Master Program in Culture Study in Norway

View Masters Programs in Culture Study in Norway 2017

Culture Study

Master-level studies involve specialized study in a field of research or an area of professional practice. Earning a master’s degree demonstrates a higher level of mastery of the subject. Earning a master’s degree can take anywhere from a year to three or four years. Before you can graduate, you usually must write and defend a thesis, a long paper that is the culmination of your specialized research.

Culture Study refers to any program that focuses on human culture. It is best oriented for those who are interested in the forces that shape the world of humans today, from media to direct issues like gender and sexuality.

Norway (Norge) is the westernmost, northernmost — and in fact the easternmost — of the three Scandinavian countries. Norway is well known for its amazing and varied scenery. The fjords in the west of the country are long narrow inlets, flanked on either side by tall mountains where the sea penetrates far inland. The ultimate responsibility for the education lies with the Norwegian Ministry of Education and Research.

Top Master Programs in Culture Study in Norway 2017

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Master of Philosophy in Visual Cultural Studies

UIT The Arctic University of Norway
Campus Full time 2 years January 2017 Norway Tromsø

Are you interested in human culture and how to use the video camera in social scientific research? At Visual Cultural Studies you are given the opportunity to study ethnographic research methods, anthropological theory, and ethnographic film making in an international environment, culminating with the production of your very own film and written thesis. [+]

Best Masters in Culture Study in Norway 2017. Are you interested in human culture and how to use the video camera in social scientific research? At Visual Cultural Studies you are given the opportunity to study ethnographic research methods, anthropological theory, and ethnographic film making in an international environment, culminating with the production of your very own film and written thesis. The Department of Archaeology and Social Anthropology offers a two-year full-time Master's programme in Visual Cultural Studies (VCS). The aim of this programme is to teach students how to produce knowledge about people's lives and cultures through an exploration of their everyday lives based on the use of qualitative social science research methods and ethnographic film. The programme combines lectures in academic theory and method, filmmaking and practical instruction in camerawork, sound recording and editing. The students at the Master's programme follow a set of courses the first two semesters before they travel on fieldwork. Based on this fieldwork, the students write a Master's Thesis and make an ethnographic film. For a complete setup of the programme, please refer to the Programme structure below. The films produced at VCS are well known for their quality. Every year several films are selected for international documentary and ethnographic film festivals. The originality of the program has led to a special educational prize from UiT, the Arctic University of Norway and a further award for educational quality from the Ministry of Education. Learning outcomes After completing successfully the programme, students are expected to have acquired the following learning outcomes. Knowledge The candidate has knowledge of the evolution of the social scientific tradition in general, and advanced knowledge of theoretical perspectives within the field of Visual anthropology especially. has thorough knowledge of the region and/or the field where his/her proper Master project takes place and solid knowledge of the cutting edge of his/her Master project¿s theme. has thorough knowledge of ethnographic research methodology and the different steps in a research process which involves the use of the video camera. can apply the acquired methods and theoretical perspectives in the description and analyses of new areas within the academic field of Visual Anthropology. can reflect critically on the use of different filmic languages and narrative structures as `ways of knowing¿ in specific historical and societal contexts. has technical knowledge of how to handle and use the recording and editing equipment for video. Skills The candidate can in a systematic way manage, process and analyze critically material from various sources and use them to structure and formulate a written scholarly argument. Is able to capture the narrative conceptualizations of their field partners by the use of video and create intelligible narrative strategies with a future audience in mind. is able to demonstrate how film and text mutually inform, inspire, and contradict each other, and critically evaluate the role of film in the creation of social scientific knowledge. can under supervision carry out an independent research project which makes use of participant observation and audiovisual tools, with applicable norms for research ethics. is able to make use of video as a tool in the acquisition and dissemination of social scientific knowledge. General competences The candidate is able to identify, analyze and discuss different theoretical and methodological approaches to their own empirical material and apply it in the description and analysis of other sociocultural phenomena. masters the language and terminology of visual socio-cultural research and can communicate to colleagues, partners, and public audiences, the methodological/analytical approaches used in- and the final results of- his/her own work. is able to build up responsibility towards partners in the field and thereby a profound consciousness of the ethics and potentials for empowerment of research and dissemination. can contribute to new thinking and innovation processes based in the exploration of the possible potentials of visual and analytical tools. is in an independent way able to apply audiovisual tools creatively and critically to enhance/clarify their story narratives within a social science framework. Admission requirements Admission to the Master's programme in Visual Cultural Studies requires a Bachelor's degree (180 ECTS) or equivalent qualification in the social sciences or a related field in the humanities. An average grade of equivalent to C or better in the Norwegian grading system is required. Applicants must enclose an application essay written in English (maximum of two pages). This should include descriptions of their motivation for, interest in and expectations relating to their Master's degree studies and ideas for their Master`s Thesis project. Applicants from Norway or Nordic countries: The application deadline for Norwegian and other Nordic applicants is 15 April for admission to the autumn semester Applicants from outside the Nordic countries: The application deadline for international applicants is 1 December for admission to the autumn semester. Online application, study code 2038 Teaching and assessment The programme is organised as a continuous participatory learning process: lectures, screenings, writing and filming assignments, and seminars make up the unique cumulative learning process of the two year course. Students are encouraged to collaborate with each other in developing skills and understandings throughout the study. The programme includes various types of examinations and coursework requirements, such as essays, research papers, and film presentations. Please note that some courses have coursework requirements. Only students whose coursework requirements have been approved will be allowed to sit the examination. Teaching and assessment methods are described in the course plan for each course. This Master's degree is an intensive programme. All courses are compulsory and demand active participation from the students. Exchange possibilities Students have the possibility to carry out their fieldwork abroad. Job prospectives The VCS degree can open doors to a variety of national and international positions in social research, television and film production, administration, communication, museums, youth and education programmes, etc. Studying in such an international environment develops competences in cross-cultural communication as well as valuable assets to a number of career options. Access to further studies On successful completion of the degree programme, students may be qualified for admission to a PhD programme in a number of academic areas at the UiT, the Arctic University of Norway or elsewhere. [-]

Indigenous Studies - Master

UIT The Arctic University of Norway
Campus Full time 2 years August 2017 Norway Tromsø

The Faculty of Humanities, Social Sciences and Education, in cooperation with the Centre for Sami Studies, offers a two-year full-time Master's Programme in Indigenous Studies (MIS). The programme is interdisciplinary and makes use of the expertise accumulated in several departments at the Faculty. The thematic focus of the master's programme is the emergence of the international indigenous movement, the historical experiences and... [+]

Master in Indigenous Studies The Faculty of Humanities, Social Sciences and Education, in cooperation with the Centre for Sami Studies, offers a two-year full-time Master's Programme in Indigenous Studies (MIS). The programme is interdisciplinary and makes use of the expertise accumulated in several departments at the Faculty. The thematic focus of the master's programme is the emergence of the international indigenous movement, the historical experiences and contemporary context that indigenous people experience across the globe. During the two years of studies, students will take courses totalling 120 credits (120 ECTS). One 10-credit course can be chosen from other courses offered by the University. This elective course must be approved by the Academic Coordinator and should be based on the interests of the individual student as a preparation for the master's thesis. The remaining courses are obligatory. They are designed to give a broad base, from which the individual student may choose a relevant topic for the master's thesis. The thesis work is supervised by academic staff from the cooperating units at UiT The Arctic University of Norway, and topics are chosen in cooperation with the appointed advisors. It is customary to conduct data collection for the master's thesis in the end of the second semester. Learning outcomes Each programme at UiT The Arctic University of Norway has set targets for knowledge, analytical understanding, and skills and competences that students should have reached by the end of their studies. Admission requirements Admission to the Master's Programme in Indigenous Studies requires a bachelor's degree (180 ECTS), or an equivalent qualification in social sciences and the social application of law and humanities. A special interest in indigenous issues is a precondition. Applicants must enclose a statement of purpose written in English (maximum of two pages). This should include a description of their motivation for, interest in, and expectations concerning their master's degree studies. Documented experience from work related to indigenous peoples and/or studies will be an advantage. Applicants from universities other than the University of Tromsø should enclose a short description of all relevant courses mentioned in applications and certificates. The programme aims to recruit Sami, Nordic and international students. A mixed group of students will strengthen the comparative aspects of the programme, and will contribute to international network building. The admission of students from different countries and regions will be emphasized in order to ensure a varied student group. Ethnic background will also be relevant in this respect. Teaching and assessment The organisation of the teaching will depend on the character and the content of each course. The type of examination is specified in each module. More information about the teaching and examination can be found in the description of each individual course. Seminars in methodology and thesis writing run parallel to the other courses throughout the studies. The course in methodology ties together the different courses and disciplinary approaches. This constitutes the basis both for the development of the students' individual research design and for the integration of indigenous perspectives in research. All students will be appointed an academic supervisor in the second semester. Supervision is to be given both through seminars and individual supervision. Language of instruction English. Job prospectives With a master's degree in Indigenous Studies, students are qualified for work within: teaching and education, promotion and implementation of indigenous issues internationally, civil society organisations, government and public sector, project management, research and studies in indigenous issues. [-]

History of Religions (M.Phil)

MF Norwegian School of Theology
Campus Full time 2 years August 2017 Norway Oslo

Interdisciplinary Approaches to Religion and History in the Pre-Modern World:Encounter and Conflict [+]

Best Masters in Culture Study in Norway 2017. Language of Instruction: English Interdisciplinary Approaches to Religion and History in the Pre-Modern World: Encounter and Conflict Why is Jerusalem still such a contested place? What are the reasons for the systematic destruction by the Islamic State (IS) of the cultural heritage of the past? Why do sacred texts produced centuries ago continue to shape the lives of people today? How are they used and abused? Why does the sword sometimes replace the word in religious matters? How did religious groups, ideas and artefacts travel from one continent to another and how did that migration transform them? In other words, how did religious conflicts and encounters shape the modern world and why do they still matter today? These are some of the topics MF Norwegian School of Theology tackles in its new M.Phil programme in History of Religions, with a primary focus on Religion in the Pre-Modern World: Encounters and Conflicts. The programme is focused on the issues of religious cross-pollination, coexistence and conflict in three target areas: Europe, South-East Asia and the Middle East. Addressed in a long historical perspective stretching from Late Antiquity to the European Renaissance, the programme seeks to illuminate the roots of present peaceful coexistence and interchange, as well as of today’s antagonisms and conflicts. The underlying idea of the programme is that, in order to fully grasp current religious conflicts and alliances, we need to understand how the perceptions of past and present are intertwined, reciprocally dependent and constantly reshaped. Based on a multidisciplinary approach and applying various theoretical frameworks and interpretative methods, the core courses of the programme aim to reveal historical dynamics, privileging ‘how’ and tentatively ‘why’ over ‘who’ and ‘when’. The programme is conceived at the intersection between political history and history of religions, but relies also on other disciplines, such as the history of ideas, art history and archaeology. These are meant to provide the depth of field expected in Big History by illustrating and clarifying the macro-historical perspectives. Teaching and learning are driven by a hands-on and case-oriented attitude and core courses are complemented by lectures and seminars of theory and method. The programme is open to all students with a BA in related disciplines (history, religious studies, theology, archaeology, art history, social sciences, etc.). The programme coordinator is Victor Ghica, Professor of Antiquity and Early Christian Studies. The core courses of the programme will be taught by Kristin B. Aavitsland, Professor of Cultural History, Liv Ingeborg Lied, Professor of the Study of Religions, John Kaufman, Associate Professor of Church History, Iselin Frydenlund, Postdoctoral Researcher and historian of religions, as well as by Victor Ghica and several other specialists. Career opportunities This programme aims at providing education for positions within research and education, as well as within Norwegian and international institutions and organizations where knowledge of the development of Christian and Jewish identity is required. The Master´s degree qualifies for further studies on a doctoral level. Admission requirements - A BA or equivalent degree in Theology, History, Religious Studies or related fields. - Grade average equivalent to Norwegian C level. Qualification History of Religions (M.Phil) More information The Master´s programme aims at providing education for positions within research and education, as well as within Norwegian and international institutions and organizations where knowledge of Religion and History: Encounter and Conflict is required. The Master´s degree qualifies for further studies at the doctoral level. The Master Programme Religion and History: Encounter and Conflict consists of 120 ECTS, including a thesis worth 30 ECTS. The study programme is built on different courses and the independent work on the Master´s thesis. Each course consists of 10 ECTS. For each course, learning outcomes and competencies are formulated emphasising the students´ insights into central academic questions. The competence aims are formulated independently for each subject. The learning outcomes are formulated on three levels; basic ability, ability and good ability. The work to fulfil these learning outcomes will contribute to reaching the competence aims, and is the basis for evaluation. (Cf. Organisering, arbeidsformer og vurdering under, og emnebeskrivelsene samt vedlegget med Nivåspesifikke vurderingskriterier på 500-/600-nivå). The objectives of the study will be fulfilled through courses at the Master´s level, 90 ECTS, including a compulsory course in historical methods (10 ECTS). The students will write a thesis worth 30 ECTS. Each student may profile her or his study programme by choosing electives and the topic of the thesis. The programme allows for relevant electives at the same level from other universities or colleges in Norway or abroad. The program includes the possibility of taking part in a study trip and/or spending a semester abroad. [-]