired data, organizing it, and analyzing it, they are in a position to develop plans to stay competitive.

 

Business Analytics Has Excellent Job Prospects…

According to a McKinsey Global Report, the US alone has a shortage of about 190,000 data scientists and 1.5 million business analysts.  Globally and in the US, companies need experts in business analytics.  High demand means higher salaries, and a variety of options.  Graduates in Business Analytics work at large companies, start their own businesses, work in banks or FinTech, web-based businesses, retail and food companies, media companies, and marketing companies.

 

…Especially When You Study at a Forward-Thinking School Like Rady

The Rady School’s  new Master of Science in Business Analytics (MSBA) puts students at the forefront of the field. The program focuses on the problems big data poses to businesses—and how to solve them using models, statistics, and machine learning – in classes such as customer analytics, business intelligence, and supply chain analytics.  The school’s bottom line?  To graduate students who know how to use analytics to make a positive impact on business performance—and sustain it. 

Professor Nijs says that “After graduation, our students should expect to work extensively with data, use statistics and machine learning, write code, and develop tools to enhance business decision-making.  After gaining some experience, we expect them to be well-suited to lead an analytics team.” 

First steps for prospective students?  Those interested in studying in this program should have an undergraduate degree in a “quantitative discipline,” says Nijs, like “mathematics, statistics, economics, or physics.”  They should also have some programming experience. 

As data continues to get bigger, the global business world will rely more heavily on business analytics to succeed.  Want to make a difference in the business world?  Earn your MSBA in the field that businesses will indisputably need for success and sustainability. 

Learn more about The Rady School of Management.

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Thanksgiving, that quintessential American holiday, is here.  Thinking about what to do?  We have four fantastic options for you.  Let’s take a closer look. 

,[text] =>

Giving thanks.  Embracing friendship.  Sharing a thoughtful meal.  Telling stories.  Thanksgiving conjures images of extended families and friends gathered around a beautiful table, sharing a delicious meal, and expressing gratitude for what they have.  International students studying in the US during the holidays have a multitude of way to celebrate this quintessential American holiday.  We’ve put together four fantastic options for you to consider as many US students return “home for the holidays.”

 

1. If an American friend invites you, accept the invitation

Thanksgiving is about, well, being thankful for what you have.  This includes being thankful for new friendships.  An American friend invites you?  Accept.  It’s an invitation to be a part of the family, to share the tradition, to take a break from school, and maybe even to participate in the day after Thanksgiving—Black Friday—the day that many retail shops offer sales and discounts in preparation for December’s holidays.  How’d “Black Friday” get its name?  It’s the day that many retailers’ ledgers assure that they will end their fiscal year “in the black,” or showing a profit for the year.

 

2. Consider on-campus opportunities

Feel like staying on-campus during the Thanksgiving break?  Look for campus traditions at your school.  Some schools offer their own Thanksgiving celebrations for any students and faculty who opt to stay on campus, or who may not have options to travel.  Kansas’s Hesston College hosts an annual Thanksgiving weekend, with a dinner and a bevy of other activities, including art exhibits, concerts, talent shows, basketball tournaments, a benefit fun run, and other special events. At Ohio State University, any students, faculty, and staff who are not planning to head home are invited to attend an annual Thanksgiving feast—this year, the University expects over 1,600 attendees.  At Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, PA, students and faculty spend the entire month of November learning about spirituality.  Several faculty at the University host international students at their homes on Thanksgiving Day—as an expression of gratitude for sharing their learning. 

Credit: nbcwashington.com

3. Attend a parade

What’s Thanksgiving without a parade?  The most famous, of course, is the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City, with over 3 million in-person spectators and upwards of 40 million television viewers.  Several major cities besides New York also hold parades where you can enjoy the holiday spirit of gratitude.  Check out the Dunkin’ Donuts Thanksgiving Day Parade in the City of Brotherly Love, Philadelphia.  Motor City has another option—check out America’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in Detroit, Michigan for floats, bands, music, and a glimpse at the history of the US auto industry.  Also in the Midwest is Chicago’s McDonald’s Thanksgiving Parade, which began in the 1930’s in an effort to raise the spirits of Depression-era residents.  Charlotte, North Carolina, Houston, Texas, and Seattle, Washington offer additional possibilities for big parades.  If you don’t live near a city, don’t fret!  Check your local paper for smaller, regional events.  Watching a parade also gives you a chance either to travel to a new place, or to learn something new and interesting about your university town. 

 

4. Take a break

Not interested in all of the hullabaloo?  Not feeling the need for turkey, Black Friday, parades, or big get-togethers?  Relax.  Enjoy the quiet.  Go for a walk.  Read that book you’ve been wanting to read.  Do some sightseeing—explore the city or town where you’ve decided to study.  If you really feel like it, get caught up—or work ahead—in one of your classes.  Take some time for yourself and recharge. 


Regardless of what you choose to do this Thanksgiving season, remember to be grateful for who you are, what you have, and the positive people in your life.  Cheers!

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Thanksgiving, that quintessential American holiday, is here.  Thinking about what to do?  We have four fantastic options for you.  Let’s take a closer look. 

,[db_lead] =>

Thanksgiving, that quintessential American holiday, is here.  Thinking about what to do?  We have four fantastic options for you.  Let’s take a closer look. 

,[text] =>

Giving thanks.  Embracing friendship.  Sharing a thoughtful meal.  Telling stories.  Thanksgiving conjures images of extended families and friends gathered around a beautiful table, sharing a delicious meal, and expressing gratitude for what they have.  International students studying in the US during the holidays have a multitude of way to celebrate this quintessential American holiday.  We’ve put together four fantastic options for you to consider as many US students return “home for the holidays.”

 

1. If an American friend invites you, accept the invitation

Thanksgiving is about, well, being thankful for what you have.  This includes being thankful for new friendships.  An American friend invites you?  Accept.  It’s an invitation to be a part of the family, to share the tradition, to take a break from school, and maybe even to participate in the day after Thanksgiving—Black Friday—the day that many retail shops offer sales and discounts in preparation for December’s holidays.  How’d “Black Friday” get its name?  It’s the day that many retailers’ ledgers assure that they will end their fiscal year “in the black,” or showing a profit for the year.

 

2. Consider on-campus opportunities

Feel like staying on-campus during the Thanksgiving break?  Look for campus traditions at your school.  Some schools offer their own Thanksgiving celebrations for any students and faculty who opt to stay on campus, or who may not have options to travel.  Kansas’s Hesston College hosts an annual Thanksgiving weekend, with a dinner and a bevy of other activities, including art exhibits, concerts, talent shows, basketball tournaments, a benefit fun run, and other special events. At Ohio State University, any students, faculty, and staff who are not planning to head home are invited to attend an annual Thanksgiving feast—this year, the University expects over 1,600 attendees.  At Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, PA, students and faculty spend the entire month of November learning about spirituality.  Several faculty at the University host international students at their homes on Thanksgiving Day—as an expression of gratitude for sharing their learning. 

Credit: nbcwashington.com

3. Attend a parade

What’s Thanksgiving without a parade?  The most famous, of course, is the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City, with over 3 million in-person spectators and upwards of 40 million television viewers.  Several major cities besides New York also hold parades where you can enjoy the holiday spirit of gratitude.  Check out the Dunkin’ Donuts Thanksgiving Day Parade in the City of Brotherly Love, Philadelphia.  Motor City has another option—check out America’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in Detroit, Michigan for floats, bands, music, and a glimpse at the history of the US auto industry.  Also in the Midwest is Chicago’s McDonald’s Thanksgiving Parade, which began in the 1930’s in an effort to raise the spirits of Depression-era residents.  Charlotte, North Carolina, Houston, Texas, and Seattle, Washington offer additional possibilities for big parades.  If you don’t live near a city, don’t fret!  Check your local paper for smaller, regional events.  Watching a parade also gives you a chance either to travel to a new place, or to learn something new and interesting about your university town. 

 

4. Take a break

Not interested in all of the hullabaloo?  Not feeling the need for turkey, Black Friday, parades, or big get-togethers?  Relax.  Enjoy the quiet.  Go for a walk.  Read that book you’ve been wanting to read.  Do some sightseeing—explore the city or town where you’ve decided to study.  If you really feel like it, get caught up—or work ahead—in one of your classes.  Take some time for yourself and recharge. 


Regardless of what you choose to do this Thanksgiving season, remember to be grateful for who you are, what you have, and the positive people in your life.  Cheers!

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Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

,[text] =>

Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

Investing in Education

In conjunction with the Group of Eight Committee (Go8), CASE first debuted its Charitable Giving to Universities in Australia and New Zealand Survey in 2012. Its aim? To provide accurate data for the countries’ development officers, alumni staff, and institutional leaders.

The most recent news is, indeed, promising. In 2015, universities in Australia and New Zealand received 26 percent more in new funds and 25 percent more in cash income than in the previous year. Concluded Tim Dolan, Chair of Go8’s Committee of Chief Advancement Officers, “This is not just a matter of anecdote and impression. With the survey of charitable giving now in its fourth year, we are accumulating real evidence and can begin to see helpful trends in the data collected.”

Even more tellingly, according to Dolan?  “This growth has continued notwithstanding an economy that was less confident than in recent years and despite political uncertainty over funding structures and deregulation. We can see that the right fundraising behaviour, consistently and professionally followed, produces satisfying results.”

Other areas of growth include total number of donors and alumni donors as well as participation by universities -- particularly Australian institutions.

Progress Ahead...With a Catch

While the increased generosity of donors bodes well for a boost to world-class research and university at the region’s higher education institutions, insiders warn of the dangers of complacency. Said Dolan, “One reason for this is the ongoing frustration generated by the shortage of appropriate fundraising professionals. We have all found that the right people are hard to find and difficult to keep. If we could double our fundraising teams, the resulting impact would be phenomenal.” Conversely, failure to find these professionals could stunt university growth.

The takeaway for students looking for an exciting and in-demand career path? A master’s in fundraising management or other fundraising-related topic may be the fast-track to success. 

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Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

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Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

,[text] =>

Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

Investing in Education

In conjunction with the Group of Eight Committee (Go8), CASE first debuted its Charitable Giving to Universities in Australia and New Zealand Survey in 2012. Its aim? To provide accurate data for the countries’ development officers, alumni staff, and institutional leaders.

The most recent news is, indeed, promising. In 2015, universities in Australia and New Zealand received 26 percent more in new funds and 25 percent more in cash income than in the previous year. Concluded Tim Dolan, Chair of Go8’s Committee of Chief Advancement Officers, “This is not just a matter of anecdote and impression. With the survey of charitable giving now in its fourth year, we are accumulating real evidence and can begin to see helpful trends in the data collected.”

Even more tellingly, according to Dolan?  “This growth has continued notwithstanding an economy that was less confident than in recent years and despite political uncertainty over funding structures and deregulation. We can see that the right fundraising behaviour, consistently and professionally followed, produces satisfying results.”

Other areas of growth include total number of donors and alumni donors as well as participation by universities -- particularly Australian institutions.

Progress Ahead...With a Catch

While the increased generosity of donors bodes well for a boost to world-class research and university at the region’s higher education institutions, insiders warn of the dangers of complacency. Said Dolan, “One reason for this is the ongoing frustration generated by the shortage of appropriate fundraising professionals. We have all found that the right people are hard to find and difficult to keep. If we could double our fundraising teams, the resulting impact would be phenomenal.” Conversely, failure to find these professionals could stunt university growth.

The takeaway for students looking for an exciting and in-demand career path? A master’s in fundraising management or other fundraising-related topic may be the fast-track to success. 

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The Chinese government recently announced a plan attract more international students from Southeast Asian countries.  Find out why and learn more about higher education initiatives in China. 

,[text] =>

ASEAN-China Center Secretary General Yang Xiuping recently announced that China would like to improve collaboration in education and culture with ASEAN countries.  He said, “Foreign students from Southeast Asian countries are the bridge and future of the relationship between ASEAN [countries] and China.”

Why the push? This push comes partly from the 21st Century Maritime Silk Road.  The Chinese government recently initiated this development strategy and framework to both unite and expand collaborative efforts in education and trade between China and other countries on the Silk Road route.  Attracting more international students from Southeast Asia not only gives students an incredible learning opportunity; it also allows them to be a part of a new collaboration between China and the rest of the region.   

Currently, about 68,000 students from Southeast Asia study in China.  The Chinese government would like to increase that number to at least 100,000 within the year.  Yang commented, “We want to see more exchange students from ASEAN countries in China.” 

This initiative reflects a larger trend in Chinese higher education.  Last year was a record year for the numbers of international students in China.  Why?  China’s outward international strategy for 2020 focuses on making China a global study destination, not just in Southeast Asia.    Some of the countries with the largest numbers of students studying in China?  You guessed it: ASEAN members Thailand and Indonesia, among other global players. 

Learn more about studying in China

 

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The Chinese government recently announced a plan attract more international students from Southeast Asian countries.  Find out why and learn more about higher education initiatives in China. 

,[db_lead] =>

The Chinese government recently announced a plan attract more international students from Southeast Asian countries.  Find out why and learn more about higher education initiatives in China. 

,[text] =>

ASEAN-China Center Secretary General Yang Xiuping recently announced that China would like to improve collaboration in education and culture with ASEAN countries.  He said, “Foreign students from Southeast Asian countries are the bridge and future of the relationship between ASEAN [countries] and China.”

Why the push? This push comes partly from the 21st Century Maritime Silk Road.  The Chinese government recently initiated this development strategy and framework to both unite and expand collaborative efforts in education and trade between China and other countries on the Silk Road route.  Attracting more international students from Southeast Asia not only gives students an incredible learning opportunity; it also allows them to be a part of a new collaboration between China and the rest of the region.   

Currently, about 68,000 students from Southeast Asia study in China.  The Chinese government would like to increase that number to at least 100,000 within the year.  Yang commented, “We want to see more exchange students from ASEAN countries in China.” 

This initiative reflects a larger trend in Chinese higher education.  Last year was a record year for the numbers of international students in China.  Why?  China’s outward international strategy for 2020 focuses on making China a global study destination, not just in Southeast Asia.    Some of the countries with the largest numbers of students studying in China?  You guessed it: ASEAN members Thailand and Indonesia, among other global players. 

Learn more about studying in China

 

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Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

,[text] =>

Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

Plans Underway

In speaking of plans to build a new university dedicated to arts and sciences in Myanmar’s Pobbathiri township, Nay Pyi Taw Council member U Tun Tin said that a plot of land was already chosen as a likely site for the campus. Additionally, insiders revealed, the state counselor had agreed to a construction proposal with a five-year timeline. 

The new university will join several others in Nay Pyi Taw, and is expected to significantly expand the region’s offerings in the arts and sciences.

Good News for Students and Parents

While the project is applauded by many stakeholders, parents and students in the capital have special cause to celebrate the possibility of bachelor’s studies closer to home.

Said one resident and parent, “Students who want to study arts or sciences at university currently have to go to Mandalay or Kyaukse. Once the new university is built, we will be able to watch over our children more easily.”

Higher educated citizens are viewed by many as a critical part of helping the country achieve its full potential during Myanmar’s transition to democracy. Perhaps Myanmar Nobel Prize winner and National League for Democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi’s words from more than a quarter-century ago best reflect the country’s outlook today: “A country’s international standard cannot be measured in terms of the number of hotels and bridges; it has to be measured in terms of education. A country of inferior education won’t be able to catch up with the world.”

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Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

,[db_lead] =>

Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

,[text] =>

Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

Plans Underway

In speaking of plans to build a new university dedicated to arts and sciences in Myanmar’s Pobbathiri township, Nay Pyi Taw Council member U Tun Tin said that a plot of land was already chosen as a likely site for the campus. Additionally, insiders revealed, the state counselor had agreed to a construction proposal with a five-year timeline. 

The new university will join several others in Nay Pyi Taw, and is expected to significantly expand the region’s offerings in the arts and sciences.

Good News for Students and Parents

While the project is applauded by many stakeholders, parents and students in the capital have special cause to celebrate the possibility of bachelor’s studies closer to home.

Said one resident and parent, “Students who want to study arts or sciences at university currently have to go to Mandalay or Kyaukse. Once the new university is built, we will be able to watch over our children more easily.”

Higher educated citizens are viewed by many as a critical part of helping the country achieve its full potential during Myanmar’s transition to democracy. Perhaps Myanmar Nobel Prize winner and National League for Democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi’s words from more than a quarter-century ago best reflect the country’s outlook today: “A country’s international standard cannot be measured in terms of the number of hotels and bridges; it has to be measured in terms of education. A country of inferior education won’t be able to catch up with the world.”

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Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

,[text] =>

Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

 

1. You’ll increase your earning potential.

While many teaching jobs require master’s degrees, others may call for just a bachelor’s degree. In this case, getting the bare minimum can hurt you in several different ways. Not only does it lower your chances of getting hired when you’re up again more qualified applicants, but it also means you’ll likely end up collecting a higher starting salary.

According to The Houston Chronicle, most school districts offer teachers with master’s degrees across the elementary, middle, and high school levels supplemental pay in the form of a “bonus” or “bump.” According to analysis by the Center for American Progress this averages between an extra $3,000 and $10,000 a year! And while the cost of getting a master’s degree can seem prohibitive, the degree can pay for itself in just a few years. Not only that, but most school districts require continuing education credits -- doesn’t it make sense to put those credits toward a degree?

 

2. You’ll enjoy greater career mobility.

While a bachelor’s degree may qualify you to be a classroom teacher, many other school jobs  require advanced credentials. If career advancement is important to you, a master’s degree is a must-have. Whether you’re looking to work as a school administrator, curriculum director, content/subject area specialist, or school counselor, you’ll likely need a master’s degree or more.

Additionally, a master’s degree can also open up new possibilities outside of the school system entirely. From textbook authors and community college teachers to educational consultants and educational researchers, these sought-after, well-paid professionals almost always have upper-level qualifications.

In addition to helping you move up the latter, a bachelor’s degree can lead to broader career prospects, which can be an effective defense against teacher burnout -- a pervasive phenomenon among today’s hard-working teaching professionals.

 

3. You’ll be a better teacher.

A master’s degree isn’t merely a means to an end. Rather, it’s an opportunity for true growth and development. Your time in graduate school will benefit you in numerous ways, from understanding of your options as a teacher by exploring what truly interest you to acquiring tools which will enrich what you offer your students.

While your undergraduate degree might have bestowed knowledge in a certain field of study, a master’s in education places the focus on transitioning that and new knowledge to the classroom. Says Teach.com, “These degrees focus on teaching somebody how to be a teacher, with heavy emphasis on pedagogy, teaching methods, philosophy of education, and educational technology.”

According to one Reddit commenter, “It was a TON of work, and took a while, but it definitely made me a better teacher, both in increasing my knowledge and also making me more sympathetic to my students. Its interesting watching another person teach after you have been teaching all day, and seeing what you can do and what you shouldn't do.”

One caveat worth keeping in mind? As with all advanced studies, you get out of a master’s degree what you put into it. On the flip side, however, if you’re pursuing your graduate coursework part-time while maintaining a teaching job, you’ll have immediate opportunities to start making change. Another Reddit poster shared, “I love teaching while going to school because I can implement strategies I learn in class the next day.”

 

4. You can make change at a higher level.

Teachers help nurture the growth and development of kids in classroom every day. If you’re interested in making change at a higher level, however, a master’s degree can help prepare you for a role in research, assessment or policy.

From regional school districts to local, state, and federal agencies, many organizations exist aimed at improving how teachers, schools and educational systems at large do what they do. They’re all looking for people with the knowledge, experience and insights to help guide them.

One of the most compelling reasons prompting people to enter the teaching profession is the chance to make a difference in society. A master’s degree will not only position you to achieve this goal, but it can also help you improve the quality of education at large while bettering your own life in the process.

 

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Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

,[db_lead] =>

Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

,[text] =>

Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

 

1. You’ll increase your earning potential.

While many teaching jobs require master’s degrees, others may call for just a bachelor’s degree. In this case, getting the bare minimum can hurt you in several different ways. Not only does it lower your chances of getting hired when you’re up again more qualified applicants, but it also means you’ll likely end up collecting a higher starting salary.

According to The Houston Chronicle, most school districts offer teachers with master’s degrees across the elementary, middle, and high school levels supplemental pay in the form of a “bonus” or “bump.” According to analysis by the Center for American Progress this averages between an extra $3,000 and $10,000 a year! And while the cost of getting a master’s degree can seem prohibitive, the degree can pay for itself in just a few years. Not only that, but most school districts require continuing education credits -- doesn’t it make sense to put those credits toward a degree?

 

2. You’ll enjoy greater career mobility.

While a bachelor’s degree may qualify you to be a classroom teacher, many other school jobs  require advanced credentials. If career advancement is important to you, a master’s degree is a must-have. Whether you’re looking to work as a school administrator, curriculum director, content/subject area specialist, or school counselor, you’ll likely need a master’s degree or more.

Additionally, a master’s degree can also open up new possibilities outside of the school system entirely. From textbook authors and community college teachers to educational consultants and educational researchers, these sought-after, well-paid professionals almost always have upper-level qualifications.

In addition to helping you move up the latter, a bachelor’s degree can lead to broader career prospects, which can be an effective defense against teacher burnout -- a pervasive phenomenon among today’s hard-working teaching professionals.

 

3. You’ll be a better teacher.

A master’s degree isn’t merely a means to an end. Rather, it’s an opportunity for true growth and development. Your time in graduate school will benefit you in numerous ways, from understanding of your options as a teacher by exploring what truly interest you to acquiring tools which will enrich what you offer your students.

While your undergraduate degree might have bestowed knowledge in a certain field of study, a master’s in education places the focus on transitioning that and new knowledge to the classroom. Says Teach.com, “These degrees focus on teaching somebody how to be a teacher, with heavy emphasis on pedagogy, teaching methods, philosophy of education, and educational technology.”

According to one Reddit commenter, “It was a TON of work, and took a while, but it definitely made me a better teacher, both in increasing my knowledge and also making me more sympathetic to my students. Its interesting watching another person teach after you have been teaching all day, and seeing what you can do and what you shouldn't do.”

One caveat worth keeping in mind? As with all advanced studies, you get out of a master’s degree what you put into it. On the flip side, however, if you’re pursuing your graduate coursework part-time while maintaining a teaching job, you’ll have immediate opportunities to start making change. Another Reddit poster shared, “I love teaching while going to school because I can implement strategies I learn in class the next day.”

 

4. You can make change at a higher level.

Teachers help nurture the growth and development of kids in classroom every day. If you’re interested in making change at a higher level, however, a master’s degree can help prepare you for a role in research, assessment or policy.

From regional school districts to local, state, and federal agencies, many organizations exist aimed at improving how teachers, schools and educational systems at large do what they do. They’re all looking for people with the knowledge, experience and insights to help guide them.

One of the most compelling reasons prompting people to enter the teaching profession is the chance to make a difference in society. A master’s degree will not only position you to achieve this goal, but it can also help you improve the quality of education at large while bettering your own life in the process.

 

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Thinking about business analytics?  The Rady School of Management at the University of California San Diego offers graduate students the chance to wrestle with real-world business problems—and their solutions—using cutting edge business analytics.  Let’s take a closer look.

,[text] =>

Data matters. “Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted,” attributed to Albert Einstein, explains the purpose of business analytics perfectly.  We live in an age of bigger and bigger data—and businesses need ways to sift through it all, to figure out which combinations of data count—and which ones don’t.  The success of business in today’s global economy depends on it.  The Rady School of Management at UC San Diego offers a forward-thinking Master of Science in Business Analytics that teaches its students how to grapple with the reality of big data using business analytics. 

 

What is Business Analytics?

Professor Vincent Nijs, co-director with Professor Terrence August of the Master of Science in Business Analytics program at the Rady School of Management at UC San Diego, describes the field this way, “I think of business analytics as the field focused on how to use data and models to make better business decisions.  Data Science uses many similar tools (e.g. machine learning) but the set of questions they seek to answer are often different.  You can think of business analytics as ‘data science for business.’”

 

The Amount of Data That Companies Collect Gets Bigger and Bigger…

Just how big is big data?  Really big, and getting bigger all the time.  The EMC Digital Universe Study predicts that by the year 2020, 1.7 megabytes of new data will be created every second for every human on the planet.  What does that mean?  There will be 44 trillion gigabytes (44 zettabytes) of data in the digital universe.  Where does the data come from?  Just about everywhere—1.2 trillion searches per year on Google alone, over 1 billion people using Facebook every day, trillions of photos taken, and billions shared.  By 2020, there will be over 6.1 billion smartphone users, and at least 1/3 of all data will be transmitted through the cloud. We haven’t even talked about online banking, business, movies, television, music, and games.

 

…But Businesses Don’t Always Know How to Use the Data

The Rady School‘s Professor Nijs states, “Companies are collecting more and more data but often lack the people to use it effectively.” He referenced a quote from a well-known report by the McKinsey Global Institute (2013): “Big data promises big things—but only if organizations have the right people in place who know what to do with it. A recurring theme among senior leadership across all sectors is a shortage of professionals trained and experienced at the intersection of disciplines necessary to capture, analyze, and generate meaningful business insights from big data. In addition to deep analytics talent, organizations need management with the right balance of business judgment and statistical skills to translate analysis into action.”

 

A Company’s Future Relies on Its Business Analytics

The need for effective, efficient business analytics is stronger than ever.  Businesses need to know what they want to learn from business analytics—and then how they’re going to use that data to inform their decisions across the board.

Businesses need to be able to determine what data they need and then identify the data sources for gleaning that information.  The final piece?  Distilling that information into actionable insights using the tools of business analytics. Once businesses have a plan for capturing the desired data, organizing it, and analyzing it, they are in a position to develop plans to stay competitive.

 

Business Analytics Has Excellent Job Prospects…

According to a McKinsey Global Report, the US alone has a shortage of about 190,000 data scientists and 1.5 million business analysts.  Globally and in the US, companies need experts in business analytics.  High demand means higher salaries, and a variety of options.  Graduates in Business Analytics work at large companies, start their own businesses, work in banks or FinTech, web-based businesses, retail and food companies, media companies, and marketing companies.

 

…Especially When You Study at a Forward-Thinking School Like Rady

The Rady School’s  new Master of Science in Business Analytics (MSBA) puts students at the forefront of the field. The program focuses on the problems big data poses to businesses—and how to solve them using models, statistics, and machine learning – in classes such as customer analytics, business intelligence, and supply chain analytics.  The school’s bottom line?  To graduate students who know how to use analytics to make a positive impact on business performance—and sustain it. 

Professor Nijs says that “After graduation, our students should expect to work extensively with data, use statistics and machine learning, write code, and develop tools to enhance business decision-making.  After gaining some experience, we expect them to be well-suited to lead an analytics team.” 

First steps for prospective students?  Those interested in studying in this program should have an undergraduate degree in a “quantitative discipline,” says Nijs, like “mathematics, statistics, economics, or physics.”  They should also have some programming experience. 

As data continues to get bigger, the global business world will rely more heavily on business analytics to succeed.  Want to make a difference in the business world?  Earn your MSBA in the field that businesses will indisputably need for success and sustainability. 

Learn more about The Rady School of Management.

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Thinking about business analytics?  The Rady School of Management at the University of California San Diego offers graduate students the chance to wrestle with real-world business problems—and their solutions—using cutting edge business analytics.  Let’s take a closer look.

,[db_lead] =>

Thinking about business analytics?  The Rady School of Management at the University of California San Diego offers graduate students the chance to wrestle with real-world business problems—and their solutions—using cutting edge business analytics.  Let’s take a closer look.

,[text] =>

Data matters. “Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted,” attributed to Albert Einstein, explains the purpose of business analytics perfectly.  We live in an age of bigger and bigger data—and businesses need ways to sift through it all, to figure out which combinations of data count—and which ones don’t.  The success of business in today’s global economy depends on it.  The Rady School of Management at UC San Diego offers a forward-thinking Master of Science in Business Analytics that teaches its students how to grapple with the reality of big data using business analytics. 

 

What is Business Analytics?

Professor Vincent Nijs, co-director with Professor Terrence August of the Master of Science in Business Analytics program at the Rady School of Management at UC San Diego, describes the field this way, “I think of business analytics as the field focused on how to use data and models to make better business decisions.  Data Science uses many similar tools (e.g. machine learning) but the set of questions they seek to answer are often different.  You can think of business analytics as ‘data science for business.’”

 

The Amount of Data That Companies Collect Gets Bigger and Bigger…

Just how big is big data?  Really big, and getting bigger all the time.  The EMC Digital Universe Study predicts that by the year 2020, 1.7 megabytes of new data will be created every second for every human on the planet.  What does that mean?  There will be 44 trillion gigabytes (44 zettabytes) of data in the digital universe.  Where does the data come from?  Just about everywhere—1.2 trillion searches per year on Google alone, over 1 billion people using Facebook every day, trillions of photos taken, and billions shared.  By 2020, there will be over 6.1 billion smartphone users, and at least 1/3 of all data will be transmitted through the cloud. We haven’t even talked about online banking, business, movies, television, music, and games.

 

…But Businesses Don’t Always Know How to Use the Data

The Rady School‘s Professor Nijs states, “Companies are collecting more and more data but often lack the people to use it effectively.” He referenced a quote from a well-known report by the McKinsey Global Institute (2013): “Big data promises big things—but only if organizations have the right people in place who know what to do with it. A recurring theme among senior leadership across all sectors is a shortage of professionals trained and experienced at the intersection of disciplines necessary to capture, analyze, and generate meaningful business insights from big data. In addition to deep analytics talent, organizations need management with the right balance of business judgment and statistical skills to translate analysis into action.”

 

A Company’s Future Relies on Its Business Analytics

The need for effective, efficient business analytics is stronger than ever.  Businesses need to know what they want to learn from business analytics—and then how they’re going to use that data to inform their decisions across the board.

Businesses need to be able to determine what data they need and then identify the data sources for gleaning that information.  The final piece?  Distilling that information into actionable insights using the tools of business analytics. Once businesses have a plan for capturing the desired data, organizing it, and analyzing it, they are in a position to develop plans to stay competitive.

 

Business Analytics Has Excellent Job Prospects…

According to a McKinsey Global Report, the US alone has a shortage of about 190,000 data scientists and 1.5 million business analysts.  Globally and in the US, companies need experts in business analytics.  High demand means higher salaries, and a variety of options.  Graduates in Business Analytics work at large companies, start their own businesses, work in banks or FinTech, web-based businesses, retail and food companies, media companies, and marketing companies.

 

…Especially When You Study at a Forward-Thinking School Like Rady

The Rady School’s  new Master of Science in Business Analytics (MSBA) puts students at the forefront of the field. The program focuses on the problems big data poses to businesses—and how to solve them using models, statistics, and machine learning – in classes such as customer analytics, business intelligence, and supply chain analytics.  The school’s bottom line?  To graduate students who know how to use analytics to make a positive impact on business performance—and sustain it. 

Professor Nijs says that “After graduation, our students should expect to work extensively with data, use statistics and machine learning, write code, and develop tools to enhance business decision-making.  After gaining some experience, we expect them to be well-suited to lead an analytics team.” 

First steps for prospective students?  Those interested in studying in this program should have an undergraduate degree in a “quantitative discipline,” says Nijs, like “mathematics, statistics, economics, or physics.”  They should also have some programming experience. 

As data continues to get bigger, the global business world will rely more heavily on business analytics to succeed.  Want to make a difference in the business world?  Earn your MSBA in the field that businesses will indisputably need for success and sustainability. 

Learn more about The Rady School of Management.

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Thanksgiving, that quintessential American holiday, is here.  Thinking about what to do?  We have four fantastic options for you.  Let’s take a closer look. 

,[text] =>

Giving thanks.  Embracing friendship.  Sharing a thoughtful meal.  Telling stories.  Thanksgiving conjures images of extended families and friends gathered around a beautiful table, sharing a delicious meal, and expressing gratitude for what they have.  International students studying in the US during the holidays have a multitude of way to celebrate this quintessential American holiday.  We’ve put together four fantastic options for you to consider as many US students return “home for the holidays.”

 

1. If an American friend invites you, accept the invitation

Thanksgiving is about, well, being thankful for what you have.  This includes being thankful for new friendships.  An American friend invites you?  Accept.  It’s an invitation to be a part of the family, to share the tradition, to take a break from school, and maybe even to participate in the day after Thanksgiving—Black Friday—the day that many retail shops offer sales and discounts in preparation for December’s holidays.  How’d “Black Friday” get its name?  It’s the day that many retailers’ ledgers assure that they will end their fiscal year “in the black,” or showing a profit for the year.

 

2. Consider on-campus opportunities

Feel like staying on-campus during the Thanksgiving break?  Look for campus traditions at your school.  Some schools offer their own Thanksgiving celebrations for any students and faculty who opt to stay on campus, or who may not have options to travel.  Kansas’s Hesston College hosts an annual Thanksgiving weekend, with a dinner and a bevy of other activities, including art exhibits, concerts, talent shows, basketball tournaments, a benefit fun run, and other special events. At Ohio State University, any students, faculty, and staff who are not planning to head home are invited to attend an annual Thanksgiving feast—this year, the University expects over 1,600 attendees.  At Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, PA, students and faculty spend the entire month of November learning about spirituality.  Several faculty at the University host international students at their homes on Thanksgiving Day—as an expression of gratitude for sharing their learning. 

Credit: nbcwashington.com

3. Attend a parade

What’s Thanksgiving without a parade?  The most famous, of course, is the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City, with over 3 million in-person spectators and upwards of 40 million television viewers.  Several major cities besides New York also hold parades where you can enjoy the holiday spirit of gratitude.  Check out the Dunkin’ Donuts Thanksgiving Day Parade in the City of Brotherly Love, Philadelphia.  Motor City has another option—check out America’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in Detroit, Michigan for floats, bands, music, and a glimpse at the history of the US auto industry.  Also in the Midwest is Chicago’s McDonald’s Thanksgiving Parade, which began in the 1930’s in an effort to raise the spirits of Depression-era residents.  Charlotte, North Carolina, Houston, Texas, and Seattle, Washington offer additional possibilities for big parades.  If you don’t live near a city, don’t fret!  Check your local paper for smaller, regional events.  Watching a parade also gives you a chance either to travel to a new place, or to learn something new and interesting about your university town. 

 

4. Take a break

Not interested in all of the hullabaloo?  Not feeling the need for turkey, Black Friday, parades, or big get-togethers?  Relax.  Enjoy the quiet.  Go for a walk.  Read that book you’ve been wanting to read.  Do some sightseeing—explore the city or town where you’ve decided to study.  If you really feel like it, get caught up—or work ahead—in one of your classes.  Take some time for yourself and recharge. 


Regardless of what you choose to do this Thanksgiving season, remember to be grateful for who you are, what you have, and the positive people in your life.  Cheers!

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Thanksgiving, that quintessential American holiday, is here.  Thinking about what to do?  We have four fantastic options for you.  Let’s take a closer look. 

,[db_lead] =>

Thanksgiving, that quintessential American holiday, is here.  Thinking about what to do?  We have four fantastic options for you.  Let’s take a closer look. 

,[text] =>

Giving thanks.  Embracing friendship.  Sharing a thoughtful meal.  Telling stories.  Thanksgiving conjures images of extended families and friends gathered around a beautiful table, sharing a delicious meal, and expressing gratitude for what they have.  International students studying in the US during the holidays have a multitude of way to celebrate this quintessential American holiday.  We’ve put together four fantastic options for you to consider as many US students return “home for the holidays.”

 

1. If an American friend invites you, accept the invitation

Thanksgiving is about, well, being thankful for what you have.  This includes being thankful for new friendships.  An American friend invites you?  Accept.  It’s an invitation to be a part of the family, to share the tradition, to take a break from school, and maybe even to participate in the day after Thanksgiving—Black Friday—the day that many retail shops offer sales and discounts in preparation for December’s holidays.  How’d “Black Friday” get its name?  It’s the day that many retailers’ ledgers assure that they will end their fiscal year “in the black,” or showing a profit for the year.

 

2. Consider on-campus opportunities

Feel like staying on-campus during the Thanksgiving break?  Look for campus traditions at your school.  Some schools offer their own Thanksgiving celebrations for any students and faculty who opt to stay on campus, or who may not have options to travel.  Kansas’s Hesston College hosts an annual Thanksgiving weekend, with a dinner and a bevy of other activities, including art exhibits, concerts, talent shows, basketball tournaments, a benefit fun run, and other special events. At Ohio State University, any students, faculty, and staff who are not planning to head home are invited to attend an annual Thanksgiving feast—this year, the University expects over 1,600 attendees.  At Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, PA, students and faculty spend the entire month of November learning about spirituality.  Several faculty at the University host international students at their homes on Thanksgiving Day—as an expression of gratitude for sharing their learning. 

Credit: nbcwashington.com

3. Attend a parade

What’s Thanksgiving without a parade?  The most famous, of course, is the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City, with over 3 million in-person spectators and upwards of 40 million television viewers.  Several major cities besides New York also hold parades where you can enjoy the holiday spirit of gratitude.  Check out the Dunkin’ Donuts Thanksgiving Day Parade in the City of Brotherly Love, Philadelphia.  Motor City has another option—check out America’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in Detroit, Michigan for floats, bands, music, and a glimpse at the history of the US auto industry.  Also in the Midwest is Chicago’s McDonald’s Thanksgiving Parade, which began in the 1930’s in an effort to raise the spirits of Depression-era residents.  Charlotte, North Carolina, Houston, Texas, and Seattle, Washington offer additional possibilities for big parades.  If you don’t live near a city, don’t fret!  Check your local paper for smaller, regional events.  Watching a parade also gives you a chance either to travel to a new place, or to learn something new and interesting about your university town. 

 

4. Take a break

Not interested in all of the hullabaloo?  Not feeling the need for turkey, Black Friday, parades, or big get-togethers?  Relax.  Enjoy the quiet.  Go for a walk.  Read that book you’ve been wanting to read.  Do some sightseeing—explore the city or town where you’ve decided to study.  If you really feel like it, get caught up—or work ahead—in one of your classes.  Take some time for yourself and recharge. 


Regardless of what you choose to do this Thanksgiving season, remember to be grateful for who you are, what you have, and the positive people in your life.  Cheers!

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Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

,[text] =>

Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

Investing in Education

In conjunction with the Group of Eight Committee (Go8), CASE first debuted its Charitable Giving to Universities in Australia and New Zealand Survey in 2012. Its aim? To provide accurate data for the countries’ development officers, alumni staff, and institutional leaders.

The most recent news is, indeed, promising. In 2015, universities in Australia and New Zealand received 26 percent more in new funds and 25 percent more in cash income than in the previous year. Concluded Tim Dolan, Chair of Go8’s Committee of Chief Advancement Officers, “This is not just a matter of anecdote and impression. With the survey of charitable giving now in its fourth year, we are accumulating real evidence and can begin to see helpful trends in the data collected.”

Even more tellingly, according to Dolan?  “This growth has continued notwithstanding an economy that was less confident than in recent years and despite political uncertainty over funding structures and deregulation. We can see that the right fundraising behaviour, consistently and professionally followed, produces satisfying results.”

Other areas of growth include total number of donors and alumni donors as well as participation by universities -- particularly Australian institutions.

Progress Ahead...With a Catch

While the increased generosity of donors bodes well for a boost to world-class research and university at the region’s higher education institutions, insiders warn of the dangers of complacency. Said Dolan, “One reason for this is the ongoing frustration generated by the shortage of appropriate fundraising professionals. We have all found that the right people are hard to find and difficult to keep. If we could double our fundraising teams, the resulting impact would be phenomenal.” Conversely, failure to find these professionals could stunt university growth.

The takeaway for students looking for an exciting and in-demand career path? A master’s in fundraising management or other fundraising-related topic may be the fast-track to success. 

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Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

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Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

,[text] =>

Where are Australians and New Zealanders donating their money these days? An increasing number of them are embracing philanthropy to the higher education sector, according to recent data from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE). Here’s a closer look at the findings.

Investing in Education

In conjunction with the Group of Eight Committee (Go8), CASE first debuted its Charitable Giving to Universities in Australia and New Zealand Survey in 2012. Its aim? To provide accurate data for the countries’ development officers, alumni staff, and institutional leaders.

The most recent news is, indeed, promising. In 2015, universities in Australia and New Zealand received 26 percent more in new funds and 25 percent more in cash income than in the previous year. Concluded Tim Dolan, Chair of Go8’s Committee of Chief Advancement Officers, “This is not just a matter of anecdote and impression. With the survey of charitable giving now in its fourth year, we are accumulating real evidence and can begin to see helpful trends in the data collected.”

Even more tellingly, according to Dolan?  “This growth has continued notwithstanding an economy that was less confident than in recent years and despite political uncertainty over funding structures and deregulation. We can see that the right fundraising behaviour, consistently and professionally followed, produces satisfying results.”

Other areas of growth include total number of donors and alumni donors as well as participation by universities -- particularly Australian institutions.

Progress Ahead...With a Catch

While the increased generosity of donors bodes well for a boost to world-class research and university at the region’s higher education institutions, insiders warn of the dangers of complacency. Said Dolan, “One reason for this is the ongoing frustration generated by the shortage of appropriate fundraising professionals. We have all found that the right people are hard to find and difficult to keep. If we could double our fundraising teams, the resulting impact would be phenomenal.” Conversely, failure to find these professionals could stunt university growth.

The takeaway for students looking for an exciting and in-demand career path? A master’s in fundraising management or other fundraising-related topic may be the fast-track to success. 

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The Chinese government recently announced a plan attract more international students from Southeast Asian countries.  Find out why and learn more about higher education initiatives in China. 

,[text] =>

ASEAN-China Center Secretary General Yang Xiuping recently announced that China would like to improve collaboration in education and culture with ASEAN countries.  He said, “Foreign students from Southeast Asian countries are the bridge and future of the relationship between ASEAN [countries] and China.”

Why the push? This push comes partly from the 21st Century Maritime Silk Road.  The Chinese government recently initiated this development strategy and framework to both unite and expand collaborative efforts in education and trade between China and other countries on the Silk Road route.  Attracting more international students from Southeast Asia not only gives students an incredible learning opportunity; it also allows them to be a part of a new collaboration between China and the rest of the region.   

Currently, about 68,000 students from Southeast Asia study in China.  The Chinese government would like to increase that number to at least 100,000 within the year.  Yang commented, “We want to see more exchange students from ASEAN countries in China.” 

This initiative reflects a larger trend in Chinese higher education.  Last year was a record year for the numbers of international students in China.  Why?  China’s outward international strategy for 2020 focuses on making China a global study destination, not just in Southeast Asia.    Some of the countries with the largest numbers of students studying in China?  You guessed it: ASEAN members Thailand and Indonesia, among other global players. 

Learn more about studying in China

 

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The Chinese government recently announced a plan attract more international students from Southeast Asian countries.  Find out why and learn more about higher education initiatives in China. 

,[db_lead] =>

The Chinese government recently announced a plan attract more international students from Southeast Asian countries.  Find out why and learn more about higher education initiatives in China. 

,[text] =>

ASEAN-China Center Secretary General Yang Xiuping recently announced that China would like to improve collaboration in education and culture with ASEAN countries.  He said, “Foreign students from Southeast Asian countries are the bridge and future of the relationship between ASEAN [countries] and China.”

Why the push? This push comes partly from the 21st Century Maritime Silk Road.  The Chinese government recently initiated this development strategy and framework to both unite and expand collaborative efforts in education and trade between China and other countries on the Silk Road route.  Attracting more international students from Southeast Asia not only gives students an incredible learning opportunity; it also allows them to be a part of a new collaboration between China and the rest of the region.   

Currently, about 68,000 students from Southeast Asia study in China.  The Chinese government would like to increase that number to at least 100,000 within the year.  Yang commented, “We want to see more exchange students from ASEAN countries in China.” 

This initiative reflects a larger trend in Chinese higher education.  Last year was a record year for the numbers of international students in China.  Why?  China’s outward international strategy for 2020 focuses on making China a global study destination, not just in Southeast Asia.    Some of the countries with the largest numbers of students studying in China?  You guessed it: ASEAN members Thailand and Indonesia, among other global players. 

Learn more about studying in China

 

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Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

,[text] =>

Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

Plans Underway

In speaking of plans to build a new university dedicated to arts and sciences in Myanmar’s Pobbathiri township, Nay Pyi Taw Council member U Tun Tin said that a plot of land was already chosen as a likely site for the campus. Additionally, insiders revealed, the state counselor had agreed to a construction proposal with a five-year timeline. 

The new university will join several others in Nay Pyi Taw, and is expected to significantly expand the region’s offerings in the arts and sciences.

Good News for Students and Parents

While the project is applauded by many stakeholders, parents and students in the capital have special cause to celebrate the possibility of bachelor’s studies closer to home.

Said one resident and parent, “Students who want to study arts or sciences at university currently have to go to Mandalay or Kyaukse. Once the new university is built, we will be able to watch over our children more easily.”

Higher educated citizens are viewed by many as a critical part of helping the country achieve its full potential during Myanmar’s transition to democracy. Perhaps Myanmar Nobel Prize winner and National League for Democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi’s words from more than a quarter-century ago best reflect the country’s outlook today: “A country’s international standard cannot be measured in terms of the number of hotels and bridges; it has to be measured in terms of education. A country of inferior education won’t be able to catch up with the world.”

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Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

,[db_lead] =>

Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

,[text] =>

Myanmar continues its quest to boost the reputation of its higher education system on the international stage with news of plans to open a new university in its capital, according to a report from The Myanmar Times. Here’s a closer look at the initiative, along with why students and parents in particular are celebrating the news.

Plans Underway

In speaking of plans to build a new university dedicated to arts and sciences in Myanmar’s Pobbathiri township, Nay Pyi Taw Council member U Tun Tin said that a plot of land was already chosen as a likely site for the campus. Additionally, insiders revealed, the state counselor had agreed to a construction proposal with a five-year timeline. 

The new university will join several others in Nay Pyi Taw, and is expected to significantly expand the region’s offerings in the arts and sciences.

Good News for Students and Parents

While the project is applauded by many stakeholders, parents and students in the capital have special cause to celebrate the possibility of bachelor’s studies closer to home.

Said one resident and parent, “Students who want to study arts or sciences at university currently have to go to Mandalay or Kyaukse. Once the new university is built, we will be able to watch over our children more easily.”

Higher educated citizens are viewed by many as a critical part of helping the country achieve its full potential during Myanmar’s transition to democracy. Perhaps Myanmar Nobel Prize winner and National League for Democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi’s words from more than a quarter-century ago best reflect the country’s outlook today: “A country’s international standard cannot be measured in terms of the number of hotels and bridges; it has to be measured in terms of education. A country of inferior education won’t be able to catch up with the world.”

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Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

,[text] =>

Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

 

1. You’ll increase your earning potential.

While many teaching jobs require master’s degrees, others may call for just a bachelor’s degree. In this case, getting the bare minimum can hurt you in several different ways. Not only does it lower your chances of getting hired when you’re up again more qualified applicants, but it also means you’ll likely end up collecting a higher starting salary.

According to The Houston Chronicle, most school districts offer teachers with master’s degrees across the elementary, middle, and high school levels supplemental pay in the form of a “bonus” or “bump.” According to analysis by the Center for American Progress this averages between an extra $3,000 and $10,000 a year! And while the cost of getting a master’s degree can seem prohibitive, the degree can pay for itself in just a few years. Not only that, but most school districts require continuing education credits -- doesn’t it make sense to put those credits toward a degree?

 

2. You’ll enjoy greater career mobility.

While a bachelor’s degree may qualify you to be a classroom teacher, many other school jobs  require advanced credentials. If career advancement is important to you, a master’s degree is a must-have. Whether you’re looking to work as a school administrator, curriculum director, content/subject area specialist, or school counselor, you’ll likely need a master’s degree or more.

Additionally, a master’s degree can also open up new possibilities outside of the school system entirely. From textbook authors and community college teachers to educational consultants and educational researchers, these sought-after, well-paid professionals almost always have upper-level qualifications.

In addition to helping you move up the latter, a bachelor’s degree can lead to broader career prospects, which can be an effective defense against teacher burnout -- a pervasive phenomenon among today’s hard-working teaching professionals.

 

3. You’ll be a better teacher.

A master’s degree isn’t merely a means to an end. Rather, it’s an opportunity for true growth and development. Your time in graduate school will benefit you in numerous ways, from understanding of your options as a teacher by exploring what truly interest you to acquiring tools which will enrich what you offer your students.

While your undergraduate degree might have bestowed knowledge in a certain field of study, a master’s in education places the focus on transitioning that and new knowledge to the classroom. Says Teach.com, “These degrees focus on teaching somebody how to be a teacher, with heavy emphasis on pedagogy, teaching methods, philosophy of education, and educational technology.”

According to one Reddit commenter, “It was a TON of work, and took a while, but it definitely made me a better teacher, both in increasing my knowledge and also making me more sympathetic to my students. Its interesting watching another person teach after you have been teaching all day, and seeing what you can do and what you shouldn't do.”

One caveat worth keeping in mind? As with all advanced studies, you get out of a master’s degree what you put into it. On the flip side, however, if you’re pursuing your graduate coursework part-time while maintaining a teaching job, you’ll have immediate opportunities to start making change. Another Reddit poster shared, “I love teaching while going to school because I can implement strategies I learn in class the next day.”

 

4. You can make change at a higher level.

Teachers help nurture the growth and development of kids in classroom every day. If you’re interested in making change at a higher level, however, a master’s degree can help prepare you for a role in research, assessment or policy.

From regional school districts to local, state, and federal agencies, many organizations exist aimed at improving how teachers, schools and educational systems at large do what they do. They’re all looking for people with the knowledge, experience and insights to help guide them.

One of the most compelling reasons prompting people to enter the teaching profession is the chance to make a difference in society. A master’s degree will not only position you to achieve this goal, but it can also help you improve the quality of education at large while bettering your own life in the process.

 

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Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

,[db_lead] =>

Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

,[text] =>

Teachers make a difference in the lives of kids all over the world every day. However, the prospect of entering the teaching profession and remaining in it for the next 30 or more years can be a daunting one. Whether you’re worried about landing a job in a competitive market or about making enough money to support yourself once you’re hired, getting your master’s degree can offer a smart solution. Let’s count down four reasons why all teachers should consider graduate studies in education.

 

1. You’ll increase your earning potential.

While many teaching jobs require master’s degrees, others may call for just a bachelor’s degree. In this case, getting the bare minimum can hurt you in several different ways. Not only does it lower your chances of getting hired when you’re up again more qualified applicants, but it also means you’ll likely end up collecting a higher starting salary.

According to The Houston Chronicle, most school districts offer teachers with master’s degrees across the elementary, middle, and high school levels supplemental pay in the form of a “bonus” or “bump.” According to analysis by the Center for American Progress this averages between an extra $3,000 and $10,000 a year! And while the cost of getting a master’s degree can seem prohibitive, the degree can pay for itself in just a few years. Not only that, but most school districts require continuing education credits -- doesn’t it make sense to put those credits toward a degree?

 

2. You’ll enjoy greater career mobility.

While a bachelor’s degree may qualify you to be a classroom teacher, many other school jobs  require advanced credentials. If career advancement is important to you, a master’s degree is a must-have. Whether you’re looking to work as a school administrator, curriculum director, content/subject area specialist, or school counselor, you’ll likely need a master’s degree or more.

Additionally, a master’s degree can also open up new possibilities outside of the school system entirely. From textbook authors and community college teachers to educational consultants and educational researchers, these sought-after, well-paid professionals almost always have upper-level qualifications.

In addition to helping you move up the latter, a bachelor’s degree can lead to broader career prospects, which can be an effective defense against teacher burnout -- a pervasive phenomenon among today’s hard-working teaching professionals.

 

3. You’ll be a better teacher.

A master’s degree isn’t merely a means to an end. Rather, it’s an opportunity for true growth and development. Your time in graduate school will benefit you in numerous ways, from understanding of your options as a teacher by exploring what truly interest you to acquiring tools which will enrich what you offer your students.

While your undergraduate degree might have bestowed knowledge in a certain field of study, a master’s in education places the focus on transitioning that and new knowledge to the classroom. Says Teach.com, “These degrees focus on teaching somebody how to be a teacher, with heavy emphasis on pedagogy, teaching methods, philosophy of education, and educational technology.”

According to one Reddit commenter, “It was a TON of work, and took a while, but it definitely made me a better teacher, both in increasing my knowledge and also making me more sympathetic to my students. Its interesting watching another person teach after you have been teaching all day, and seeing what you can do and what you shouldn't do.”

One caveat worth keeping in mind? As with all advanced studies, you get out of a master’s degree what you put into it. On the flip side, however, if you’re pursuing your graduate coursework part-time while maintaining a teaching job, you’ll have immediate opportunities to start making change. Another Reddit poster shared, “I love teaching while going to school because I can implement strategies I learn in class the next day.”

 

4. You can make change at a higher level.

Teachers help nurture the growth and development of kids in classroom every day. If you’re interested in making change at a higher level, however, a master’s degree can help prepare you for a role in research, assessment or policy.

From regional school districts to local, state, and federal agencies, many organizations exist aimed at improving how teachers, schools and educational systems at large do what they do. They’re all looking for people with the knowledge, experience and insights to help guide them.

One of the most compelling reasons prompting people to enter the teaching profession is the chance to make a difference in society. A master’s degree will not only position you to achieve this goal, but it can also help you improve the quality of education at large while bettering your own life in the process.

 

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Thinking about business analytics?  The Rady School of Management at the University of California San Diego offers graduate students the chance to wrestle with real-world business problems—and their solutions—using cutting edge business analytics.  Let’s take a closer look.

,[text] =>

Data matters. “Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted,” attributed to Albert Einstein, explains the purpose of business analytics perfectly.  We live in an age of bigger and bigger data—and businesses need ways to sift through it all, to figure out which combinations of data count—and which ones don’t.  The success of business in today’s global economy depends on it.  The Rady School of Management at UC San Diego offers a forward-thinking Master of Science in Business Analytics that teaches its students how to grapple with the reality of big data using business analytics. 

 

What is Business Analytics?

Professor Vincent Nijs, co-director with Professor Terrence August of the Master of Science in Business Analytics program at the Rady School of Management at UC San Diego, describes the field this way, “I think of business analytics as the field focused on how to use data and models to make better business decisions.  Data Science uses many similar tools (e.g. machine learning) but the set of questions they seek to answer are often different.  You can think of business analytics as ‘data science for business.’”

 

The Amount of Data That Companies Collect Gets Bigger and Bigger…

Just how big is big data?  Really big, and getting bigger all the time.  The EMC Digital Universe Study predicts that by the year 2020, 1.7 megabytes of new data will be created every second for every human on the planet.  What does that mean?  There will be 44 trillion gigabytes (44 zettabytes) of data in the digital universe.  Where does the data come from?  Just about everywhere—1.2 trillion searches per year on Google alone, over 1 billion people using Facebook every day, trillions of photos taken, and billions shared.  By 2020, there will be over 6.1 billion smartphone users, and at least 1/3 of all data will be transmitted through the cloud. We haven’t even talked about online banking, business, movies, television, music, and games.

 

…But Businesses Don’t Always Know How to Use the Data

The Rady School‘s Professor Nijs states, “Companies are collecting more and more data but often lack the people to use it effectively.” He referenced a quote from a well-known report by the McKinsey Global Institute (2013): “Big data promises big things—but only if organizations have the right people in place who know what to do with it. A recurring theme among senior leadership across all sectors is a shortage of professionals trained and experienced at the intersection of disciplines necessary to capture, analyze, and generate meaningful business insights from big data. In addition to deep analytics talent, organizations need management with the right balance of business judgment and statistical skills to translate analysis into action.”

 

A Company’s Future Relies on Its Business Analytics

The need for effective, efficient business analytics is stronger than ever.  Businesses need to know what they want to learn from business analytics—and then how they’re going to use that data to inform their decisions across the board.

Businesses need to be able to determine what data they need and then identify the data sources for gleaning that information.  The final piece?  Distilling that information into actionable insights using the tools of business analytics. Once businesses have a plan for capturing the desired data, organizing it, and analyzing it, they are in a position to develop plans to stay competitive.

 

Business Analytics Has Excellent Job Prospects…

According to a McKinsey Global Report, the US alone has a shortage of about 190,000 data scientists and 1.5 million business analysts.  Globally and in the US, companies need experts in business analytics.  High demand means higher salaries, and a variety of options.  Graduates in Business Analytics work at large companies, start their own businesses, work in banks or FinTech, web-based businesses, retail and food companies, media companies, and marketing companies.

 

…Especially When You Study at a Forward-Thinking School Like Rady

The Rady School’s  new Master of Science in Business Analytics (MSBA) puts students at the forefront of the field. The program focuses on the problems big data poses to businesses—and how to solve them using models, statistics, and machine learning – in classes such as customer analytics, business intelligence, and supply chain analytics.  The school’s bottom line?  To graduate students who know how to use analytics to make a positive impact on business performance—and sustain it. 

Professor Nijs says that “After graduation, our students should expect to work extensively with data, use statistics and machine learning, write code, and develop tools to enhance business decision-making.  After gaining some experience, we expect them to be well-suited to lead an analytics team.” 

First steps for prospective students?  Those interested in studying in this program should have an undergraduate degree in a “quantitative discipline,” says Nijs, like “mathematics, statistics, economics, or physics.”  They should also have some programming experience. 

As data continues to get bigger, the global business world will rely more heavily on business analytics to succeed.  Want to make a difference in the business world?  Earn your MSBA in the field that businesses will indisputably need for success and sustainability. 

Learn more about The Rady School of Management.

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Thinking about business analytics?  The Rady School of Management at the University of California San Diego offers graduate students the chance to wrestle with real-world business problems—and their solutions—using cutting edge business analytics.  Let’s take a closer look.

,[db_lead] =>

Thinking about business analytics?  The Rady School of Management at the University of California San Diego offers graduate students the chance to wrestle with real-world business problems—and their solutions—using cutting edge business analytics.  Let’s take a closer look.

,[text] =>

Data matters. “Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted,” attributed to Albert Einstein, explains the purpose of business analytics perfectly.  We live in an age of bigger and bigger data—and businesses need ways to sift through it all, to figure out which combinations of data count—and which ones don’t.  The success of business in today’s global economy depends on it.  The Rady School of Management at UC San Diego offers a forward-thinking Master of Science in Business Analytics that teaches its students how to grapple with the reality of big data using business analytics. 

 

What is Business Analytics?

Professor Vincent Nijs, co-director with Professor Terrence August of the Master of Science in Business Analytics program at the Rady School of Management at UC San Diego, describes the field this way, “I think of business analytics as the field focused on how to use data and models to make better business decisions.  Data Science uses many similar tools (e.g. machine learning) but the set of questions they seek to answer are often different.  You can think of business analytics as ‘data science for business.’”

 

The Amount of Data That Companies Collect Gets Bigger and Bigger…

Just how big is big data?  Really big, and getting bigger all the time.  The EMC Digital Universe Study predicts that by the year 2020, 1.7 megabytes of new data will be created every second for every human on the planet.  What does that mean?  There will be 44 trillion gigabytes (44 zettabytes) of data in the digital universe.  Where does the data come from?  Just about everywhere—1.2 trillion searches per year on Google alone, over 1 billion people using Facebook every day, trillions of photos taken, and billions shared.  By 2020, there will be over 6.1 billion smartphone users, and at least 1/3 of all data will be transmitted through the cloud. We haven’t even talked about online banking, business, movies, television, music, and games.

 

…But Businesses Don’t Always Know How to Use the Data

The Rady School‘s Professor Nijs states, “Companies are collecting more and more data but often lack the people to use it effectively.” He referenced a quote from a well-known report by the McKinsey Global Institute (2013): “Big data promises big things—but only if organizations have the right people in place who know what to do with it. A recurring theme among senior leadership across all sectors is a shortage of professionals trained and experienced at the intersection of disciplines necessary to capture, analyze, and generate meaningful business insights from big data. In addition to deep analytics talent, organizations need management with the right balance of business judgment and statistical skills to translate analysis into action.”

 

A Company’s Future Relies on Its Business Analytics

The need for effective, efficient business analytics is stronger than ever.  Businesses need to know what they want to learn from business analytics—and then how they’re going to use that data to inform their decisions across the board.

Businesses need to be able to determine what data they need and then identify the data sources for gleaning that information.  The final piece?  Distilling that information into actionable insights using the tools of business analytics. Once businesses have a plan for capturing the desired data, organizing it, and analyzing it, they are in a position to develop plans to stay competitive.

 

Business Analytics Has Excellent Job Prospects…

According to a McKinsey Global Report, the US alone has a shortage of about 190,000 data scientists and 1.5 million business analysts.  Globally and in the US, companies need experts in business analytics.  High demand means higher salaries, and a variety of options.  Graduates in Business Analytics work at large companies, start their own businesses, work in banks or FinTech, web-based businesses, retail and food companies, media companies, and marketing companies.

 

…Especially When You Study at a Forward-Thinking School Like Rady

The Rady School’s  new Master of Science in Business Analytics (MSBA) puts students at the forefront of the field. The program focuses on the problems big data poses to businesses—and how to solve them using models, statistics, and machine learning – in classes such as customer analytics, business intelligence, and supply chain analytics.  The school’s bottom line?  To graduate students who know how to use analytics to make a positive impact on business performance—and sustain it. 

Professor Nijs says that “After graduation, our students should expect to work extensively with data, use statistics and machine learning, write code, and develop tools to enhance business decision-making.  After gaining some experience, we expect them to be well-suited to lead an analytics team.” 

First steps for prospective students?  Those interested in studying in this program should have an undergraduate degree in a “quantitative discipline,” says Nijs, like “mathematics, statistics, economics, or physics.”  They should also have some programming experience. 

As data continues to get bigger, the global business world will rely more heavily on business analytics to succeed.  Want to make a difference in the business world?  Earn your MSBA in the field that businesses will indisputably need for success and sustainability. 

Learn more about The Rady School of Management.

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Thanksgiving, that quintessential American holiday, is here.  Thinking about what to do?  We have four fantastic options for you.  Let’s take a closer look. 

,[text] =>

Giving thanks.  Embracing friendship.  Sharing a thoughtful meal.  Telling stories.  Thanksgiving conjures images of extended families and friends gathered around a beautiful table, sharing a delicious meal, and expressing gratitude for what they have.  International students studying in the US during the holidays have a multitude of way to celebrate this quintessential American holiday.  We’ve put together four fantastic options for you to consider as many US students return “home for the holidays.”

 

1. If an American friend invites you, accept the invitation

Thanksgiving is about, well, being thankful for what you have.  This includes being thankful for new friendships.  An American friend invites you?  Accept.  It’s an invitation to be a part of the family, to share the tradition, to take a break from school, and maybe even to participate in the day after Thanksgiving—Black Friday—the day that many retail shops offer sales and discounts in preparation for December’s holidays.  How’d “Black Friday” get its name?  It’s the day that many retailers’ ledgers assure that they will end their fiscal year “in the black,” or showing a profit for the year.

 

2. Consider on-campus opportunities

Feel like staying on-campus during the Thanksgiving break?  Look for campus traditions at your school.  Some schools offer their own Thanksgiving celebrations for any students and faculty who opt to stay on campus, or who may not have options to travel.  Kansas’s Hesston College hosts an annual Thanksgiving weekend, with a dinner and a bevy of other activities, including art exhibits, concerts, talent shows, basketball tournaments, a benefit fun run, and other special events. At Ohio State University, any students, faculty, and staff who are not planning to head home are invited to attend an annual Thanksgiving feast—this year, the University expects over 1,600 attendees.  At Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, PA, students and faculty spend the entire month of November learning about spirituality.  Several faculty at the University host international students at their homes on Thanksgiving Day—as an expression of gratitude for sharing their learning. 

Credit: nbcwashington.com

3. Attend a parade

What’s Thanksgiving without a parade?  The most famous, of course, is the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City, with over 3 million in-person spectators and upwards of 40 million television viewers.  Several major cities besides New York also hold parades where you can enjoy the holiday spirit of gratitude.  Check out the Dunkin’ Donuts Thanksgiving Day Parade in the City of Brotherly Love, Philadelphia.  Motor City has another option—check out America’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in Detroit, Michigan for floats, bands, music, and a glimpse at the history of the US auto industry.  Also in the Midwest is Chicago’s McDonald’s Thanksgiving Parade, which began in the 1930’s in an effort to raise the spirits of Depression-era residents.  Charlotte, North Carolina, Houston, Texas, and Seattle, Washington offer additional possibilities for big parades.  If you don’t live near a city, don’t fret!  Check your local paper for smaller, regional events.  Watching a parade also gives you a chance either to travel to a new place, or to learn something new and interesting about your university town. 

 

4. Take a break

Not interested in all of the hullabaloo?  Not feeling the need for turkey, Black Friday, parades, or big get-togethers?  Relax.  Enjoy the quiet.  Go for a walk.  Read that book you’ve been wanting to read.  Do some sightseeing—explore the city or town where you’ve decided to study.  If you really feel like it, get caught up—or work ahead—in one of your classes.  Take some time for yourself and recharge. 


Regardless of what you choose to do this Thanksgiving season, remember to be grateful for who you are, what you have, and the positive people in your life.  Cheers!

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Thanksgiving, that quintessential American holiday, is here.  Thinking about what to do?  We have four fantastic options for you.  Let’s take a closer look. 

,[db_lead] =>

Thanksgiving, that quintessential American holiday, is here.  Thinking about what to do?  We have four fantastic options for you.  Let’s take a closer look. 

,[text] =>

Giving thanks.  Embracing friendship.  Sharing a thoughtful meal.  Telling stories.  Thanksgiving conjures images of extended families and friends gathered around a beautiful table, sharing a delicious meal, and expressing gratitude for what they have.  International students studying in the US during the holidays have a multitude of way to celebrate this quintessential American holiday.  We’ve put together four fantastic options for you to consider as many US students return “home for the holidays.”

 

1. If an American friend invites you, accept the invitation

Thanksgiving is about, well, being thankful for what you have.  This includes being thankful for new friendships.  An American friend invites you?  Accept.  It’s an invitation to be a part of the family, to share the tradition, to take a break from school, and maybe even to participate in the day after Thanksgiving—Black Friday—the day that many retail shops offer sales and discounts in preparation for December’s holidays.  How’d “Black Friday” get its name?  It’s the day that many retailers’ ledgers assure that they will end their fiscal year “in the black,” or showing a profit for the year.

 

2. Consider on-campus opportunities

Feel like staying on-campus during the Thanksgiving break?  Look for campus traditions at your school.  Some schools offer their own Thanksgiving celebrations for any students and faculty who opt to stay on campus, or who may not have options to travel.  Kansas’s Hesston College hosts an annual Thanksgiving weekend, with a dinner and a bevy of other activities, including art exhibits, concerts, talent shows, basketball tournaments, a benefit fun run, and other special events. At Ohio State University, any students, faculty, and staff who are not planning to head home are invited to attend an annual Thanksgiving feast—this year, the University expects over 1,600 attendees.  At Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, PA, students and faculty spend the entire month of November learning about spirituality.  Several faculty at the University host international students at their homes on Thanksgiving Day—as an expression of gratitude for sharing their learning. 

Credit: nbcwashington.com

3. Attend a parade

What’s Thanksgiving without a parade?  The most famous, of course, is the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City, with over 3 million in-person spectators and upwards of 40 million television viewers.  Several major cities besides New York also hold parades where you can enjoy the holiday spirit of gratitude.  Check out the Dunkin’ Donuts Thanksgiving Day Parade in the City of Brotherly Love, Philadelphia.  Motor City has another option—check out America’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in Detroit, Michigan for floats, bands, music, and a glimpse at the history of the US auto industry.  Also in the Midwest is Chicago’s McDonald’s Thanksgiving Parade, which began in the 1930’s in an effort to raise the spirits of Depression-era residents.  Charlotte, North Carolina, Houston, Texas, and Seattle, Washington offer additional possibilities for big parades.  If you don’t live near a city, don’t fret!  Check your local paper for smaller, regional events.  Watching a parade also gives you a chance either to travel to a new place, or to learn something new and interesting about your university town. 

 

4. Take a break

Not interested in all of the hullabaloo?  Not feeling the need for turkey, Black Friday, parades, or big get-togethers?  Relax.  Enjoy the quiet.  Go for a walk.  Read that book you’ve been wanting to read.  Do some sightseeing—explore the city or town where you’ve decided to study.  If you really feel like it, get caught up—or work ahead—in one of your classes.  Take some time for yourself and recharge. 


Regardless of what you choose to do this Thanksgiving season, remember to be grateful for who you are, what you have, and the positive people in your life.  Cheers!

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