Part time Master's Degree in Creative Writing

Find Part time Masters Programs in Creative Writing 2017

Creative Writing

A master's degree is a postgraduate academic degree. One must already have an undergraduate degree to apply for a master's program. Most master's degree program would require students to complete a master's thesis or research paper.

Human Being self-expression, self-awareness, and the progress of reading trades are notified by a hands-on engagement with the chances of literary language and form. The significant part provides the traditional, contextual and logical context for this useful knowledge.

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MLitt in Modern Scottish Writing

University of Stirling
Campus Part time 12 - 27 months September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling

The Stirling Master's course views Scottish literature in the light of this ambiguity from a perspective shaped by critical theory as well as traditional literary history. Our focus is the unusually strong role played by literature in sustaining the reality and difference of Scottish culture over the past three centuries – not forgetting the role of novelists and poets in integrating Scottish identity into the project of Britishness. [+]

Best Part time Masters in Creative Writing 2017. After more than a decade of devolution, Scotland’s national status ‘is both dangled before us and tantalisingly withheld’ (Don Paterson) The Stirling Master's course views Scottish literature in the light of this ambiguity from a perspective shaped by critical theory as well as traditional literary history. Our focus is the unusually strong role played by literature in sustaining the reality and difference of Scottish culture over the past three centuries – not forgetting the role of novelists and poets in integrating Scottish identity into the project of Britishness. As debate intensifies over Scotland’s political status, the time is ripe to examine the role of writing in shaping the image and reality of the nation. Scholarships & funding University of Stirling Postgraduate Merit Scholarship The University of Stirling is offering any UK or European Union student with a First Class Honours degree (or equivalent) a £2,000 scholarship to study full-time on any taught Master's course or £1,000 for part-time study. Structure and content The Autumn core modules provide a thematic and historical overview; the Spring core module explores Scottish Romantic and Modernist writing in relation to specific themes of authenticity, representation and democracy. Option modules allow students to pursue deeper knowledge of specific texts and issues. Full-time students take one option in each semester; part-time students take options in Year 2 of their course. It is now possible to study Modern Scottish Writing jointly with Creative Writing; students on this pathway do ‘critical’ modules in Modern Scottish Writing alongside Creative Writing workshops. Delivery and assessment Dissertation The most significant piece of work on the course will be a dissertation of 15,000 words, written during the summer on a subject of your choosing in consultation with a member of teaching staff. You may choose to develop work initiated on one of the modules you have studied. Those who do not embark on the dissertation may be awarded a Diploma. The work of the best students completing the course may be deemed worthy of an MLitt with Distinction. Career opportunities Completing a Master’s degree as a prelude to further academic research is an increasingly common pattern of study for young scholars and is a route encouraged by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC). Advanced education in the Arts, the practical experience of research and the production of a dissertation are significant transferable skills for many careers in business and the professions. Skills you can develop through this course An English degree is acknowledged by potential employers as providing important skills, such as motivation, intelligence and the ability to meet deadlines. Although English is not a specifically vocational degree it offers a number of important transferable skills, such as the ability to write clearly, effectively, accurately and persuasively. Seminar discussion and oral presentations (required by many of our modules) help to develop your spoken communication skills. The critical and reflexive study of a variety of texts (literary and non-literary) teaches you how to analyse and interpret complex information and to apply abstract concepts and theories. Our criteria for assessment also requires students to be able to synthesise conclusions, to assimilate existing research and to construct and defend an argument clearly and cogently. Throughout their degrees, our students are also trained to use library and bibliographic resources effectively and appropriately to reference accurately, and to present their work professionally. All of these skills are essential to many kinds of work, which is why so many employers recognise the value of an English Degree. In a recent report, graduates of English were as likely (if not more) to be in professional or managerial jobs three to three and a half years after graduation than graduates in other subjects (including science and social science subjects). Almost fifty percent of English graduates pursue further education within three years of graduating from their undergraduate degree, often as a route to a professional career, such as teaching or law. Chances to expand your horizons During the semester, the department runs a number of lively literary seminars for students and staff alike, in which writers, staff members, postgraduate students and distinguished visiting scholars give papers on their work and special interests. We are fortunate in that the macrobert Arts Centre is at the centre of the University, presenting a widely varied programme of film, drama and music throughout the year. Small magazines are published on campus and the Literary Society organises visits from distinguished creative writers each year, along with theatre trips to Glasgow and Edinburgh. Finally, the University Drama Society is very active, producing about seven plays a year, including performances at the Edinburgh Festival. Where are our graduates now? In a recent report, graduates of English were as likely (if not more) to be in professional or managerial jobs three to three and a half years after graduation than graduates in other subjects (including science and social science subjects). Almost fifty percent of English graduates pursue further education within three years of graduating from their undergraduate degree, often as a route to a professional career, such as teaching or law. Here are a few examples of the sorts of careers graduates of this course have gone on to, in recent years: Teaching and Research Assistant Doctoral research Teaching Freelance content editor Photographer Journalist Completing a Master’s degree as a prelude to further academic research is an increasingly common pattern of study for young scholars and is a route encouraged by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC). [-]

Master in Creative Writing (MLitt)

University of Stirling
Campus Part time 12 - 27 months September 2017 United Kingdom Stirling

The MLitt Creative Writing offers the opportunity to produce a body of work – poetry, fiction, or creative non-fiction – over the course of a creative and stimulating year. The degree combines intensive writers’ workshops, technique-focused option modules, and one-to-one tuition by the distinguished writers on staff, along with stimulating visits from authors, agents and publishers. [+]

The MLitt Creative Writing offers the opportunity to produce a body of work – poetry, fiction, or creative non-fiction – over the course of a creative and stimulating year. The degree combines intensive writers’ workshops, technique-focused option modules, and one-to-one tuition by the distinguished writers on staff, along with stimulating visits from authors, agents and publishers. Course objectives The course is designed to develop the talents of creative individuals, allowing them to focus in-depth on a project while offering them creative encounters with a range of genres and working practices, drawing on Stirling’s rich expertise in contemporary literature, publishing, film, media, and journalism.
 Students learn skills in listening and diplomacy, advocacy, and in producing fine, nuanced writing. What makes us different? Entry requirements Academic requirements A minimum of a second class Honours degree (2.1 preferred) or equivalent in a relevant subject. Applicants without these formal qualifications but with significant appropriate/relevant work/life experience are encouraged to apply. Applicants must supply a sample of their creative work: For the prose strand - up to eight pages of prose (fiction or creative nonfiction) or a portfolio of eight poems. A half-and-half mix is also acceptable. English language requirements If English is not your first language you must have one of the following qualifications as evidence of your English language skills: IELTS: 6.0 with 5.5 minimum in each skill Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE): Grade C Cambridge Certificate of Advanced English (CAE): Grade C Pearson Test of English (Academic): 54 with 51 in each component IBT TOEFL: 80 with no subtest less than 17 If you don’t meet the required score you may be able to register for one of our pre-sessional English courses. To register you must hold a conditional offer for your course and have an IELTS score 0.5 or 1.0 below the required standard. Scholarships & funding University of Stirling Postgraduate Merit Scholarship The University of Stirling is offering any UK or European Union student with a First Class Honours degree (or equivalent) a £2,000 scholarship to study full-time on any taught Master's course or £1,000 for part-time study. Structure and content The teaching year at Stirling is divided into two semesters, which run from mid-September to late December, and from January to the end of May. Full-time students In the Autumn Semester, all full-time students take two consecutive core modules, the Writer’s Workshops. In these core modules, students and tutors read and discuss each other’s work and present their own creative work for discussion. Also in Autumn, full-time students will take a specialist option module, either Prose Fiction or Poetry. In Spring, full-time students will take a third core module the Writer’s Workshop and also a Research Skills module which entails visits to class by literary agents, editors etc. Also in Spring, we offer an option called ‘The Writing Life’ which covers non-fiction writing, memoir, and script-writing. The Summer is spent preparing and writing the Dissertation. Part-time students Part-time students take the MLitt over two years: Year 1: In the Autumn Semester of Year 1, part-time students take one core module, 'The Writer’s Workshop'. In these core modules, students and tutors read and discuss each other’s work and present their own creative work for discussion. Also in Autumn, part-time students will take a specialist option module, either Prose Fiction or Poetry. In Spring, part-time students take the option ‘The Writing Life’, plus the Research Skills module. Year 2: In the Autumn of Year 2, part-time students take two consecutive Writer’s Workshop modules. For part-time students, Dissertation preparation begins in Spring of Year 2. Delivery and assessment Assessment for the workshops will depend on the literary form chosen (prose or poetry) but will be based on reading journals and/or working notebooks, book reviews and in some cases completed pieces of creative work. Assessment for each option module will likewise vary but may include a critical essay, a journal, a creative project. The most significant piece of work in the course is the creative dissertation, due at the end of the summer. This will be circa 15,000 words of prose or a collection of circa 15 poems. A dissertation may be a portfolio of shorter texts – stories, personal essays, poems – or part of a novel. It is expected to be revised and polished original work, written and presented to professional standards. Those who do not embark on the dissertation may be awarded a Diploma. The work of the best students completing the course may be deemed worthy of an MLitt with Distinction. Modes of study Workshops and seminars and guest lectures are taught on campus. We also encourage students to embrace the wider literary life by attending – even organising – events and readings, festivals, libraries and the like. Strengths From September 2013 this course will be taught by Stirling’s Creative Writing team: poet and essayist Kathleen Jamie and fiction writer Liam Murray Bell. Kathleen Jamie is an internationally recognised poet, and winner of, amongst other awards, the Scottish Book of the Year Award, a Forward Prize, and the Costa Poetry Prize. Liam Murray Bell’s first novel ‘So It Is’ attracted Arts Council funding. Set in Belfast, it was hailed as ‘a beautifully written debut novel’ concerning the Troubles. His latest novel 'The Busker' is a Scottish Book Trust 'Pick' for 2014. Both tutors also write non-fiction, reviews, essays etc and are popular figures at festivals, literary events, and residencies. We offer a dynamic mix of youth and experience, and encourage students in an atmosphere which is both rigorous and creative. Regular visits from other established writers, publishers, editors etc offer a wide view of the literary life. Career opportunities Our Creative Writing students find a place for their creativity in many fields: teaching, broadcasting, publishing, community work. Many chose to become self-employed as writers and tutors. Some develop their interest further by studying for a PhD. Some actually publish books! Skills you can develop through this course Graduates in Creative Writing will be highly literate self-managers capable of realising sustained projects using their own initiative and creativity. They will be emotionally intelligent and diplomatic and have skills in: Communication and presentation - being able to articulate complex ideas and information in imaginative, comprehensible and entertaining forms. They will be able to present ideas in verbal and written forms to audiences in a range of situations; and to encourage, evaluate and assist with the work of others. Self-management – students will have the ability to work independently, set goals and meet deadlines. They will be able to work with creativity and imagination to meet challenges, and to respond positively to change and uncertainty. Critical engagement – students will have the ability to formulate independent judgements, articulate arguments and research relevant material, presenting their findings in engaging and creative ways. Chances to expand your horizons In any given year a number of course-specific talks and literary events are arranged for and by the students. These include but are not limited to: visits from literary agents and or publishers public events by poets and novelists (with students’ input and assistance) visits to research centres Where are our graduates now? As well as becoming professional writers our students find employment in many sectors. Some students have gone on to further study, in particular the creative writing PhD. Others are teachers, editors, librarians, some work in publishing. Our course is particularly attractive to students are already well established in careers, or even retired and who take our MLitt later in life to enhance their skills and develop new creative prospects. [-]

Writing

Birmingham City University Faculty of Art, Design and Media
Campus Part time 1 - 2 years September 2017 United Kingdom Birmingham

The MA in Writing at Birmingham City University is aimed at emerging writers and can be taken over one year full-time or two years part-time. Key features of the course include: * The opportunity to learn from distinguished practitioners, with tuition from Ian Marchant, Gregory Leadbetter, Anthony Mellors, Andy Conway, and from among the Fellows of the Institute of Creative and Critical Writing (http://www.bcu.ac.uk/iccw), including Helen Cross, Caroline Jester, Sally Read, Patrick McGuinness and David Morley. * A flexible modular structure, with options in Fiction, Screenwriting, Creative Non-fiction, Scripting and Staging, and Poetry, taken together with the compulsory module Reading into Writing and a Final Project. * Direct contact with guest authors, literary agents, publishers, editors, and development agencies through the Institute of Creative and Critical Writing programme of seminars, readings and public events. * Our masterclass system, offering a detailed critique of your work by an established author – and the benefit of hearing other students’ work receive the same attention. * The opportunity for publication in our annual anthology of new writing, and to present your work in public at the end of year show in Birmingham city centre. * Online support through the Moodle e-learning interface. * Distance Learning modules in Fiction and Screenwriting, enabling you to study these options entirely from home, should you wish. [+]

Entry Requirements

Admission to the course is based on talent, potential and commitment. This is assessed through your application form, a sample of your written work (c. 2000 words of prose, or equivalent in script or poetry), and usually an interview, either in person or over the telephone.

 

Employability

We believe that the study of writing has an inherent personal and cultural value – but we also support those who wish to pursue a professional career as a writer, by preparing our students for the literary marketplace. The School of English is very active in research, with excellent 2008 RAE results. MPhil and PhD opportunities may be available.

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Master in Open Media

Macromedia University for Media and Communication
Campus Part time 4 semesters October 2017 Germany Munich

Whether as an employee in corporate communications, as a freelance designer, entrepreneur or marketing manager of a publishing house: a classical study does not often meet the complex job requirements of the media industry. In a modular Open Media Master programme you therefore have the opportunity to put together your individual study according to your specific requirements [+]

Design your own curriculum: Whether as an employee in corporate communications, as a freelance designer, entrepreneur or marketing manager of a publishing house: a classic study is sometimes not adequate to meet the complex requirements of the professional media industry. In the modular master program Open Media students have the opportunity to put together their studies individually according to their specific requirements. They are based on a few core modules in which they train their scientific and methodological expertise to develop basic management skills and broaden their knowledge of media law and economics. Based on this, students select the areas of Design, Journalism, and Management courses relevant to them. The master's program Open Media has a strong international focus. A majority of the courses will be in English and the students work in interdisciplinary projects to deal with international issues. According to the non-consecutive principle of studies, the MHMK Master School’s degree in Open Media program is not only limited to those who hold Bachelor degrees in media related fields, but to all those interested parties of any fields, who bring first-hand professional experience in the media industry. Flexible lecture hours and part-time studies are possible due to the low amount of required portions. ... [-]


Master of Arts in Creative Writing

University of Technology Sydney
Campus Part time 1.5 years

The Master of Arts in Creative Writing is designed for experienced writers who want to further develop their theoretical knowledge and skills. Students learn valuable skills and work towards developing a major project under the guidance of an academic faculty member with expertise in creative writing. [+]

Students study one genre in depth or explore a range of genres and media.

Graduates of this course develop: general and specific skills in writing across a range of genres an ability to develop and critically revise their own work an understanding of the relationships of writing practice and publication across a range of media and contemporary cultural forms a critical knowledge of cultural and aesthetic debates, and an ability to think creatively and critically about, and contribute to, developments in cultural industries.

Career options include advertising, computing, creative writing, freelance writing and editing, journalism, media research, publishing or scriptwriting, and editing in community organisations or government departments.... [-]


Master in Creative Writing

University of Aberdeen
Campus Part time 1 - 2 years August 2017 United Kingdom Aberdeen

The Diploma/MLitt in Creative Writing is a taught postgraduate programme designed to offer students the opportunity to develop their creativity and literary skills in a highly supportive, constructive learning environment. [+]

Master in Creative Writing

Programme Length

MLitt 12 months full-time, 24 months part-time PgDip 9 months full time, 21 months part-time (Non EU students should note that immigration regulations preclude part-time study)

Aims

The Diploma/MLitt in Creative Writing is a taught postgraduate programme designed to offer students the opportunity to develop their creativity and literary skills in a highly supportive, constructive learning environment. It also introduces students to, and prepares them thoroughly for, the processes and challenges involved in publishing creative written work, whether poetry or prose.

Students can take this degree as a stand-alone one-year or two-year part-time Masters degree (but immigration regulations prevent an overseas student from outside the EU from studying part-time), or as a first step towards an MPhil or PhD (subject to admission to a further degree programme either at Aberdeen or elsewhere). Hence, it is likely to appeal to those who wish to develop their own knowledge and practical skill in imaginative writing, those who wish to create a solid foundation on which to build a PhD research proposal in Creative Writing and those who wish to teach Creative Writing.... [-]