Masters Degree in Culture Study in United Kingdom

Compare Masters Programs in Culture Study in United Kingdom 2017

Culture Study

Master-level studies involve specialized study in a field of research or an area of professional practice. Earning a master’s degree demonstrates a higher level of mastery of the subject. Earning a master’s degree can take anywhere from a year to three or four years. Before you can graduate, you usually must write and defend a thesis, a long paper that is the culmination of your specialized research.

Culture Study refers to any program that focuses on human culture. It is best oriented for those who are interested in the forces that shape the world of humans today, from media to direct issues like gender and sexuality.

Education in the United Kingdom is a devolved matter with each of the countries of the United Kingdom having separate systems under different governments: the UK Government is responsible for England, and the Scottish Government, the Welsh Government and the Northern Ireland Executive are responsible for Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, respectively.

Top Master Programs in Culture Study in United Kingdom 2017

Read More

Master of Letters in English Literature

University of Glasgow
Campus Full time Part time 2 semesters August 2017 United Kingdom Glasgow + 1 more

This programme gives you the opportunity to pursue your own interests in English Literature at postgraduate level across a wide range of courses led by internationally renowned experts. [+]

Best Masters in Culture Study in United Kingdom 2017. English Literature MLitt This programme gives you the opportunity to pursue your own interests in English Literature at postgraduate level across a wide range of courses led by internationally renowned experts. A core research training course will introduce you to key skills in postgraduate study, while a flexible degree structure allows you to select from the rich variety of optional courses on offer from the School of Critical Studies and elsewhere in the College of Arts, or even beyond. You can also pursue one of the specialist pathways offered by English Literature, including Fantasy, Medieval and Early Modern, Modernities, and Victorian Literature. The programme ends with an opportunity to write a dissertation on an appropriate English Literature-related topic of your choice. Why this programme The structure of the degree allows you to follow either a bespoke English Literature MLitt programme, constructing your own pathway through a range of different courses, or one of several specialist pathways to suit your interests (see below). You will have access to world class libraries and museums, as well as the extraordinary diversity of cultural, literary and artistic events that makes Glasgow such a vibrant place for postgraduate study. The core research skills programme includes tailored workshops with the University’s archives and world-class Special Collections, as well as providing the academic and technical skills you will need to succeed at postgraduate level in the university and other professional environments. Programme structure There are five different pathways through the MLitt in English Literature at Glasgow: MLitt in English Literature MLitt in English Literature: Fantasy MLitt in English Literature: Medieval and Early Modern Literature and Culture MLitt in English Literature: Modernities: Literature, Culture, Theory MLitt in English Literature: Victorian Literature  Each pathway will give you a different mix of core and optional courses. All students take our 20 credit core English Literature Research Training Course. You then take five more 20 credit courses, some of which may be compulsory for your chosen pathway, and one 60 credit dissertation. The structure for full-time students is as follows: Semester 1:  English Literature Research Training Course plus two 20 credit courses Semester 2:  Three 20 credit courses Summer:  Dissertation Part-time students take the English Literature Research Training Course and three 20 credit courses in their first year of study, and two 20 credit courses and the dissertation in their second year. Pathways English Literature Build your own English Literature postgraduate degree, drawing on the rich range of optional courses available from English Literature, the School of Critical Studies, and elsewhere in the College of Arts or even beyond. Core courses: English Literature Research Training  English Literature Dissertation Optional courses: Of the five further 20 credit courses you take, two must be from any of those offered within the English Literature MLitt programme. The remaining three 20 credit courses may be either from English Literature or, with the convenor’s permission, from elsewhere in the College of Arts and beyond, e.g. Celtic Studies, Classics, History of Art, the School of Education, etc. English Literature courses may include: The American Counterculture, 1945-75 American Fiction of the 1930s Creative Writing Fiction Workshop (cross-discipline) Decadence and The Modern Embodiments: Literature and Medicine, 1750-1900 Explaining Change: Science and Literary Culture 1830-1880 F Scott Fitzgerald, Edith Wharton and Dialogues of American Literary Modernism Fantasy c. 1780 to 1950 Fantasy 1950 to the present Fictions of Adultery From Medieval to Early Modern Genres and Canons Historic and Critical Approaches to Medieval and Early Modern English Literature The Mind of the Contemporary American Novel The Modern Everyday Modernist Sexualities Modernities 1: Literature, Culture and Theory 1880-1945 Modernities 2: Literature, Culture and Theory 1945 to the present Neo-Victorianism The Novel Now Proust in Theory Victorian Literary History Virginia Woolf Writes Modernity Writing Empire English Literature: Fantasy This programme is designed to give you an overview of fantasy literature in English from the era of revolutions at the end of the eighteenth century to the present. As well as charting the history of modern fantasy, including major children’s fiction where this had a significant impact on the development of adult fantasy literature, the course will introduce you to a range of contemporary critical and theoretical approaches to fantasy and the fantastic. Visiting speakers will be invited, which will give you the opportunity to meet contemporary writers, critics and publishers. There is a Fantasy Film Club and you will also be encouraged to participate reflectively in fantasy-related conventions, conferences and festivals, and to join us on field trips and other events. The Masters in Fantasy is a programme run by enthusiasts for enthusiasts, and we hope this will show. Core courses: Fantasy 1: c. 1780-1950 Fantasy 2: 1950 to the present English Literature Research Training Optional courses: You then take a further three 20 credit courses. These can be from: the options listed under the General English Literature pathway  elsewhere in the College of Arts and beyond (with the convenor's permission). E.g. Celtic Studies, Classics, History of Art, School of Education, and many more.   English literature: Medieval and Early Modern Literature and Culture The MLitt in Medieval and Early Modern English Literature and Culture offers students the opportunity to study one of the most vibrant and intellectually challenging periods of literary history. This is an interdisciplinary programme offering a mixture of compulsory and option courses; students may choose options across the range of postgraduate taught courses on offer across the University. You will work with a team of internationally renowned experts with an unparalleled range of medieval and early modern interests, and develop your research skills in manuscripts and print culture by working with the rich manuscript and printed collections held at Glasgow University, the Hunterian, and the Kelvin Hall.  You will also have the option to study a language (i.e. Old English or Latin).  Core courses: From Medieval to Early Modern Historic and Critical Approaches to Medieval and Early Modern English Literature English Literature Research Training Optional courses: You then take a further three 20 credit courses. These can be from: the options listed under the General English Literature pathway  elsewhere in the College of Arts and beyond (with the convenor's permission). E.g. Celtic Studies, Classics, History of Art, School of Education, and many more.  English Literature: Modernities This programme provides the opportunity for advanced study of literary modernism and the avant-garde, and postmodern and contemporary developments in culture and theory. You will investigate the key texts and concepts which shape our understanding of literature and culture across a period of radical change, through an examination of the aesthetic and cultural assumptions of different modern movements; and through an examination of issues in modern writing, particularly those relating to modernity (such as mass culture, revolution, war and empire) and post-modernity (such as simulation, spectacle, performativity and trauma). Throughout, you will study texts in relation to developments in other cultural practices, such as film, theatre and the visual arts. Core courses: Modernities 1: 1890-1945 Modernities 2: 1945 to the present English Literature Research Training Optional courses: You then take a further three 20 credit courses. These can be from: the options listed under the General English Literature pathway  elsewhere in the College of Arts and beyond (with the convenor's permission). E.g. Celtic Studies, Classics, History of Art, School of Education, and many more.  English Literature: Victorian Literature This programme is designed to give you a wide-ranging knowledge of Victorian literature and literary history, introducing you to the period or building on any previous experience of it you may have. You will study a great variety of Victorian writers, genres and forms, and will hone your skills in close reading, historical contextualisation, and use of critical and theoretical sources.  You will also have the opportunity to explore your particular interests in detail, working with staff who are specialists in many aspects of Victorian literature and culture. Glasgow has outstanding resources for the study of Victorian literature including our Special Collections and library. Glasgow is in many ways a Victorian city and you will be working amid some of the most important and beautiful Victorian architecture and landscapes in the UK.  The programme is designed to help you develop research, writing and professional skills which will be transferrable to doctoral study or employment. Previous graduates have gone on to pursue PhDs at Glasgow, Oxford, Cambridge, and other universities, and to careers in teaching, journalism, and consultancy, among other areas. Core courses: Genres and Canons Victorian Literary History English Literature Research Training Optional courses: You then take a further three 20 credit courses. These can be from: the options listed under the General English Literature pathway  elsewhere in the College of Arts and beyond (with the convenor's permission). E.g. Celtic Studies, Classics, History of Art, School of Education, and many more.  Dissertation The two semesters of coursework are followed by one term of supervised work towards a dissertation of up to 15,000 words which you will submit at the beginning of September. The topic normally arises out of the work of the previous two semesters, but the choice is very much open to the student’s own initiative. If you are on a named pathway, then your dissertation topic should fall within the scope of that pathway. If you are on the general pathway, you are welcome to choose a topic from anywhere in the field of English Literature. Your supervisor helps you to develop the proposal and plan the most appropriate reading and methodology. It is also possible to write a dissertation made up of creative writing with a critical component. Normally this possibility is only available to students who have taken the Creative Writing Fiction Workshop (cross-discipline) as one of their options. Entry requirements For entry in 2017 Entry requirements for postgraduate taught programmes are a 2.1 Honours degree or equivalent qualification (for example, GPA 3.0 or above) in a relevant subject unless otherwise specified. We also require: a sample of written work, about 3,000 words in length. This can be a previous piece of work from an undergraduate degree. The work should be written in English and the content does not have to cover a topic related to this specific programme. a short statement of around 500 words outlining your interest in this programme. two academic references. International students  with  academic  qualifications below those required should contact our partner institution, Glasgow International College, who offer a range of pre-Masters courses. English language requirements For applicants whose first language is not English, the University sets a minimum English Language proficiency level. Career prospects Our MLitt programmes provide excellent preparation for PhD studies and an academic career. They also develop key skills sought by many employers, including: the ability to find, select and manage large quantities of information; confident and persuasive oral and written communication; and problem solving through creative and critical thinking. Past Glasgow MLitt graduates have gone on to pursue successful careers in writing, editing, publishing, teaching, the media, heritage and creative industries, and numerous other related professions. [-]

Master in Travel and Nature Writing

Bath Spa University
Campus Full time 1 year September 2017 United Kingdom Bath

The Master of Arts in Travel and Nature Writing is designed for writers seeking advanced skills in the growing field of creative non-fiction inspired by the natural... [+]

Master in Travel and Nature Writing

 

The Master of Arts in Travel and Nature Writing is designed for writers seeking advanced skills in the growing field of creative non-fiction inspired by the natural world and contemporary journeying. The course focuses on the application of writing skills to match the requirements of the travel and nature writing sector. To this end, students will learn from engagement, encounter, workshop, tuition and mentoring; they will develop their professional practice and produce a portfolio of work to help establish their careers in this highly competitive field.

Course Structure and Content

 

This is a low residency course over three semesters. It will consist of three week-long residential sessions, meeting visiting writers and industry specialists; distance learning modules designed to familiarise participants with the standards, interests and publishing requirements of the sector; one-to-one tutorials and mentoring providing the opportunity to turn experience into well-crafted writing of publication standard.... [-]


Master in European Affairs (Dual Degree with the London School of Economics)

Sciences Po
Campus Full time 2 years September 2017 United Kingdom London

This two-year programme, built on the complementary approaches of two prestigious members of the Global Public Policy Network (GPPN), combines the study of economics, public administration, global health and management. [+]

Best Masters in Culture Study in United Kingdom 2017. Master in European Affairs (Dual Degree with the London School of Economics) Dual Degree with the London School of Economics This two-year programme, built on the complementary approaches of two prestigious members of the Global Public Policy Network (GPPN), combines the study of economics, public administration, global health and management. It is designed for young professionals who want to gain an expertise in the management and evaluation of public policy in the European context and at the heart of two major European capitals. During the two year programme, dual degree students develop an understanding of the European project and acquire the professional competencies needed to work in the European affairs. During their first year in Paris, students are enrolled at Sciences Po, in either the Master in Public Policy or the Master in European Affairs. During their second year, students are enrolled at the LSE. Upon successful completion of the two years, students receive two degrees: a Master's from Sciences Po and a Master's from LSE. Dual master's degree in European Affairs Programme The Master in European Affairs offers a broad knowledge of the legal, economic and political foundations of the European Union, as well as of the history and sociology of the European integration project. During the first year at Sciences Po, students are integrated within the Master European Affairs (MAE). They follow courses in English and French. Students of the dual degree attend a joint seminar providing an introduction to research on European affairs. Its aim is to familiarize students with the scientific literature on politics and governance in the European Union. Every week students meet scholars of the two universities, Sciences Po and LSE, to discuss about European politics and governance through different perspectives: from political theory to sociology and political science and from economy to law. The participation to these seminars permits to students of the dual degree to prepare themselves for the second year at LSE. The second year takes place within the European Institute of the LSE and students choose among three different MSc, depending on their interests and their professional project: Ideas, Ideology and Identities, European Political Economy or EU Politics. The second year at LSE is composed of three semesters. During the summer semester, students write a Master's thesis on a topic chosen during the school year. Admissions Students interested in the dual degree with the Master in European Affairs at Sciences Po and the European Institute at LSE should apply directly via the admissions website. Careers Our dual degree graduates hold leadership positions in the public, private and non-profit sectors. Examples of graduate careers: Policy Advisor at the OECD Analyst at the World Bank or World Food Programme Consultant at Accenture Budget economist at the Ministry of Finance International consultant in one of "the Big 4" worldwide audit firms (EY, KMPG, PwC, Deloitte) Contacts For questions related to the Sciences Po School of Public Affairs curriculum, please contact the Academic Advisor in charge of the policy stream that interests you. For questions related to the LSE curriculum, please send an email to the Institute of Public Affairs or the European Institute at the LSE. This is a dual degree with the London School of Economics. [-]

MMus Performance

SOAS University of London
Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3 years September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

This programme is designed for students who wish to specialise in performance while studying for an academic degree. Students have the unique opportunity to develop performance in specific Asian and African music traditions to professional standard. [+]

MMus Performance Duration: Full time: 1 calendar year. Part time: 2/3 calendar years. Minimum Entry Requirements: Minimum upper second class honours degree (or equivalent), usually in Music Start of programme: September intake only Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time This programme is designed for students who wish to specialise in performance while studying for an academic degree. Students have the unique opportunity to develop performance in specific Asian and African music traditions to professional standard. They acquire expert knowledge about performance and the geographical or stylistic region of their performance specialism. The performance component of the programme, in which students choose an Asian or African performance tradition, includes practice-based research. Students study the music of a particular region alongside performance theory training. Through a range of optional courses they pursue additional interests as well. The programme is particularly suited to performing musicians who wish to deepen and broaden their theoretical perspectives and musical horizons. Many former students have found their performance careers enhanced, while others have gone on to engage with their performance from more critical, academic perspectives, including MPhil/PhD research. Structure Students are required to take 4 units (one unit courses being two-terms in duration, while half unit courses are taught in one term only). In addition to these formal elements, students may attend postgraduate and public seminars and may also participate in performance ensemble classes and other activities. Course Detail The formal elements of the MMus Performance programme are: Performance Theory (half unit) The compulsory core course; part-time students must normally take this in year 1. Performance (full unit) Performance lessons in a vocal or instrumental tradition from their selected region. Examined by a public recital in May-June (for part-time students: in May-June of year 1) and by coursework. Performance as Research (full unit) Further study of the same tradition as under 3 above, but with a more specific research focus. Examined by a public recital in September (for part-time students: in September of the final year) and by coursework. Select courses to the value of 67.5 credits from List A,B and/or C, including at least one course from List A. List A: Area Courses Aspects of Music and Religion in South East Asia - 15PMUH017 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Atlantic Africa: (P)Layers of Mediation in African Popular Music (PG) - 15PMUC009 (1 Unit) - Full Year Central Asian Music - 15PMUH008 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Ethnicity, Religion and Gender in Middle Eastern Musical cultures - 15PMUH024 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Indian vocal music: Styles and histories - 15PMUH025 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Klezmer Music: Roots and Revival - 15PMUH011 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Music in Selected Regions of Africa: Contexts and Structures - 15PMUC006 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Music, Place and Politics in Cuba - 15PMUH015 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Musical Traditions of East Asia (Masters) - 15PMUH016 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Pop and Politics in East Asia (Masters) - 15PMUH014 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Popular and Fusion Music in South East Asia (PG) - 15PMUH018 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Sacred Sound in South Asia - 15PMUH021 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 List B: Additional Courses Analysing World Music: Transcription & Analysis in Ethnomusicology - 15PMUH004 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Composition - 15PMUH013 (0.5 Unit) - Full Year Gender and Music (MMus) - 15PMUH009 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 The Music Business (Masters) - 15PMUH003 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 List C: Courses Taught at King's College Students may also take approved courses from Kings College Department of Music (see this link for available options: //www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/depts/music/study/handbook/programmes/pgt/mods15-16.aspx) Special assessment rules apply for SOAS students to bring the credit rating up to 22.5 – please check with course tutors at King’s for requirements. Advanced Opera Study - (22.5 Unit) Advanced Studies in Musical Analysis & Criticism: Beethoven's Late Works - (22.5 Unit) Issues in Biography and Criticism - (22.5 Unit) Issues in Historiography and Criticism - (22.5 Unit) Performance, Gesture and Meaning - (22.5 Unit) Post-tonal Music and Composition Theory - (22.5 Unit) Theories of Modernism and the Avant-Garde - (22.5 Unit) 21st-Century Bach - (22.5 Unit) Teaching & Learning The Department of Music has been highly rated for teaching and research in all recent assessment exercises, and is regularly ranked amongst the top Music departments in the UK in Good University Guides. Music students have access to the large Main Library of the School which holds numerous books, journals and recordings relevant to the study of ethnomusicology and world music, as well as the nearby British Library Sound Archive and other London libraries and museums. The SOAS Library holds copies of standard reference works on music, such as the current edition of the New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians. The Grove dictionary and the RILM database can also be accessed on line from computer terminals in the Library or elsewhere on the SOAS network. Listening facilities are provided in the Library, and most CDs are available on short loan. Among special items in the Department’s collections are: field recordings, films and slides a large working collection of musical instruments from Asia and Africa extensive staff collections relating to specific research interests Performance The Convenor will communicate by email and through meetings with all students taking Performance or Performance as Research, and must be approached for official approval of your choice of performance tradition and teacher. Such approval is signalled by the Convenor’s signature on the Department’s standard “Performance study application form”, available from the Faculty office and online. No lessons should be taken until this form has been signed. The staff member most closely related to your chosen tradition acts as a Sub-convenor and should be your first point of contact for any matters pertaining to the specific tradition you are studying. Convenor and Sub-convenor will liaise as necessary. The Department will not support training in “Western” vocal or instrumental traditions. Subsidy towards the cost of lessons: The Department will pay for approved external tuition, up to a maximum amount agreed at the start of the session (currently £500 for Performance and £300 for Performance as Research). Please be aware that the cost of regular performance lessons might exceed these amounts; any excess must be paid by the student. Claims for reimbursement must be submitted using the standard Music Performance Lesson Reimbursement Form available from the convenor, accompanied by a signed receipt or invoice from the teacher. Claims cannot be accepted after the examination. The student is also responsible for arranging regular lesson times, negotiating lesson fees, and obtaining access to any necessary instrument. You will receive an Information Sheet for External Teachers, describing payment procedures, the teacher’s obligations, and so forth; you should read through this together with your teacher at the earliest opportunity. Destinations A postgraduate degree in Music Performance from SOAS gives students improved competency in performance and a better understanding of global music which will enable them to continue in the field of research or engage in related work. Equally, they develop a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek in many professional and creative capacities including interpersonal skills, communication skills, focus, team work, passion and dedication. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate. Specific Graduate Destinations Helen Evans is an Education Officer for the Asian Music Circuit. Jo Shaw (née Hoskin) was gamelan co-ordinator for the London Symphony Orchestra’s educational Discovery programme, but is moving on to set up her own Indonesian music and dance programme in southwest England. Sarah Hall has worked as India regional director for two different charities. Jon Kertzer directed the Smithsonian Global Sound Network and is now working on the business development of the Microsoft MSN Music Service. Hélène Rammant is a Producer for BBC Radio 3, specialising in World Music. Megan Jones is a Producer in the Music Department of BBC Cymru Wales. Katie Vickers (née Hall) is a music Marketing Officer for the South Bank Centre, London. Sally Pomme Clayton is a storyteller and lecturer on world oral traditions at Middlesex University. Rachel Ireland first served as executive assistant at the Great Britain-Sasakawa Foundation and is now Executive Officer, Operations for the London-based charity Youth Music. Chua Siew Ling is a music officer in the Ministry of Education in Singapore. Louise Taylor was an administrator for Folkworks at the Sage Gateshead music centre, and has now moved on to a related community post in Newcastle. Elie Gussman is an Education Officer for the Asian Music Circuit. London. Nobuko Miyazaki is an Education Officer for the Asian Music Circuit, London. Many other MMus graduates continue on to do MPhil/PhD research. Others return, enhanced, to their previous careers. For example, Belinda Sykes is Professor of Medieval Song at Trinity College of Music and singer and director of the Arabic and European medieval song ensemble Joglaresa. A Student's Perspective "SOAS is a great place to study Ethnomusicology. It has the flavour of the world spread through the music made by the students, lecturers and guests." Marina Di Giorgi [-]

MMus Ethnomusicology

SOAS University of London
Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3 years September 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

This programme is tailored for musicians and musicologists, anthropologists, teachers and composers, as well as those dedicated to developing an in-depth knowledge of a specific music tradition. [+]

Best Masters in Culture Study in United Kingdom 2017. MMus Ethnomusicology Duration: One calendar year (full-time); Two or three years (part-time, daytime only) Minimum Entry Requirements: Minimum upper second class honours degree (or equivalent), usually in Music Start of programme: September intake only Mode of Attendance: Full Time or Part Time Theoretical and practical grounding in the discipline of ethnomusicology, as well as the opportunity to develop performance and ethnographic skills, regional expertise, and a deeper understanding of global music – just some of what you can expect to develop on the MMus Ethnomusicology. This programme is tailored for musicians and musicologists, anthropologists, teachers and composers, as well as those dedicated to developing an in-depth knowledge of a specific music tradition. You will study with the largest and most influential team of ethnomusicologists in the UK, who are experts in the musical traditions of Africa, Asia, the Middle East, Central Asia and the Jewish world. You will be part of a thriving culture of performance, research and active engagement with music around the globe. The programme will suit those looking for a springboard into further research or employment in a range of music-related fields including journalism, industry, NGOs and education, and often serves as a conversion route for those trained predominantly in western music traditions. Structure The MMus programme involves taking three courses and writing a 11,000-word dissertation. In addition to these formal elements, students are expected to attend regular postgraduate and public seminars and may also participate in performance ensemble classes and other activities. Course Detail The four formal elements of the MMus Ethnomusicology programme are: The full unit core course Ethnomusicology in Practice. A broad introduction to the major themes of ethnomusicological study. Taught as a weekly two-hour lecture/seminar with additional tutorials. Part-time students must take this in their first year. The Dissertation in Music. A special study 11,000 words in length on a topic agreed with the candidate's supervisor. This will normally relate to the "major region" chosen below, but may instead deal with a theoretical or comparative topic. Part-time students normally take this in their final year. Select courses to the value of 90 credits from List A,B,C and/or D,including at least one course from list A. List A: Area Courses Atlantic Africa: (P)Layers of Mediation in African Popular Music (PG) - 15PMUC009 (1 Unit) - Full Year Aspects of Music and Religion in South East Asia - 15PMUH017 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Central Asian Music - 15PMUH008 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Ethnicity, Religion and Gender in Middle Eastern Musical cultures - 15PMUH024 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Indian vocal music: Styles and histories - 15PMUH025 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Klezmer Music: Roots and Revival - 15PMUH011 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Music in Selected Regions of Africa: Contexts and Structures - 15PMUC006 (1 Unit) - Full Year - Not Running 2016/2017 Music, Place and Politics in Cuba - 15PMUH015 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Musical Traditions of East Asia (Masters) - 15PMUH016 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Pop and Politics in East Asia (Masters) - 15PMUH014 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Popular and Fusion Music in South East Asia (PG) - 15PMUH018 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Sacred Sound in South Asia - 15PMUH021 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 List B: Additional Music Courses African and Asian Cultures in Britain - 15PANH009 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 African and Asian Diasporas in the Modern World - 15PANH010 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 Analysing World Music: Transcription & Analysis in Ethnomusicology - 15PMUH004 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 Composition - 15PMUH013 (0.5 Unit) - Full Year Digital traditional broadcasting communication - 15PMSH022 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Gender and Music (MMus) - 15PMUH009 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 - Not Running 2016/2017 Music and Healing - 15PMUH019 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 - Not Running 2016/2017 Music in Development - 15PMUC034 (1 Unit) - Full Year Performance - 15PMUC002 (1 Unit) - Full Year Sound Recording and Production - 15PMSH025 (0.5 Unit) - Term 1 The Music Business (Masters) - 15PMUH003 (0.5 Unit) - Term 2 List C: Courses at King's College Students may also take up to a maximum of 45 credit units from King's College Department of Music (see this link for available options: https: //www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/depts/music/study/handbook/programmes/pgt/mods15-16.aspx) . Special assessment rules apply for SOAS students taking King’s College courses to bring the credit rating of each course up to 45 credits. Please check with course tutors at King’s for specific requirements. Course choices will vary each year, at the time of completing this document, the following courses are available: Advanced Opera Study - (22.5 Unit) Advanced Studies in Musical Analysis & Criticism: Beethoven's Late Works - (22.5 Unit) Issues in Biography and Criticism - (22.5 Unit) Issues in Historiography and Criticism - (22.5 Unit) Performance, Gesture and Meaning - (22.5 Unit) Post-tonal Music and Composition Theory - (22.5 Unit) Theories of Modernism and the Avant-Garde - (22.5 Unit) 21st-Century Bach - (22.5 Unit) List D: Courses at SOAS from other departments in the Faculty of Arts and Humanities or MA Area Studies courses (including languages) in the Faculty of Languages and Cultures. Course choices are subject to the agreement of both the course convenor and the MMus Ethnomusicology convenor. Courses will normally relate to the same geographical region chosen from List A course(s). Teaching & Learning The Department of Music has been highly rated for teaching and research in all recent assessment exercises, and is regularly ranked amongst the top Music departments in the UK in Good University Guides. Music students have access to the large Main Library of the School which holds numerous books, journals and recordings relevant to the study of ethnomusicology and world music, as well as the nearby British Library Sound Archive and other London libraries and museums. The SOAS Library holds copies of standard reference works on music, such as the current edition of the New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians. The Grove dictionary and the RILM database can also be accessed on line from computer terminals in the Library or elsewhere on the SOAS network. Listening facilities are provided in the Library, and most CDs are available on short loan. Among special items in the Department’s collections are: field recordings, films and slides a large working collection of musical instruments from Asia and Africa extensive staff collections relating to specific research interests Destinations A postgraduate degree in Ethnomusicology from SOAS gives students greater intercultural awareness, improved competency in performance and a better understanding of global music which will enable them to continue in the field of research or engage in related work. Equally, they develop a portfolio of widely transferable skills which employers seek in many professional and creative capacities including interpersonal skills, communication skills, focus, team work, passion and dedication. A postgraduate degree is a valuable experience that provides students with a body of work and a diverse range of skills that they can use to market themselves with when they graduate. Graduates have gone on to work for a range of organisations including: Internet Advertising Board Marie Stopes International Association of Culture & World Music School of Traditional & Popular Music Vortex Jazz Club Sony/EMI S24 Film British Library Grant & Cutler British Library UK Government Warner Music Types of roles that graduates have gone on to do include: Production Assistant Sound Archive assistant Bookseller Solicitor Finance Manager Manager of Musical Association Junior Research Executive Project support officer Policy adviser Playworker Library Assistant Local Councillor A Student's Perspective "SOAS is a great place to study Ethnomusicology. It has the flavour of the world spread through the music made by the students, lecturers and guests." Marina Di Giorgi [-]

Visual Cultures: Practice and Activism MRes

Middlesex University London
Campus Part time 2 years October 2017 United Kingdom London

This exciting course operates at the forefront of a rich, interdisciplinary academic and creative landscape. Pushing at the limits of Visual Culture, we encourage students to approach the field from a variety of perspectives. [+]

Why should you study MRes Visual Cultures: Practice and Activism at Middlesex? This exciting course operates at the forefront of a rich, interdisciplinary academic and creative landscape. Pushing at the limits of Visual Culture, we encourage students to approach the field from a variety of perspectives. Working with, and feeding into, learning networks beyond the University, we aim to influence and inform the emerging and developing communities of professional, activist, creative and research practice around Visual Cultures. We champion creative and activist practices as both methods of engagement and as subjects of enquiry, drawing on our 130 year history of experimental and progressive attitudes to art and design through our origins as the Hornsey College of Art. Course highlights: - World-class teaching and research from leading Visual Cultures academics, activists, artists, curators and practitioners across the Art & Design Research Institute (ADRI) and Lansdown Centre for Electronic Arts (LCEA) - State of the art facilities including the latest digital resources, a range of new and traditional equipment and specialist archives and collections - Direct access to London's art and design world and cultural industries including galleries, museums, organisations, artists, libraries and collections - Part-time and low-residency options established to meet the needs and ambitions of individual students and to embed your learning within your existing networks and practice - Off-site networking and exhibition opportunities with a range of London-based, UK-wide and international partners - As a student of this course you'll receive a free electronic textbook for every module. [-]

MRes in Renaissance Studies

University of Stirling
Campus Full time Part time 12 - 27 months September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

The MRes Renaissance Studies is aimed at those who are interested in the literary and broader cultural aspects of the Renaissance and who wish to acquire a more specialised knowledge of this field. A primary objective is to investigate factors that contribute to the distinctiveness of the cultural productions of Northern Europe, including Scotland. [+]

Best Masters in Culture Study in United Kingdom 2017. Suspended for 2016/17 entry The MRes Renaissance Studies is aimed at those who are interested in the literary and broader cultural aspects of the Renaissance and who wish to acquire a more specialised knowledge of this field. A primary objective is to investigate factors that contribute to the distinctiveness of the cultural productions of Northern Europe, including Scotland. Course objectives The research-based MRes course aims to: Introduce you to key areas of critical debate in Renaissance Studies by comparing different canonical accounts of the period Explore the distinctiveness of northern Renaissance culture, including Scotland. Develop a critical understanding of the variety of genres, media and signifying practices employed by Renaissance writers and visual artists Equip you with the technical skills necessary for conducting research in this field, presenting information and constructing scholarly arguments What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. A sample of work (e.g. English Essay) is required. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.5 with 6.0 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade B Pearson Test of English (Academic): 60 with 56 in each component IBT TOEFL: 90 with no subtest less than 20 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. View our range of pre-sessional courses. Scholarships & funding University of Stirling Postgraduate Merit Scholarship The University of Stirling is offering any UK or European Union student with a First Class Honours degree (or equivalent) a £2,000 scholarship to study full-time on any taught Master's course or £1,000 for part-time study. Structure and content The core of this MRes course is a sustained period of independent study, assessed by coursework over two semesters. This involves a course of directed reading and research, to be agreed by each individual student with his/her supervisor, and tailored to his/her interests. In addition, students take two taught modules from a menu including: Politics and Renaissance Drama: Shakespeare and His Contemporaries Renaissance Sovereignty: Politics and Representation Writing and National Identity Please note that not all these optional modules may be offered in each academic year. Arts Research Training Our innovative training for graduates enables students to build up a portfolio of skills that prepare them for academic and professional life. All graduate students will work with their supervisors to select what’s right for them from a menu of activities. Each student will build up a portfolio of skills every year. On a taught postgraduate degree, you may be given specific guidance on what activities you need to undertake for those qualifications. Dissertation The most significant piece of work on the course will be a dissertation of 15,000 words on a subject of your choosing in consultation with a member of English Studies. You may choose to develop work initiated on one of the modules you have studied. Those who do not embark on the dissertation may be awarded a Diploma. Career opportunities Completing a Master’s degree as a prelude to further academic research is a route encouraged by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC). Advanced education in the Arts and the practical experience of research and the production of a dissertation are significant transferable skills for many careers. [-]

MLitt in The Gothic Imagination

University of Stirling
Campus Full time Part time 12 - 27 months September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling + 1 more

The MLitt in The Gothic Imagination at the University of Stirling provides students with the unique opportunity to steep themselves in the scholarly appreciation of this mode, providing a rigorous and intensive historical survey of its literary origins and developments, and charting its dispersal across a broad range of media and national contexts. [+]

Contemporary culture is characterised by nothing if not a reawakened interest in the Gothic, be that in the form of the current vogue for horror film, in the heightened preoccupation with terror and monstrosity in the media, the extraordinary success of writers such as Stephen King and Stephenie Meyer, or in manifestations of an alternative Gothic impulse in fashion, music and lifestyle. As the countless adaptations and retellings of texts such as Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (1818; 1831) and Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1897) in our own day attest, the Gothic, though once relegated to a dark corner of literary history, has assumed a position of considerable cultural prominence. The MLitt in The Gothic Imagination at the University of Stirling provides students with the unique opportunity to steep themselves in the scholarly appreciation of this mode, providing a rigorous and intensive historical survey of its literary origins and developments, and charting its dispersal across a broad range of media and national contexts. In so doing, the course equips its graduates with the necessary theoretical vocabulary to address, and critically reflect upon, the Gothic as a complex and multi-faceted cultural phenomenon, while also preparing them for further postgraduate research in the rich and vibrant field of Gothic Studies. In addition to these subject-specific objectives, the MLitt in The Gothic Imagination also provides its graduates with several invaluable transferable skills, including critical thinking, theoretical conceptualisation, historical periodization and independent research. Course objectives The MLitt in the Gothic Imagination consists of four core modules, two option modules, and a dissertation. Across these components, the course aims to provide students with a rigorous grounding in the work and thematic preoccupations of the most influential Gothic writers, both historical and contemporary. Supplemented by relevant historical and theoretical material throughout, the course aims to provide as rich and varied an exposure to the academic study of the Gothic as possible. The first two core modules seek to provide a searching historical overview of the genesis and development of the Gothic aesthetic, taking students systematically from the circulation of the term ‘Gothic’ in the political and aesthetic discourses of the late seventeeth and eighteenth centuries, through the late eighteenth-century writings of Horace Walpole, Ann Radcliffe, Matthew Lewis and Charlotte Dacre, and into the nineteenth-century fictions of writers such as Charles Maturin, Mary Shelley, Charles Dickens, the Brontës, Sheridan Le Fanu, Robert Louis Stevenson, Bram Stoker and Oscar Wilde. The second and third core modules, on Gothic in modern, modernist and postmodern writing, include texts by authors such as Gaston Leroux, Algernon Blackwood, H.P. Lovecraft, Djuna Barnes; Mervyn Peake, Shirley Jackson, Stephen King, Anne Rice, Joyce Carol Oates, Toni Morrison and Patrick McGrath. Option modules vary from year to year, depending on student interest and demand. Recent option topics have included the Gothic on the Romantic Stage; Nineteenth-century American Gothic; Transmutations of the Vampire; The Gothic in Children’s Literature; Monstrosity; The Female Gothic; Queer Gothic; and Gothic in/and Modern Horror Cinema. At the dissertation stage, students are encouraged to undertake independent, supervised research on any particular interest within Gothic studies that they might wish to pursue. Subject to the agreement of the course director, a creative writing dissertation may be undertaken at this stage. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. A sample of work (e.g. English Essay) is required. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Scholarships & funding University of Stirling Postgraduate Merit Scholarship The University of Stirling is offering any UK or European Union student with a First Class Honours degree (or equivalent) a £2,000 scholarship to study full-time on any taught Master's course or £1,000 for part-time study. Structure and content The teaching year at Stirling is divided into two semesters, which run from mid-September to late December, and from January to the end of May respectively. Both full-time and part-time students take four Gothic core modules over two semesters. For part-time students, these core modules are completed in year 1. The core modules in the Autumn semester are as follows: Early British Gothic, 1764-1820 (20 credits) and Victorian Gothic, 1820-1900 (20 credits). The core modules for the Spring semester are Twentieth-century British and American Gothic (20 credits) and Twenty-first-century Gothic (20 credits). In parallel with the core modules, students are required to take one optional module in each semester, each weighted at 20 credits. Part-time students take one optional module in each semester in the second year of study. In addition to allowing for the development of a range of subject-specific skills, these two optional modules are also designed to provide students with a rigorous training in research and employability skills. These modules vary depending on teaching staff, but in the past have included the following: American Gothic: An examination of the emergence and development of Gothic in 19th-century American fiction with particular attention to the ways in which these texts transform the optimistic narratives of the new American republic Gothic in Contemporary Film: An analysis of the ways in which Gothic tropes have been appropriated and reworked in a selection of contemporary films The Female Gothic: A study of selected contemporary texts as reworkings of the female Gothic tradition of Ann Radcliffe Transmutations of the Vampire: An investigation into the cultural significance of the vampire over the past 50 years The most significant piece of work on the course will be a dissertation of 15,000 words, written during the summer, on a subject of your choosing, in consultation with a member of English Studies. You may choose to develop work initiated on one of the modules you have studied. Those who do not embark on the dissertation may be awarded a Diploma. The work of the best students completing the course may be deemed worthy of an MLitt with Distinction. Delivery and assessment Two hours of seminars per module per week, plus individual consultations and supervisions with members of staff. Assessment is by means of a 4,000-word essay for each core module, and a variety of skills-based assessments (such as presentations; portfolios; blog-entries) for optional modules. All students complete a 15,000-word dissertation on a topic of their choice once optional and core modules have been completed. Strengths The MLitt in The Gothic Imagination at the University of Stirling is one of the few taught Master's degree courses worldwide that is devoted exclusively to the academic study of the dynamic, ever-expanding field of the Gothic. While aspects of the Gothic feature prominently on undergraduate and graduate university curricula across the globe, the MLitt in The Gothic Imagination at Stirling is unique in the advanced levels of specialisation and expertise with which it equips its graduates. Long acknowledged as a centre of excellence for the study of the Gothic aesthetic worldwide, the division of English Studies at Stirling has historically been the home of leading Gothic scholars for the last two decades; students on the course thus have the opportunity to work closely with some of the leading researchers in the field. As recruitment patterns reveal, the MLitt in The Gothic Imagination enjoys a strong international reputation, and Stirling in the past has been proud to welcome students from as far afield as Argentina, Canada, Greece, Mexico, India, Indonesia, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, South Africa, Spain, Sweden and the USA. With high levels of choice and flexibility built into it, the course structure allows students to develop their own critical interests, though always under the specialist guidance of recognised experts in the broad and exciting field of Gothic Studies. Employability With course-work assessed solely by means of independently devised, researched and executed essays, the MLitt in The Gothic Imagination equips students with a number of the skills and abilities that are prized and actively sought after by employers across the private and public sectors. These include the ability to process and reflect critically upon cultural forms; the ability to organise, present and express ideas clearly and logically; the ability to understand complex theoretical ideas; and the ability to undertake extended independent research. Previous graduates of the course have gone on to pursue successful careers in such fields as teaching, publishing, research, academia, advertising, journalism and the film industry. The 15,000-word dissertation that is submitted towards the end of the course allows students to devise, develop, support and defend their own academic ideas across an extended piece of written work; addition to the skills of independence, organisation and expression fostered by this exercise, the dissertation also provides an excellent point of entry into more advanced forms of postgraduate research, including the Doctoral degree. [-]

MSc Science, Communication & Society

University of Kent, School of History
Campus Full time September 2017 United Kingdom Canterbury

This MSc is unique amongst science communication programmes in the UK and globally because of the depth of the critical humanities perspectives that it brings to bear on science: history, sociology, ethics and visual arts. Using [+]

Best Masters in Culture Study in United Kingdom 2017. ’This is a degree of the highest quality’ Prof. Frank Burnet MBE, external examiner, 2009-2013 This MSc is unique amongst science communication programmes in the UK and globally because of the depth of the critical humanities perspectives that it brings to bear on science: history, sociology, ethics and visual arts. Using the latest scholarship, we enable students to get behind contemporary and historic science to understand how knowledge is created and consumed within society. The course also features visiting professionals from a range of sectors (medical writing, journalism, arts, museums). Practical and creative assessments harness students' developing knowledge to create a portfolio of skills that are highly valued by employers. There is a particular focus on developing excellence in writing. The MSc in Science, Communication and Society complements our more straightforward MA in History of Science, Technology, Environment and Medicine. If you are interested in the history of science or STS, you might nevertheless choose the MSc for its focus on practical and marketable skills, and for the route that it provides between an academic study of the history of science and related careers (museums, policy, lobbying, NGOs). However, the route to further study in history of science remains open; the programme’s graduates have gone into PhDs in history of science, PhDs in science policy or science communication, as well as professional work in a variety of science communication sectors. Entry Requirements Minimum 2.1 or equivalent in history or a relevant subject. In certain circumstances, the School will consider candidates who have not followed a conventional education path. These cases are assessed individually by the Director of Graduate Studies. [-]

MA American Studies

University of Kent, School of History
Campus Full time September 2017 United Kingdom Canterbury

Called Durovernum by the Romans, Canterbury is a city steeped in history and as such makes a stimulating environment for [+]

We asked our students why they would recommend choosing American Studies at Kent. Here are their top five reasons: 1) The variety of modules to choose from, ranging from Literature, History, Politics, Film etc, and the seminars are relatively small in numbers. 2) The fact that it is a varied programme gives you a chance to meet many different American Studies Lecturers/staff, who are very helpful, approachable and looking out for our best interests... 3) ... and you learn to write essays in different styles, whether it be History, Literature or Politics. 4) It’s great, too, to have a choice of programme pathways, including History, Literature Or Latin American pathways. 5) And of course the choice of a year or semester abroad, with a huge variety of destinations is a perennial attraction. Oh, and we can’t count, so: 6) This is also quite a small centre, which allows lecturers/students to get to know one another. Location The School of History is based at the University of Kent's Canterbury campus. Called Durovernum by the Romans, Canterbury is a city steeped in history and as such makes a stimulating environment for anyone wishing to study the past. The green and leafy campus is situated on a hill overlooking the city, and is conveniently located for travel to both London and the continent. The resources available to undergraduates are also excellent. Historians gain access to a wealth of books, journals and other resources through the university's Templeman Library (which is home to over a million items, and the British Cartoon Archive), alongside privileged access to the Canterbury Cathedral Library and Archives. This represents an opportunity to work with a range of top-quality primary sources - such as the Cathedral's unique collection of medieval and early modern manuscripts. Entry Requirements Minimum 2.1 or equivalent in history or a relevant subject. In certain circumstances, the School will consider candidates who have not followed a conventional education path. These cases are assessed individually by the Director of Graduate Studies. [-]

Masters in Events and Exhibition Management

Birmingham City University Faculty of Art, Design and Media
Campus Full time Part time 1 - 3 years September 2017 United Kingdom Birmingham + 1 more

On the Events and Exhibition Management MA at Birmingham School of Media, you'll acquire the professional skills needed to develop and manage successful events, conferences and exhibitions. The course develops these skills to the highest level, enabling you to be ready to enter or progress within the industry, fully prepared and equipped with the skills to embark on a successful event and exhibition management career. Our very real links with exhibition venues and organisations—such as the NEC Group mean you'll learn from top industry professionals, gaining invaluable insider information and learning through real life experiences. [+]

Key Facts

The first of its kind in the UK, the course has been developed with The National Exhibition Centre (NEC) to ensure the qualification is tailored towards careers within the industry. The course is also relevant to those already working in all event management areas or roles. It also will appeal to graduates from disciplines such media, tourism, music technology, public relations, business or marketing. Birmingham is one of the best cities in the country when it comes to event venues. It boasts an enviable array of locations to visit and draw professional experience from. There are impressive event spaces on every scale, from the massive exhibition halls of The NEC and ICC to museums, galleries and a wide range events spaces. There are also a number of music venues, such as the O2 Academy, as well as smaller, bespoke venues like the Custard Factory. Our close partnerships with related organisations like The NEC allows students access to the real world of events and exhibition management while studying. Students on this course can develop their own professional network, ready for when they enter the workplace.... [-]


MRes Philosophy

University of East Anglia Faculty of Arts and Humanities
Campus Full time 1 year August 2017 United Kingdom Norwich

The Master of Research is a research training programme designed to prepare students for independent research, either as part of a one-plus-three year route leading to the PhD or to give students a cutting edge on the job market. The programme has an undiluted Oxbridge format, with teaching structured around one-on-one tutorials. [+]

Philosophy at UEA As a student within Philosophy, you will benefit from a dynamic and friendly environment with a highly distinctive research profile – an ideal place in which to be inducted into philosophical research. While actively supporting research in all core areas and periods of philosophy, we have particular research strengths at various frontiers of the subject: philosophy and the arts (literature, film, music), philosophy and linguistics, environmental philosophy, and metaphilosophy (epistemology and methodology of philosophy) are among its distinctive specialisms. Some of these benefit from the proximity to worldwide leading departments in related areas (including literature and creative writing, and environmental studies). We are a leading centre for research on Wittgenstein, while our members also work on ancient philosophy, early modern philosophy and Kant, phenomenology, and the history of analytic philosophy. Weekly guest lectures and workshops add to the vibrancy of Philosophy at UEA and make it easy for newcomers to blend into the graduate community of about thirty, and be in constant touch with academic staff. The MRes Programme The Master of Research is a research training programme designed to prepare students for independent research, either as part of a one-plus-three year route leading to the PhD or to give students a cutting edge on the job market. The programme has an undiluted Oxbridge format, with teaching structured around one-on-one tutorials. Students typically take four supervised study modules consisting of three such tutorials each. Each module involves doing research on individually agreed topics from one area of the subject, under the guidance of a member of academic staff. Results are presented in three essays. After feedback from the supervisor, two essays are revised and submitted for assessment. Students taking two such modules per semester will have fortnightly essay deadlines and tutorials. One or two supervised study modules can be replaced with appropriate taught modules from the menu of PHI MA modules. Alternatively, it is also possible to take language training (e.g. Ancient Greek, or German for philosophical research purposes) in place of one or two of the modules. One-on-one supervisions are complemented by the Philosophy Postgraduate Research Training Workshop, a research skills module for all Masters’ students. From May to September, students write a dissertation (12-15,000 words) on a topic chosen in consultation with the course director and under the guidance of a supervisor. [-]

MA Art History and Curating

University of Birmingham, College of Arts and Law
Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years September 2017 United Kingdom Birmingham + 1 more

The MA in Art History and Curating is one of the few postgraduate programmes in the country that offers you the opportunity to work in a team with academic and museum professionals to curate an art exhibition in a public gallery [+]

Best Masters in Culture Study in United Kingdom 2017. The MA in Art History and Curating is one of the few postgraduate programmes in the country that offers you the opportunity to work in a team with academic and museum professionals to curate an art exhibition in a public gallery, the Barber Institute of Fine Arts. This unique programme enables you to develop the knowledge and skills to conduct original research into art objects, to understand at first hand the history, theory and contemporary practice of their curation and to disseminate your findings through a public art exhibition and a 15,000-word dissertation. The core components of the programme include the 60-credit ‘Curatorial Practices’ module – taught on a weekly basis in the Barber Institute – that provides you with a full range of skills to curate an exhibition, and a 20-credit 'Research Training and Methods' module which will help you to develop essential research skills. The programme also offers you the flexibility to select a further 40 credits of optional study from a range of complimentary practical, theoretical and historical modules. These include: a 12 week placement with a local gallery, auction house or other commerical arts organisation set up on your behalf; the application of digital technologies in art history; the theory of exhibitions; aesthetics and the philosophy of art. As a result, this unique programme will provide you with the knowledge, experience and employability skills invaluable to museum and academic sectors whilst enabling you to establish professional networks in both. You will study three core modules: - Curatorial Practices – taught by both academics and gallery professionals with leading expertise in the field, you will learn a range of skills related to the organisation of an exhibition including marketing, interpretation and curation - Postgraduate Research Training and Methods – covering topics such as referencing systems, writing a research proposal, literature reviews, approaching archives and oral histories, this module will prepare you for writing your dissertation - Criticism and Methods in the History of Art and Visual Culture – this module looks at the historiography, methods and theoretical underpinning of contemporary practices of artistic and visual analysis You will also choose two options from a range of practical, theoretical and historical modules including: Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art; Art History in the Field: Placements; Cultural Analysis; Digital Cultures; and Theorising Exhibitions Employability The University of Birmingham has been ranked 8th in the UK and 60th in the world for post-qualification employability in the latest global survey of universities commissioned by the International Herald Tribune. Your degree will provide excellent preparation for employment and this will be further enhanced by the employability skills training offered through the College of Arts and Law Graduate School. Birmingham's History of Art graduates develop a broad range of transferable skills, including: familiarity with research methods; the ability to manage large quantities of information from diverse sources; the ability to organise information in a logical and coherent manner; the expertise to write clearly and concisely and to tight deadlines; critical and analytical ability; the capacity for argument, debate and speculation; and the ability to base conclusions on detailed research. Our History of Art postgraduates also have the advantage of gaining hands-on experience at the Barber Institute of Fine Arts: the university's on-campus art gallery which is home to the Department of Art History, Film and Visual Studies. Over the past five years, 100% of History of Art postgraduates were in work and/or further study six months after graduation. Many graduates enter occupations relating to gallery and museum curatorship, management and research; others pursue careers in academia. Employers that our graduates have gone on to work for include: Barber Institute of Fine Arts; Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery; Bodleian Library; National Portrait Gallery; Royal Birmingham Society of Artists; University of Birmingham; and Victoria and Albert Museum. [-]

Master in Scandinavian Studies

University of Aberdeen
Campus Full time Part time August 2017 United Kingdom Aberdeen

The Centre for Scandinavian Studies was launched at the University of Aberdeen in 2007 and is an interdisciplinary research institution, crossing discipline, School and College boundaries. The Centre’s aims are to: Initiate research on aspects on Scandinavian language, history and culture Create a ‘Research School’ in Scandinavian ... [+]

Master in Scandinavian Studies

Research Degrees: MLitt by Research, MPhil, PhD

Background

The Centre for Scandinavian Studies was launched at the University of Aberdeen in 2007 and is an interdisciplinary research institution, crossing discipline, School and College boundaries. The Centre’s aims are to: Initiate research on aspects on Scandinavian language, history and culture Create a ‘Research School’ in Scandinavian Studies for Postgraduates, where the MLitt and PhD students will participate in the activities at the Centre on a daily basis Run several MLitt (Master) programmes Run a Scandinavian Studies Seminar Series Participate, promote and enhance different projects, networks, conferences and interests related to Scandinavia.... [-]


Master in Hispanic Studies

University of Aberdeen
Campus Full time Part time August 2017 United Kingdom Aberdeen

Hispanic Studies, which is part of the School of Language & Literature, has a highly distinguished record of research and publication in Spanish and Latin American studies. Lately, at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels, the interests of staff have been increasingly directed to the modern period. [+]

Master in Hispanic Studies

Research Degrees: MLitt, MPhil, PhD

Background

Hispanic Studies, which is part of the School of Language & Literature, has a highly distinguished record of research and publication in Spanish and Latin American studies. Lately, at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels, the interests of staff have been increasingly directed to the modern period.

Hispanic Studies provides a stimulating and supportive research environment. It offers a wide range of specialisation for postgraduate research, leading to the degree of MLitt and PhD. All full-time staff are active in research, prominent areas including 19th and 20th century Spanish narrative; modern Latin American studies; Basque Studies; Mexican history, culture and anthropology; historicist approaches to literature; and psychoanalytic literary theory.... [-]