Masters Program in Landscape Architecture in United Kingdom

See Masters Programs in Landscape Architecture in United Kingdom 2016/2017

Landscape Architecture

A masters refers to the completion of a graduate study program that prepares students to further their knowledge of a specific subject or advance their careers. The majority of masters are granted by state or public universities.

Landscape architecture refers to using plants and open space in a creative and functional way. Landscape architects may design hospital grounds that encourage calm and relaxation, or they may work to design a green roof system that helps companies save on heating and cooling costs.

UK, United Kingdom is more than 300 years old and comprises four constituent nations: England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland. The UK has been a centre of learning for the past 1,000 years and possesses many ancient and distinguished universities. Foreign students make up a significant proportion of the student body at UK universities.

Top Master Programs in Landscape Architecture in United Kingdom 2016/2017

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Master (MA) Environment Design

Ravensbourne
Campus Full time Part time 1 - 2 years August 2017 United Kingdom London + 1 more

The Ravensbourne MA Environment Design investigates spatial design in its real-virtual, and macro-micro scales. [+]

Best Masters in Landscape Architecture in United Kingdom 2016/2017. The Ravensbourne MA Environment Design investigates spatial design in its real-virtual, and macro-micro scales. Encompassing interior, architecture, cities and natural environments the programme analyzes a series of different perspectives of theory and practice from art, science, and technology towards an understanding of a cultural sustainability. Systems - Every year the course aims to produce new research that takes forward questions inherent in Modernity. Currently focused on natural ecological systems (earthquakes, tectonic plates, deltas and shorelines), (re)contruction and war, cosmographies and cultures of outerspace, and bio-tech materials ; the course encourages you to explore your own field of research and practice. Technologies - The Environment Design operates with a multidisciplinary team where knowledge exchange is one of the core points to focus. From: applied technologies, visual effects, interactive digital media, moving image, communication design and fashion, the programme aims to deploy students with methods and techniques from different perspectives embracing new possibilities offered by new technology and the creative processes involved in designing. Modeling and simulation - with a hands on training in the use of the scientific instruments and computational tools, Ravensbourne offers you with full access to digital facilities for digital imaging and prototyping; where you will be able to experiment and innovate through technical, user and interaction workshops based upon strategies deployed by leading practitioners within the field. You will be encouraged to engage with advanced practice within a global context and explore the similarities and key differences and emphases of different centres across the world and to put your learning and design solutions into context. Here you will expand your own research and practice, by developing and managing an individual programme of enquiry and creative development in environment design culminating in the realisation of a final major project fully informed by professional and industrial contexts and multi disciplinary perspectives. [-]

(MArch) Master of Architecture (RIBA pt II)

University of Westminster - Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment
Campus Full time 2 years September 2016 United Kingdom London

The MArch (Part 2) is a long-established and well-respected course that is prescribed by the ARB and validated by the RIBA to give exemption from the second stage of professional education. The emphasis of the course is on innovative design work, and on developing a caring and critical approach to the study and practice of architecture. [+]

The MArch (Part 2) is a long-established and well-respected course that is prescribed by the ARB and validated by the RIBA to give exemption from the second stage of professional education. The emphasis of the course is on innovative design work, and on developing a caring and critical approach to the study and practice of architecture. The course fosters diversity of choice, interpretation and approach, whether in design projects or more academic research. The former focuses on sophisticated design programmes (in formal, technical, professional or urban terms) that demand rigour and self-criticism. The latter focuses on your major dissertation, an extended piece of specialised research into architecture and its historical or theoretical contexts. The course has three main objectives: to develop your design ability through project-based experimentation; to present an evaluation and critique of your coursework within a broad cultural context, and in light of technical, economic and legal constraints; and to promote the articulate explanation and representation of quality and value in design projects. Core modules DESIGN PROJECT 1 (YEAR 1 DESIGN STUDIO) This single design project, or series of linked design projects, is individual to each elective Design Studio, and is run in parallel with the Year 2 Design Studio. You choose your Design Studio following presentations by all the Design Studio tutors at the beginning of the academic year; each Design Studio offers a new project every year. Projects lead from exploratory research to the development of an individual brief, and a design proposal which you develop for assessment at the end of Semester One. DIGITAL REPRESENTATION This module focuses on digital media technology and computer-based strategies, including the principles of 2D and 3D computer drawing, modelling, rendering, animation and digital fabrication techniques. The module aims to extend your practical and theoretical understanding of advanced digital media, as well as to enhance your existing computing knowledge and skills - so assessment is on a 'value-added' basis. PROFESSIONAL STUDIES This module draws on your work experience and introduces statutory, professional and management concepts related to the 'professional' development of your coursework. It asks you to reflect on your prior experience and personal development, and to identify areas for future investigation. The module introduces you to the role of the architect in the construction industry (including development and procurement issues), and to the professional, managerial and legal constraints that influence the work of the architect in practice. DESIGN PROJECT 2 (YEAR 1 DESIGN STUDIO) Commonly, though not exclusively, the theme or context of Design Project 2 involves developing or testing aspects of the Design Project 1 through further research or exploratory projects. This module, however, places greater emphasis on the detailed resolution of the individual design proposal, often at a larger scale, and deals more explicitly with the issues of programme, materiality, technology and environmental impact. The module is run in parallel with the Year 2 Design Studio. HISTORY AND THEORY This module consists of specialist seminar study and a series of wider module-wide lectures, and begins a year-long study of architectural history and theory which culminates with your dissertation submission in Year 2. Following presentations by all the seminar group leaders at the beginning of the semester, you choose a seminar group with its own particular theme and programme of study. Based on this, you select an individual area of research, and develop it through writing and a presentation; you also prepare an abstract for your Dissertation. TECHNICAL STUDIES IN PRACTICE This module requires you, individually or within a group, to carry out research into different approaches to, and kinds of, technology and environmental design. You will need to look at the wider cultural issues involved, but more especially at issues of sustainability in design. This is expected to inform your Design Studio project work. DISSERTATION The Dissertation is the primary focus of Architectural History and Theory teaching, and the main written component of the course. Building on your abstract, you research into primary and secondary sources, define and refine a methodology, produce a draft synopsis, and, finally, complete a 10,000-word dissertation with footnotes, bibliography and illustrations. If you explore another mode of study, such as making a film or designing a website, you will still need to meet a lower word limit of 6,000 words. MAIN DESIGN PROJECT (YEAR 2 DESIGN STUDIO) As with Design Studio 1, this is individual to each elective Design Studio, and you choose your Design Studio following presentations by all the Design Studio tutors at the beginning of the academic year. The module is integrated with the subsequent Design Development module, and these two modules usually create a single overarching project for the final academic year. The modules is run in parallel with the Year 1 Design Studio, however, Year 2 students are expected to pursue, and resolve, a more ambitious and sophisticated thesis. APPLIED TECHNICAL STUDIES In this module you complete an applied technical study concurrent with the progression of your main Design Studio project. This integrated report explains and deepens the environmental, structural and constructional strategies inherent to your design thinking and your project. DESIGN DEVELOPMENT (YEAR 2 DESIGN STUDIO) This module follows on from the Main Design Project, and asks you to elaborate, test, adapt and develop your design project proposal to produce a well-resolved architectural design. This module encourages you to communicate your ideas, research work and design proposals in a range of media at an advanced level. You also integrate your presentation with your work in the Strategic Report and Applied Technical Studies modules. The module is run in parallel with the Year 1 Design Studio. STRATEGIC REPORT This module is a substantial report that is integrated with your main Design Studio project, and the Applied Technical Studies modules. The report focuses on exploring and explaining the critical project decisions made as part of the design process. The module introduces you to various approaches to the report - methodologies, techniques, selected building precedents - through seminars and Design Studio group tutorials. Course-specific entry requirements You are required to have an undergraduate degree in Architecture, or similar, with a high level of achievement, which will normally be validated by the RIBA for Part 1/prescribed by the ARB for Part 1. You will usually have one year's (post-degree) professional experience. At interview, you should present your academic portfolio together with examples of work undertaken during professional training, and any relevant contextual material. If your first language is not English you will need an IELTS score of 7.0, with a minumum of 6.5 in all components. Associated careers Most students who complete the Architecture MArch (Part 2) are subsequently employed in architectural offices, and become registered architects after taking the Part 3 exam. Others progress to take further Masters or PhD degrees, and then go into research and/or teaching. [-]

MArch Architecture (ARB/RIBA Part Part II)

University of Westminster - Faculty of Architecture and the Built Environment
Campus Full time 2 years September 2016 United Kingdom London

The MArch (Part 2) is a long-established and well-respected course that is prescribed by the ARB and validated by the RIBA to give exemption from the second stage of professional education. The emphasis of the course is on innovative design work, and on developing a caring and critical approach to the study and practice of architecture. [+]

Best Masters in Landscape Architecture in United Kingdom 2016/2017. The MArch (Part 2) is a long-established and well-respected course that is prescribed by the ARB and validated by the RIBA to give exemption from the second stage of professional education. The emphasis of the course is on innovative design work, and on developing a caring and critical approach to the study and practice of architecture. The course fosters diversity of choice, interpretation and approach, whether in design projects or more academic research. The former focuses on sophisticated design programmes (in formal, technical, professional or urban terms) that demand rigour and self-criticism. The latter focuses on your major dissertation, an extended piece of specialised research into architecture and its historical or theoretical contexts. The course has three main objectives: to develop your design ability through project-based experimentation; to present an evaluation and critique of your coursework within a broad cultural context, and in light of technical, economic and legal constraints; and to promote the articulate explanation and representation of quality and value in design projects. Core modules DESIGN PROJECT 1 (YEAR 1 DESIGN STUDIO) This single design project, or series of linked design projects, is individual to each elective Design Studio, and is run in parallel with the Year 2 Design Studio. You choose your Design Studio following presentations by all the Design Studio tutors at the beginning of the academic year; each Design Studio offers a new project every year. Projects lead from exploratory research to the development of an individual brief, and a design proposal which you develop for assessment at the end of Semester One. DIGITAL REPRESENTATION This module focuses on digital media technology and computer-based strategies, including the principles of 2D and 3D computer drawing, modelling, rendering, animation and digital fabrication techniques. The module aims to extend your practical and theoretical understanding of advanced digital media, as well as to enhance your existing computing knowledge and skills - so assessment is on a 'value-added' basis. PROFESSIONAL STUDIES This module draws on your work experience and introduces statutory, professional and management concepts related to the 'professional' development of your coursework. It asks you to reflect on your prior experience and personal development, and to identify areas for future investigation. The module introduces you to the role of the architect in the construction industry (including development and procurement issues), and to the professional, managerial and legal constraints that influence the work of the architect in practice. DESIGN PROJECT 2 (YEAR 1 DESIGN STUDIO) Commonly, though not exclusively, the theme or context of Design Project 2 involves developing or testing aspects of the Design Project 1 through further research or exploratory projects. This module, however, places greater emphasis on the detailed resolution of the individual design proposal, often at a larger scale, and deals more explicitly with the issues of programme, materiality, technology and environmental impact. The module is run in parallel with the Year 2 Design Studio. HISTORY AND THEORY This module consists of specialist seminar study and a series of wider module-wide lectures, and begins a year-long study of architectural history and theory which culminates with your dissertation submission in Year 2. Following presentations by all the seminar group leaders at the beginning of the semester, you choose a seminar group with its own particular theme and programme of study. Based on this, you select an individual area of research, and develop it through writing and a presentation; you also prepare an abstract for your Dissertation. TECHNICAL STUDIES IN PRACTICE This module requires you, individually or within a group, to carry out research into different approaches to, and kinds of, technology and environmental design. You will need to look at the wider cultural issues involved, but more especially at issues of sustainability in design. This is expected to inform your Design Studio project work. DISSERTATION The Dissertation is the primary focus of Architectural History and Theory teaching, and the main written component of the course. Building on your abstract, you research into primary and secondary sources, define and refine a methodology, produce a draft synopsis, and, finally, complete a 10,000-word dissertation with footnotes, bibliography and illustrations. If you explore another mode of study, such as making a film or designing a website, you will still need to meet a lower word limit of 6,000 words. MAIN DESIGN PROJECT (YEAR 2 DESIGN STUDIO) As with Design Studio 1, this is individual to each elective Design Studio, and you choose your Design Studio following presentations by all the Design Studio tutors at the beginning of the academic year. The module is integrated with the subsequent Design Development module, and these two modules usually create a single overarching project for the final academic year. The modules is run in parallel with the Year 1 Design Studio, however, Year 2 students are expected to pursue, and resolve, a more ambitious and sophisticated thesis. APPLIED TECHNICAL STUDIES In this module you complete an applied technical study concurrent with the progression of your main Design Studio project. This integrated report explains and deepens the environmental, structural and constructional strategies inherent to your design thinking and your project. DESIGN DEVELOPMENT (YEAR 2 DESIGN STUDIO) This module follows on from the Main Design Project, and asks you to elaborate, test, adapt and develop your design project proposal to produce a well-resolved architectural design. This module encourages you to communicate your ideas, research work and design proposals in a range of media at an advanced level. You also integrate your presentation with your work in the Strategic Report and Applied Technical Studies modules. The module is run in parallel with the Year 1 Design Studio. STRATEGIC REPORT This module is a substantial report that is integrated with your main Design Studio project, and the Applied Technical Studies modules. The report focuses on exploring and explaining the critical project decisions made as part of the design process. The module introduces you to various approaches to the report - methodologies, techniques, selected building precedents - through seminars and Design Studio group tutorials. Course-specific entry requirements You are required to have an undergraduate degree in Architecture, or similar, with a high level of achievement, which will normally be validated by the RIBA for Part 1/prescribed by the ARB for Part 1. You will usually have one year's (post-degree) professional experience. At interview, you should present your academic portfolio together with examples of work undertaken during professional training, and any relevant contextual material. If your first language is not English you will need an IELTS score of 7.0, with a minumum of 6.5 in all components. Associated careers Most students who complete the Architecture MArch (Part 2) are subsequently employed in architectural offices, and become registered architects after taking the Part 3 exam. Others progress to take further Masters or PhD degrees, and then go into research and/or teaching. [-]

MArch Architecture

University of Brighton
Campus Full time 2 years August 2017 United Kingdom Brighton

The Master of Architecture (MArch) RIBA Part II course is a highly creative, research-led and professional two-year masters rooted in studio laboratories and driven by individual enquiry. The MArch course is prescribed by the ARB and validated by RIBA, giving exemption from RIBA Part II. [+]

The Master of Architecture (MArch) RIBA Part II course is a highly creative, research-led and professional two-year masters rooted in studio laboratories and driven by individual enquiry. The MArch course is prescribed by the ARB and validated by RIBA, giving exemption from RIBA Part II. We are part of the vibrant College of Arts and Humanities. Founded in 1859 as the School of Art, it offers an inspirational creative context for nurturing excellence in our work. Our distinct research-led approach filters through all aspects of the course, with rigorous inquiry fusing innovation, regulation and social commentary. This student focussed approach offers the opportunity for you to investigate your personal architectural agenda, developing your own critical position and design language prior to entry into the profession. The studio laboratories are driven by tutors’ personal research agendas and all staff are actively engaged within this field of enquiry as academics or practitioners. The stimulating mix of practitioners and academics across the course builds conversations, with visiting lecturers and critics further feeding the dialogue. Recent visiting lecturers have included Neil Denari, Perry Kulper, Chris Thurlbourne, Michael Jemtrud, and our close links with practice ensure stimulating review panels. We place critical thought at our core and look forward to you joining the conversation. Entry requirements Applications are competitive and considered on an individual basis through a process of portfolio review and interview. Practice experience is recommended and there is a minimum requirement of a lower second class undergraduate degree in architecture or a closely related subject such as interior architecture. RIBA Part 1 is not a prerequisite for entry on to the course. To register as an architect with the Architects Registration Board (ARB) in the UK, RIBA Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3 are required. Those without RIBA Part 1 would therefore need to undertake this independently in order to proceed towards registration. Further details regarding this process, the ARB Prescribed Examination for Part 1 and registering as an architect in the UK can be found on the ARB website. For non-native speakers of English One of the following: IELTS 6.5 overall with 6.0 in writing and a minimum of 5.5 in the other elements Cambridge CAE B2 score 58 with a borderline pass in each component Pearson (PTE) 61 with no less than 51 in each component Trinity ISE III with a pass in each component Course structure We want you to emerge from the course as an assured designer, confident in your approach, ideals and aspirations and with the ability to communicate this to the wider world. Over the two years you will be challenged to define your own critical position, and evolve your personal language of design and representation. The course will assist you in this through a gradual deepening of understanding, and by providing you with the tools with which to critically reflect upon design strategies and to navigate the wider contemporary debate on architecture. The design laboratories form the backbone to the course. The other individual elements of the course increasingly intertwine with this over the two years to provide a final systematic understanding of architecture as a holistic entity. Year 1: Strategy There are four elements of the course (modules) covered in the first year and these are organised such that you will only ever address two at any one time. Design forms the backbone of the year and is divided into two elements that run consecutively across the whole year. The third element, or module, is technology and this runs through the first half of the year and is then replaced by Humanities and Design Theory in the second half of the year. Year 2: Integration Year two is also formed of four elements (modules). Design encompasses the whole year in the form of the master thesis, with the technology and professional studies elements of the course plugging into this as the year progresses. Architectural humanities runs in the first term in the form of the Humanities Research Project. Once this is completed technology then takes its place in the course diagram and runs through to the end of the year integrating itself into the design proposal. Careers and employability On successful completion of the course you will have divined your own architectural language and agenda, and formed a systematic understanding of architecture, a critical awareness of current problems and comprehensive understanding of techniques, methodologies and practice. This rigorous and critically engaged basis will form a solid foundation upon which to build your professional architectural career. [-]

MArch Architecture

University of Portsmouth
Campus Full time Part time 2 - 4 years August 2017 United Kingdom Portsmouth + 1 more

The Master of Architecture provides a vibrant, challenging and expansive programme of study that leads to RIBA Part II exemption. [+]

Best Masters in Landscape Architecture in United Kingdom 2016/2017. MArch Architecture (2015 entry) The Master of Architecture provides a vibrant, challenging and expansive programme aimed at equipping you with the professional and creative skills for a successful career as an architect and leads to Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) Part 2 exemption. Through the design studios you will be exposed to a range of related architectural interests, including urbanism, landscape, practice, sustainability and culture, providing a cross-disciplinary learning environment that is appropriate in today’s professionally complex architectural world. On this course you can: engage with current collaborative projects with academic institutions in other countries – in the past these have included Turkey, Spain, Denmark and Australia work on projects with 'live' clients through our RIBA registered Project Office practice opt to study at a choice of European universities through the ERASMUS exchange scheme What opportunities might this lead to? This course is professionally accredited by the Architects Registration Board (ARB) and the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA). Its structure is designed to ensure the integration of contextual, technical and professional issues with the design synthesis, helping you to engage with the prescribed ARB/RIBA criteria, and leads to RIBA Part 2 exemption. Entry requirements A 2:1 degree or above with Royal Institute of British Architects part 1 exemption. Students with appropriate qualifications and design skills may be accepted directly. All suitable applicants will be required to submit an online portfolio. All students are subject to interview. English language requirements English language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 6.5 or equivalent with no component less than 6.0. [-]