Master in Archaeology: Archaeology of North Western Europe

Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam

Program Description

Master in Archaeology: Archaeology of North Western Europe

Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam

Master in Archaeology of North Western Europe

The Master’s programme in Archaeology of North Western Europe covers the period from the Late Iron Age into the Early Modern period. The two specialisations in this programme are Late Iron Age and Roman archaeology of North Western Europe and Medieval and Early Modern archaeology.

Vrije Universieit Amsterdam has a leading position in research and teaching in the field of late prehistory and the Roman era in Western Europe, with special reference to Dutch archaeology, while archaeology of the Middle Ages and the early modern period is one of the specialisms at the University of Amsterdam. The two universities together thus cover 3000 years of Western European archaeology. This programme devotes considerable attention to settlement archaeology, the archaeology of sanctuaries and burial sites, integration processes in the Roman Empire and studies of city centres and material culture. There are close links between the teaching in all these areas and the results of recent fieldwork and other ongoing research, from Roman villa landscapes in the southern Netherlands to the shipyards of the VOC (Dutch East India Company) in the heart of Amsterdam.

3000 Years of Western European Archaeology


As for the compilation of your programme, or your choice of specialism and thesis supervisor, it makes no difference at which institution you decide to enrol. Together the UvA and VU Amsterdam cover more than 3000 years of West European archaeology. One of the UvA’s specialisms is the archaeology of the Middle Ages and the Early Modern Era. The VU’s focus is on research and education in the fields of late prehistory and Roman times of Western Europe. Special attention is given to Dutch archaeology. The programme gives considerable attention to topics such as settlement archaeology, the archaeology of cult sites, the archaeology of grave sites, integration processes in the Roman Empire, and research of city centres and material culture studies. These topics are already closely intertwined with the results of recent fieldwork and other ongoing research projects, which range from Roman villa landscapes in the south of the Netherlands to VOC shipyards in the centre of Amsterdam.

Specializations


Master's Students in Archaeology of North Western Europe can choose one of the following specializations:

  • Late Prehistory and Roman Archaeology of North Western Europe
  • Medieval and Early Modern Archaeology


Structure

The programme comprises 60 ECTS credits:

  • 42 credits for core courses
  • 18 credits for a thesis


Field work

You learn the skills you need for doing fieldwork. Apart from analysing, reporting and presenting field data, these skills also include managing and conducting fieldwork, e.g. making reasoned choices, adhering to deadlines, delegating tasks and working within a group. You will learn these skills in a practical setting at one of ACASA's current research locations in the Netherlands and in the Mediterranean.

As a Master’s student you can also do a protocol internship in the field, followed by the writing of a protocol book (maximum of 12 ECTS).


Thesis

The Master’s thesis (18 ECTS) reports on research carried out by the student under the supervision of two academic staff members involved in the programme. The subject of the thesis must be mutually agreed upon by the student and the academic adviser.

Well prepared for the job market


Archaeologists with a Master's in the Archaeology of North Western Europe are exceptionally suited to follow a professional career in archaeology. They will have knowledge of and experience in archaeological fieldwork and the study of material from Dutch excavations, which qualifies them for archaeological fieldwork in the Netherlands and for positions in European companies doing archeological research. Moreover, they will be qualified to work in local, national or international heritage management institutions and public services. Their wide knowledge of European archaeology also makes them suitable for a career in sectors such as journalism, tourism and publishing. Finally, an ACASA Master's in Archaeology prepares students very well for additional education on the Master's or, eventually, PhD level.

Admission requirements

Students with a Bachelor’s degree in Archaeology are eligible for admission to the Master’s programme in Archaeology. Admission on the basis of other related Bachelor’s degrees is at the discretion of the Examination Board. They determine which modules, if any, you need to make up. If these amount to more than 60 credits, you will have to take a (short-track) Bachelor’s degree programme in Archaeology before you can start on the Master’s. If the deficit amounts to 60 credits or less, you will have to take a pre-Master’s Archaeology course tailored to your requirements by the Examination Board, after completion of which you will be admitted to the Master’s programme.

Not a student of the Faculty of Arts of VU Amsterdam?

  • application form (Dutch)
  • transcript of records (scan of original)
  • motivation letter
  • curriculum vitae
This school offers programs in:
  • English


Last updated July 14, 2016
Duration & Price
This course is Campus based
Start Date
Start date
Sept. 2017
Duration
Duration
1 year
Full time
Price
Price
1,984 EUR
Information
Deadline
Apr. 1, 2017
deadline for international students
Start date Sept. 2017
Place
Netherlands Amsterdam
Application deadline Apr. 1, 2017
deadline for international students
End date Request Info
Duration 1 year
Price 1,984 EUR
for EEA students; €13.400 for Non-EEA